School/Class News





ICYMI: FREE ONLINE COURSE MATERIALS HELP TAKE TEXTBOOKS OFF N.Y. STUDENTS’ SHOULDERSSUPPORTERS OF FREE RESOURCES TOUT CREATIVE LEEWAY FOR TEACHERS, BUT SKEPTICS CAUTION SOME MATERIALS LACK QUALITY OR COHERENCE

The Wall Street Journal
By Leslie Brody

The City University of New York predicts that ditching more textbooks in favor of free online materials will save 50,000 students more than $4.5 million this coming year in book fees.

Like many schools nationwide in recent years, CUNY and the State University of New York have started replacing some required textbooks with free digital options. That effort got a boost in April when the state allotted $4 million to each institution to speed up the change.

So-called open educational resources can be downloaded, edited and shared under an intellectual-property license that allows their use at no cost. Such materials are “outstanding tools,” said Marc Cohen, the 22-year-old president of the Student Assembly at SUNY. He applauded the shift as “life-changing,” saying every student has been forced to buy an “insanely expensive textbook” at some point. One organic chemistry tome, for example, costs $364.

While supporters of free materials say they give teachers more leeway to be creative, skeptics caution that some resources lack quality or coherence and adapting them can be time-consuming.

At CUNY, where almost half of the student body comes from households earning less than $20,000, officials said the cost of a student’s books can total as much as $1,200 a year. The officials said faculty members were converting 350 popular courses to free digital materials for the fall and were being trained on their use. These resources will be shared publicly.

The infusion of funding for this project is “a real shot in the arm for efforts to make college attendance even more affordable,” said CUNY Chancellor James Milliken. He said the course catalog will show which classes have no textbook fees, and, in a year or two, some CUNY degrees won’t require such fees.

Eleven of SUNY’s 64 campuses have reported enrollment information so far, and at those 11 schools, officials projected that 12,000 students will be taking at least one course using open educational resources this fall. Overall, SUNY estimates its students will save around $8 million on textbooks by June 2018.

Jean Amaral, a librarian at CUNY’s Borough of Manhattan Community College, said courses converting to open educational resources this fall include psychology, English literature and public speaking.

In surveys, students at her campus reported that digital materials saved them from lugging heavy backpacks and were more quickly accessible than printed books they had to order. Some students said they could study on cellphones on the subway. One student said saving money on books allowed the purchase of a MetroCard.

Ms. Amaral said some teachers were excited about the chance to tap more engaging and interactive materials, including audio and video. “Textbooks are incredibly dry,” the librarian said.


Professor Sarah Lamdan on Her New Book about Environmental Information Access

Sarah Lamdan

Sarah Lamdan

Professor Sarah Lamdan is the author of the new book Environmental Information: Research, Access and Environmental Decisionmaking, published by the Environmental Law Institute.

CUNY Law students Maria Brinkmann ‘18, Jonathan Cantarero ‘16, Robert Feliu ‘16 and April Whitehead ‘17 provided research assistance.

Here, Professor Lamdan discusses her book and considers what role access to environmental information can play in the future.

Why did you choose to research this subject?
In my work as a legal information specialist and librarian and an environmental law-focused lawyer, I noticed that there were no resources to help people looking for environmental information. There are many resources to help people conducting research in other legal fields, including securities and corporate law, etc. I noticed that areas of the law that are largely the focus of public interest attorneys, like environmental law, criminal law, immigration law, etc. don’t have the same wealth of information access resources. I decided to write a practical book for environmental information seekers, including laypeople, environmental advocacy groups, journalists, law students and practitioners and to do it in a format that can be duplicated for other legal fields – immigration law, health law, etc. Not only is this a book for environmental information seekers, it is also a template that I hope others will use to create similar works for other areas of law.

Why is access to environmental information important?
Environmental information is necessary for understanding and solving any and all environmental issues. In fact, international law has recognized environmental information access as a human right. Before engaging in environmental advocacy, policy-making, or decision-making, all of the parties involved need the facts, figures, data, and policies of environmental phenomena, circumstances, and realities at issue.

Environmental regulation is the backbone of environmental law and regulation, playing a critical and necessary role at every level of environmental decision-making. Governments, industry, and the public all need comprehensive, trusted, and timely environmental information to make decisions about environmental issues.  Without this information, people cannot properly take stock in the state of their environmental surroundings.

Knowing about environmental projects, which are often government-facilitated, and access to environmental data, which is often collected and maintained by the government, also honor the notion that U.S. citizens have a fundamental right to know about what their government is doing. Thus, providing more information to the public puts citizens in a better position to bargain with private entities as well as the government.

Environmental information access is also important because transparency can substantially affect government behavior. Transparency serves as a preventative measure for environmentally detrimental practices, exposing transgressions before they permanently damage the environment. It also empowers citizens to assume an adversarial role when necessary, since this type of information is needed when filing lawsuits against parties violating environmental statutes and regulations. When environmental information is available to the public, individuals can file citizen suits to prevent the damage before it occurs through injunctive relief, rather than engaging in litigation only after the environmental damage has been done.

What are some obstacles to getting, understanding and acting on environmental information?
I discuss the major obstacles to getting, understanding, and acting on environmental information in the book, and also in the law review article addressing environmental information access policy issues that I wrote to accompany the book (available here).

In short, I found four major issues:

  • publicly available environmental information on the EPA’s website and elsewhere is not well organized and it’s very hard to find;
  • environmental information is often incomplete and hard to understand because of data collection processes and scientific jargon;
  • there are often long delays to get timely environmental information (data can take a long time to compile, and transparency laws like FOIA can take a long time to provide fruitful records requests);
  • the information systems and technology used by federal, state and local governments (government entities collect and store the majority of environmental information in the U.S.) are outdated, silo-ing information in unsearchable or hard-to-search databases and information systems, or in formats that can no longer be opened on modern computer interfaces, etc.

Tell us about an instance when citizens were able to use environmental information to significantly influence a decision about the environment.
There are many instances where citizens use environmental information to file citizen suits under environmental statutes, advocate for environmental protection, and learn about environmental threats. One major instance is the Flint, Michigan water crisis, where people were made aware of dangerously high levels of lead in drinking water due to a scientist’s federal and state requests.

What role do you hope environmental information can play under the current administration?
Mostly, I hope that environmental information access is not blocked under the current administration. We’ve already seen efforts to decrease the availability of information regarding climate change and greenhouse gas data and policies. I worked with the Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (EDGI) on efforts to maintain environmental data collection and access, and continue to work with librarians and archivists on initiatives and projects to secure the availability of environmental information and improve access to environmental data. In an ideal world, I’d love to work on initiatives and efforts to implement special environmental information regulations like the ones in the UK, which provide broader access to environmental information than the traditional FOIA laws, but in the current climate, I’ve been focusing my efforts on emphasizing the importance of environmental information access in the hopes that the concept of environmental information access as a human right is extended to future generations.

 


ICYMI: TO GROW TECH IN NYC, DON’T HOPE FOR SKILLED STUDENTS—MAKE THEMA FIRM DESIGNED CUNY COURSES AND PROMISED STUDENT JOBS. IT WORKED

Crain’s New York Business
By Charles Phillips

In 2012, New York City was not the Silicon Alley we know today. There was disappointingly little to show in the market when it came to technology talent. Yet, as CEO of Infor, a multi-billion-dollar software company with 16,000 employees, I somehow persuaded my Silicon Valley-based board of directors to let me move the company to New York City. While the local tech economy had a long way to go, many of our 90,000 customers regularly visit New York, the capital of the business world. There was a strong business case to move, but I knew it would require some significant investment in the local tech community to be sustainable.

What I’ve learned over the last five years is that if you build it, they will come.

Fresh, creative thinking is essential to innovation in tech. But in 2012, I didn’t see a pipeline for the skillsets my business needed in New York. Finding college graduates with relevant skills turned out to be a challenge—partly because many students think of technology as smartphones, web design and social media. In reality, there are far more jobs to be found in the complex world of enterprise technology, including business solutions and application software. For example, enterprise resource planning applications contain millions of lines of code that automate every company’s critical business functions, from finance and payroll to production, supply chains, customer service and commerce.

While the skills gap in enterprise tech was immense, recent college graduates were struggling to find entry-level jobs. Sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roska tracked 1,000 college students and found that two years after graduation, only a quarter earned over $40,000 in a full-time job. Survey results showed one in four of the students living at home two years after graduation, a rate almost double what it was in the 1960s. That didn’t make sense to me. I realized that if I wanted great talent to work at my company, I needed to invest in development at the post-secondary level. This wasn’t just about improving the education system, it was about broadening access to STEM-related training and careers.

Historically companies put fresh graduates through elaborate training programs to develop specific skills around business applications. Now, many companies are increasingly hiring offshore or from competitors. I believe more can be done to drive job readiness, particularly in the New York market.

To start, I met with Chancellor Jim Milliken at City University of New York. As the third largest university system in the country (after those of the entire states of California and New York), CUNY has a long tradition of providing immigrants and first-generation college graduates a pathway to better careers. Most of its students speak a second language. The chancellor was looking to differentiate CUNY by producing career-ready graduates—of course without compromising on developing critical thinking, complex reasoning and writing skills.

It was the perfect partnership. CUNY wanted to set up its graduates for real-world success, and Infor needed skilled talent. We designed two courses on Infor’s software and offered students that passed both courses and the certification exam a guaranteed job at Infor or one of its customers or partners. The first class to learn Infor CloudSuite Industrial, an application that automates manufacturing companies, was oversubscribed threefold, and one-third of students who applied were at the graduate level. It was an “aha” moment for us.

One remaining issue was that many student loan programs and grants do not allow course credit for nonacademic skills training. So the courses we created to provide marketable technology skills could not be offered for credit. This meant we had to not only persuade professors but also fund their training and curriculum development, and provide cloud environments where the curriculum could live, in addition to internships. This kind of job-readiness framework would be an easy win for a federal program, and could also help higher-ed institutions to differentiate themselves and attract students.

Academia may need convincing, but CUNY is showing this model works—and students certainly see the need for career development in addition to academic development. They form their own communities on LinkedIn, and Infor also established a skills marketplace on the platform. There, students can market themselves to our customers and partners, some of which participate as guest speakers in our courses.

We are expanding this effort, offering new courses, and have started to see positive results in our own company and across the technology landscape in New York. We’re committed to driving this change and making New York into a true Silicon Valley competitor—the kind of leader in tech innovation and talent I believe it should to be.

I hope we’ll be joined in this effort by others in academia and the public and private sectors. As part of a New York-based company, my business depends on it.

Charles Phillips is CEO of Infor and a former president of Oracle.


Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree in Music Program Starts Fall 2017

In Fall 2017, BMCC students who envision a career teaching music or performing can enroll in the College’s new Associate in Science (A.S.) program in Music, with specializations in Music Studies and Music Performance that articulate to the Bachelor of Science in Music program at Lehman College, as well as a specialization in Music Education.

According to a proposal submitted by BMCC to the New York State Education Department, the Music program will educate students in the fundamentals of music, and in specialized topics in music education and music performance. The curriculum will encompass basics of music theory, keyboard skills, ear training and sight singing. Each concentration, while offering a different focus, will produce graduates who are better equipped to compete with others in the field.

Music majors at BMCC will benefit from a wide range of facilities to support their work, including 16 practice rooms for chorus and voice, the Art and Rita Siegel Piano Lab, which provides 24 electronic keyboards and classrooms with Steinway grand pianos. They will also have access to a comprehensive collection of percussive and string instruments, unique sets of instruments from Bali and more.

Past music students at BMCC have won national contests and performed widely. They are mentored by BMCC’s accomplished Music faculty, who guide students as they audition for and perform with well-established ensembles including the Downtown Symphony, Downtown Chorus and BMCC Select Chorus, String Ensemble and Flute Choir.

Fitore Mehmetaj, a 2017 BMCC alumna and mezzo-soprano who graduated before the A.S. in Music program was created, nonetheless availed herself of the Music courses and performance practice opportunities at BMCC. “The best voice teachers of my life are here,” says Mehmetaj, who also learned digital music software at BMCC and whose composition, “Themes and Variations,” for cello and piano, was performed in the 2017 Composers Now Festival at BMCC’s Shirley Fiterman Art Center. “I have met so many amazing artists through these experiences,” she says.

“We are very excited about this opportunity for students to earn an Associate degree as they gain competence in the areas of music performance, pedagogy and theory,” says BMCC Music and Art Chairperson Eugenia Oi Yan Yau. “Graduates will be prepared to enter a variety of majors at the baccalaureate level, as well as a range of careers in music.”

Auditions for the Fall 2017 Music Program will be held August 18 in Fiterman Hall, 11th floor. For more information, contact Professor Robert Reed at roreed@bmcc.cuny.edu or Music and Art Chair Eugenia Yau, at eyau@bmcc.cuny.edu.


BMCC Remembers Miosotis Familia’s Determination to Succeed in College and a Career

BMCC is mourning the loss of one of its own. Miosotis Familia graduated with an Associate in Liberal Arts degree from BMCC in Summer 2009. She went on to work as a medical assistant before serving as a law enforcement officer in the New York Police Department for 12 years, a career which came to a tragic end on the night of July 4.

Officer Miosotis Familia

“Miosotis Familia will be remembered for many things, including her determination to gain an education and earn her Associate degree,” says BMCC President Antonio Pérez. “She attended BMCC from 2000 to 2005, then returned in the summer of 2009 to complete one final class and graduate. Her unwavering goal was to help her fellow New Yorkers and she accomplished that goal; first as a medical assistant and then as a law enforcement officer. We are proud to count Miosotis Familia among the alumni of BMCC.”

The NYPD’s Officer Down Memorial Page states that Familia, 48, was “shot and killed from ambush as she sat in a marked mobile command post vehicle at the intersection of East 183rd Street and Morris Avenue in the Bronx.” Officer Familia was taken to St. Barnabas Hospital and pronounced dead about three hours later.

According to an article in the New York Daily News, Familia had switched about three weeks earlier from working days in central booking at the 46th Precinct stationhouse, to working the night shift, in order to have more time with her 12-year-old twin son and daughter. Familia also had a 20-year-old daughter.

An article in The New York Times reports that Officer Familia, who grew up in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, made 76 arrests during her 12-year career with the NYPD, 23 of them in felonies. The marked van in which she was killed was intended to serve as a deterrent to a rash of shootings in the Bronx neighborhood where it was stationed.

“Law enforcement officers across New York put their lives on the line to protect and serve their communities,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo posted on his Facebook page. “This horrific and senseless assassination is a devastating reminder of the risks these brave men and women face each day. I offer my deepest condolences to Officer Familia’s loved ones and fellow members of the NYPD. Today, we all come together to mourn one of New York’s Finest.”

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio posted on his Facebook page, “Officer Miosotis Familia was on duty serving this city, doing the job she loved. I ask all New Yorkers to keep her family in your prayers.” The Mayor also ordered flags on all city buildings to be flown at half-mast in Officer Familia’s honor.


Louis Armstrong House Museum Breaks Ground on New $23 Million Education Center

— Facility to Include State-of-the-Art Exhibition Gallery, 68-Seat Jazz Club, Museum Store, and the Louis Armstrong Archives, Currently Housed at Queens College —

Queens, NY, July 17, 2017—A ground-breaking ceremony for the new 14,000-square-foot Louis Armstrong House Museum Education Center took place today across the street from the museum—the legendary jazz great’s nationally landmarked Queens home—which is located at 34-56 107th Street in Corona. Joining Louis Armstrong House Museum Executive Director Michael Cogswell were Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, New York State Assembly Member Jeffrion Aubry, New York City Council Member Julissa Ferreras-Copeland, and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl.

The children’s choir from Our Lady of Sorrows’ Academy Summer Program performed the Armstrong classic, “What a Wonderful World.” A reception followed in the Armstrong House’s Japanese-inspired garden.

The new facility will broaden the public’s understanding of Armstrong’s life and legacy and complement the visitor experience with a state-of-the-art exhibition gallery, 68-seat jazz club, and museum store. The center will also house the materials in the Louis Armstrong Archives—currently housed at Queens College, which administers the museum through a constituency with its Kupferberg Center for the Arts—in a cutting-edge second-floor archival center.

“We are thrilled to reach this important milepost. The groundbreaking for the Education Center is the next step toward creating a Louis Armstrong campus. When completed, we can offer a broad array of public programs to preserve and promote Louis’s remarkable legacy. There is nothing else like it in the jazz world,” said Cogswell.

“The Education Center is a gift to Corona, to the Borough of Queens, and to Satchmo fans all over the world,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “It was brought about by many offices, and we are profoundly grateful to all of them—the office of the governor and the NYS legislature, the Mayor/NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, the Borough President of Queens, and the City Council, along with a federal planning grant. Queens College has been a primary beneficiary of its association with the Louis Armstrong House Museum for many years. We applaud the efforts of Michael Cogswell, his staff, the Louis Armstrong House Museum Board of Directors, and the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation. Our students conduct research in the museum’s archives—housed, until the Education Center is complete, in our Rosenthal Library—and interns from our Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences work with this material. Armstrong scholar Ricky Riccardi, director of the museum’s research collections, teaches a popular graduate seminar at the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College, and Michael lectures on campus. We will be thrilled to reciprocate by having students from our jazz studies program present public concerts at the Education Center’s Jazz Room.”

“The Louis Armstrong House Museum’s transformative new Education Center and expanded programming will better serve visitors from around the globe and directly support the very community that Satchmo called home,” said Queens Borough President Melinda Katz.

The Center is designed by New York City-based Caples Jefferson Architects, a recipient of numerous commissions and awards, including AIA New York State Firm of the Year. When completed in 2019, the project design aims to achieve a LEED Gold rating.

The campus will also include the home of the late Selma Heraldo—Louis and Lucille Armstrong’s beloved neighbor—who lived next door to the Armstrong House from birth until her death in 2011 at age 87. Heraldo bequeathed her home to the museum, which has since received a $1.027 million grant from New York City to renovate “Selma’s House”—as it will always be called—for offices, meetings, and storage.

About the Louis Armstrong House Museum
In 1943, the great musician Louis Armstrong and his wife Lucille (a Cotton Club dancer) purchased a modest house on 107th Street in Corona, Queens. Despite their wealth and celebrity, they lived there for the rest of their lives. Today the perfectly preserved house is a National Historic Landmark and a New York City Landmark which hosts visitors from all over the world. Located at 34-56 107th Street, it is open Tuesday through Friday, from 10 am to 5 pm, and on Saturday and Sunday, from 12 to 5 pm.

The exhibit “Fifty Years of What a Wonderful World” is on display at the museum now through October and is free with museum admission. Street parking is available in the neighborhood. The museum is accessible via the 7 train from the 103rd Street-Corona Plaza stop.

Thanks to the vision and funding of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the Louis Armstrong House Museum welcomes visitors from all over the world, six days a week, 52 weeks a year. The Louis Armstrong House Museum is a member of the American Alliance of Museums, Association of African American Museums, Museums Council of New York City, New York State Museums Association, National Trust for Historic Preservation, NYC & Co., and the Queens Tourism Council. The museum is a constituent of Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College, CUNY.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Brooklyn College Enters Into Its First Student Exchange Program With a South Korean University

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson and a team of Brooklyn College students, faculty, staff, and administrators met with a delegation from Dongguk University led by President Tae Sik Han, a Buddhist monk, to formalize a longstanding collaboration between the two institutions and inaugurate a semester-long exchange program. The student exchange program begins fall 2017 and, with departmental permission, students will be able to apply major, minor, and elective toward their degree.

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson and Dongguk University President Tae Sik Han exchange gifts at a meeting to inaugurate a semester-long student exchange program between the two institutions.

“This is a wonderful academic opportunity,” said President Anderson. “For Brooklyn College students, it provides a chance to enhance cultural competency and directly engage in a new kind of learning in a new environment that will broaden their perspectives and give them the sought-after experiences and skills that will make them stand out in the marketplace.”

Anderson also noted that Dongguk University students will have the benefit of coming to Brooklyn College to learn on the beautiful 30-acre campus, with state-of-the-art facilities. She added that the campus is, in many ways, a microcosm of the world itself. With over 100 languages spoken by students who come from more than 140 countries, from all across the political spectrum, practicing or not practicing dozens of religions, Brooklyn College is one of the most diverse institutions of higher learning in the world.

In previous years, Brooklyn College students traveled to Dongguk Univeristy for study in the Media Production and Cultural Studies in South Korea Program led by Program Director and Adjunct Associate Professor Young Cheong ’00 M.F.A. from the Department of Television and Radio.

Biology major and Brooklyn College Korean Culture Club member Franclessa Louis is participating in the South Korea study abroad program for the second time. Louis—who, prompted by her love of Korean popular music (K-pop), has spent the last eight years teaching herself the Korean language—was one of the students who greeted the Dongguk delegation and was very excited to be able to speak with President Han in his native tongue.

“It was amazing,” Louis said. “These opportunities—meeting the delegation and studying abroad—open my eyes about the world and what is possible to accomplish in it. You would think that biology has nothing to do with media production, for example, but I learned that I can make it so. This year, I have an internship with a dentist and one of the things that I’m going to do is create a video project about dentistry and dental health in the United States using all the skills I gained during my time studying in Korea.”

The semester exchange program between Dongguk University and Brooklyn College was developed after the success of the summer program, which is in its fourth year.

 The new semester exchange program is the culmination of a great deal of goodwill, hard work, and dedication on the part of both institutions to provide a rigorous and well-rounded, but also enjoyable, education to students. At Dongguk University, Brooklyn College students can study many subjects in English, including global management, criminal justice, Korean culture  and Buddhist studies.

“There are sometimes difficulties in getting Brooklyn College students to go abroad for study, for a number of reasons, including financial restrictions and global political concerns.” said Gail Bier, senior director of International Education and Global Engagement. Students whose economic situations would not allow for them to pay out of pocket the full price for a study abroad have a number of financial aid, scholarship, and award options to help them with program costs. And Bier says that the efforts behind overcoming these hurdles are their own reward because the benefits gained by studying abroad are vital.

“The value of cultural competency cannot be underestimated,” she said. “For a student to be able to say to a potential employer that they spent time studying in another country, it demonstrates that they are proficient in working with people very different from themselves, in environments very different from ones they are accustomed to, that they are able to communicate across challenges, and are open to expanding their worldview. This gives them the edge needed to stand out amongst other candidates.”

Dongguk University Delegation

Dr. Tae Sik Han, President
Dr. Kwan Jeh, Lee Vice-President for External Affairs
Dr. Jong Tae Rhee, Dean of Office of International Affairs
Mr. Je Sun Ko, Director of President’s Office

Brooklyn College Delegation

Michelle J. Anderson, President
William A. Tramontano, Provost, Vice President of Academic Affairs
Lillian O’Reilly, Vice President Enrollment Management
Stuart MacLelland, Associate Provost for Academic Programs
Katherine G. Fry, Professor and Chair of the Department of Television and Radio
Young Cheong, Adjunct Associate Professor, Education Coordinator for New Media and Digital Technology, Program Director of the CUNY Study Abroad in South Korea Program
Gail Bier, Senior Director of International Education and Global Engagement
Students from the Brooklyn College Korean Culture Club, and past and future participants on the Media Arts and Cultural Studies Program in South Korea

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Queens College is Ranked in the Top 10% of Money Magazine’s 2017-18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money” Listing

— Queens College “Stands Out” for its Affordability, with Students
Borrowing Less than a Third of the National Average —

Queens, N.Y., July 12, 2017—Queens College has been ranked in the top 10% of colleges nationwide in Money magazine’s 2017–18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money.” Queens College stands out for its affordability: Through a combination of low tuition and generous financial aid packages, over 90% of the undergraduates who graduate in four years emerge from the college debt free. The 711 schools Money included were ranked on the basis of 27 measures, such as educational quality, affordability and alumni success.

New York City topped the list of cities with the most schools with 21. Among them, Queens College was noted for its exceptionally diverse student body in a borough “sometimes described as ‘America’s most ethnically diverse county,’ ” with more than half its students being born overseas. Recent analysis by the Equality of Opportunity Project, as reported in the New York Times, ranks Queens College in the top 1% of all colleges in moving students from the bottom fifth of the income distribution to the top fifth.

Student reviews from the Best Colleges ranking-related site Niche.com describe a vibrant campus life and an enriching academic experience: “I loved absolutely everything about this campus! . . .  In NY campuses are small and isolated. QC however is huge! . . . Overall this school was amazing and offered everything you would need to have a fulfilling college life.” Another student adds, “Queens College offers a quality education for all students who are enrolled. The professors are leaders in their fields and they do their best to pass on their knowledge to the next generation. The campus is centrally located in Queens, a lovely neighborhood in the suburbs of New York City.”

See the full Money Best Colleges for Your Money 2017 list here.

About Queens College Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received more than 60 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Queens College is Ranked in the Top 10% of Money Magazine’s 2017-18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money” Listing

— Queens College “Stands Out” for its Affordability, with Students Borrowing
Less than a Third of the National Average —

Queens, N.Y., July 12, 2017—Queens College has been ranked in the top 10% of colleges nationwide in Money magazine’s 2017–18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money.” It “stands out” for its affordability, made possible by a combination of low tuition and generous financial aid packages that results in 90% of its students graduating debt-free. The 711 schools Money included were ranked on the basis of 27 measures, such as educational quality, affordability and alumni success.

New York City topped the list of cities with the most schools with 21. Among them, Queens College was noted for its exceptionally diverse student body in a borough “sometimes described as ‘America’s most ethnically diverse county,’ ” with more than half its students being born overseas. Recent analysis by the Equality of Opportunity Project, as reported in the New York Times, ranks Queens College in the top 1% of all colleges in moving students from the bottom fifth of the income distribution to the top fifth.

Student reviews from the Best Colleges ranking-related site Niche.com describe a vibrant campus life and an enriching academic experience: “I loved absolutely everything about this campus! . . .  In NY campuses are small and isolated. QC however is huge! . . . Overall this school was amazing and offered everything you would need to have a fulfilling college life.” Another student adds, “Queens College offers a quality education for all students who are enrolled. The professors are leaders in their fields and they do their best to pass on their knowledge to the next generation. The campus is centrally located in Queens, a lovely neighborhood in the suburbs of New York City.”

See the full Money Best Colleges for Your Money 2017 list here.

About Queens College Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received more than 60 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Playwright Taylor Adamson Receives Hunter’s Goldberg Prize

Taylor Adamson (MFA ’17) has won the 2017 Rita and Burton Goldberg Playwriting Prize for his thesis work, Endless Summer. Adamson’s award-winning play follows three young people and their adventures as they sublet a New York City apartment and discover more about themselves and the distinct individuals they want to become. It was presented in a staged reading at the MFA Playwriting Festival of New Works, the Hunter graduate program’s spring showcase of second-year thesis projects. Bestowed annually, the Goldberg prize includes a cash award.

Born and raised in Texas, Adamson came to New York to earn his BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. He has worked with several theatre companies and had his plays produced in New York, California, Colorado, Ohio, Washington, DC and Columbia, Ontario. His latest project is a drama set in Texas about the relationship between two sisters who meet for the first time after their father dies.

Adamson says that when he decided to pursue an MFA, he was impressed by the extraordinary faculty of Hunter’s Rita and Burton Goldberg Playwriting Program – a faculty that currently boasts 2016 MacArthur “Genius” and Obie winner Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Pulitzer Prize winner Annie Baker, and 2012 Guggenheim Fellow Brighde Mullins.

“This program has three exceptionally dedicated, brilliant individuals whose teaching approaches are diverse and complementary, and who are each incredibly inspiring writers on their own terms,” Adamson said. “Working with them and my peers has been the greatest joy.”

The source of the program’s overall excellence and low cost to students is its endowment – funded by Hunter alumna Rita Goldberg and her late husband, Burton. The Goldbergs’ generosity, guided by their love of great writing for the stage, now plays a vital role in theatre at Hunter and across the country. At the award ceremony on June 1, Rita Goldberg’s family joined Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab, MFA students and theatre faculty in applauding the honoree, his fellow graduates, and the program that has helped them hone their craft.


Arnhold Graduate Dance Education Program Celebrates Cross-Cultural Collaboration

In June of 2017, Hunter College’s Arnhold Graduate Dance Education Program (AGDEP) Arnhold Graduate Dance Education Program Celebrates Cross-Cultural Collaborationsent two students to Cuba for a life-changing cultural and educational exchange. Selected for their outstanding artistic ability and contributions to public dance education, Uthman Ebrahim and Sabrina Jaafar Melton, both graduate students in the AGDEP, spent a week in Camaguey, Cuba, performing, teaching, and taking master classes with Arnhold Visiting Artist in Residence Pedro Ruiz, a renowned Cuban-American dancer and choreographer.

Sponsored by The Windows Project – Ruiz’s program to encourage cross-cultural dance opportunities — in collaboration with AGDEP and the Ballet Contemporaneo de Camaguey, this project enabled Ebrahim and Jaafar Melton to take their already professional abilities to an international level. The scholars, also full time dance teachers in the New York City Department of Education, have demonstrated exceptional skills as artists, educators, and role models. In Cuba, they performed with Ballet Contemporaneo de Camaguey and also explored the dance world of Camaguey, teaching and taking classes alongside Cuban company members.

“It’s tremendously exciting to know that this successful collaboration between Cuban and American dance artists and educators, can serve as a model for how AGDEP scholars serve as leaders and ambassadors in the artistry, scholarship and education of dance, not only in New York City public schools, but worldwide,” Says Kathleen Isaac, Director of the AGDEP.

Pedro Ruiz, who had a 20 year career as a dancer at Ballet Hispanico before segueing into choreography and returning to his native Cuba, is the first Cuban-American to have created work with a Cuban dance troupe in Cuba. The two Hunter scholars worked with him in his native country as he created a full length performance for the Camaguey company and an original duet for the two of them. Their duet, set to an original score by drummer and composer Dafnis Prieto, was called Taking the Soul for a Walk, and performed as a work in progress from June 2-4 at the Allevaneda Theater in Camageuy, Cuba.

The finished ballet will perform in the United States in the fall of 2017, when the Ballet Contemporaneo de Camaguey takes the stage at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, and the Arnhold Graduate Dance Education students Sabrina Jaafar Melton and Uthman Ebrahim will have another opportunity to dance with their Cuban colleagues.

In the meantime, you can watch it here: https://youtu.be/WU9lQemJ1d0


Hunter Recognizes The Rising Stars in New York City Food Policy

The New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College Hunter Recognizes The Rising Stars in New York City Food Policy has named its annual class of New York City’s 40 individuals under 40 years old who are working to transform the food system. On June 8th, these honorees – policymakers, educators, community advocates, farmers, and innovators – gathered at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College to celebrate the strides they are making to create healthier, more sustainable food environments.

New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College’s 40 under 40 roster reflects the Center’s broad perspective around food policy, specifically that food policies are not simply regulations imposed by government but guidelines that impact millions of New Yorkers every day, at home and at work. The individuals selected – including Hunter professor Herman Pontzer  and Kevin Froner, principal of Manhattan Hunter Science High School – are working to make New York City a model for fair, equitable, and just food policy.

The Honorees:

Morgan Ames–Policy Advisor for Food Policy, Office of the Mayor
Carla Anastasio--Director, Division of Nutrition, Cicatelli Associates Inc.
Suzanne Babb–Community Partnerships Manager, WhyHunger
Andrew Barrett–Program Director, Edible Schoolyard NYC
Drew Barrett–Co-Founder and COO, FoodWorks
Olivia Blanchflower–Director of Wholesale and Distribution, GrowNYC
Margaret Brown–Staff Attorney, NRDC NY Program
Liz Carollo–Publicity Manager, Greenmarket, GrowNYC
Cara Chard–Executive Director, City Growers
Jimmy Chen–CEO, Propel
Alice Chiang–Communications Manager, School Food Focus
Anastasia Cole Plakias–Co-founder, Vice President, and Vegevangelist at Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm
Rachel Dannefer–Director of Research and Evaluation, Harlem Neighborhood Health Action Centers, Center for Health Equity, NYC DOHMH
Tanya Fields–Executive Director, The BLK Projek
Kevin Froner–Principal, Manhattan Hunter Science High School
Henry Gordon-Smith–Managing Director, Blue Planet Consulting; Founder, Agritecture.com; Co-Founder, Association for Vertical Farming
Lindsay Greene–Senior Advisor to NYC Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen
Iyeshima Harris–Organizer, Youth Food Justice Network
Corey Johnson–New York City Council Member, 3rd District
James Johnson Piett–Principal and CEO, Urbane Development
Carey King–Director, Uptown Grand Central and North Harlem East Merchants Association
Mac Levine– Executive Director, Concrete Safaris
Megan Lent– Policy Director at New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Kim Libman–Director for Prevention and Community Development, Center for Health Policy and Programs, The New York Academy of Medicine
Jenna Liut–Food Consultant and Host of Eating Matters, Heritage Radio Network
Bill LoSasso– Director, NYC Parks GreenThumb
Carlos Martinez–Deputy Director, NYC Parks GreenThumb
Kris Moon–Vice President, James Beard Foundation
Saara Nafici–Executive Director, Added Value / Red Hook Community Farms
Margot Pollans–Assistant Professor, Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, and Faculty Director, Pace-NRDC Food Law Initiative
Herman Pontzer–Associate Professor of Anthropology, Hunter College
Kristin Reynolds–Lecturer, Environmental Studies and Food Studies programs, The New School; Lecturer, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Amy Richards–Health Projects Coordinator, Make the Road NY and Grove St. Farm Manager
Rosanna Robbins–Director of Retail Partnerships, City Harvest
Annette Slonim–Program Manager, Edible Schoolyard NYC
Sam Slover– Founder and CEO, the Sage Project
Jennifer Tirado– Director of Urban Agriculture Initiative and Land Improvement, Green City Force
Shulamit Warren– Director of Policy and Special Projects, Office of Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer
Alissa Wassung–Director of Policy and Planning, God’s Love We Deliver
Ariel Lauren Wilson–Editor, Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn

About the New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College

The New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College develops intersectoral, innovative and evidence-based strategies to prevent diet-related diseases and promote food security in New York and other cities. The Center works with policy makers, community organizations, advocates and the public to create healthier, more sustainable food environments and to use food to promote community and economic development. Through interdisciplinary research, policy analysis, evaluation, outreach and education, the Center leverages the expertise and passion of the students, faculty and staff of Hunter College.


Summer Reading for 2017

For ALL NEST+m students and families —

This summer we are engaging in a shared Summer Reading Text, I Am Malala. Parents/Families — please join our school-wide conversation by reading this text too.

When we return in the Fall our students will engage in cross-grade, interdisciplinary text-based conversation. You can find our differentiated summer reading assignments in the below links:


City Tech Professor Discusses New Film At New York Women’s Foundation Event

Professor Marta Effinger-Crichlow, African American Studies Department, was an invited speaker at the New York Women’s Foundation event “Neighborhood Gathering in the Bronx: Art, Gender, and Social Justice,” on June 14 at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. She was joined by Caridad De La Luz (La Bruja), spoken word artist/activist, and Victoria Sammartino, founder and executive director emeritus of Voices UnBroken.

Professor Effinger-Crichlow spoke about her new film Little Sallie Walker, a feature-length documentary that tells the story of how black women played as children. In a captivating return to childhood, a diverse group of black women, many of whom are sharing their stories for the first time, reveal with vulnerability how they have lived with play. They came of age during the birth and height of World War II, Civil Rights, and Hip Hop, and dared to create worlds where their imaginations soared.

While the title of the film is inspired by the classic circle game, the women of Little Sallie Walker, now all living in different regions of the US, admit they were not bound by one type of play. The circle games, the hand games, the dress up, the somersaults, the dolls, the skating, the infinite imagining through play, evoke memories of both pleasure and pain and shape how these women view American society and their positions within it. Effinger-Crichlow created the film with the support of an Independent Filmmaker Project JustFilms Fellowship.

Marta Effinger-Crichlow, PhD, is the author of Staging Migrations Toward an American West: From Ida B. Wells to Rhodessa Jones (University Press of Colorado). Her other writings have been published in African American Lives, Theatre Journal, African American Review, Footsteps: Children’s Magazine, Journal of Black Studies, and the Dictionary of Literary Biography.

Effinger-Crichlow is also a dramaturg, playwright, and filmmaker. In addition to Little Sallie Walker, produced works include the multi-media collage The Kitchen is Closed Startin’ Sunday and Whispers Want to Holler. She served as the project director and co-investigator for City Tech’s first ever National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant project titled Retentions and Transfigurations: The Technological Evolution and Social History of Five New York City Neighborhoods. This NEH-funded faculty development initiative was designed to strengthen teaching of humanities within technical and professional studies programs. In 2014, The Network Journal, which recognizes “Black women leaders and influencers in every field,” selected Effinger-Crichlow as one of their “25 Influential Black Women in Business.”

Effinger-Crichlow has been an invited lecturer at The Rosie the Riveter Museum of the National Park Service in Richmond, CA; Syracuse University; The CUNY Graduate Center; The African Burial Ground Museum and Monument of the National Park Service in New York City; Lane College’s NEH Summer Institute in Eugene, OR; and Xiamen University in China. In 2015, she appeared on TEDx CUNY at the TriBeCa Performing Arts Center in New York City.

About the New York Women’s Foundation: The New York Women’s Foundation creates an equitable and just future for women and families by uniting a cross-cultural alliance that ignites action and invests in bold, community-led solutions across the city.

About IFP JustFilms Fellowships: The Independent Filmmaker Project and its Made in NY Media Center offer JustFilms Fellowships to filmmakers who have a unique vision and a deep commitment to addressing inequality their work. Fellowships are open to creatives working in an array of nonfiction forms: long- and short-form film, episodic content, web-based media projects, social impact gaming, 360 video, virtual reality, and more. They seek storytellers who inspire imagination, disrupt stereotypes, and help transform the conditions that perpetuate injustice and inequality. JustFilms Fellows receive 12-month memberships at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, full-time incubator workspace at the Media Center, mentorship by industry leaders and IFP staff, and access to classes, networking events, Media Center facilities and more. These fellowships are made possible by the generous support of the Ford Foundation.


City Tech Professor Discusses New Film At New York Women’s Foundation Event

Professor Marta Effinger-Crichlow, African American Studies Department, was an invited speaker at the New York Women’s Foundation event “Neighborhood Gathering in the Bronx: Art, Gender, and Social Justice,” on June 14 at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. She was joined by Caridad De La Luz (La Bruja), spoken word artist/activist, and Victoria Sammartino, founder and executive director emeritus of Voices UnBroken.

Professor Effinger-Crichlow spoke about her new film Little Sallie Walker, a feature-length documentary that tells the story of how black women played as children. In a captivating return to childhood, a diverse group of black women, many of whom are sharing their stories for the first time, reveal with vulnerability how they have lived with play. They came of age during the birth and height of World War II, Civil Rights, and Hip Hop, and dared to create worlds where their imaginations soared.

While the title of the film is inspired by the classic circle game, the women of Little Sallie Walker, now all living in different regions of the US, admit they were not bound by one type of play. The circle games, the hand games, the dress up, the somersaults, the dolls, the skating, the infinite imagining through play, evoke memories of both pleasure and pain and shape how these women view American society and their positions within it. Effinger-Crichlow created the film with the support of an Independent Filmmaker Project JustFilms Fellowship.

Marta Effinger-Crichlow, PhD, is the author of Staging Migrations Toward an American West: From Ida B. Wells to Rhodessa Jones (University Press of Colorado). Her other writings have been published in African American Lives, Theatre Journal, African American Review, Footsteps: Children’s Magazine, Journal of Black Studies, and the Dictionary of Literary Biography.

Effinger-Crichlow is also a dramaturg, playwright, and filmmaker. In addition to Little Sallie Walker, produced works include the multi-media collage The Kitchen is Closed Startin’ Sunday and Whispers Want to Holler. She served as the project director and co-investigator for City Tech’s first ever National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant project titled Retentions and Transfigurations: The Technological Evolution and Social History of Five New York City Neighborhoods. This NEH-funded faculty development initiative was designed to strengthen teaching of humanities within technical and professional studies programs. In 2014, The Network Journal, which recognizes “Black women leaders and influencers in every field,” selected Effinger-Crichlow as one of their “25 Influential Black Women in Business.”

Effinger-Crichlow has been an invited lecturer at The Rosie the Riveter Museum of the National Park Service in Richmond, CA; Syracuse University; The CUNY Graduate Center; The African Burial Ground Museum and Monument of the National Park Service in New York City; Lane College’s NEH Summer Institute in Eugene, OR; and Xiamen University in China. In 2015, she appeared on TEDx CUNY at the TriBeCa Performing Arts Center in New York City.

About the New York Women’s Foundation: The New York Women’s Foundation creates an equitable and just future for women and families by uniting a cross-cultural alliance that ignites action and invests in bold, community-led solutions across the city.

About IFP JustFilms Fellowships: The Independent Filmmaker Project and its Made in NY Media Center offer JustFilms Fellowships to filmmakers who have a unique vision and a deep commitment to addressing inequality their work. Fellowships are open to creatives working in an array of nonfiction forms: long- and short-form film, episodic content, web-based media projects, social impact gaming, 360 video, virtual reality, and more. They seek storytellers who inspire imagination, disrupt stereotypes, and help transform the conditions that perpetuate injustice and inequality. JustFilms Fellows receive 12-month memberships at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, full-time incubator workspace at the Media Center, mentorship by industry leaders and IFP staff, and access to classes, networking events, Media Center facilities and more. These fellowships are made possible by the generous support of the Ford Foundation.


Baruch College Earns Top Money Magazine Ranking

New York, NY – July 11, 2017 – Money Magazine just announced that Baruch College ranks #1 among the “Best Public Colleges” and #2 for “Best Colleges for Your Money” in its final analysis of 711 schools across the nation.

These rankings put Baruch College ahead of such prestigious schools as Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, and University of Texas at Austin.

“This new, independent ranking from Money reinforces other recent evidence that Baruch College is an agent for social mobility, providing underserved students the academic training and professional skills they need to achieve career success, higher earnings, and a shot at the American dream,” said Dr. Mitchel B. Wallerstein, president of Baruch College. “We do this not only by providing an excellent education at a highly affordable price, but also by focusing on a student’s path to on-time graduation and delivering strong support and professional development programs throughout their college experience.”

The annual list, which is a ranking evaluating colleges on educational quality, affordability and alumni success, features colleges that “provide a boost in the job market and offer graduates the best odds of real-world success.”

In its announcement, Money pointed to Baruch College’s value, its strong job outcomes for alumni, and its nationally recognized track record in advancing social mobility among its students.

“CUNY Bernard M. Baruch College comes in at No. 2, up from No. 188 last year, above schools like Harvard, Yale and Stanford because it is highly affordable with tuition of just $6,330 and has a remarkable record of alumni success. Paychecks for recent graduates average more than $51,000 a year. And Baruch has the best record of moving low-income students into high-paying jobs of any large college in the country.”

Accolades for Affordability to its New York City Location

Money noted “About 44% of undergraduates are considered low-income, which makes the college’s affordability and graduation rate all the more impressive: 70% of students graduate within six years with an average debt load of just $8,500. This rate is all the more impressive considering that it is 32% higher than at schools with students from similar academic and economic backgrounds.”

In its profile of Baruch, Money cited the College’s New York City location which “helps Baruch draw one of the most ethnically diverse campuses in the country. Baruch students speak 128 different languages, and almost three-quarters of them are either minority or international students.” It also noted “the college’s well-known Zicklin School of Business, which benefits from being just a few miles from Wall Street and close to the headquarters of many major corporations.”

Baruch College Alumni Featured

In its coverage of its 2017 rankings, Money noted that “some other high-priced private schools scored poorly because their alumni aren’t thriving in the job market. Instead, many affordable colleges, such as the City University of New York’s Baruch College (our No. 2 college for 2017) and the University of Florida (No. 18), produce successful alumni with little debt.”

The article quoted alum Ashley Hall ’16, who told Money that she had chosen Baruch College over acceptances from New York University and Pace University. “I would have owed over $100,000 in loans, and that didn’t make any sense to me at all,” says Hall, who is a coordinator of client services for the Orchard, a division of Sony Music.”

Video of the Top 10 Schools

Watch a video of Money Magazine’s ranking of the top 10 schools, which features Baruch College, here.

METHODOLOGY:

As a basis for its rankings, Money focused on three factors that “surveys show are the most important to parents and students:” Quality of education, Affordability, and Outcomes. From more than 2,000 schools, Money looked at 2,4000 schools and compiled an initial cut of 711 colleges that met such requirements as having sufficient, reliable data to be analyzed, were not in financial distress, and having at least 500 students.For more information on Money’s methodology go here.

About Baruch College

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak 129 languages. Ranked among the top 15% of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. As a public institution with a tradition of academic excellence, Baruch College offers accessibility and opportunity for students from every corner of New York City and from around the world. For more about Baruch College, go to http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/.

 

 

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CUNY Law Mourns the Loss of Professor Cicero

Professor John Cicero passed away on July 24, 2017. He taught at CUNY Law for 28 years, bringing his passion for lawyering in service of workers’ rights through organized labor alive for the thousands of students in his Labor Law and Evidence classes.

“Professor Cicero’s death is a tremendous loss for our institution, said CUNY Law Dean Mary Lu Bilek. “He was an inspiration to many of our students, faculty, staff and alums who benefitted from his care, creativity and passion.”

John Cicero

Professor Cicero was an innovative teacher, as demonstrated by incorporating his ground-breaking teaching method “The Classroom as Shop Room Floor” into his classes.

The announcement of his death was followed by an outpouring of sadness from the CUNY Law community and countless notes of appreciation for Professor Cicero’s transformational influence.

“John’s labor law class was part-class, part-theatrical performance: he was the boss and we (the students) were his workers, remembered Alex Van Shaick ’13. “I’m proud to say that he wrote me up and then promoted me to management in an unsuccessful attempt to break our organizing. We fought back by leafleting his evidence class. The semester culminated in a walk out and negotiations over the final exam. Professor Cicero will be missed.”

“He taught a Labor Law class with such heart, wit, and intelligence,” recounted Kathryn Jones Malwitz ’94. “I remember it so well even though it was 25 years ago. He had a profound impact on all his students and I know he will be greatly missed.”

Professor John Cicero with students

Professor Cicero received the Distinguished Professor Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Classes of 1994 and 1997 and was honored by the student group, Public Interest Law Association in 2013. He was beloved by his students and colleagues.

“He was generous in answering questions from colleagues and cared deeply about his students and their learning,” said Professor Sue Bryant. Professor Andrea McArdle agreed, “John so loved teaching and he inspired and was beloved by his students.  And even with his many, many health challenges, particularly in this past year, he always maintained his good humor, steadfastness, and enthusiasm for teaching, and for CUNY and his colleagues.”

He is survived by his wife Lori Nessel ’92 and their children Jacob, Gensiana and Sofia. Nearly 30 CUNY Law community members were present at the memorial service held on July 6 at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Tenafly, NJ.

“It was clear throughout the service that John loved with his whole heart and focused on his family above all,” said Allie Robbins ’09, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. “That love permeated his teaching, and every interaction he had with students, staff, and faculty at the law school. It was clear that he loved well, and was very loved.”

Professor Cicero’s family wishes to continue his legacy of supporting CUNY Law students, through the CUNY School of Law John Cicero Memorial Fellowship in Labor Law.

A fall event celebrating Professor Cicero’s life is currently being planned.


MONEY MAGAZINE PUTS 5 CUNY COLLEGES IN TOP QUARTER OF NATION’S “BEST COLLEGES FOR YOUR MONEY” – BARUCH RANKED SECOND

Money magazine’s “Best Colleges for Your Money 2017” puts five CUNY colleges in the top quarter of 711 schools, ranking Baruch College second overall, just after Princeton University and first in the country among the “Best Public Colleges.” Also among the nation’s leaders, according to the assessment, were CUNY’s Brooklyn College, Queens College, Hunter College and John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

“College rankings can vary in usefulness, but Money’s magazine’s methodology is refreshing and very practical because of its focus on student success, not just inputs.  It’s not surprising that Money magazine’s assessment confirms what so many have consistently found,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said. “CUNY schools offer high-quality education, great access and affordability, and a tremendous boost up the social ladder. CUNY has become America’s premier urban university by providing generations of low- and middle-income students the means to achieve their aspirations.”

Money magazine ranks colleges based on 27 measures of educational quality, affordability and alumni success. A key factor in the rankings was the social mobility rate developed by Stanford University professor Raj Chetty. That study’s rankings measured how effective each college was at propelling low-income students into the middle class and beyond over the past 20 years. As Money magazine explains, that critical assessment ends up “pointing to colleges that help students achieve the American dream.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


Money Magazine Ranks Brooklyn College One of the Top 50 Best Colleges in the Country

Brooklyn College made the top 50 in Moneymagazine’s 2017–18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money” listing.

The Money magazine ranking recognizes Brooklyn College’s students’ post-graduation success in the marketplace.

Coming in at #43, the college was noted for its outstanding national academic reputation, rigorous honors collegestudy abroad programfirst-year learning communitiesdiversity, and selectivity. Additionally, Money highlighted Brooklyn College as having one of the highest rates of achievement in the country in regard to assisting its students climb the socioeconomic ladder. This is exemplified by resources like the Magner Career Center. The center’s dedicated staff provides expert career guidance and utilizes alumni networks to help students obtain valuable internship opportunities that give them an advantage in the marketplace.

Brooklyn College was the #2 ranked City University of New York (CUNY) institution, coming behind only Bernard M. Baruch College (the top-ranked CUNY school ranked #2 overall), and beating stiff competition from the likes of Rutgers University, Barnard College, the University of Chicago, Stony Brook University, Cornell University, Duke University, and Wesleyan University.

Money‘s ranking system assesses schools on educational quality, affordability, faculty, alumni success, and graduation rate, among other factors.

To see the full listing, please visit the Money website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Hospitality Management Professor Claire Stewart Interviewed by Brides

“Wedding trends come and go, and traditions have evolved right along with them—including what’s served and eaten on a wedding day. And while deciding what to feed your guests can be fun (hello, tastings!), you may not have realized that what you choose to serve can actually provide all sorts of cultural insight. That’s what Claire Stewart set out to do as she began researching her new book, As Long As We Both Shall Eat: A History of Wedding Food and Feasts.

Assistant Professor of Hospitality Management at City Tech, CUNY in New York and a trained and experienced chef herself, Stewart examined wedding food customs, from tossing rice to late night snacks, to get a peek into the conspicuous consumption that is a wedding feast. We asked the author to share a little bit of what she learned, both writing her book and as her time as a banquet chef, serving meals to newlyweds and the ones they love.”

Read the interview at Brides.com
Interviewed by Jaimie Mackey


CCNY hosts the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium, July 9-12

ACS Colloid Symposium 2017The 91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium will take place on July 9-12 at The City College of New York. The conference is co-sponsored by the Grove School of Engineering and the Division of Science as well as 22 exhibitors and sponsors.

The annual meeting of the American Chemical Society Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry will bring together students, faculty, developers and entrepreneurs seeking the latest developments and applications in colloids and surface science. The conference features 13 topical sessions from Colloidal Forces to Interactions to Rheology with over 500 talks and poster contributions presented in 86 sessions.

Plenary lecturers include alumna Professor Kathleen Stebe of the University of Pennsylvania and Professor Markus Antoniotti of the Max Planck Institute – Colloids and Interfaces Potsdam, Germany.

In addition, there will be a Unilever Award Lecture, the Victor K. LaMer Award Lecture and an instrument exhibition. The social program includes a Sunday evening welcome reception, a Monday evening poster session with refreshments, and a Tuesday evening Symposium Banquet.

For more information, please click here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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A Record-Breaking Spring for Hunter Student Fulbrights

The U.S. Department of State regularly names Hunter a “Top Producer” of Fulbright award-winning students . . .  and this year, the news is better than ever!A Record-Breaking Spring for Hunter Student Fulbrights Eight Hunter-educated Fulbright candidates an unprecedented number were offered the coveted grant for work and study abroad (and, in Fulbright terms, are now called Finalists).

Two graduating Hunter seniors and two recent Hunter graduates have accepted the award. Hunter is also the home campus of CUNY Fulbright Finalist Michael Clark (CUNY BA ’17).

After weighing multiple options, three members of the Hunter Class of 2017 have decided to forego the Fulbright. Valedictorian David Kanbergs has instead accepted a fellowship from The American University in Cairo’s Center for Arabic Study Abroad. Heather Armijo, with her newly minted MSW, will stay in New York to begin working in complex-care management at Mount Sinai. And Sara Clemente is headed to Stanford University, where she’ll earn an MA in Latin American studies on a full tuition scholarship.

We congratulate all eight recipients of 2017 Fulbright offers. And as four Finalists prepare for their Fulbright year abroad teaching, conducting research, and building lasting relationships with the people of their host countries we look at their backgrounds, interests, Fulbright projects, and post-Fulbright plans:

Jane Breakell, MFA ’14 – Destination: Canada

Norine Chan ’17 – Destination: Taiwan

Robert Roth, MA ’16 – Destination: Colombia

John Wetmore ’17 – Destination: Spain


Kids Reign Supreme for Two Days in August at Lehman College

The annual event owes much of its success to a core group of devoted Lehman alumni and friends.

For the past nine years, for two hot, sticky days in August, Bronx children and their families have enjoyed a festival of theatre, arts and crafts, waterslides, pony rides, face painting, and more for free. It’s the annual Kids Rule Weekend, and it’s all thanks to a group of people at Lehman College who believe that kids rule.

In celebration of the event’s 10th anniversary, and to ensure that Kids Rule continues at Lehman into the future, organizers have rounded up twelve former and current volunteers—many of whom are Lehman alumni—to help raise funds. They call themselves the Grand Jury, and they’ve each pledged to raise $1,000 each—for a total goal of $12,000.

The idea for a two-day event where kids can play in a beautiful and safe environment was, as Dante Albertie, director of Lehman Stages, puts it, a no-brainer. “There is a community of people here that want and need something like this,” he explained. Recognizing that Lehman students were its greatest asset, he got 30-40 student volunteers to put on a few theatrical shows and play with the children that first year. He brought in an electric grill to cook hotdogs.

For the second year, Albertie borrowed his parents’ grill. José Roldán (’05), now a playwright and actor, flipped burgers at that event. Communications specialist Allie Mautone (’07) remembers that the entertainment consisted of mostly tabletop carnival games. Alicia Waldie (’06), an accountant, shared her hip-hop dancing skills with the kids. Yini Rodriguez (’13), an administrative coordinator at the College, has been there since the beginning as well, and returns every year to lend a hand. Reynolds Fernandez (’13), an account manager at a marketing research firm, is a performer at heart and is happy to be part of the entertainment. Henry Ovalles (’06), now the associate director of Lehman Stages, remembers the smiling faces of the happy children during the shows.

The Grand Jury all agreed to participate in the fundraiser for the same reason: They love being part of something that is positive and gives back to the community. They have witnessed the event’s evolution over the years with attractions and attendance—an estimated 3,500 guests participate in the weekend-long event. But, most importantly, they can see the impact they have on the children and their families. “It’s a joyful event and it exposes the little ones to a college campus,” said Rodriguez.

“What is amazing about the Grand Jury is that they are people who have been with us from the beginning. Students who volunteered when they were sophomores and juniors, and now they’re out in the world, starting careers and families, and they want to give back to a specific thing that they know is important. It’s great stuff and I’m proud to be a part of it,” said Albertie.

Regard for Albertie runs high among the group, as well. Many credit him for giving them their first taste of theater and for what it means to belong to a place and a time. “It’s Dante who brings us all together,” said Alicia Waldie. “Even if we haven’t seen each other all year, we know we’ll be together the first weekend in August.”

Kids Rule will run on August 5 and 6, from Noon to 5 p.m. Admission is free. All children are welcome. To donate, go to lehman.stages.org/kids-rule.


CUNY TO HOST SPECIAL LIVE FACEBOOK SESSION ON EXCELSIOR SCHOLARSHIP

Top CUNY enrollment and admission officials will answer questions about New York State’s new Excelsior Scholarship in a special Facebook Live information session on Thursday, July 13, at 6 p.m.  The Excelsior Scholarship initiative will provide free tuition at CUNY and SUNY colleges to qualified students.

The Facebook Live information session will be hosted by James Murphy, University Dean for Enrollment Management, and University Director of Admission Clare Norton. Students, family members and others can join the session on CUNY’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/events/495782110764808/.

The deadline for applying for the Excelsior Scholarship is July 21, 2017.

 

###


JOHN JAY STUDENT ‘ACES’ BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN 2 YEARS

Chancellor James B. Milliken announced that a University initiative to increase timely graduation in four-year baccalaureate programs has produced its first graduate – a 19-year-old John Jay College of Criminal Justice student who earned his bachelor’s degree in just two years.

The ACE (Accelerate, Complete and Engage) program is the baccalaureate-level offshoot of CUNY’s highly successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs), which has consistently doubled graduation rates at CUNY’s community colleges.

ACE’s first graduate, Piotr Tandek of Staten Island, earned a 2017 B.S. in criminal justice at John Jay and aims to become a New York City police officer when he turns 21. He plans to enter the College of Staten Island this fall to begin studying for a master’s in the history of education, in anticipation of a post-NYPD career as a high school or middle school history teacher.

Chancellor Milliken congratulated Tandek on his “exceptional” achievement, which he said was an indicator that “the rest of his class will finish strong.”

“Although we’re only halfway through our four-year pilot program, ACE’s results so far affirm that our robust approach to helping students graduate on time and preparing them for careers or further study works just as well on the baccalaureate level as it does in community colleges,” the Chancellor said. “This may well serve as the template that other CUNY colleges – and colleges elsewhere – may follow as they seek to improve their degree-completion rates. It will also stand as yet another piece of the extraordinary and important legacy of John Jay College President Jeremy Travis, a leader in our efforts to improve graduation rates.”

Just as ASAP aims to graduate at least half of its students within three years – a goal it has consistently exceeded – ACE, piloted only at John Jay, aims to graduate at least 50 percent of its students within four years and 65 percent within five years. ACE set the 50 percent target for the end of summer in 2019 and the 65 percent target for the end of summer in 2020.

Tandek, the son of Polish immigrants, graduated in two years by marshaling 51 credits toward his baccalaureate degree even before entering John Jay, including 12 Advanced Placement credits earned in high school; nine from taking two proficiency exams, in college algebra and college mathematics; and 12 from taking a Polish proficiency exam. In addition, he earned seven credits by joining the NYPD Police Cadet Corps, which provided the first month of Policy Academy training that also served as his required internship; and he earned two credits from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (introduction to animals in distress and introduction to hazardous materials), six from the CUNY School of Professional Studies (physical science) and three for life experience.

Tandek said he wanted to graduate quickly because “I was thinking ahead.” His goals include becoming a police officer at 21, taking the sergeant’s exam and becoming a lieutenant by 30. Why policing? “I want to be proactive,” he said. “I want to show the community that instead of hearing all the negatives we hear about police, that we are here to help you. I’m trying my best to make the community safe.”

Looking further ahead, Tandek said he plans to take the NYPD’s early retirement at 46, after 25 years of service, and then teach history. He intends to remain in New York City.

Tandek said the enhanced advisement and academic and financial support provided by the ACE program gave him “nothing to worry about” that was school-related, “so I could excel in my classes.” He added, “They treat you like family. Without a network, it’s hard to succeed in life.”

ACE provides the same proven system of supporting students as ASAP, including strong, ongoing academic and career development counseling. It offers the same financial support, including free unlimited MetroCards and a $500 textbook voucher each year. Most ACE students attend tuition-free, with a tuition-gap waiver to cover any shortfall for students who receive state TAP and federal Pell grants.

Students also are eligible for winter and summer session scholarships for up to $1,650 to cover tuition and fees (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-john-jay). The program requires internships in the junior and senior years and offers 14 majors (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-eligible-majors). Students must take at least 15 credits a semester.

The pilot is showing positive results so far. An analysis of Fall 2016 data by CUNY ASAP Research and Evaluation, the University’s internal assessment team for the ACE project, showed the Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 retention rate for the first ACE cohort at John Jay was 83 percent, compared with 78 percent for a matched comparison group of similar John Jay students. Of the students retained, 95 percent were in good academic standing at the end of the Fall 2016 semester, versus 89 percent for the comparison group, with a mean cumulative GPA of 3.07 for ACE students versus 3.03 for the comparison group. Most significantly, a higher percentage of ACE students are on track to four-year graduation, with 71 percent at or above 45 cumulative credits earned, versus 43 percent of the comparison group as of the end of the Fall 2016 semester.

CUNY launched its nationally acclaimed ASAP initiative in 2007 as a pilot, seeking to graduate more than half of its associate degree students within three years, more than double the national rate of about 20 percent. It has consistently met and exceeded that goal.

A study by the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, recently published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Higher Education, found that ASAP provides taxpayers with a big bang for the buck – a return of $3 to $4 for every dollar invested. See http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/forum/2017/05/23/cunys-associate-degree-completion-program-huge-cost-saver-over-traditional-approach-independent-study-finds/


JOHN JAY STUDENT ‘ACES’ BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN 2 YEARS

Chancellor James B. Milliken announced that a University initiative to increase timely graduation in four-year baccalaureate programs has produced its first graduate – a 19-year-old John Jay College of Criminal Justice student who earned his bachelor’s degree in just two years.

The ACE (Accelerate, Complete and Engage) program is the baccalaureate-level offshoot of CUNY’s highly successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs), which has consistently doubled graduation rates at CUNY’s community colleges.

ACE’s first graduate, Piotr Tandek of Staten Island, earned a 2017 B.S. in criminal justice at John Jay and aims to become a New York City police officer when he turns 21. He plans to enter the College of Staten Island this fall to begin studying for a master’s in the history of education, in anticipation of a post-NYPD career as a high school or middle school history teacher.

Chancellor Milliken congratulated Tandek on his “exceptional” achievement, which he said was an indicator that “the rest of his class will finish strong.”

“Although we’re only halfway through our four-year pilot program, ACE’s results so far affirm that our robust approach to helping students graduate on time and preparing them for careers or further study works just as well on the baccalaureate level as it does in community colleges,” the Chancellor said. “This may well serve as the template that other CUNY colleges – and colleges elsewhere – may follow as they seek to improve their degree-completion rates. It will also stand as yet another piece of the extraordinary and important legacy of John Jay College President Jeremy Travis, a leader in our efforts to improve graduation rates.”

Just as ASAP aims to graduate at least half of its students within three years – a goal it has consistently exceeded – ACE, piloted only at John Jay, aims to graduate at least 50 percent of its students within four years and 65 percent within five years. ACE set the 50 percent target for the end of summer in 2019 and the 65 percent target for the end of summer in 2020.

Tandek, the son of Polish immigrants, graduated in two years by marshaling 51 credits toward his baccalaureate degree even before entering John Jay, including 12 Advanced Placement credits earned in high school; nine from taking two proficiency exams, in college algebra and college mathematics; and 12 from taking a Polish proficiency exam. In addition, he earned seven credits by joining the NYPD Police Cadet Corps, which provided the first month of Policy Academy training that also served as his required internship; and he earned two credits from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (introduction to animals in distress and introduction to hazardous materials), six from the CUNY School of Professional Studies (physical science) and three for life experience.

Tandek said he wanted to graduate quickly because “I was thinking ahead.” His goals include becoming a police officer at 21, taking the sergeant’s exam and becoming a lieutenant by 30. Why policing? “I want to be proactive,” he said. “I want to show the community that instead of hearing all the negatives we hear about police, that we are here to help you. I’m trying my best to make the community safe.”

Looking further ahead, Tandek said he plans to take the NYPD’s early retirement at 46, after 25 years of service, and then teach history. He intends to remain in New York City.

Tandek said the enhanced advisement and academic and financial support provided by the ACE program gave him “nothing to worry about” that was school-related, “so I could excel in my classes.” He added, “They treat you like family. Without a network, it’s hard to succeed in life.”

ACE provides the same proven system of supporting students as ASAP, including strong, ongoing academic and career development counseling. It offers the same financial support, including free unlimited MetroCards and a $500 textbook voucher each year. Most ACE students attend tuition-free, with a tuition-gap waiver to cover any shortfall for students who receive state TAP and federal Pell grants.

Students also are eligible for winter and summer session scholarships for up to $1,650 to cover tuition and fees (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-john-jay). The program requires internships in the junior and senior years and offers 14 majors (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-eligible-majors). Students must take at least 15 credits a semester.

The pilot is showing positive results so far. An analysis of Fall 2016 data by CUNY ASAP Research and Evaluation, the University’s internal assessment team for the ACE project, showed the Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 retention rate for the first ACE cohort at John Jay was 83 percent, compared with 78 percent for a matched comparison group of similar John Jay students. Of the students retained, 95 percent were in good academic standing at the end of the Fall 2016 semester, versus 89 percent for the comparison group, with a mean cumulative GPA of 3.07 for ACE students versus 3.03 for the comparison group. Most significantly, a higher percentage of ACE students are on track to four-year graduation, with 71 percent at or above 45 cumulative credits earned, versus 43 percent of the comparison group as of the end of the Fall 2016 semester.

CUNY launched its nationally acclaimed ASAP initiative in 2007 as a pilot, seeking to graduate more than half of its associate degree students within three years, more than double the national rate of about 20 percent. It has consistently met and exceeded that goal.

A study by the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, recently published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Higher Education, found that ASAP provides taxpayers with a big bang for the buck – a return of $3 to $4 for every dollar invested. See http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/forum/2017/05/23/cunys-associate-degree-completion-program-huge-cost-saver-over-traditional-approach-independent-study-finds/


ICYMI: CUNY celebrates first graduate from new program

POLITICO
By KESHIA CLUKEY

Piotr Tandek recently graduated John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Manhattan with a bachelor’s degree that he completed in two years.

The 19-year-old Brooklyn native, whose parents are from Poland, started at John Jay with 12 credits from high school, but it was his enrollment in a City University pilot program that helped him finish so quickly, saving time and slashing the amount of loans he had to take out, Tandek said. “I saved $18,000 by graduating early.”

Tandek is the first graduate of CUNY’s Accelerate, Complete and Engage (ACE) program, piloted at John Jay, which provided him with additional financial and academic assistance, including an adviser who helped him navigate course requirements, getting him set up with summer and winter courses and an internship.

“Going into college is overwhelming and with this program … it helps you transition,” Tandek said. “They boost you up. They set the standards for you … It helps us excel,” he said of the ACE program.

Tandek’s story — though a bit unique because of the credits he earned in high school — is one CUNY hopes to replicate at other four-year colleges through the ACE program as it seeks to improve on-time graduation rates, chancellor James Milliken said.

“This culture of completion is a focus at each of our colleges and it is a central point of our strategic plan, of where we’re going to be focusing attention and resources in the coming years,” Milliken said in an interview. “Getting students college ready, into CUNY, [and] getting them out in a timely way with degrees.”

The move comes as college affordability and student debt have been at the center of the national discussion on higher education.

ACE is a spinoff of CUNY’s nationally renowned Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), which focuses on increasing the three-year graduation rate for students looking to earn an associate’s degree. U.S. Rep. Yvette Clarke of Brooklyn introduced a bill last month that would create a national version of the ASAP to support students attending community colleges nationally.

ASAP was launched as a pilot in 2007 with 1,100 students across six campuses and as of the 2016-17 school year has expanded to 15,400 students across nine of CUNY’s colleges, including its six community colleges and three comprehensives that offer associate and bachelor’s degrees, said Donna Linderman, who oversees the program. It is supported through funding from the state and New York City.

ACE, like ASAP, provides an array of support services for students, including ongoing academic and career development counseling, free unlimited MetroCards, a $500 textbook voucher each year, and scholarships toward summer and winter courses.

Most ACE students attend tuition-free. They must take at least 15 credits a semester and are required to complete internships.

The first cohort of the ACE pilot at John Jay began in fall 2015 with 262 students. The retention rate at the end of the fall 2016 semester was 83 percent, compared with 78 percent for similar students. Of those retained, 95 percent of ACE students were in good academic standing, according to CUNY data.

And a higher percentage of ACE students are on track to graduate within four years, with 71 percent at or above 45 cumulative credits earned compared to 43 percent of the comparison group as of the end of the fall 2016 semester, according to CUNY.

An additional 350 students entered the program in fall 2016, Linderman said. “The early outcomes are so promising, with significantly more students on track to graduate at the four- or five-year level,” she said.

The goal is to graduate at least 50 percent of ACE students within four years and 65 percent within five years.

But the program doesn’t come without a cost to the college.

ACE currently costs about $4,000 per student per year over and above what it costs for regular full time equivalent students services, Linderman said. This includes having more advisers, as well as paying for the additional tuition, books and transportation aid. The ACE program currently is funded through the Robin Hood Foundation, Office of the Mayor’s NYC Opportunity, and the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women.

But even though its more expensive per student, it actually costs less per degree than if the student were to take additional years to graduate, and allows the college to graduate twice the number of students, she said.

CUNY currently is looking into a sort of public-private partnership to fund the ACE program at additional schools, Linderman said.

While there is an additional cost, it’s an “investment worth making,” Milliken said. “If it is successful, which we believe it will be, then yes, we will look at ways to expand that across CUNY.”

“The goal is not obviously just to increase enrollment. The goal for us at CUNY and at all large public universities, is to make sure that those students are successful,” he said. “That’s something where I don’t think we’ve had enough focus in recent decades and so we’re going to turn that around at CUNY.”

http://www1.cuny.edu/portal_ur/news/in_news/2017/POLITICO_Piotr_Tandek_7.6.17.pdf


Class of 2017 Grad Ryan Beckford Heads to CNBC

Even before he walked down the aisle at Barclays Center for the 2017 Brooklyn College Commencement Ceremony, Ryan Beckford ’17 had already scored a coveted position as a post-production prep tech at CNBC, thanks, in no small part, to the resources and training he received from the Magner Career Center.

Ryan Beckford ’17 said that the Magner Career Center was crucial in helping him hit the ground running on his post-graduation career track.

Beckford, who received his Bachelor of Arts in television and radio, said that his first week at CNBC Global Media Operations, which began the Monday following commencement, was “busy and hectic,” but it was the kind of busy and hectic he had been working toward for his entire college career and he was glad to be finally living it.

“I was getting trained by numerous employees from within the department that knew how to handle the workflow and were willing to show me what to do,” says Beckford. “During the peak of my first week, I was sending shows out for captioning, digitally delivering shows to 30 ROCK, screening USA Network promos, applying fixes to close captions, and taking in live show feeds for Oxygen and Telemundo.” Currently, Beckford is being trained to perform quality checks on regional and national sports programs for the NBC Sports Network, ensuring the shows meet standards before they air.

A Kingston, Jamaica native who now lives in Queens, New York, Beckford is the first person in his immediate family to attend college. His family’s economic situation required that he receive financial aid and take out a loan to attend college. He enrolled at Brooklyn College because of its affordability and rigorous curriculum. Given his financial challenges, Beckford felt a special responsibility to himself and his family to take full advantage of the opportunities afforded to him. This is what led him to the Magner Career Center, where his path to CNBC began as an internship inquiry.

“The center helped me attain my internship at NBCUniversal (CNBC’s parent company) by allowing me to take advantage of the resources offered before having to go in for my interview,” Beckford says. “When I found out that CNBC wanted to interview me, I reached out to my career adviser Michael Sarrao at the center, who reviewed my resume and made changes. During our meetings, my adviser provided me with sample questions, which I could ask my interviewer at the end of my interview to show them my interest. The center was an important resource for me because the friendly staff were always available to answer my questions, whether by e-mail or by phone.”

Beckford began his internship in fall 2016. Because he had performed so well in his duties—which included video editing, social media management, researching celebrity guests of the network, and pitching show topics—by spring 2017, CNBC offered him an entry-level position in its cable network division.

“The most important tip for any intern wanting to be hired is to believe in yourself,” says Beckford. “Take in as much as possible from the internship experience. Teach yourself new skills and have fun. Always ask questions, stay busy, and complete any tasks that are asked of you. Have conversations with your supervisor. Discuss your goals and where you see yourself in the future with the company. You want to let your supervisor know you want to be a part of the company months before you graduate. Finally, network and make friends.”

Of the Magner Career Center, Beckford adds, “Having a center on campus where students can go and seek their career is very important. The services the center offers would be expensive and out of reach just about anywhere else. For these reasons, I thank Marge Magner [founder of the Magner Career Center], center director Natalia Guarin-Klein, and Michael Sarrao for thinking about Brooklyn College students, putting their career goals first, and for wanting to provide a value to help change students’ lives.”

Beckford says Brooklyn College prepared him for the job market through classroom lessons, hands-on activities, career fairs, and off-campus research. “The classes are designed to provide every student with a real-world understanding for broadcast media. Faculty like Michelle Ciulla-Lipkin and Claire Serant provide students with vision through talks of their experiences working in the industry.”

Beckford’s ultimate goal is to become an executive producer and senior video editor, which he says will put him in a better position to pay Magner’s efforts forward.

“As I proceed through my career, I plan to give back to Brooklyn College by advising students on how to achieve their career goals” say Beckford. “I plan to serve as a mentor for students hoping to achieve careers in broadcast media.”

 

The Magner Career Center, founded by Marge Magner ’69, is able to provide students like Ryan Beckford with the assistance, skills, values, and opportunities essential to fulfilling their career aspirations thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To make a charitable donation to the Magner Career Center, please visit the center’s website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Bronx Community College Hosts Announcement of Big Bucks for the Bronx

Bronx City Council Delegation Will Unveil $8,196,000 in Capital Spending for the Borough in the Next Fiscal Year


What
: The New York City Council Bronx Delegation’s Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Press Conference

When: Thursday, June 29, 2017, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Where: Gould Memorial Library, Bronx Community College, 2155 University Avenue, Bronx, New York
About: The Bronx Delegation to the New York City Council will hold a press conference announcing $8,196,000 in capital spending for the borough in the Fiscal 2018 budget.  The event will be held in the Rotunda of Bronx Community College’s Gould Memorial Library, itself the recipient of $2,000,000 in City Council funds towards the restoration of the historic Bronx landmark. Following welcoming remarks from BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe, the speakers will include:

  • Council Member and Chair of the Bronx Delegation Annabel Palma (District #18) with an overview of the budget
  • Council Member Andy King (District #12), announcing $1,000,000 funds to renovate and upgrade the NYPD’s 47th precinct
  • Council Member Ritchie J. Torres (District #15) announcing $5,000,000 for the Construction of a new worker’s operation center at the New York Botanical Garden
  • Council Member Vanessa L. Gibson (District #16) announcing $1,000,000 for a permanent facility At Mill Pond Park for the Bronx Children’s Museum and $400,000 to provide Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility for the Roscoe Brown Student Center of Bronx Community College

For further information, contact David Levers at 718.289.5157 or david.levers@bcc.cuny.edu.


Lehman College/CUNY Partners with NYU in the First Publicly Funded VR/AR Lab in the U.S.

When the City of New York was considering how the region could be a center of excellence for virtual and augmented reality they turned to New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and asked them to partner with Lehman College.

The private university won a $6 million grant from New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) and the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment (MOME) to develop and build the new lab for the city’s emerging VR/AR sector as part of the de Blasio’s Administration plan to create 100,000 good jobs. Lehman, which opened its own VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in a public-private partnership with EON Reality in May, will serve as a workforce development center in the Bronx.

“The milestone we observe here today, evidences the strength of your character, the depth of your dedication, and the firmness of your purpose,” Cruz told the graduates.

“Creating a virtual reality hub here in New York City will expand education and career opportunities in the high-tech sector for residents, and Lehman College is proud to have been chosen to participate the workforce development component of this initiative,” said President José Luis Cruz of Lehman College. “The College’s Virtual and Augmented Reality Training Academy is introducing students now to a fast-paced world filled with innovation and entrepreneurship. By fully establishing an avenue from the classroom and lab to the workplace, it is easy to see the potential for success and economic growth, here in the Bronx and across the city.”

NYU will develop a new lab in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and by partnering with Lehman’s College’s VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in the Bronx, will connect New Yorkers with VR/AR jobs. The Brooklyn lab is expected to open in late 2017.

“VR/AR is one of the most exciting new technologies out there and is a rapidly growing sector with significant opportunities for innovation,” said Council Member James Vacca, chair of the New York City Council Committee on Technology, who represents District 13 in the Bronx. “The creation of the VR/AR lab in Brooklyn and the establishment of a workforce development center in the Bronx will ensure New York City is at the forefront of this quickly expanding field, and that a diverse range of local companies and residents have the resources they need to succeed. I’m really excited to see what kinds of new technologies come from this forward thinking investment.”

According to a 2016 report by Citigroup, the VR/AR sector has seen nearly $3 billion in investments nationally over the past two years. The report also projects that the global VR/AR market could grow to $2.16 trillion by 2035 as different industries and applications make use of the technology.

New York City is uniquely positioned to become a leader in VR/AR due to its diverse talent pool and strong anchor industries with opportunities for crosspollination. A 2016 Goldman Sachs report identified six New York City anchor industries—healthcare, education, real estate, retail, live entertainment and video entertainment—as being among the most impacted by VR/AR.

For more information regarding the Lehman VR/AR Academy and Lab, please see http://www.lehman.edu/vr.

About Lehman College:

CUNY’s only senior college in the Bronx, Lehman College enrolls over 12,000 students and offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Lehman is home to 12 CUNY doctoral programs (most in conjunction with the CUNY Graduate Center) and has a long-standing collaboration with the New York Botanical Garden. Lehman is a Hispanic-Serving Institution where students speak 91 languages, 40 percent hold two passports, and all have a global outlook. In recent years students have won Fulbrights, Soros Fellowships, and fellowships from the National Science Foundation and the Organization of American States.

In 2015 Washington Monthly selected Lehman as the No. 3 “Best Bang for the Buck” college in the Northeast. Its tree-lined, 37-acre campus once housed the United Nations Security Council, where in 1946, diplomats drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In recent years, Lehman has added a number of new buildings to its historic campus, including Science Hall, a $70 million, state-of-the-art research and teaching facility, and a $16 million all-digital Multimedia Center.


Lehman College/CUNY Partners with NYU in the First Publicly Funded VR/AR Lab in the U.S.

When the City of New York was considering how the region could be a center of excellence for virtual and augmented reality they turned to New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and asked them to partner with Lehman College.

The private university won a $6 million grant from New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) and the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment (MOME) to develop and build the new lab for the city’s emerging VR/AR sector as part of the de Blasio’s Administration plan to create 100,000 good jobs. Lehman, which opened its own VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in a public-private partnership with EON Reality in May, will serve as a workforce development center in the Bronx.

“The milestone we observe here today, evidences the strength of your character, the depth of your dedication, and the firmness of your purpose,” Cruz told the graduates.

“Creating a virtual reality hub here in New York City will expand education and career opportunities in the high-tech sector for residents, and Lehman College is proud to have been chosen to participate the workforce development component of this initiative,” said President José Luis Cruz of Lehman College. “The College’s Virtual and Augmented Reality Training Academy is introducing students now to a fast-paced world filled with innovation and entrepreneurship. By fully establishing an avenue from the classroom and lab to the workplace, it is easy to see the potential for success and economic growth, here in the Bronx and across the city.”

NYU will develop a new lab in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and by partnering with Lehman’s College’s VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in the Bronx, will connect New Yorkers with VR/AR jobs. The Brooklyn lab is expected to open in late 2017.

“VR/AR is one of the most exciting new technologies out there and is a rapidly growing sector with significant opportunities for innovation,” said Council Member James Vacca, chair of the New York City Council Committee on Technology, who represents District 13 in the Bronx. “The creation of the VR/AR lab in Brooklyn and the establishment of a workforce development center in the Bronx will ensure New York City is at the forefront of this quickly expanding field, and that a diverse range of local companies and residents have the resources they need to succeed. I’m really excited to see what kinds of new technologies come from this forward thinking investment.”

According to a 2016 report by Citigroup, the VR/AR sector has seen nearly $3 billion in investments nationally over the past two years. The report also projects that the global VR/AR market could grow to $2.16 trillion by 2035 as different industries and applications make use of the technology.

New York City is uniquely positioned to become a leader in VR/AR due to its diverse talent pool and strong anchor industries with opportunities for crosspollination. A 2016 Goldman Sachs report identified six New York City anchor industries—healthcare, education, real estate, retail, live entertainment and video entertainment—as being among the most impacted by VR/AR.

For more information regarding the Lehman VR/AR Academy and Lab, please see http://www.lehman.edu/vr.

About Lehman College:

CUNY’s only senior college in the Bronx, Lehman College enrolls over 12,000 students and offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Lehman is home to 12 CUNY doctoral programs (most in conjunction with the CUNY Graduate Center) and has a long-standing collaboration with the New York Botanical Garden. Lehman is a Hispanic-Serving Institution where students speak 91 languages, 40 percent hold two passports, and all have a global outlook. In recent years students have won Fulbrights, Soros Fellowships, and fellowships from the National Science Foundation and the Organization of American States.

In 2015 Washington Monthly selected Lehman as the No. 3 “Best Bang for the Buck” college in the Northeast. Its tree-lined, 37-acre campus once housed the United Nations Security Council, where in 1946, diplomats drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In recent years, Lehman has added a number of new buildings to its historic campus, including Science Hall, a $70 million, state-of-the-art research and teaching facility, and a $16 million all-digital Multimedia Center.


Three CCNY Black Studies majors awarded Mellon Fellowships

Mellon Mays Fellows 2017

2017 Mellon Mays Fellows. From left: Naajidah Correll, Bryan Guichardo and Nana Minder.

Naajidah Correll, Bryan Guichardo and Nana Minder, from the Black Studies Program at The City College of New York, are 2017 Mellon Mays Fellows.  The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program is the centerpiece of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s initiatives to increase diversity in the faculty ranks of institutions of higher learning.

Fellows have demonstrated academic ability and an aspiration to pursue a doctoral degree in selected humanities, social sciences and physical sciences. The fellowship provides fellows with structured programming; faculty mentoring; support for research activities; and repayment of undergraduate loans up to $10,000.

“The MMUF program is preparing me for my life goal of becoming a professor within the humanities, “ said Correll, who is also a Colin Powell Fellow and fellow of the Skadden, Arps Honors Program in Legal Studies. “Upon graduating, it is my hope to join Stanford’s Modern Thought in Literature and Law JD/PhD program, which is directed by Mellon Mays Fellow and professor Bernadette Meyler.”

2017 Mellon Fellows and their research topics are:

  • Naajidah Correll (junior, literature, Black Studies minor) will be at the University of California, Los Angeles this summer for a six-week program to work on her research topic the resurgence of African spirituality in New York City, specifically among Black and Latin communities and seeing the correlation between certain political movements.
  • Bryan Guichardo (junior, anthropology and Black Studies) is researching racial and ethnic identity through hair, within Afro-Latinx communities, with a focus on Dominican Studies.
  • Nana Minder (junior, sociology and Black Studies, Women’s Studies minor) is researching Black girls in schools, particularly girls in the school-to-prison pipeline with high expulsion rates. She is doing research alongside Dr. Terri Watson at A. Phillip Randolph Campus High School and will be writing a book chapter with her on their work.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS


FORMER ACTING ASST. U.S. EDUCATION SECRETARY APPOINTED ASSOCIATE VICE CHANCELLOR TO GUIDE IMPLEMENTATION OF CUNY STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

Chancellor James B. Milliken today announced the appointment of Amy B. McIntosh, acting Assistant Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education in the Obama administration, as Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Strategy, a new role where she will be responsible for guiding implementation of the University’s Strategic Framework and other important CUNY strategic objectives.

Ms. McIntosh will work closely with the Chancellor, Presidents and other senior university leadership in the planning, oversight and implementation of the vision for CUNY’s future development. She will provide strategic advice and coordination across the University to support progress on priority initiatives. She will help identify priorities, set benchmarks and time frames, and determine the financial and human resources needed to achieve the goals that will renew CUNY’s mission for the 21st century. The vision will enhance student preparedness for college, significantly improve graduation rates and give graduates more workplace experience to launch them on promising careers.

“CUNY has set an ambitious agenda with our Strategic Framework, and a comprehensive implementation plan is required to achieve its goals of academic excellence, expanded access, and improvement in student progress to graduation,” Chancellor Milliken said. “Amy McIntosh’s extensive and deep expertise as a key executive and manager in the federal, New York State and New York City education departments, and her many accomplishments in both the public and private sectors, will be helpful in navigating clear paths to achieving CUNY’s critical goals.”

Ms. McIntosh has deep experience as a leader in education. Her responsibilities during the Obama Administration included policy development, creation and implementation of Education Department budgets, and advancement of financial aid programs for low-income college students.

Ms. McIntosh served in the U.S. Department of Education from January 2014 to this past January, most recently as acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development. In that post, she led a team shaping policy development from Pre-K-12 to higher education. She also developed and implemented two annual Education Department budgets of approximately $78 billion in discretionary funding, forged policy around the new P-12 Every Student Succeeds Act, advanced financial aid and grant programs to improve college access, affordability and completion for low-income college students, and navigated across multiple agencies including the White House and Office of Management and Budget.

Previously, she was Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for P-12 Policy, where she launched a new 50-state teacher-equity planning requirement to improve poor and minority students’ access to excellent educators, and launched a Preschool Development Grant program to increase state-funded preschool in 18 states.

Ms. McIntosh worked in the New York State Education Department from October 2010 to December 2013 as a Senior Fellow with the privately funded Regents Research Fund, providing policy and strategic leadership to the New York State Education Commissioner and the Board of Regents. She transformed management of teachers and principals through several initiatives to improve preparation, development and retention of excellent teachers and principals across the State, including initiating a grant program to establish differentiated compensation and career ladder incentives, with awards going to 221 districts and 42,000 teachers.

Ms. McIntosh holds a B.A. in Economics from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. She worked in the private sector from 1984 to 2004 at companies including American Express, where her last position was Senior Vice President-Marketing for the Consumer Card Group; Verizon, where she was President/General Manager, Consumer Internet Business; Zagat Survey, where she was CEO; and D&B, where she was Senior Vice President.

CUNY’s new Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Strategy will report to the Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost and work closely with the Chancellor and other senior University leaders. Ms. McIntosh will also lead in the development and execution of a communications campaign to increase awareness of and participation in Strategic Framework-related activities and accomplishments.


City Tech Professor Earns Prestigious Math Award

Professor Satyanand Singh of the Department of Mathematics was awarded the prestigious “Distinguished Teaching Award in Mathematics” on April 29, in recognition of extraordinarily successful teaching and commitment to students. The Mathematics Association of America New York (MAA NY) Metro Section conferred the award. 

“It is a privilege to challenge and help my students grow in their studies and impact their lives in a positive way,” said Singh, “Winning this distinguished award further validates my teaching and its influence on them.”

Professor Janet Liou-Mark, Professor Satyanand Singh

In addition to his award-winning teaching, Singh has mentored several students through Emerging Scholars and other programs at City Tech. Many of his students went on to present their work at the national level and have achieved or are pursuing advanced degrees in Mathematics.

Singh has coauthored papers and published in highly-ranked and respected peer-reviewed journals such as The Electronic Journal of Combinatorics, The International Journal of Number Theory, CMJ and International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology. The three sequences (A224920, A274628 and A274629) are linked to some of his work on OEIS (The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences). Singh is also a coauthor of Visualizing Calculus by Way of Maple: An Emphasis on Problem Solving (McGraw-Hill 2011).

As a trustee of the Belle Zeller Scholarship Fund, Singh awards talented CUNY students with merit-based scholarships. He is a faculty advisor to the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) student chapter at City Tech and is the secretary-elect of the MAA NY Metro Section (2015-2018).

Singh received his Ph.D. in 2014 from the CUNY Graduate Center under the direction of Professor Melvyn B. Nathanson, and has been teaching at City Tech since 2001. His research interests are in number theory, cryptography, probability, and algebra.

http://sections.maa.org/metrony/news 


The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and The Advanced Science Research Center of the City University of New York Launch Inter-Institutional Glial Biology Initiative

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) and the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) today announced the creation of an Inter-Institutional Glial Biology Initiative, a collaboration designed to catalyze and strengthen scientific interaction and create a multidisciplinary research and clinical program focused on glial biology between the two institutions.

The complexity of brain function relies on networks of many billions of cells communicating via transmission of electrochemical signals, metabolite exchanges, and communication with blood vessels. The function of glial cells, which outnumber neurons, is only beginning to be addressed. Traditionally viewed as “support cells,” glial cells have begun to take the stage as intriguing sensors of the environment and as major players in disease mechanisms.

The Inter-Institutional Glial Biology Initiative, the first of its kind in New York City, will focus on the study of glial cell development and function. Investigators from both institutions will collaborate to foster the growth of robust research programs while sharing ideas, resources, and core facilities at both institutions.

“This partnership—scientific discovery led by world-class researchers leveraging outstanding facilities—is an exciting development for neuroscience research,” said Joy Connolly, Provost and Senior Vice President at the Graduate Center. “The collaborations this agreement makes possible will advance the important work currently being undertaken independently by the teams at CUNY and Mount Sinai. Efforts such as these help us fulfill our commitment to do great science for the public good.”

The partnership brings together two institutions that are leading the way in modern scientific research.

“We are delighted to launch this joint initiative to capture the many synergies between our two institutions focused on the essential role played by glial cells in health and disease,” said Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD, Nash Family Professor of Neuroscience and Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs at ISMMS. “We believe that a greater understanding of the brain and insight into fundamentally new approaches to treatment will result from this novel affiliation.”

ISMMS is an international leader in medical and scientific training, biomedical research, and patient care. It is the medical school for the Mount Sinai Health System, an integrated health care system which includes seven hospitals and an expanding ambulatory network serving approximately 3.7 million patients per year. The School has more than 1,800 students in MD, PhD, and Master’s programs and post-doctoral fellowships; more than 5,600 faculty members; over 2,000 residents and fellows; and 36 clinical and research institutes. The Graduate Center’s ASRC is the scientific research hub of the CUNY system, providing cutting-edge research tools necessary to push the limits of scientific exploration. CUNY, the largest urban university system in the United States, serves more than 270,000 students, including the 4,100 graduate students enrolled in 30-plus doctoral degree programs at the Graduate Center.

The new initiative will be led by Patrizia Casaccia, MD, PhD, Director of the ASRC Neuroscience Initiative at the Graduate Center, CUNY and an internationally-recognized scientist focused on myelin and oligodendrocyte biology and Anne Schaefer, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and an outstanding scientist in microglia biology

“Thanks to the cutting-edge instrumentation that is being installed at the ASRC, including our MRI, Epigenetics and Live Imaging Facilities, and the considerable resources and expertise available at Mount Sinai, investigators at both institutions will only be limited by their imaginations,” said Dr. Casaccia.

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About the Advanced Science Research Center at the Graduate Center, CUNY
The Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) is the Graduate Center’s University-wide venture that elevates CUNY’s legacy of scientific research and education through initiatives in five distinctive, but increasingly interconnected disciplines: Nanoscience, Photonics, Structural Biology, Neuroscience and Environmental Sciences. The ASRC is designed to promote a unique, interdisciplinary research culture with researchers from each of the initiatives working side by side in the ASRC’s core facilities, sharing equipment that is among the most advanced available.

About the Icahn School of Medicine
The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is an international leader in medical and scientific training, biomedical research, and patient care. It is the medical school for the Mount Sinai Health System, an integrated health care system which includes seven hospitals and an expanding ambulatory network serving approximately 4 million patients per year. The School has more than 1,800 students in MD, PhD, and Master’s programs and post-doctoral fellowships; more than 5,600 faculty members; over 2,000 residents and fellows; and 23 clinical and research institutes and 34 academic departments. It is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per principal investigator. The School was the first medical school in the country to create a progressive admissions approach for students who seek early assurance of admission through the FlexMed program. The Graduate School of Biomedical Science trains PhD and MD/PhD students, and offers master’s-level programs in areas such as genetic counseling, clinical research, biomedical sciences, and public health, and an online master’s degree in health care delivery leadership. The seamless connections between our medical school, graduate school, and hospital campuses provide an extraordinary environment for translating scientific discoveries into clinical treatments.


City Tech Offers New Degree Program in Applied Computational Physics

This last decade has witnessed historically rapid advances in science, technology, and education driven by a dramatic increase in the power and usage of computers. In the past, undergraduate physics students were often taught exclusively analytical and theoretical skills; scientific computations were left as “black boxes” whose content was only revealed in graduate school. However, our increasing reliance on computer-based tools, both in science and in everyday life, makes this less true today, and much less likely to be true in the future.

This fall, the Physics Department at City Tech will offer a Bachelor of Science degree program in Applied Computational Physics (ACP). This program places a unique emphasis on task-oriented rather than theoretical or formal aspects of physical sciences, and on the use of advanced computational techniques to solve problems. As a result, it differs substantially from Physics Bachelor’s programs already in existence at other CUNY (The City University of New York) colleges.

“The program has been designed to equip students with skills that are in demand on the job market while, at the same time, conveying the excitement of exploring and testing the fundamental laws of our universe,” said Professor Giovanni Ossola, coordinator of the ACP degree program. “It took a few years to find the right combination of courses. We sought the advice of physicists employed in industry and finance, and I think we succeeded in providing the right blend. We want our graduates to have a scientific approach to study advanced problems, as well as the ability of applying their skills to practical tasks.”  

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Applied Computational Physics will fulfill the growing need for researchers, educators, and information professionals who perform in roles requiring programming and problem-solving skills, as well as technological proficiency. It will provide students with strong technical skills, critical thinking and problem-solving abilities, all of which are highly rated by companies in their hiring process.

Graduates will be equipped with a solid foundation in physics, computer science, and mathematics. This will enable them to pursue careers in a variety of STEM disciplines such as aerospace engineering, applied mathematics and computer science, finance, environmental science, chemistry, biomedicine, or conduct research in academia, industry, or national laboratories. Graduates of the program will gain access to a wide spectrum of employment opportunities in the private and public sector, as well as to advanced degree programs.

The Physics Department currently has twelve award-winning tenured or tenure-track faculty qualified to teach all the classes related to the program. In particular, many faculty members are active in research involving advanced computational techniques and their applications to various physical systems. Their research includes the use of theoretical and computational methods for the study of particle physics, condensed matter systems, cosmology and astrophysics, gravitational physics, and optics. In addition, there are several faculty members in other Departments within City Tech who can provide support and bring their expertise to the proposed curriculum, in particular in the Mathematics and Computer Systems Technology Departments.

“A degree in Applied Computational Physics will provide students with a strong level of motivation to solve complex computational problems in the different fields of physics, engineering, applied mathematics, and finance. It also opens a wide avenue to pursue graduate studies at any high-quality academic institution,” said Professor Roman Kezerashivili, Chair of the Physics Department.

Advanced courses developed specifically for the ACP major, such as Computational Dynamics, Machine Learning for Physics and Astronomy, and Computational Methods will help students build a readily usable toolbox of mathematical, problem-solving, and programming skills. Those will be put to the test in an internship/real research experience, another unique component of this program. This program-specific section of the curriculum will provide students with a diverse skill set to either proceed to graduate school, or to enter the job market and access careers in technology, engineering, data science, and financial sectors.

For more information about the ACP degree program, contact Professor Giovanni Ossola, program coordinator, at 718.260.5569 or by email at acpcoordinator@citytech.cuny.edu


KEVIN D. KIM APPOINTED TO CUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES BY GOVERNOR CUOMO; FIRST PERSON OF KOREAN DESCENT TO SERVE ON CUNY BOARD

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo named Manhattan attorney and small-business owner Kevin D. Kim to the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York effective July 1, 2017. He replaces Wellington Z. Chen, who served from 2000 to 2017.

Kim received a B.A. in East Asian Studies and a M.A. in sociology (organizational behavior) from Stanford University, both in 1993, and a JD from Columbia University School of Law in 1999, where he was an editor of the Columbia Law Review. He is an alumnus of the first graduating class of the “new” Townsend Harris High School at Queens College (1988). Professionally, he clerked for then-U.S. District Judge Denny Chin, worked as a corporate attorney at Davis Polk & Wardwell, and served as the deputy director of community affairs for Rep. Gary L. Ackerman. Kim was also an adjunct professor at Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Kim co-founded Tactile Brain LLC, which brought to the United States an innovative Korean mental math program designed by Master Jeonghee Lee, one of the world’s foremost mental mathematicians. The program aims to improve concentration, focus and confidence with numbers for people of all ages. He also was the first Asian-American to serve as a commissioner of the New York State Liquor Authority – from 2014 to 2016. Among other accomplishments, Kim was awarded a 2015 Ellis Island Medal of Honor by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations.

Kim is the third Asian and the first person of Korean descent to sit on the CUNY Board of Trustees. There were two previous trustees of Chinese descent, Wellington Chen and Thomas Tam, who became the first Asian board member in 1989.

“Kevin Kim brings a unique and welcome perspective to the CUNY Board, and we look forward to working with him,” said William C. Thompson Jr., chairperson of the Board of Trustees.

“This CUNY Board appointment means a lot to me personally,” said Kim. “As a proud product of the New York City public school system from kindergarten to high school, I know first-hand the critical role public education plays in the pursuit of the American Dream. Part of CUNY’s statutory mission – to be ‘a vehicle for the upward mobility of the disadvantaged in the City of New York’ – exemplifies what is so great about this city and country. During my term, I hope to secure even greater access and affordability to a world-class education for anyone in New York City who is willing to work hard for a better future for themselves and their families.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


Finding Common Ground Through Art—Young Muslim Teacher Inspires and is Embraced by Young Israel of Queens Seniors

— Free Public Exhibition and Performance of Seniors’ Work from this Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College-Sponsored Program Takes Place June 30 —

FLUSHING, N.Y., June 27, 2017— A community arts engagement program at Young Israel of Queens Valley (YIQV) in Flushing that’s geared toward seniors has helped more than just the participants’ creativity flourish—it has fostered an unlikely friendship between a young Muslim teacher and a group of older women, most of whom are Jewish. The Creating Senses of Self through Poetry program has deepened the friendship between Queens College alumna Saira Chaudhry—who wears the hijab—and her students, who range in age from 65 to 90. Introduced in March 2017, the program is presented by Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College through a grant from the SU-CASA program.

Chaudhry, who has worked with the group since January 2016, notes that they made their first––and one of their most compelling––connections over her name. “When I introduced myself as Saira,” says Chaudhry, “many of the participants were pleasantly surprised because it is such an important name in the Hebrew faith, Sarah being the wife of Abraham.” What followed was a two-hour conversation on their religious commonalities and differences, during which Chaudhry and the seniors shared what the name means in their respective languages—“happy” and “traveler” in Arabic and “princess” in Hebrew.

SU-CASA community arts engagement programs place artists in senior centers across the five boroughs of New York City. The YIQV Creating Senses of Self Through Poetry program centers on the concept of word play and poetic themes with a visual art component. Chaudhry introduced a wide range of craft elements related to memoir-writing and teaches her students about different types of poetry, including spoken word and Haiku, figurative language, and how to identify poetic devices and the elements of a poem. The dozen participants—some who struggle with visual and physical disabilities—covered such themes as family, identity, nature, memory, love, time, wisdom, and loss in their work. A free public exhibition of performances of their work will take place at the YIQV center—located at 141-55 77 Avenue—on Friday, June 30, from 10 am to 12 noon.

“It’s a great program. I love Saira, we’ve become friends. She’s so helpful and has wonderful ideas,” says program participant Chaya Brandwein. Beverly Siller agrees. “Saira is an excellent teacher. The poetry was universal—it encompassed different types of countries and backgrounds and we learned from each other, as well as from the various different books. In addition, it connected us to each other.”

“We’ve connected on many different levels, but in particular through religion and culture—we’re all walking-talking stories,” says Chaudhry, who holds a bachelor’s degree with double majors in secondary education and English literature from Queens College. “Although we cover all forms of poetry, I wanted to make it culturally significant for my students, so I brought in a Hebrew poem for us to translate. This led to a discussion of the overlapping meanings of Arabic and Hebrew words, which I find fascinating.”

Chaudhry—who is Pakistani—and her students have also connected on the theme of food, with her students bringing in homemade baked goods. “We eat dates to break the Ramadan fast; they’re a food that I eat every day, and yet surprisingly, I was able to learn new and creative ways to use them from my students in recipes they shared,” says Chaudhry. Other cross-cultural topics they discussed included the similarities in dress codes among conservative Muslim and Jewish women.

The SU-CASA program, funded by the New York City Council—with support from Council Member Rory Lancman—began as SPARC: Seniors Partnering with Artists Citywide, which the Department of Cultural Affairs and the Department for the Aging developed and operated in partnership with the city’s five local arts councils. It is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Materials for the Arts also supports this program.

“It has been a privilege for me to partner with the Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College again this year to provide local seniors with quality arts programming,” says Council Member Lancman. “The expert instruction provided enables seniors to learn new skills and participate in engaging activities. I look forward to working with Kupferberg Center next year to ensure seniors have new opportunities to explore the arts.”

“Our seniors are grateful for the opportunity of having a poetry program at our center, thanks to a charismatic and talented instructor who was able to relate to our constituents. Saira had the teaching ability to develop creative poetry while making it pleasurable and educational for our membership,” says Alan Gombo, YIQV director. YIQV is a place where anyone over 60 can enjoy programs targeting diverse backgrounds and interests. Programming includes low-impact exercise sessions as well as arts and crafts and lectures on health, finance, safety, politics, and elder law.

Kupferberg Center for the Arts (KCA) is the largest multidisciplinary arts complex in Queens, which was named “Best place to visit in 2015” by Lonely Planet. With performances by world-class artists in our on-campus venues; regional and local talent in our off-site neighborhood performances; and professionally produced shows by Queens College’s students and faculty, KCA provides high-quality, accessible, and affordable cultural attractions to the Queens College community and the borough’s 2.3 million residents. In addition to the star-studded events that take place at its home at Queens College, Kupferberg Center connects the communities of Queens by presenting diverse programming throughout the borough. With over 50 free yearly concerts by international acts and exhibitions by local artists in many of our neighborhoods, KCA seeks to cross cultural boundaries and link the diverse populations of our borough as well as attract people from outside Queens to our parks, libraries, schools, and plazas. Visit www.kupferbergcenter.org for more information.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu

 

 


CUNY ENACTS BROAD SERIES OF REFORMS TO ENSURE FISCAL AND ETHICAL INTEGRITY OF ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

The Trustees of The City University of New York passed a sweeping package of reforms of the university’s governance and administrative policies, creating greater transparency and accountability and putting CUNY in the vanguard of reform efforts in higher education, Board Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr. and Chancellor James B. Milliken announced.

The changes are the product of an extensive review of administrative practices and financial management at CUNY led by Chancellor Milliken, in collaboration with the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, to address concerns raised by New York State Inspector General Catherine Leahy Scott.

In an interim report issued last year, the Inspector General recommended that “CUNY implement centralized spending policies to increase organization and uniformity of action and reduce the potential for fiscal mismanagement.” She also recommended that CUNY institute more “stringent controls over the relationships between all of CUNY-based foundations and their affiliates to ensure fiscal oversight of the foundation funds managed by the institutions.”

Chairperson Thompson said: “These important changes enacted by the Trustees, including more rigorous spending controls and a revamping of how CUNY foundations are managed, will help ensure the fiscal and ethical integrity of CUNY in all of its administrative operations.  I want to thank the Chancellor and his staff, as well as the trustees, who put considerable time into these reform efforts, placing CUNY at the forefront of good governance in higher education.”

Chancellor Milliken said: “These measures will have a positive impact on CUNY for many years by ensuring the university lives up to the highest administrative and ethical standards and allowing CUNY to focus on fulfilling its special mission for the people of New York. I am grateful to the trustees for their leadership in strongly supporting reforms that will help us realize our new vision of making CUNY even more accessible to New Yorkers, sharply improving the quality of the education and our graduation rates and making sure our graduates are well prepared for the demands of the workplace.”

Under the direction of Chancellor Milliken, the university’s staff reviewed administrative practices and financial management at CUNY. As part of this review, the staff, working closely with members of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, worked with the Inspector General to address the concerns she had identified. Additionally, the Inspector General met with the Board to discuss her findings, and her staff held training sessions with University staff.

These collaborative efforts have resulted in several changes already approved by the Board, including establishment of a standing Audit Committee and revised Procurement Guidelines for the university. The new reform package will further increase transparency, especially in spending and funding sources, establish an improved accountability structure, institute more stringent controls over relationships with outside foundations, help the operations of the University perform more productively and modernize the University’s Executive Compensation Plan.

Max Berger, president of the foundation at CUNY’s Baruch College, The Baruch College Fund, who helped negotiate the new guidelines along with Barry Bryer, chairperson of The Queens College Foundation, and Cathy Weinroth, chairperson of The Hunter College Foundation, said, “The foundations appreciate the recognition by the Chancellor, CUNY’s Trustees and the Inspector General of the essential role CUNY college foundations play in supporting and enhancing the educational mission of CUNY. We are pleased to have been able to help reach an agreement on revised financial and oversight guidelines that do not inhibit our foundations in fulfilling our important mission of support to our colleges and students.”

The reforms include:

  1. Revised college foundation guidelines – last revised in 2007, the guidelines have been updated to reflect changes in law and to strengthen requirements for governance, accountability, transparency and financial controls.
  2. CUNY will renegotiate its 1983 agreement with the Research Foundation to ensure oversight and compliance in fiscal and legal matters, increase transparency in operations and reporting and improve communications regarding policies and procedures.
  3. New vehicle policy to align the CUNY policy with State of New York policies and limit the use of fleet vehicles to an as-needed basis, significantly reducing the size of the University fleet and redirecting the savings to core mission activities.
  4. A new policy on the use and reporting of non-tax levy funds by college presidents.
  5. The Executive Compensation Plan has been changed to eliminate compensation for Chancellor Emeritus and to adjust salary ranges for managerial employees along the same lines that the collectively bargained employees were adjusted last year.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Hostos In The New York Times

Commencement may have signaled the end of the school year, but that doesn’t mean that academic activity on campus came to a stop; students merely slipped into sandals and shorts and signed up for a wealth of fun—but challenging—summer courses. Some of those courses are part of CUNY Start, which provides intensive preparation in academic reading/writing, pre-college math, and “college success” advisement for students entering CUNY with significant remedial needs. It’s a program that’s playing a significant role in rewriting the game book for remedial learning.

Jessica Mingus, director of CUNY Start at Hostos, was prominently featured in a New York Times article. “Ending the Curse of Remedial Math,” written by David L. Kirp, appeared in the June 10th edition of the paper. Kirp examined the ways in which CUNY Start is improving the math skills—and, therefore, the chances of graduating—at Hostos and other CUNY schools…and beyond. Kirp writes of CUNY Start:  “Its track record shows that, with good teaching and I-have-your-back counseling, youths who otherwise would likely drop out have a solid shot at making it.” Hostos Math Instructor Erica Fells was also quoted in Kirp’s article. It’s heartening to see Jessica and Erica’s superlative work so widely celebrated.

Read full New York Times Article here.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, week of June 26, 2017

 

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Here We Are: We have reached the final days of our 2016-17 school year! I am so proud of our K-12 school community and grateful for the Students, Teachers, Faculty and Families whose collaborative commitment to every NEST+m student has made our 2016-17 school year so successful.

This week’s schedule:

  • Monday June 26: School Closed— Eid al-Fitr
  • Tuesday June 27: Full instructional Day
  • Wednesday June 28: Half Day; students released at 11:30am

Please know that end-of-year report cards/transcripts will be provided on Wednesday. For any family that is unable to receive this in person, please be in touch with Parent Coordinator Melissa Hernandez, MHernandez92@schools.nyc.gov.

As you know, this summer we are engaging in a shared Summer Reading Text, I Am Malala. Parents/Families — please join our school-wide conversation by reading this text too.

When we return in the Fall our students will engage in cross-grade, interdisciplinary text-based conversation.Our differentiated summer reading assignments are attached to this message:

On a separate note, congratulations to the NEST+m Math team for their individual and collective success during their final competition of the 2016-17 school year. On June 10th students from grades 3-6 were award winners at the Stevens Math Olympiad at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey. More than 300 students participated from grades 3-12 from New York and New Jersey. Winners from 3rd grade to 6th grade include: Anish Sundraraj (3rd grade-2nd place); Harrison Zhang (4th grade-3rd place); Patrick Allen Eleazar (5th grade-1st place); Nada Hameed (6th grade-2nd place); Julia Kozak (6th grade-1st place); and Daphne Qin (6th grade-2nd place). We are proud of these Mathematicians and their accomplishments.

Parents, Families: Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

We hope that your summer is filled with great fun and continued exploration!

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


CUNY NAMES PETER M. COHEN AS INTERIM PRESIDENT OF KINGSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

The City University of New York today named Peter M. Cohen as interim president of Kingsborough Community College following the recent announcement that Farley Herzek, the president since 2014, is retiring. Cohen will serve while the Board of Trustees conducts a search for a permanent replacement.

Cohen has been Kingsborough’s Vice President of Student Affairs since 2014 and has served in a variety of student-service capacities since 1987.

“We’re lucky to have someone from Kingsborough’s own family who can step seamlessly into the top leadership post,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Vice President Cohen’s deep experience with the needs and aspirations of Kingsborough’s students and faculty will provide an essential bridge to the next administration.”

“Peter Cohen brings a keen, student-centered orientation to the post of interim president, which will serve the students and faculty well during this transitional period,” said William C. Thompson Jr., chairperson of CUNY’s Board of Trustees.

As vice president for student affairs, Cohen has implemented science, technology, engineering and math initiatives and managed innovative enrollment programs.  He has overseen a broad range of services, including disability services, counseling, career development, athletics and veteran affairs.

Earlier, Cohen developed the Freshman Year Experience Program and managed freshman services. These efforts provided new and continuing students, in both day and evening divisions, timely and useful advice about courses, programs, careers and the adjustment to college life. He began his professional life as a psychiatric social worker at Coney Island Hospital, providing individual, family and group psychotherapy as well as educational and preventive outreach to the community. He has a bachelor’s degree in English from New York University and a master’s degree from NYU’s School of Social Work.

Under the leadership of retiring President Herzek, Kingsborough launched the innovative AssistMe app, designed to help first-year students keep on track with information about financial aid, academic support, food and housing assistance, residency, child care and, if needed, provide an easy way to contact people who could address problems and help them succeed. An educator with wide experience in K-12 schools and higher education, President Herzek exemplifies the CUNY success story. He is a Brooklyn native and the son of a Holocaust survivor – the first in his family to graduate from college – and a graduate of New York City public schools, who earned his B.S. degree from The City College of New York.

Kingsborough prides itself on promoting student learning and development as well as strengthening and serving a highly diverse borough. It offers a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 16,000 full- and part-time students annually in credit- and non-credit bearing courses in liberal arts and career education, Kingsborough also serves an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education and workforce development programs on- and off-campus.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Climate Change and National Security: New Study Suggests Americans Willing to Modify Voting and Lifestyle Decisions

Climate Change and National Security: New Study Suggests Americans Willing to Modify Voting and Lifestyle Decisions

New York, NY, June 20, 2017 – Researchers from the Center on Terrorism at John Jay College of Criminal Justice reported new data concerning how the American public views the relationship between climate change and security.  Working with GfK Custom Research, LLC (GfK), the study’s authors,  Professor Charles B. Strozier and Research Fellow Kelly A. Berkell, designed questions to begin quantifying public familiarity with the idea of climate change as a security threat, along with the potential impact that increased or changed awareness might exert on individual lifestyle and voting decisions.

Findings of the Public Perceptions of Climate Change and Security report suggest that the public – even those who believe that climate change is happening and that human actions are causing or contributing to it – remains largely unfamiliar with the idea of a connection between climate change and security.  About 38 percent of all respondents, and 42 percent of those who think human-caused climate change is occurring, expressed familiarity with the general idea that climate change may multiply global threats such as political violence or mass migrations, or act as a catalyst for conflict.  Even fewer, only about 14 percent of all respondents, had ever heard or read that a severe drought in Syria, likely caused or worsened by climate change, was one of many factors that helped spark the initial conflict that continues there today.

Nevertheless, respondents indicated openness to changes in behavior if they came to believe that climate change and security were causally interrelated.  Participants reported the greatest willingness to take action if U.S. national security, rather than global security, were at stake.  Taking an inclusive approach to “openness,” encompassing “definitely,” “probably,” and “maybe” responses, researchers found that 90 percent of those who think human-climate change is happening were open to modifying their voting priorities, and 93 percent were open to seriously considering lifestyle changes, if they perceived a threat to national security.  When excluding “maybe” responses, willingness to “probably” or “definitely” adapt behavior along the same lines measured at 66 percent and 67 percent among those who think that human-caused climate change is occurring.

While the national security and intelligence communities, as well as academic researchers, have explored the connections between climate change and security for years, relatively little priorresearch has probed public perceptions in this area.  The new data could hold significant implications for climate change communication, particularly if reinforced and expanded upon by further research.

The survey was conducted using the web-enabled KnowledgePanel®, a probability-based panel designed to be representative of the U.S. population, and fielded to 1002 male and female adults.  GfK weighted the interviews to ensure accurate and reliable representation of the total population.  The margin of error on weighted data is plus or minus three percentage points.  This research was supported by the Research Foundation of the City University of New York.
The Center on Terrorism was launched in late 2001 after the September 11 attacks. The goals of the Center are to study terrorism conceptually in ways that are familiar and appropriate for a university and to identify the practical applications of that knowledge in the search for alternative forms of human security. Such a blend of scholarship and commitment is particularly relevant for John Jay College, the leading institution in the country in the field of criminal justice and public safety, and one of the few institutions to offer M.A. students a certificate in the critical study of terrorism.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.


NYC Mayor’s Roadmap to Closing Rikers Island: President Travis Named to Advisory Group

 NYC Mayor’s Roadmap to Closing Rikers Island: President Travis Named to Advisory Group

Jeremy Travis, President of John Jay College, was named as a member of the Research and Learning Advisory Group to help implement the roadmap to closing Rikers Island. Mayor de Blasio launched the “Smaller, Safer, Fairer: A Roadmap to Closing Rikers Island,” 18 concrete steps the City is taking now to make it possible to close Rikers Island and replace it with a smaller network of modern, safe, and humane facilities. As noted in the announcement from the Office of the Mayor. The initiative includes a roadmap, a Justice Implementation Task Force, and $30 million in new investments to drive progress towards closing Rikers Island.

To ensure effective implementation of the roadmap, the Justice Implementation Task Force will coordinate the work of the many groups inside and outside of government, including government agencies, service providers, and community representatives, that are vital to achieving a smaller, safer and fairer jail system. Working groups will focus on safely reducing the jail population; improving culture for both staff and incarcerated individuals; and designing and siting safe, modern and humane jails. The Research and Learning Advisory Group includes President Travis, Bruce Western, Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Professor of Criminal Justice, Harvard Kennedy School, and Emily Wang, Assistant Professor at the Yale School of Medicine and Co-Founder of the Transitions Clinic Network.

“Closing the jails on Rikers Island is an important milestone in the work to improve fairness in New York City’s criminal justice system,” said President Travis. “New York City has already made great strides in reducing crime and incarceration, and I look forward to working with the Justice Implementation Task Force to reduce both even further as we implement the plan to close Rikers Island.”

Read the complete announcement from the Office of the Mayor.

Read Closing Rikers: Statement by President Travis


Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation Supports Center for Policing Equity’s Leap Program

Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation Supports Center for Policing Equity’s Leap Program

On Tuesday June 20, President Travis, First Deputy Police Commissioner Benjamin Tucker, Dr. Phillip Goff, Joanne Hill, and members of the Hill family gathered at John Jay to dedicate a lecture hall in memory of Joanne’s father, alumnus Arthur Hill, and celebrate a generous gift from the Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation to support the Leadership in Empowering Advocates Program (LEAP), through the Center for Policing Equity (CPE).

View a photo gallery of the dedication event.

Arthur Hill ’66, MPA ’73, was a prominent John Jay College alumnus, having received both his B.A. and M.P.A. from the College. Through his 27 years of exemplary service in the New York Police Department, he left an indelible mark on the community. He retired as Assistant Chief Inspector in 1973, and over the years received numerous awards, commendations, and citations for his law enforcement work and community service.

Arthur HillDuring the course of the ceremony, thoughtful remarks by Travis, Tucker, and Goff reminded the audience of the fragile time period during which Hill served – the late 60s and 70s when the city was torn by racial tension and desperately in need of compassionate leadership within the police department and local communities. Hill, one of the very first graduates of John Jay College and among the first African Americans to hold a leadership position in the NYPD, set the example for that type of leader.

Commissioner Tucker, also an alumnus, BS ’77, described the moment he first encountered Hill back in the 60s, when he was a young officer on desk duty at the 81st precinct in Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. When Hill marched in to take over as commanding officer, cigar in hand and a look of determination on his face, Tucker said, “It blew my mind. Knowing that we were going to have a black man as Assistant Chief was extraordinary.”

Joanne Hill, a trustee of the Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation, said she first conceived of the idea of memorializing her father at John Jay five years ago, when she ran into President Travis in their home neighborhood of DUMBO. The feeling of finally seeing his name up on the wall was “Unbelievable,” she said. “I can’t even explain how exciting it is.” She added that being able to support the College and the CPE’s new LEAP initiative was the perfect fit. “It’s a very happy time for the Hills.”

The CPE works collaboratively with law enforcement, communities, and political stakeholders to identify ways to strengthen relationships with the communities they serve. Dr. Goff, the inaugural Franklin A. Thomas Professor in Policing Equity at John Jay, is the co-founder and president of the CPE, and an expert in contemporary forms of racial bias and discrimination, as well as the intersections of race and gender. He describes justice as a second language, and said, “One of the major goals for CPE is developing a language that helps both my generation and the next generation make sense of where we ended up.”

Arthur HillThe CPE is the largest think tank in the world that looks at race and policing, and will implement the LEAP initiative to train students through research and experiential learning to allow them to become champions of justice. Said Goff, “We’re hoping the LEAP program allows us to get really committed, talented young folks who want to come in and get exposure to how justice is being produced, so they can help us do that better.”

Interested students can get involved by applying for a paid internship with LEAP, and they can also volunteer in the lab or take an independent study for credit.

“A lifelong fierce advocate for justice, Arthur Hill embodied John Jay’s core values as he helped to shape a better New York City for all,” said Joanne Hill. “By providing support for the LEAP initiative, we are helping Dr. Goff provide an incredible and practical learning experience for John Jay students who are committed to being leaders in the field of criminal and social justice reform.”


Attorneys Muhammad Faridi ’04 and Brendan McGuire Join the John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees

Attorneys Muhammad Faridi ’04 and Brendan McGuire Join the John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees

On May 25, the Board of Trustees of the John Jay College Foundation elected two new members: Muhammad Faridi and Brendan R. McGuire.

Muhammad Faridi ’04, is currently a partner at the law firm Patterson Belknap. Faridi’s journey began when he was seven years old and came to the U.S. from Pakistan. Faridi understood that in order to succeed in his new country he would need to master the English language. This determination led him at the age of 18, to take a job as a cab driver so that he could listen to CDs to improve his English. Faridi says that a life changing moment was when he gave a ride to a former U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, who through the course of the cab ride inspired him to become a lawyer. Shortly after, he enrolled at John Jay, graduating in 2004, and later graduated from CUNY School of Law in 2007. He went on to become the recipient of the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 Outstanding Young Lawyer Award for having rendered outstanding service to both the community and the legal profession. Faridi has also received The Legal Aid Society’s Pro Bono Publico Award for multiple years, MFY Legal Services, Inc.’s Partner in Justice Award, the Brooklyn Bar Association Volunteer Lawyers Project’s TD Bank Champion of Justice Award, and has been recognized for multiple years as a Rising Star in the New York-Metro edition of Super Lawyers. From 2007 to 2008, Faridi served as a Law Clerk to the Hon. Jack B. Weinstein of the United States District Court, Eastern District of New York. At John Jay’s Law Day on March 24, Faridi talked about his experience as a young immigrant and the struggle to stay true to oneself: “I loved working at my firm and representing my corporate clients, but I also felt an obligation to the community that I came from… So how do I measure my success as a lawyer and as a human being? I measure it in terms of the people I have helped.”

Brendan R. McGuire is a lawyer at the firm WilmerHale, where he advises clients on issues related to white-collar enforcement, as well as money laundering, national security, cybersecurity and privacy, and export controls and economic sanctions. Said McGuire, “I am delighted to be a part of such a distinguished group that serves such a worthy institution.  I very much look forward to it.”  An accomplished trial lawyer and litigator, he joined the firm after serving for more than 10 years in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York.  During his tenure, McGuire was appointed to lead the two most sensitive units within the Southern District’s Criminal Division. First, he served as Chief of the Public Corruption Unit for three years, and then as Chief of the Terrorism and International Narcotics Unit. McGuire handled some of the most significant terrorism cases within the Department of Justice, including the 2009 kidnapping of Captain Richard Phillips by Somali pirates on the Indian Ocean, the 2010 prosecution of Faisal Shahzad for the attempted bombing of Times Square, and the 2011 prosecution of Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout for conspiring to kill Americans.  He also clerked for the Honorable Peter K. Leisure of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. McGuire graduated from Williams College in 1998 and earned his law degree at New York University School of Law in 2002.


Two Guttman Professors Honored as Outstanding Educators of the Year

Guttman Professors Karla Smith Fuller (L) and Lori Ungemah.

Karla Smith Fuller, Assistant Professor of Biology, and Lori Ungemah, Assistant Professor of English, were among the Outstanding Educators of the Year 2017. They were honored at Education Update’s annual awards ceremony held June 23 at the Harvard Club.


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN

“For decades, it has been a matter of pride and policy that The City University of New York has been among the most inclusive universities in the country, welcoming and benefiting enormously from our diversity, which includes every underrepresented group and especially the LGBT community. CUNY and the university community have been solid supporters of what was initially called gay liberation, and, more recently, for marriage equality, on behalf of our students, faculty and staff, for our city and for our country. Our classrooms explore our changing society and the struggle to realize our country’s promise of freedom for all, our campuses offer a rich array of services and support to all of our students, and our students have created vibrant LGBT organizations across our campuses that recognize and promote their valuable role in the success of our mission.

“In a significant new step, CUNY’s Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy announced this week its leadership role in a federally funded, $7.5 million collaboration with Albert Einstein College of Medicine and The Rockefeller University aimed at preventing HIV transmission and ending the AIDS pandemic. CUNY will design strategies to create, deliver and scale up evidence-based programs for preventing and treating HIV infection, regardless of socioeconomic, racial and ethnic background.

“CUNY joins all of New York in recognizing the immense contributions of our LGBT community and celebrating the rich diversity of our great university and the city. It is one of the great sources of our pride and, we all hope, yours as well.”

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Middle States Grants Accreditation to the College

Stella and Charles Guttman Community College of The City University of New York is now accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104. (267-284-5000) The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

The College’s multiyear accreditation process began with the draft submission of an accreditation readiness report (ARR) in 2013 and then the final ARR submission in 2014, with advancement to candidate status and approval to proceed to self-study. The College then moved to the design of a self-study (2015) and the production of a full self-study 2016–2017 report. The self-study culminated with an evaluation team visit in late March 2017 and the Middle States Commission’s vote on June 22, 2017, to grant accreditation to Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

In addition to its vote to grant accreditation, the Commission requested a monitoring report, due September 1, 2018, documenting further evidence to meet certain standards. Based on the monitoring report, the Commission may schedule a small team visit to the College following the submission of the report. The next evaluation visit is scheduled for 2020-2021.


President Cruz’s “Students First” Leadership Hailed by the Gates Foundation

President José Luis Cruz was hailed for his innovative leadership of Herbert H. Lehman College, part of The City University of New York in a Huffington Post article by a top official in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The piece, written by Allan Golston, the President of U.S. Program at the Gates Foundation, praises Lehman College as “a bright example of a higher institution that listens—and responds—to the needs of students particularly from low-income backgrounds.”

As evidence of the College’s ability to realize its mission, Golston cites the recent Equality of Opportunity Project (published in The New York Times) that ranked Lehman fourth in the nation for moving students up the economic ranks and into the middle class.

Golston credits President Cruz for his leadership style that puts “students first.” Since arriving at Lehman in August 2016, President Cruz has worked to improve student success and supported the innovative work of the College’s outstanding faculty—such as investing in the expansion of service hours to accommodate student needs and celebrating Lehman’s GenChem flipped classroom program, which has resulted in a 50 percent increase in pass rates. President Cruz has also sought to address long-term solutions for the community’s needs, especially his ambitious 90×30 program, which would double the number of high quality, market-ready degrees and certificates to 90,000 by 2030.

What’s more, Golston acknowledges President Cruz’s personal connection to the many challenges Lehman students face. He writes how he was captivated by President Cruz’s insights at a New America panel discussion on higher education last month in Washington D.C. and later learned of President Cruz’s discussion of his own academic struggles as a child attending public school in Florida after his family moved there from Puerto Rico. For Cruz, a defining moment came when his first grade teacher told him in his native Spanish, “I’ll help you.” That encouragement made all the difference in the world to him.

“Throughout his professional career, Cruz dedicated himself to carrying that promise forward—to listen to students and help them on their path,” writes Golston. “That mindset is an integral part of Lehman’s culture, approach, and recent successes.” Golston concluded, “I applaud the work of Lehman College and encourage other institutions to follow their lead in thinking big and helping all students succeed.”


Enjoy Free, Live Music—Complemented by a Waterfront View—in Queens This Summer at “Live at the Gantries”

— Kupferberg Center for the Arts Announces Live at the Gantries 2017,
Tuesdays at 7:00 pm from July 11 – August 29 at Gantry Plaza State Park —

Queens, N.Y., June 19, 2017—Enjoy free, live music complemented by a waterfront view along the East River this summer at the Gantry Plaza State Park “Live at the Gantries” series. These outdoor performances, which will take place on Tuesdays at 7 pm from July 11 through August 29, will feature Queens-based musicians that mirror the borough’s legendary diversity. The 2017 Season line-up includes jazz standards, blues, Afro-Cuban, country and Peruvian folk music.

Gantry Plaza State Park is a 10-acre oasis located between 49th and 50th Avenues along the East River in Queens. The end of each show is scheduled to coincide with sunset at the park.

Live at the Gantries is presented by Kupferberg Center for the Arts, the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, and Queens Theatre. It is sponsored by Plaxall, the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, and NYC City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer.

The Live at the Gantries 2017 Full Performance Schedule

JULY 11:                D.B. Reilly: Country Zydeco, Blues

JULY 18:               Alex Cummings Ensemble: Straight-ahead jazz

JULY 25:               Conjunto Guantanamo: Afro-Cuban jazz ensemble

AUGUST 1:           Samba New York! Brazilian music and dance with a little capoeira to liven things up

AUGUST 8:           Dance Entropy: Modern dance adapted for family audiences

AUGUST 15:         High and Mighty Brass Band: New Orleans-style jazz

AUGUST 22:         Dan Martin Ensemble: Standards, jazz

AUGUST 29:         Inkarayku: Peruvian folk music

Event Information and Directions
Live at the Gantries is free and open to the public.

Subway: 7 train to Vernon/Jackson (first stop in Queens). Walk west toward the river on 50th Avenue.

Ferry: East River Ferry to Hunter’s Point. Walk north on 2nd Street.

More information is available at www.kupferbergcenter.org or by calling the Kupferberg Center box office at 718-793-8080.

About Kupferberg Center for the Arts
Kupferberg Center for the Arts comprises eight distinguished institutions at Queens College that offer outstanding programming in music, dance, drama, literature, and the visual arts. Since 1961 Kupferberg Center Performances has provided accessible and affordable world-class cultural entertainment to the New York City region. From classical and pop performances, to concerts and school residencies for children in kindergarten through high school, to a wide range of family events, over 350,000 individuals attend events at Kupferberg Center for the Arts each year. Located on the campus of Queens College, we are easily accessible from the Long Island Expressway at Exit 23 & 24.

Follow
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KupferbergCenterArts and facebook.com
Twitter Handle: @KupferbergArts
Website: www.kupferbergcenter.org

Media Contact
Jennifer Zanca
Director, External Affairs and Audience Development
Kupferberg Center for the Arts
jennifer.zanca@qc.cuny.edu

 


Macaulay Honors College Class of 2017 Commencement Highlights

(l-r) William Macaulay, Garry Trudeau, Dean Mary C. Pearl and alumni speaker Ayodele Oti

The Class of 2017 proudly celebrated the end of their years of scholarship at Macaulay Honors College at The City University of New York on June 12, 2017. A highlight of their commencement was the keynote speaker Garry Trudeau, creator of the Doonesbury comic strip and the first such artist to win a Pulitzer Prize. Trudeau also received a Honorary Doctor of Letters degree following his address.

Said Macaulay Dean Mary C. Pearl, Ph.D.: “With a keen eye and sharp sense of humor, Trudeau has tackled difficult subjects ranging from mental health to military intervention to the battle lines of personal and political conflict that have challenged our society over the past five decades. His thoughtful approach, his sensitivity, and his deep civic engagement exemplify Macaulay’s highest ideals.”

Among the other noteworthy speakers was William Thompson, the new Chairman of the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York; student speakers Stephin Jose (City College) and Aissatou Diallo (Hunter College); and alumna Ayodele Oti ’12 (City College).

Macaulay’s commencement this year took place at the United Palace Theater in Upper Manhattan and accommodated hundreds of graduates and their families. Performers and music for the ceremony included the Lehman College Wind Ensemble and The Macaulet Triplets singing group. Macaulay seniors also were selected as valedictorians and salutatorians at their home campus, including:

Valedictorians

Ellianna Schwab (City College)

Palwasha Syar (CSI)

Daniela Mikhaylov and Rina Schiller (Hunter)

Caitlin Larsen (Baruch College)

Salutatorians:
Michael Franco (Brooklyn)

Naomi Gaggi and Vincent Jost (CSI)

About Macaulay Honors College

Macaulay Honors College at The City University of New York offers exceptional students a uniquely personalized education with access to the vast resources of the nation’s largest urban university and the largest city, New York City. Selected for their top high school records and leadership potential, Macaulay students receive a full tuition scholarship*, a laptop and technology support, and exclusive access to apply for grants from a Macaulay fund to pursue global learning, research and service opportunities. Macaulay students enroll in one of eight CUNY senior colleges: Baruch, Brooklyn, City, Hunter, John Jay, Lehman, and Queens Colleges and the College of Staten Island. For more information, see macaulay.cuny.edu.

*Students must meet CUNY NYS residency requirements for in-state tuition to receive the Macaulay tuition scholarship.

Contact: marcomm@mhc.cuny.edu

 

 


BWRC Conference Focuses on Moving Goods and People Along the Brooklyn Waterfront

City Tech’s Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center (BWRC) held its first-ever full day conference at the Brooklyn Borough Hall on March 31, with support from the New York City Economic Development Corporation and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The conference explored the challenges of “Moving Goods and People to, from, and along the Brooklyn Waterfront” with panels and keynote speaker Congressman Jerrold Nadler.

l to r: Hanley, Nadler, Kamga

The conference opened with introductions by City Tech Professor Richard Hanley, BWRC director, and Camille Kamga of the University Transportation Research Center. BWRC project coordinator Inna Guzenfeld provided a historical overview, followed by Christopher Clott, of SUNY Maritime College, who outlined New York’s shipping and maritime context. The morning panel, titled “Moving Goods Along the Brooklyn Waterfront” assembled a group of industry professionals, with strong representation from Red Hook. 

Robert Hughes of Erie Basin Bargeport, Michael Stamatis of the Red Hook Container Terminal, and Gregory Brayman of Phoenix Beverages all emphasized the importance of retaining an active port in Brooklyn. Council Member Carlos Menchaca discussed strategies to preserve manufacturing jobs in Southwest Brooklyn. Panelists also raised the issues of waterfront zoning and conflicts between residential development and maritime use. Edward Kelly who heads the Maritime Association of the Port of NY-NJ, moderated the discussion.

Keynote speaker Congressman Jerrold Nadler, a longtime supporter of the working waterfront, spoke about the Cross-Harbor Rail Tunnel. Congressman Nadler cited a startling statistic: Over 40 percent of freight moves by rail in Midwestern cities, but in the New York region, which is highly truck-dependent, rail accounts for less than one percent of all goods movement. Congressman Nadler alluded to the environmental impacts of trucking and the need for cleaner, more sustainable ports. 

Afternoon panel discussions focused on passenger transportation and included representatives of two community groups, Alan Minor of Neighbors Allied for Good Growth and Ryan Chavez of UPROSE; and two others from larger organizations: Eliot Matz from the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation and Andrew Hoan from the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce. The panelists discussed the need for resilient transit that serves community needs, while responding to climate change on the Brooklyn waterfront. Eliot Matz revealed that the Brooklyn Navy Yard expects to be housing 20,000 jobs by 2020, and outlined the Yard’s plan to provide greater mobility for employees.

Another panel discussed the roles that different modes play in moving people to, from, and along the Brooklyn waterfront and how (semi) private transportation can supplement public transit. Providing a truly multi-modal perspective was Dani Simons, of Motivate, which operates CitiBike; Franny Civitano, of NYC Ferry by Hornblower; Adam Giambrone, who directs the Brooklyn Queens Connector (BQX) project; and Matthew Daus, the former Taxi & Limousine Commissioner and expert on Transportation Networking Companies.

The closing discussion and Q&A, moderated by Roland Lewis of the Waterfront Alliance, included the BQX, which led to a lively discussion about funding, development, and resiliency. Attendees also raised the issue of community involvement in the rollout of new transportation modes, such as ferries and streetcars. Richard Hanley announced the topic for next year’s conference: coastal resiliency along the Brooklyn waterfront.

Brooklyn Eagle Article 1
Brooklyn Eagle Article 2


The National Network for Safe Communities Hosts National Conference on “Race, History, and Policing”

The National Network for Safe Communities Hosts National Conference on "Race, History, and Policing"

New York, NY, June 13, 2017 – The National Network for Safe Communities (NNSC) is hosting its third national conference at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice on June 15 and 16, 2017. More than three hundred national and international stakeholders and practitioners will convene to showcase innovations in violence prevention and trust building, discuss new research from the field, and build relationships among peers.

In recent years, calls for equity, dignity, and fairness in the criminal justice system have grown in both force and substance, elevating this issue to the level of national discourse. To reflect this movement, the theme of this conference will be “Race, History and Policing: A New Vision for Public Safety.” The first plenary session will feature a frank conversation between prominent police executives and community organizers. They will address the ways police departments and communities can forge a path, on equal footing, towards reconciliation, thus bolstering legitimacy, and enhancing public safety.

Over the course of the two-day event, conversations will cover a range of topics, including harnessing community action to reduce violence, tailoring support and outreach to those at the highest risk of offending or victimization, developing frameworks for police-community reconciliation, and addressing the harm caused by certain criminal justice practices. There will also be a special screening of “The Force,” a documentary film that follows the Oakland Police Department during a tumultuous three-year period.

“Criminal justice reform is at the heart of America’s renewed civil rights movement,” said NNSC Director David Kennedy. “We can’t get that right without being honest about the nation’s history of oppressing communities of color through the law and policing—and making a real commitment to owning that and correcting it going forward. We’re tremendously excited about this national convening of people—police, other criminal justice actors, community representatives, service providers, advocates, and others—to get this right, and together produce the kind of public safety and police-community relationships our communities deserve.”

Although the registration deadline for the event has passed, many of the conference panels will be livestreamed—to tune in, visit the NNSC website on Thursday and Friday beginning at 9:00 AM EST. Videos from the conference will also be posted to the NNSC YouTube channel. To follow the proceedings on Twitter, follow @NNSCommunities.

The National Network for Safe Communities, a project of John Jay College of Criminal Justice, was launched in 2009 under the direction of Kennedy and John Jay College President Jeremy Travis. The National Network focuses on supporting cities implementing proven strategic interventions to reduce violence and improve public safety, minimize arrest and incarceration, strengthen communities, and improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities it serves. For more information, please contact the NNSC’s Heather Conley at hconley@jjay.cuny.edu.


Huffington Post Hails President Cruz’s Leadership of Lehman College

In some ways, the end of a graduation ceremony marks a fork in the road for the people on stage. The students head off to careers, further education, and life beyond college, putting their hard-earned diplomas to good use. The college presidents, deans, and other academic leaders return to the work of planning, teaching, challenging, supporting—and getting more of their students to walk across that same stage the following year.

Given the evolving profile of today’s college students, effective higher ed leaders know the importance of listening to students—and to the data. Listening unlocks insights that allow leaders to reimagine how to serve the needs of all students, not just the so-called “traditional” students who enroll immediately after high school, live on campus, and take classes full-time. While our nation continues to struggle with persistent, national achievement gaps in higher ed—including by income and by race—there are several pioneering institutions and leaders who are transforming how they operate with the goal of widening the bridge to opportunity for their students.

For example, I was struck by the insights of Lehman College’s President José Luis Cruz at a recent New America panel discussion on higher education. Lehman College—a college of The City University of New York (CUNY)—is a bright example of a higher education institution that listens—and responds—to the needs of students, particularly those from low-income backgrounds, students of color, and those who are the first in their family to go to college.

Lehman College’s social mobility rate—that is, the rate at which students move up the economic ladder—was recently ranked 4th nationally by the Equality of Opportunity Project. But it wasn’t until I heard President Cruz’s own story about how an educator listening and supporting him changed his life trajectory that I understood the motivation that drives him.

As a young child, Cruz moved from Puerto Rico to Florida with his family so his father could work at a telephone company. Cruz’s English was poor, and he struggled in the classroom. To avoid humiliation, he hid and kept quiet. It got to the point where Cruz, as a first-grade student, decided he wouldn’t return to school.

Thankfully, his mother convinced him to give it another shot. After he returned to his first-grade classroom, Cruz’s peers laughed at him when he couldn’t quite find the right word. During a particularly embarrassing incident, Cruz remembered wanting to walk away again until his teacher hugged him and, in broken Spanish, made him a promise: “I’ll help you.”

Throughout his professional career, Cruz dedicated himself to carrying that promise forward—to listen to students and help them on their path. That mindset is an integral part of Lehman’s culture, approach, and recent successes. Many Lehman students—like college students nationwide—have competing responsibilities such as full- or part-time jobs, lengthy commutes to campus, and partners or children. These students are hungry to succeed, but busy schedules mean getting to campus is challenging and they may need some additional academic help.

Guided by these insights, Lehman expanded their hours of operation and identified gateway courses where students struggled. Gen Chem, where the passing rate was only 35 percent, was one such course that often delayed or derailed student progress. In 2015, Lehman took an innovative approach that allowed faculty to flip the course from a three-hour-a-week lecture to two hours of online courses and an hour-long workshop.

The new model allowed students to complete most of their work from anywhere—including engaging in instructor-made videos and podcasts; viewing and downloading materials online; and completing homework assignments. Then, during class time, instructors use digital tools to quiz students on content in real-time.

Throughout the course, Lehman kept listening—to students, to faculty, and to the data. “Flipping” the course to provide more flexible digital options proved not only popular—with 90 percent of students approving of the new model, it worked. Instructors saw that students were often watching the at-home videos multiple times and rewinding back to key parts. Most importantly, the passing rate soared from 35 percent to more than 85 percent.

Cruz is rightly encouraged when these types of innovations help more students be successful, but he knows there’s still much work to be done. Just recently, Lehman College announced an ambitious goal to double the number of students receiving high-quality degrees and credentials to 90,000 by 2030.

Cruz’s commitment to expanding opportunity isn’t limited to Lehman’s students either. As a member of a consortium that exchanges data and best practices, Lehman College shares knowledge and best practices with other institutions that similarly take a student-centric approach so they can learn successful strategies from each other.

While institutions vary, the importance of listening, innovating, collaborating and measuring is universal. Strong leaders apply these principals to every facet of an institution’s work. They create a student-centered culture that uses new approaches, tools, and information to keep a simple commitment to each hardworking student—“I’ll help you.”

I applaud the work of Lehman College and encourage other institutions to follow their lead in thinking big and helping all students succeed.

—Allan Golston, President of U.S. Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (originally published in The Huffington Post).


BMCC Students Show Business Acumen at Goldman Sachs Final Challenge

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students participated in a number of external volunteer opportunities, internships and also real world training exercises throughout the past academic year.One group of students took part in the Goldman Sachs Local College Collaborative Program, a six-month exercise where teams from select colleges are assigned a Business Case Challenge and the team’s decisions impact a hypothetical corporation.

BMCC, along with student teams from Hudson County Community College, New Jersey City University and St. Peter’s University, participated in the program, which took place from November 2016 through May 2017.

Students on each team assumed a corporate role such as chief executive officer, chief financial officer or marketing and branding according to Won Kang, Director of the Center for Career Development at BMCC.

This year’s Business Case Challenge culminated on May 5 at Goldman Sachs global headquarters in New York when team members took the stage and made their final business strategy presentations before a mock board of directors.

Among the questions the teams considered were, “How will results be measured and communicated to shareholders?” “How do you boost employee morale in the face of economic challenges?”

The BMCC team’s corporation was a multinational technology company that designs, develops and sells consumer electronics, computer software and online services.

For its final presentation, the BMCC team developed a plan to circumvent a business crisis in which news about the company’s groundbreaking, solar-powered mobile phone had been leaked to the media before its much anticipated, and highly promoted launch date.

Team members had to devise damage control tactics and come up with a plan that would still build excitement and buzz around the company and its new product.

As Computer Science major Babatunde Ogunniyi made his way with the other students to the auditorium before the presentation, he said one of the skills he and his teammates strengthened during the course of the program was how to put aside personality differences and work as a unit for the greater goal, the product’s success.

“At the end of the day, you have to make everybody mesh, and use everyone’s best ideas for the group,” said Ogunniyi.

BMCC was the first team among the four schools to present. Presentations were made before a mock board made up by Goldman Sachs company officers, including managing directors. Each student spoke about a specific component of the proposal. After each team had completed its presentation, the mock board offered candid feedback, critiques and asked questions.

Overall, the Goldman Sachs Local College Collaborative Program was a unique experience for BMCC team member and Science major Tesfamichael W. Demeke. “The experience gave us an introduction to the corporate world and lessons about business etiquette,” he said. “It inspired me to take a Business Administration class this semester and I’m exploring summer internship opportunities at companies like Goldman Sachs.”

The BMCC team worked with BMCC staff including Michael Hutmaker, Dean for Student Affairs and Thierry Thesatus, Senior Career Advisor. They also worked closely with Goldman Sachs Mentors Karina Suryan, Analyst, Finance, and Ochelle Drysdale, Analyst, Technology.

BMCC student participants included Diagna Camilo (Modern Languages), Natalia Corletto (Multimedia Programming and Design), Tesfamichael Demeke (Science), Olesia Hyka (Business Administration), Hyun-Shin Lee (Accounting), Karol Malachowicz (Engineering Science), Ching Hei Mok (Business Administration), Henry Noble, (Business Administration), Babatunde Ogunniyi (Computer Science) and Una Radakovic (Criminal Justice).


$1.4 Million Grant Helps Upward Bound Soar Higher


BMCC Upward Bound End of Year Celebration 2017

 

The BMCC Upward Bound program has received a five-year, $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to build on its work making college a reality for low-income high school students and those from families in which neither parent has earned a bachelor’s degree.

The program will continue working with two Manhattan high schools — Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers and Murray Bergtraum High School — and will add Landmark High School and the Leadership and Public High School. It will serve about 65 students, ages 13 through 19.

“In addition to scaling up the program, the grant will enable us to use more technology in the classroom,” says Antonette McKain, who led the BMCC Upward Bound program for 17 years and recently assumed the role of Director of Evening, Weekend and Off-Site Programs at BMCC. “By accessing online resources, students will research and explore career fields and academic areas they might not have been aware of. We will also do more targeted outreach as we meet the technology needs of this generation of students who communicate through Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and other platforms.”

Upward Bound students also work closely with instructors who are high school teachers or guidance counselors. In small groups after school, they prepare for New York State Regents examinations and bolster their skills in algebra, physics, biology, earth science, English and other subjects.

A ‘family vibe’

“Upward Bound is a very close-knit program,” says Janice Zummo, BMCC Assistant Dean for Academic Support Services who oversees the program. “The students come together as a small group every day after school for up to four years, and they become an important resource and support for each other.”

Zummo also says the program has also evolved to have a strong alumni network.

Keiran Miller, who attended Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers, was part of BMCC’s Upward Bound program from 2008 through 2011. He attended Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on a Posse Foundation Scholarship and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English and Creative Writing in Spring 2015.

“I started a spoken-word poetry group on campus and served on editorial boards,” Miller says. “I also tried to help other students by doing college access and college success work — and I made all those connections because of my experience with Upward Bound.”

Looking back on his experience with the BMCC Upward Bound program, he says, “People are willing to go the extra mile for you and give you the tools and resources you need, but you have to have confidence and faith in yourself, too.”

Miller and his fellow Upward Bound members took college tours together and attended cultural events such as a performance of Cirque du Soleil. “There was always some kind of meal component. Upward Bound has a family vibe,” Miller says.

“One of the staples of Upward Bound was Antonette McKain’s ‘tough love’ approach,” he says. “She treated us like adults. We stumbled and made mistakes but in our own ways, we all learned responsibility, time management and the importance of following up with people — if someone connects you to someone or some opportunity, it’s important to keep that person in the loop.”

In Fall 2018, Miller will start work on his master’s degree. In the year prior to that, he will work as a counselor at Anatolia College in Thessaloniki, Greece, guiding students as they consider college in the United States.

Guiding students into college is central to the mission of Upward Bound. “We take the students on college tours, both interstate and intrastate, so they begin to think critically about their options,” says McKain. “We help them grapple with questions such as, ‘What size school will I feel comfortable in? Do I want an urban or suburban setting? Do I want to be in a homogenous school, or one that is more diverse? Do I want to live on campus or off?’”

Celebrating the end of a dynamic year

On June 17 in Theatre 2 at 199 Chambers Street, the BMCC Upward Bound program held its End-of-Year Celebration. Special guest speakers include Key Note speaker Maggie Howard and BMCC’s Dean Janice Zummo. A surprise tribute was made in honor of the program’s exiting Director, Antonette McKain. “She didn’t even know it was coming,” says Zummo. “The alumni had prepared a video in which they spoke about their experience of working with Antonette, and others spoke in person. They also gave her a beautiful engraved vase.”

Awards were distributed by the following Upward Bound workshop leaders: Jennifer Springer, Composition and Literature; Celeste Farmer, Algebra and Geometry; Subhra Goswami, Living Environment/Earth Science; Dominique Ceniceros, Trigometry/Pre-Calculus; Linda Barber, SAT/ACT Math; Marjorie Antoine and Yolanda Simancas, Road to College, and Serena Fong, Senior Transition to College.

The event celebrated Upward Bound seniors heading off to college: Angelica Diaz, Marist College; Valentino Gordon, Alfred University; Junior Holguin, Ithaca College; Shuzel Lide, University at Buffalo; Rashel Loaiza-Duarte, SUNY Brockport; Allyssa Martinez, Queens College, CUNY; Maireni Paulino, Ithaca College; Jarleny Pichardo, Skidmore College; Caitlyn Santander, SUNY Brockport; Da’Sandra Stephens, Marist College, Susanie Seecharan, SUNY Albany and Michelle Sun, Hamilton College.

 

 

 

The Upward Bound Project is an externally funded program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education under the category of Federal TRIO programs in partnership with Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY).

 


GC Faculty to Edit ASA Book Series

GC Faculty membersSix GC sociology professors have been named the editors of the American Sociological Association (ASA) Rose Series books beginning in January 2018.

The editorial team, to be led by Associate Professor Leslie Paik (GC/City College), includes professors Amy Adamczyk (GC/John Jay) and Lynn Chancer (GC/Hunter), distinguished professors Richard Alba and Nancy Foner, and Presidential Professor Philip Kasinitz.

The Rose Series is ASA’s only book series and competition to edit it is stiff, according to Paik. She points out that the six GC editors have collectively published 43 books and won numerous awards. With different areas of expertise, the new editors “represent the breadth of the discipline,” Paik adds.

She calls the selection “an honor and a recognition of CUNY’s strength and impact in our field and in our society.”

With the Rose Series of books, the ASA aims to make leading sociological research accessible to policymakers and lay readers as well as sociologists and other academics.

“We’re trying to translate and disseminate our research to a broader audience beyond sociology because we think it has value to all of our lives and the important social problems of today,” says Paik.

She adds that the GC editors chose “intersections of inequality” as the series’ next theme with the goal of addressing “how we can try to fix this issue as individuals, as communities, as societies.”

Photo: GC faculty members Lynn Chancer, Leslie Paik, Philip Kasinitz, Richard Alba, Nancy Foner, and Amy Adamcyzk will be the new editors of the ASA Rose Series.


New Issue of Techne Focuses on the Solar Decathlon and Digital Fabrication

City Tech’s Department of Architectural Technology is proud to announce the publication of the new issue of Techne, an annual journal of student and faculty work. This is the fourth issue of the publication and features the extraordinary work of our students and faculty, such as the Solar Decathlon—a project that exemplifies experiential learning.

Contributors also discuss the impact of new digital fabrication tools on the way architecture is conceived, practiced, and taught. These explorations and inspirations expand the field of architecture, increasing the number of trajectories upon which one can embark. And, as a result, these tools and processes are redefining the role of architects.  

Faculty Advisors: Ting Chin, Michael Duddy, Jason Montgomery


York College Professor Co-Authors Article for Museum Publication

Professor Timothy Paglione, chair of the Department of Earth and Physical Sciences, co-authored an article for the Rubin Museum’s new publication, Spiral. The article is now published and accompanies a video in their upcoming World of Sound exhibit. The project was contracted through the American Museum of Natural History, where Dr. Paglione has served as a project scientist on their Space Show and Big Bang Theater Show.

Professor Paglione’s expertise includes Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science.

http://rubinmuseum.org/spiral (click on “One Verse: A Chorus of Light and Sound”)


CCNY sociology professor to head ASA Rose Series editorial team

Associate Professor Leslie Paik to be lead editor on sociological book series

The City College of New York’s Leslie Paik has been named lead editor for the American Sociological Association’s (ASA) Rose book series. “I am especially proud to be part of this series,” said Paik, a sociology professor in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, “because it features innovative sociological research with significant policy relevance on a wide range of topics such as economic inequality, the environment, race and ethnic relations, and justice reform.”

The ASA Rose Series in Sociology chose the City University of New York to be its new editorial home, starting January 2018 for a three-year period. The editorial team, to be led by Paik, includes five other editors on a three-year tenure that officially starts in January 2018.
“We are delighted to have the ASA Rose Series editorship come to CUNY,” said Paik. “This series strives to make the most cutting edge research in sociology accessible to multiple audiences across the academy, policy world and general public alike. I am looking forward to honoring and continuing that tradition in the years to come.”
Paik’s fellow CUNY editors are: Amy Adamcyzk (John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, CUNY), Richard Alba (the Graduate Center, CUNY), Lynn Chancer (Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY), Nancy Foner (Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY) and Philip Kasinitz (the Graduate Center, CUNY).
The ASA is the nation’s main sociological professional association and volumes published in the Rose Series have recently been recognized with such honors as the Grawemeyer Award for the Best Book in Education and the Otis Dudley Duncan Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Social Demography.
Paik who teaches courses at CCNY and the CUNY Graduate Center on social problems, law and society, deviance, and juvenile justice, called her selection as leading editor “a prestigious honor.”
About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Senator Golden and Borough President Eric Adams Attend Ribbon Cutting at City Tech to Celebrate the Infor Center of Excellence

Senator Martin J. Golden and Eric Adams, Brooklyn Borough President, joined City Tech and Infor to celebrate the launch of the College’s new Infor Center of Excellence (CoE) at a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Friday, May 19. A reception commemorating the opening took place at the Center of Excellence, room 216, Voorhees Building, 186 Jay Street, in Downtown Brooklyn, followed by a program that included remarks from Senator Golden; Eric Adams; Martine Cadet, Infor; Russell Hotzler, President, City Tech; and City Tech student Shanardo Sharpe.

l to r: Senator Golden; John Parham, Infor; Martine Cadet, Infor; Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams; City Tech President Russell Hotzler. Credit: A. Vargas

The CoE is an exciting technology partnership that offers Infor’s industry-specific software solutions and training to City Tech students and students from other CUNY (The City University of New York) Colleges.

Senator Golden thanked Infor and City Tech for helping to develop well-trained, educated young men and women ready to start careers in the tech industry. “These partnerships are extremely important and there’s no better place than Brooklyn—there’s so much to offer here,” said Golden.

“Infor has been a phenomenal partner,” said President Hotzler, commending Charles Phillips, Infor’s CEO, and his team on developing the CoE. “We have a real-world partner with a very strong commitment to all CUNY students, giving them the opportunity to engage in experiences that are truly door-opening.”

“I’m excited and very thankful,” said Martine Cadet, Vice President of Global Talent Enablement at Infor, “There is real value in a partnership that gives students the ability to hit the ground running, and this is a passion project not just for CUNY but for Infor as well.”

“More than a tree grows in Brooklyn,” said Eric Adams, “great scholars grow in Brooklyn.”

City Tech’s partnership with Infor, through its Education Alliance Program (EAP), led to the development of the Center of Excellence, an innovative lab and learning environment where participants enjoy access to cutting-edge software, such as Infor’s Mongoose, as well as guidance from faculty who collaborate with students on projects. The hands-on experience gained through the CoE will prepare participants to enter a number of career paths, including system analyst, developer, integration consultant, and application developer.

Infor, a leading provider of beautiful business applications specialized by industry and built for the cloud, has developed a curriculum that empowers students and professionals at every level to gain critical skills that will set them apart in the job market by developing proficiency using these industry-specific business tools. Through the EAP program, participants gain exposure to Infor Mongoose, Infor Enterprise Asset Management, Infor Cloudsuite Industrial, Infor ION, and Infor Supply Chain Management.


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON RESTORATION OF YEAR-ROUND PELL GRANTS  

“The City University of New York applauds the federal government’s restoration of year-round Pell Grants, which have, for decades, provided essential assistance to lower income students.  This is great news for current and prospective CUNY students.  It will enable many students to attend summer school with reduced tuition or no tuition, and it will give them needed support to achieve their academic goals without having to take on debt.

“CUNY is proof that Pell Grants work and provide extraordinary opportunities to some of our city’s most talented students. With approximately 117,000 Pell-eligible undergraduates attending CUNY colleges, this restored benefit – providing up to 150 percent of a student’s maximum Pell award for the academic year – is critically important in allowing students to maintain their academic momentum, in many instances by continuing their studies through the summer.  Fifty-seven percent of CUNY undergraduates attend college tuition-free due to full tuition coverage by Pell Grants and New York State TAP awards.  Combined with Governor Cuomo’s new Excelsior Scholarship program, year-round Pell Grants will increase the number of students attending college tuition-free and obtaining the diplomas that can change lives and accelerate careers.

“The restoration of year-round Pell Grants will help expand college access, raise graduation rates and improve career prospects for our graduates as they enter the 21st-century workforce.”


Japanese Mayor leads pilgrimage honoring CCNY founder | The City College of New York

Townsend Harris image by James Bogle

Yusuke Fukui, Mayor of Shimoda City, joins the long list of Japanese pilgrims that have traveled to The City College of New York to pay homage to its founder Townsend Harris when he visits the institution on July 12. Since 1986, top civic officials from Shimoda have made annual pilgrimages to City College to honor Harris. This year marks CCNY’s 170th anniversary.

After establishing what was then known as The Free Academy in 1847, Harris, a prominent New York merchant, went on to forge U.S.-Japan relations. He arrived in Shimoda on August 21, 1856 to open the first American consulate in Japan.

“As the first consul general there, he negotiated the treaty that is credited with opening the Japanese Empire to foreign trade and culture,” said City College archivist Sydney Van Nort. “Owing to his goodwill, openness and honesty, Harris quickly gained the respect and affection of the Japanese people, and is revered there to this day.”

Mayor Fukui’s visit on CCNY’s 170th anniversary is confirmation of this, said Van Nort.  The Mayor’s delegation will attend a presentation by Van Nort on the life and career of Harris and view documents from the Townsend Harris Papers Collection in CCNY’s Morris Raphael Cohen Library.

For more information on the Mayor’s visit to The City College of New York, please call the CCNY Archives at (212) 650-7609.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Source: Japanese Mayor leads pilgrimage honoring CCNY founder | The City College of New York


CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York

CCNY’s HIV researchers Hari Akula [left] and Mahesh Lakshman.

As the HIV/AIDS epidemic approaches its fourth decade, each year brings promising news of pioneering research to alleviate the scourge. Add City College of New York scientists to the list with a rapid method to access new molecules that could inhibit the virus that causes AIDS.

The CCNY research led by Mahesh K. Lakshman, vice chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Ph.D. student Hari Akula, focuses on the modification of nucleosides.  These are genetic building materials in all living organisms and because of this they possess great potential as antiviral agents.

The ability to rapidly modify the structures of natural nucleosides is at the core of developing potential pharmaceutical agents. This is likely to yield diverse compounds that can then be tested to gain insight into structural effects on biological activity. “Such is the case with modifying pyrimidine nucleosides, including AZT (zidovudine), a drug used in the control of HIV infections,” said Lakshman, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

In this context, Lakshman and Akula have developed a simple and fast method for preparing new pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, a family in which AZT belongs, and for modifying AZT itself.  Along with their collaborators at the Rega Institute for Medical Research, they have identified several new compounds that are active against the more virulent HIV-1 and the less common and less pathogenic HIV-2.

Their research appears in the Royal Society of Chemistry publication “Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry.”

According to the Geneva-based UNAIDS, as of 2015, an estimated 35 million people have died globally from AIDS-related illnesses since the start of the epidemic.

HIV, however, is no longer considered a death sentence following the development of antiretroviral therapy. As a result, UNAIDS estimates that more than 18 million people around the world are living with HIV.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit

« BACK TO NEWS

Source: CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York


CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York

As the HIV/AIDS epidemic approaches its fourth decade, each year brings promising news of pioneering research to alleviate the scourge. Add City College of New York scientists to the list with a rapid method to access new molecules that could inhibit the virus that causes AIDS.

Source: CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, week of June 19, 2017

 

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

I am hoping that today has been a day of meaning for you and your families.

Hats off to you Dads!

In this final full-week of our school year, we have much to celebrate.

This week marks the completion of elementary school for NEST+m’s 5th Grade students, the completion of Middle School for NEST+m’s 8th Grade students and the completion of High School for NEST+m’s 12th Grade students.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.
Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


The Week Ahead

Monday June 19th

  • 4th Grade Music Concert in the auditorium, 8:45am
  • 4th Grade Celebration in classrooms, 9:15am
  • Second Language Proficiency Exams, 9:00am
  • LOTE – Languages Other than English Exams, 1:00pm

Tuesday June 20th

  • Second Grade Celebration in classrooms, 9:00am
  • Regents Chemistry Exam, 9:00am

Wednesday June 21th

  • 5th Grade “Moving Up/Graduation” Ceremony & Celebration in the NEST+mauditorium, 8:30am
  • 5th Grade Dance Celebration in the Cafeteria, from 5-8 pm

Thursday June 22th

  • 12th Grade Graduation Ceremony at The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 9:00am
  • 8th Grade Stepping Up Ceremony, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 12:30pm

Friday June 23rd

  • Kindergarten End of Year Concert in auditorium, 8:45am
  • Kindergarten Celebration in classrooms, 9:30am

Middle Grades Announcements
To ensure that students have access to course-specific support beyond that which is provided within our regular instructional periods, please see the following link which specifies when academic supports for Grades 6-12 will be provided with an eye toward Summative Assessments:
Open Classroom Tutoring & Regents Review Schedule – Grades 6-12

Middle Grades Summative Assessments: (End-of-Year Projects, Papers, Final Exam Schedules, and Regents).

6th Grade:

  • ELA: Final Exam on 6/19/2017
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/21/2017
  • Theater/Literacy: Final Project on 6/23/2017

7th Grade:

  • Science: Final Project Presentation the week of June 19th
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/23/2017

8th Grade:
Please Review the June 2017 Regents and SLP Schedule. Passing the Regents course and corresponding exam is necessary to earn high school credit in 8th Grade. If a family makes a choice to opt-out of a Regents exam or SLP, students will not be able to earn high school credit for that course.
Regents exams are non-attendance days for students participating in the exams. Students will come in to take the exam only and then will be dismissed. 8th Grade Courses will not be in session on the following date: 6/19/2017

For 8th grade students and families:

  • 6/19 – Report for World Languages Second Language Proficiency (SLP) exam only
  • 6/20 – Normal day
  • 6/21 – Normal day, 8th Grade Cruise at night
  • 6/22 – Report for Graduation only at Cooper Union
  • 6/23 – Report to school normal time. 8th grade Field Day Field Trip.

Upper Grades Announcements
This week features the continuation of our June Regents Examination Cycle. Please Review the June 2017 Regents SLP and LOTE Schedule and note the following:

  • Regents exam days are non-attendance days for Upper Grade Students. Students will come to school only if they are taking an exam and then will be dismissed from school when finished. Students taking two exams on a single day should be prepared with food and snacks as they will have limited break time (45 minutes) between tests.
  • For morning Regents Exams students should arrive to school by 8:45am and be seated in their exam room by 9:00am for attendance and test directions
  • For afternoon Regents Exams students should be seated in their Exam Room by 1:00pm
  • Students who finish a morning exam early may not leave the Regents Exam room before 10:30am. Students who finish an afternoon exam may not leave the Regents Exam room before 2:30pm.
  • All students taking Regents Exams should bring a copy of their Regents ticket and school ID with them on Exam Days.
  • Student Cell Phones must be powered off and stored in hallway lockers before the beginning of any Regents Exam. Cell Phones brought into an Exam room must be given to the testing room proctor before the exam begins and will be held by the testing room proctor until the test’s conclusion. Students may NOT wear or use any electronic device during a Regents Exam– this includes Smart Watches and bluetooth enabled fitness bands.

Monday, June 19

  • Second Language Proficiency Exams (9:00am)
  • LOTE – Languages Other than English Exams (1:00pm)

Tuesday, June 20

  • Chemistry Regents (9:00am)

Wednesday, June 21

  • Regents Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students

Thursday, June 22

  • Upper Grades Commencement at Cooper Union Great Hall
  • Regents Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students

Friday, June 22nd

  • Regents Rating Day
  • Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students

Looking ahead

  • June 26: Eid al-Fitr. All schools are closed.
  • June 27: Regular instructional day. Upper Grades classes are in session (Normal School Day)
  • June 28: Final Day of School (½ day with dismissal at 11:30am)
    • UG students, please be sure all textbooks have been turned in and that your locker is clean / without lock

 


Raquel Chang-Rodríguez wins prestigious Imbert Prize

Professor Raquel Chang-Rodriguez receiving the Enrique Anderson Imbert Prize

Distinguished Professor Raquel Chang-Rodriguez receiving the Enrique Anderson Imbert Prize.

Raquel Chang-Rodríguez, Distinguished Professor of Hispanic literature and culture at The City College of New York, is the recipient of the Enrique Anderson Imbert Prize from the North American Academy of the Spanish Language. This distinction recognizes the achievements and scholarship of individuals who have contributed to the understanding, appreciation and promotion of Hispanic culture in the United States, especially in the fields of language and literature.

“This  award holds a particular significance because of the prestige of the institution conferring it and because I personally knew Enrique Anderson Imbert, the Harvard professor whose name the prize carries,” said Chang-Rodríguez.

A specialist in Colonial Literary Studies with emphasis on the Andean area and Mexico, Chang-Rodríguez has authored, edited and co-edited more than twenty books treating the chronicles of the early contact period and native historians, as well as colonial drama and poetry.

Her most recent book is “Cartografía garcilasista” (Universidad de Alicante, 2013). In 2017, The University of New Mexico Press published her translation and edition (with Nancy Vogeley) of Luis Jerónimo de Oré’s 17th century “Account of the Martyrs in the Provinces of La Florida.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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President Cruz Commits Lehman College to the Paris Agreement

Lehman College President José Luis Cruz is one of the many United States educational leaders to sign on as part of the “We Are Still In” pledge on the Paris Climate agreement. The pledge was publically submitted on June 5, demonstrating the ongoing commitment of American leaders, despite President Donald J. Trump’s announcement that the U.S. would withdraw from the accord.

“The Paris Agreement reflects international recognition that climate change is real and concerted action imperative,” said President Cruz. “We must redouble our efforts to reduce fossil-fuel emissions, as well as improve our collective economic well-being through new and better energy sources and technologies. Consequently, I am willing to support this initiative on behalf of Lehman College.”

Cruz joins 205 other college and university presidents, along with governors, mayors, businesses, and investors, who have, according to the pledge, “declared their intent to continue to insure the U.S. remains a global leader in reducing carbon emissions.”

The goal of the “We Are Still In” pledge is to send a “strong signal to the international community and the 194 other parties to the Paris Agreement about the continued commitment of the U.S. to ambitious action on climate change absent leadership at the federal level. Trump’s announcement to exit the Paris agreement came in a White Rose Garden speech on June 1.

The “We Are Still In” effort was organized by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, in conjunction with numerous philanthropic and environmental groups, including Bloomberg Philanthropies, Center for American Progress, The American Sustainable Business Council, and the Sierra Club; other supporters of the effort include CUNY Chancellor James Milliken and New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio; as well as hundreds of corporations such as Facebook, Amazon, Adidas, Microsoft, and Apple.

The Paris Climate agreement was signed in December 2015 and was the first global commitment to climate change. The agreement allows each nation to set its own emission reduction targets.


CCNY Architecture Historian Wins International Book Award

Marta Gutman's urban history "A City For Children"

CCNY Professor Marta Gutman has been recognized on an international level for her urban history, A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850–1950 (The University of Chicago Press, 2014). The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) awarded the book the 2017 Spiro Kostof Award, given to interdisciplinary studies of urban history that make the greatest contribution to our understanding of the growth and development of cities. A City for Children focuses on the use and adaptive reuse of everyday buildings over a hundred year span in Oakland, California, to make the city a better place for children.

The Society, which promotes the study, interpretation, and conservation of architecture, design, landscapes, and urbanism worldwide, announced the winners of the 2017 Publication Awards at the SAH 70th Annual International Conference Awards Ceremony held June 8 in Glasgow, Scotland. Gutman called her book’s selection, “an incredible honor.”
Gutman is an historian and licensed architect. She is Professor of Architecture and Coordinator, History & Theory, Spitzer School of Architecture at CCNY and is also Professor of Art History, Doctoral Faculty in Art History, The Graduate Center/CUNY.
The Society of Architectural Historians is a nonprofit membership organization that serves a network of local, national, and international institutions and individuals who, by profession or interest, focus on the history of the built environment and its role in shaping contemporary life. SAH promotes meaningful public engagement with the history of the built environment through advocacy efforts, print and online publications, and local, national, and international programs.
About The City College of New York
The City College of New York is an established leader in sustainability, with an expert faculty conducting groundbreaking research and providing innovative, interdisciplinary opportunities for students to engage in emerging approaches in architecture, engineering, science and the social sciences.
CCNY’s response to a rapidly urbanizing global community consists of courses on climate response, resilient design, water resource management and energy, with engineering, science and architectural degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate level that address the sustainability challenges of the 21st century.
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Hunter College-Led Scientists Develop Molecular Code for Melanin-Like Materials

Published on June 8, 2017 in Science Magazine, aHunter College-Led Scientists Develop Molecular Code for Melanin-Like Materials study led Einstein Professor of Chemistry Rein V. Ulijn shows an exciting new approach to making substances with the properties of melanin, a compound that scientists have been unable to effectively synthesize in the lab. Melanin’s disordered molecular structure makes it impossible to fully replicate, which has been scientifically frustrating; it has numerous useful qualities that scientists have long tried to harness. Melanin gives the color to our skin, hair, and eyes – but it also absorbs light, providing UV-protection and energy storage.

Now, with this new process to create melanin-like substances, scientists can harness these usefulnesses, while maintaining control over the ways the pigments and properties express themselves. This innovative discovery could enable the development of a new range of cosmetic, skin care, and biomedical products, and the commercialization opportunities may lead to near-term possibilities for the researchers.

“We took advantage of simple versions of proteins—tripeptides, consisting of just three amino acids—to produce a range of molecular architectures with precisely controlled levels of order and disorder,” said Professor Ulijn, also director of the Nanoscience Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center, CUNY. “We were amazed to see that, upon oxidation of these peptide structures, polymeric pigments with a range of colors—from light beige to deep brown- were formed.”

Subsequent, in-depth characterization of the approach demonstrated that further properties, such as UV absorbance and nanoscale morphology of the melanin-like materials, could also be systematically controlled by the amino acid sequence of the tripeptide.

The findings published in Science build on Professor Ulijn's previous research. His lab will now turn its attention to further clarifying the chemical structures that form and expanding the resulting functionalities and properties of the various melanin-like materials they produce.

“We are very proud of Professor Ulijin’s work,” said Jennifer J. Raab, President of Hunter College. “Our students are fortunate to learn from a scientist on the cutting edge of such impactful advances, and we anticipate broad implications of this and future discoveries.”

In addition to Professor Ulijn, the research team also included Hunter Professors Steven G. Greenbaum, Sunita Humagain , and Barney Yoo; Ayala Limpel, Scott A. McPhee, Tai-De Li and Rinat R. Abzalimov of the ASRC; Christopher Bettinger and Hang-Ah Park, Carnegie Mellon University; Tell Tuttle and Gary G. Scott, University of Strathclyde; Doeke R. Hekstra, Harvard University; Pim W.J.M. Frederix, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; and Chunhua Hu, New York University.

Funding for the research was provided in part by the U.S. Air Force. Additional funding was provided by the Israeli Council of Higher Education (Postdoctoral Fellowship).

Document

New Art Exhibit by Hunter MFA Students Finds Home in Lobby of 5 Bryant Park

Beginning today, June 7, 2017, a new exhibitionNew Art Exhibit by Hunter MFA Students Finds Home in Lobby of 5 Bryant Park of paintings and large-scale works on paper will be shown in the lobby of 5 Bryant Park, located on 6th Avenue between 40 and 41st Street – all created by current Hunter College Master of Fine Arts students: Talia Levitt, Madhini Nirmal, Leonard Reibstein, and Andy Van Dinh.

This yearlong installation inaugurates an ongoing partnership between Hunter’s nationally ranked MFA program in Studio Art and Blackstone, owner of the building and of Equity Office, a national leader in property management, real estate development, and construction.

Curated by Hunter College Professor Carrie Moyer in collaboration with José Gonzalez of Gonzalez Architects for Equity Office, this exhibition gives students a prominent space to showcase their work and engage with an audience of thousands every day. The building has a history as a home to art – in 1958, notable mosaic artist Max Spivak completed a mural of quarter million hand-cut tiles for the building’s entrance. Covered for many years and meticulously restored in 2015, the mural will now act as a welcome sign, inviting visitors to the contemporary work inside.

“We are very grateful to Blackstone and Equity Office for offering their space to some of our very talented graduate students and increasing the visibility of our artists’ work in the heart of Midtown Manhattan,” said Jennifer J. Raab, President of Hunter College.  “We appreciate the commitment Blackstone and Equity Office have shown to future artists offering them exposure while giving their tenants and visitors opportunities to appreciate new art.”

The largest public graduate program in Studio Art in New York, the Hunter College MFA provides exceptional opportunities for students from around the world to develop as artists in an environment that encourages experimentation, production, and critical dialogue. The Hunter College MFA at 5 Bryant Park initiative was spearheaded by Simon Wasserberger, Senior Vice President of Equity Office, and Debi Wisch of the Hunter College Art Advisory Board.


A Soaring 215th Commencement: Hunter Hawks Flying High!

“The steely determination I see in this audience is a testament to you, and to Hunter College,”A Soaring 215th Commencement: Hunter Hawks Flying High! said Alphonso David, chief counsel to Governor Cuomo, as he addressed the Class of 2017. “You represent the best of New York. Now, as you stand on the edge, ready to dive into a world that needs you, take pride in your accomplishment.”

David had begun his speech with a personal account of Liberia’s 1980 military coup. In stark, terrifying detail, he recalled his family fleeing gunmen who invaded their home in the middle of the night; the imprisonment of his father, Monrovia’s democratically elected mayor; the assassination of his uncle; and, during the family’s house arrest, his immense pride as his mother, facing rampaging troops and a gun to her head, barred the door and protected the women inside.

The family eventually found asylum in the U.S. But here, David faced new kinds of assault – first, racial epithets and exclusion by his young classmates, and years later, a work environment that drove him to be a closeted gay lawyer.

“Each of you in this room will face defining moments. You will find the power of your own fear, and find the great power of your own courage,” he told the graduates, adding, “Be unabashedly you, without denigrating anyone else. Be proud of who you are: you the immigrant, the woman, the Muslim, the Jew, the LGBT person, the single mother, the single father, the person living on public assistance, the person with HIV.” At the same time, he acknowledged that by gaining entry to Hunter and earning their degrees, the graduates had already chosen not to be defined or defeated by difficulty or circumstance.

The heroic achievements of a number of graduates had already been highlighted by President Raab. In her welcoming remarks, she also noted that the highly diverse Class of 2017 represented more than 150 countries, and that family members had traveled from five continents to celebrate that afternoon. Looking ahead, she asked the graduates to commit themselves to the Hunter motto, Mihi Cura Futuri (The Care of the Future is Mine), with a reminder that Thomas Hunter began building a great college because he believed in his own obligation to the future.

[See ABC 7 NY's coverage here.]

In a moment that paid tribute to another historic Hunter figure and to three new graduates, Dina Buitrago, Hajaru Hamza and Saipriya Iyer were officially named Hunter’s first Women in Science Mildred Dresselhaus Scholars. Dresselhaus, the renowned physicist and 2014 recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, always credited her teachers and mentors at Hunter College High School and Hunter College for her resolve and success in a challenging field so unwelcoming to women.

Commencement honoree Sandra Wilkin, a CUNY trustee and Hunter alumna, remembered how well the College taught her about “the value of hard work and perseverance” – wisdom that enabled her to succeed as a woman in the construction industry. She also expressed her pride in CUNY’s being “the most diverse university in the world.”

The afternoon’s final major address came from valedictorian Daniela Mikhaylov, who was speaking not for herself alone but also for the Class of 2017’s four other valedictorians: Victoria Lau, Qin Lin, Rina Schiller and Clarissa Torres. Mikhaylov began by mentioning her background as the daughter of Uzbekistani immigrants who fled anti-Semitism to give their children a better life. Now headed to the Icahn School of Medicine and a career as an oncologist, she thanked Hunter for helping her know for sure that medicine was her calling, for professors who “have pushed us beyond what we thought was possible,” and for classmates she predicts will be her lifelong friends.

“Have faith in yourself, and know that as a Hunter graduate, you have the tools to succeed,” she told her fellow graduates. “As Hunter Hawks, we are destined to fly high!”

Click here to view photos from Hunter's 215th commencment.


New Exhibition at Queens Museum Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Queens Pride Parade

The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens: June 10 to July 30, 2017

Draws from records of City Council Member Daniel Dromm who co-founded Queens Pride, and explores how the 1990 hate crime murder of Julio Rivera impacted the LGBTQ movement in Queens

—Presented by the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at
LaGuardia Community College—

Queens Museum Exhibition

Queens, NY (June 12, 2017)—Marking the 25th anniversary of the Queens Pride Parade, a new multimedia exhibition at the Queens Museum spotlights the largely unknown history of LGBTQ activism in Queens from the 1990s to the present. The exhibition runs through July 30 and is located in the Museum’s famed Panorama Room. The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens , draws largely from the Collection of Queens City Council MemberDaniel Dromm, recently acquired by the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College, which is presenting the exhibit.

This exhibition curated by LaGuardia commercial photography faculty Thierry Gourjon and Javier Larenas, and by LaGuardia’s Gardiner-Shenker Student Scholars, marks the first-ever showing of materials from the Dromm Collection. The exhibition’s title celebrates lavender as both a symbol of the original gay liberation movement and the color of a line marking the Queens Pride Parade route in Jackson Heights.

Following a series of anti-gay incidents in the early 1990s, including the brutal murder of Julio Rivera, and controversy over references to same-sex couples in the Children of the Rainbow Curriculum, Dromm and fellow activist Maritza Martinez co-founded the Queens Lesbian & Gay Pride Committee, Inc., known as Queens Pride. One of their first acts was to organize a march to take their advocacy to the streets. The first Queens Pride Parade in 1993 drew 1,000 marchers. Today it’s an annual tradition that attracts crowds of over 40,000, and draws support of politicians and corporate sponsors.

With both historical and contemporary work, The Lavender Line comprises photographs, flyers, video footage, and audio recollections, illustrating the pride and protests of a community unknown to most New Yorkers. The title celebrates lavender not only as a symbol of the original gay liberation movement but also as the color of the line painted on the Queens Pride Parade route along 37th Avenue, from 89th Street to 75th Street.

The contemporary photographs in the exhibition by LaGuardia’s Gardiner-Shenker Student Scholars chronicle a range of Queens LGBTQ social organizations and cultural institutions. These include centers that offer social and counseling services as well as bars that function as leisure and entertainment spaces. What results is a representation of struggle and pride that continues today.

“Queens has its own unique lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) history and people should know about it,” said NYC Council Education Committee Chairperson Daniel Dromm (D - Jackson Heights, Elmhurst). "We didn’t just one day wake up and have same sex marriage. It’s been a long struggle for LGBT acceptance especially in the borough once known for being the home of Archie Bunker. This exhibition highlights a dynamic period in the history of the Queens LGBT rights movement. The anti-gay murder of Julio Rivera and the battle over the Children of the Rainbow Curriculum are Queens’ equivalent of the Stonewall Rebellion.”

Through his work on Queens Pride, Dromm came out publicly as gay. Dromm, who at the time was a public school elementary teacher in Queens, was called before a school board disciplinary hearing where he was "ordered never to discuss his homosexuality with his fourth-grade students.” He stood firm and refused to be silenced; this activism helped seed his decision to leave teaching for public office.

City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer contributed materials from his personal archives to TheLavender Line: Coming Out in Queens. Van Bramer, then a student at St John’s University, drew attention in the 1990s for his activism work encouraging members of the LGBTQ community to stand proud and in public, and for raising awareness of the AIDS epidemic and bias crimes.

“For far too long, the stories, experiences, trials, and victories of the LGBTQ movement in our country and in Queens have often gone untold,” said Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer. “The history of the LGBTQ movement in Queens is a deeply human story of ordinary people fighting for the right to openly and freely love without fear. I’m thankful and honored for the opportunity to contribute personal pieces to the new Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens exhibition at the Queens Museum.”

"The Queens Museum is very proud to be a part of the celebration of such an important milestone for the history of LGBTQAI advocacy and rights. Our involvement exemplifies our commitment to the communities that find a home here at the Museum, and our desire to address with urgency the factors that threaten freedom and diversity," said Laura Raicovich, Executive Director of the Queens Museum.

“Most New Yorkers don’t know that Queens was the first outer borough to publicly support gay rights by holding a parade. We developed this exhibition to share the remarkable stories of LGBTQ activism in Queens, which have been largely absent from the historical narrative,” said Richard Lieberman, PhD, professor of history and director of the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives. “It’s an incredible story of activism in the face of tremendous opposition.”

“This is an important exhibition to both the history of New York City and the story of LGBTQ activism in Queens, and we’re enormously proud of the work of our faculty, staff, and students that went into creating it,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “The opportunity for our students to learn valuable research and curatorial skills, while working on this significant exhibition, is sure to benefit their professional careers. And it showcases our LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, the only archives of its kind to document NYC’s social and political history.”

Lavender Line Group Shot

“The project gave me an excellent opportunity to get to know the Queens LGBTQ community,” said Jham Valenzuela, a LaGuardia student who worked on the exhibition. “And as a gay man, this project was deeply fulfilling to me on a personal level.”

“I am proud to have contributed my papers and artifacts from the last 25 years to help create this commemoration. I thank the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College and the Queens Museum for producing this extremely important display,” added Dromm.

To capture additional information about the LGBTQ movement in Queens from the 1990s to today, the Queens Memory project at the Queens Library conducted interviews with members of the Queens LGBTQ community and will encourage The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens visitors to use their mobile app to contribute their memories. Additionally, an audio booth will be set up at the Museum where visitors can contribute their memories of this period to this archival collection.

To supplement the Queens Pride celebrations, the Queens Museum will screen Julio of Jackson Heights, a documentary about Julio Rivera’s murder, on June 18.

After the conclusion of the exhibition at the Queens Museum, The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens will travel to all five CUNY campuses in Queens, dates TBD.

The exhibition is made possible through generous support from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, and the New York City Council through the office of Daniel Dromm.

• • • •

About the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College
The LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, established in 1982, serves as a repository for NYC’s social and political history, which includes the largest collection of New York City mayoral papers. Archive records include the personal papers and official documents of Mayors Fiorello H. LaGuardia, Robert F. Wagner, Abraham D. Beame and Edward I. Koch, the records of the New York City Housing Authority, the piano maker Steinway & Sons, The Council of the City of New York and a Queens Local History Collection. Assets from these collections are regularly referenced in news stories, and studied by journalists, policy makers, and other researchers. The Archives regularly produces public programs exploring its collections, including an annual calendar produced in partnership with The New York Times and the City University of New York. Each year, the calendar is devoted to a theme of importance to the Greater New York Metropolitan area. The 2017 calendar is devoted to housing in NYC. Click here to learn more.

About LaGuardia Community College
LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more. Or on Twitter at @LaGuardiaLIC.

About the Queens Museum
The Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows Corona Park features contemporary art, events of hyperlocal and international impact, and educational programs reflecting the diversity of Queens and New York City. Changing exhibitions present the work of emerging and established artists, both local and global, that often explore contemporary social issues, as well as the rich history of its site. In November 2013, the Museum reopened with an expanded footprint of 105,000 square feet, a soaring skylit atrium, a suite of daylight galleries, nine artist studios, and flexible event space. The Museum works outside its walls through engagement initiatives ranging from multilingual outreach and educational opportunities for adult immigrants, to a plethora of community led art and activism projects. The Museum's educational programming connects with schoolchildren, teens, families, seniors as well as those individuals with physical and mental disabilities. The Queens Museum is located on property owned in full by the City of New York, and its operation is made possible in part by public funds provided through the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Visit www.queensmuseum.org. On Twitter at @queensmuseum.

About the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation
The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, established in 1987, primarily supports the study of New York State history. Robert David Lion Gardiner was, until his death in August 2004, the 16th Lord of the Manor of Gardiner’s Island, NY. The Gardiner family and their descendants have owned Gardiner’s Island since 1639, obtained as part of a royal grant from King Charles I of England. The Foundation is inspired by Robert David Lion Gardiner’s personal passion for New York history.

  • The purpose of the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation is:
  • To educate and inform the general public in the State of New York, particularly in the area of the Town of Islip and more generally in Suffolk County, concerning the culture, art and tradition of the locality;
  • To cultivate, foster and promote interest in, and understanding and appreciation of the societal heritage of Town of Islip, particularly during the nineteenth century;
  • To encourage and sponsor the creation and perpetuation by existing and future historical societies of collections and repositories for the deposit, collection and examination of documents and artifacts of various kinds relevant to such heritage and traditions; and
  • To sponsor and encourage the preservation, restoration and exhibition by existing and future historical societies of at least one facility appropriate to such purpose.

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Exhibition Listing

The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens

What:  Marking the 25th anniversary of Queens Pride Parade is a new multimedia exhibition at the Queens Museum that spotlights the largely unknown history of LGBTQ activism in Queens from the 1990s to the present.

The exhibition explores the impact of the 1990 hate crime murder of Julio Rivera, and the blocked “Children of the Rainbow” curriculum, on the LGBTQ movement in Queens. The exhibition draws from records of City Council Member Daniel Dromm who co-founded Queens Pride, and from the personal archives of City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer.

Why:  While Manhattan is well-recognized as the birthplace of NYC’s LGBTQ movement, the remarkable stories of LGBTQ activism in Queens are largely absent from the historical narrative. It's an incredible story of activism in the face of tremendous opposition, and helped motivate Council Member Danny Dromm's career shift from teaching to public office.

The New York region has the highest number of people who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, nationwide. A recent survey found that nearly 800,000 New Yorkers identify as LGBTQ.

Who:  Curated by LaGuardia Community College/CUNY commercial photography faculty, as well as by LaGuardia students, the exhibition uses photographs, flyers, video footage, and audio recollections to illuminate the pride and protests of a community unknown to most New Yorkers.

Coming Out in Queens is made possible through the generous support of the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, and the New York City Council, through the office of Daniel Dromm.

Where:  Queens Museum, Panorama Room

Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Corona, NY 11368

When:  June 10 through July 30, during museum hrs: Wednesday—Sunday 11AM-5PM


City Tech Foundation Hosts 2017 Best of New York Award Dinner at the Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge

The City Tech Foundation held its 2017 Best of New York (BONY) Award Dinner on Monday, May 8, at the New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge, 333 Adams Street, Downtown Brooklyn, New York. In addition to honoring friends of the College, the 2017 BONY event celebrates City Tech’s 70th anniversary. The evening began with a Guest of Honor Reception at 6:00 p.m., followed by dinner and the award presentations at 7:15 p.m.

Founded in 1947 as the New York State Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences, this year marks the 70th anniversary of the College. The theme of the 2017 dinner was “Building Toward the Next 70 Years.” Honorees included Frank J. Sciame, Jr., CEO/Chairman and Joseph Mizzi, President/COO of Sciame Construction; Joseph Aliotta, Principal, Perkins Eastman; and DonnaMarie Russo, President, New York Concrete Corporation.

Special recognition was accorded to Professor Janet Liou-Mark, Department of Mathematics, an award-winning teacher, City Tech’s 2017-2018 Scholar on Campus, and the director of City Tech’s Honors Scholars Program. Dr. Liou-Mark received the 2011 CUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction and the 2014 Mathematical Association of America Metro New York Section Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics.

The City Tech Foundation was chartered in 1981 to raise funds for the College. Proceeds from the annual dinner continue to help fund Foundation-sponsored scholarships and other student financial assistance and student/faculty professional development programs.


15th ANNUAL CUNY CITIZENSHIP NOW! FREE AND CONFIDENTIAL IMMIGRATION HOTLINE

The 15th annual Citizenship NOW! hotline, a free, confidential citizenship and immigration information service helping thousands of callers, will open June 19, according to the New York Daily News and The City University of New York, which sponsor the event.

“The New York Daily News is pleased to partner with CUNY to support immigration and citizenship issues in New York City and around the nation by together providing important, confidential and free information and referrals to assist those immigrants who may qualify for citizenship,” said Eric Gertler, co-chairman and co-publisher of the Daily News. “Citizenship Now! is the most comprehensive university-based immigration legal service program in the country,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “It’s an important reminder to all that at CUNY, immigrants matter.”

In anticipation of a record number of calls due to the current political climate, the hotline has expanded to 80 phone lines from last year’s 48. It will be open June 19 through June 23, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and staffed by more than 400 volunteers. Calls will be answered in English and Spanish, as well as Mandarin, Cantonese, Russian, Korean, Italian, Haitian Creole, Bengali, Polish, French, Yiddish and Arabic.

Permanent residents who want to become U.S. citizens, or those seeking permanent residency or who have other immigration concerns, will be referred to organizations that can help with applications at low or no cost.

“The outpouring of volunteer support for this year’s call-in from community activists, attorneys, students and others is inspiring,” said attorney Allan Wernick, director of Citizenship Now! and a law professor at Baruch College. Wernick also writes the “Immigration” column for the Daily News.  "We will provide the information and referrals needed by immigrants to naturalize and for other immigration goals,” he said. “For undocumented immigrants, the best defense to deportation is getting legal status and we are here to help.”

Citizenship NOW! – the largest program of its kind in the nation –was co-launched by the Daily News and CUNY in April 2004 to address the lack of access to free and confidential immigration information. More than 156,000 callers have sought information from the hotline since its opening.

WXTV Univision 41, our Spanish-language media partner, will provide extensive outreach to the Hispanic community. Univision 41 has been a partner of the program since its inception. WABC-TV will once again serve as our English-language media partner. Both stations’ coverage will include live-coverage, on-air promotional announcements, and special news segments

This year’s generous sponsors include: American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) NY Chapter, AXA, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Capalino+Company, Cisco, Consulate General of Mexico in NY, CUNY Office of Computing and Information Services, CUNY Service Corps, CUNY School of Professional Studies, CUNY TV, El Diario, Fragomen Worldwide, GOYA, Hispanic Federation, Immigration Advocates Network (IAN), John Jay College for Criminal Justice, Juntos Podemos, MetroPlus, New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC), NYC Mayor's Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA),  New York State Office for New Americans (ONA), Presidio, Pro Bono Net, Qué Buena 92.7 FM, WADO 1280 AM.

English/Multilingual: (212) 444-5968

Spanish: (212) 444-5964

Deaf/HoH: 711

About the Partners:

Daily News:
With 2 million readers in New York, and 42 million national unique visitors online each month, the New York Daily News is the most widely read tabloid in the city and one of America’s fastest-growing websites. Covering breaking news, politics, sports, entertainment, celebrity, lifestyle, opinion, business and health, the New York Daily News delivers up-to-the-minute reporting, rich photography and compelling video to readers of its print newspaper, industry-leading website, tablet apps, and iPhone, Blackberry and Android editions.

The New York Daily News has won 10 Pulitzer Prize Awards for excellence in journalism. In 2015, it was awarded seven New York State Associated Press Association awards and took the Associated Press Sports Editors awards’ “Triple Crown,” as well as first place in the Investigative category across all circulation categories. In addition to its news operations, the New York Daily News runs Daily News Digital Solutions and the Innovation Lab.

The City University of New York:
The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and at more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

About the Media Partners:
 

Univision Communications Inc.
Univision Communications Inc. (UCI) is the leading media company serving Hispanic America. The company, a leading content creator in the United States, includes Univision Network, one of the top five networks in the country regardless of language and the most-watched Spanish-language broadcast television network in the country available in approximately 93 percent of U.S. Hispanic television households; UniMás, a leading Spanish-language broadcast television network available in approximately 87 percent of U.S. Hispanic television households; Univision Cable Networks, including Galavisión, the most-watched U.S. Spanish-language cable network, as well as UDN (Univision Deportes Network), the most-watched U.S. Spanish-language sports network, Univision tlnovelas, a 24-hour cable network dedicated to telenovelas,  ForoTV, a 24-hour Spanish-language cable network dedicated to international news, and an additional suite of cable offerings - De Película, De Película Clásico, Bandamax, Ritmoson and Telehit; Univision Television Group, which owns 59 television stations in major U.S. Hispanic markets and Puerto Rico; digital properties consisting of online and mobile websites and apps, including Univision.com, the most-visited Spanish-language website among U.S. Hispanics, UVideos, a bilingual digital video network and Uforia, a music application featuring multimedia music content; and Univision Radio, the leading Spanish-language radio group in the U.S. which owns and operates 67 radio stations, including stations in 16 of the top 25 U.S. Hispanic markets and Puerto Rico. UCI’s assets also include a minority stake in El Rey Network, a 24-hour English-language general entertainment cable network and a joint venture with Disney/ABC Television Network for Fusion, a 24-hour English-language news and lifestyle TV and digital network. With headquarters in New York City, UCI has television network operations in Miami and television and radio stations and sales offices in major cities throughout the United States. For more information, please visit Univision.net.

WABC-TV:
Channel 7 is the ABC-owned television station in New York City, serving more than 7.3 million television households in 29 counties covering New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. It is New York’s No. 1 station and the most watched local television station in the United States.

###

Media Contacts
Brian Adams, Daily News
(347) 452-3798
badams@nydailynews.com

Griselda Garcia, Daily News
(347)-486-1049
ggarcia@nydailynews.com

Frank Sobrino, CUNY
(646) 664-9300
Frank.Sobrino@cuny.edu

 


Signs of Change: Brooklyn College Implements Gender-Inclusive and Gender-Neutral Restrooms

All Brooklyn College single-sex restrooms are gender inclusive and single-occupancy restrooms are gender neutral thanks to the advocacy of a variety of groups in the campus community. The implementation of this policy, in accordance with New York City law, comes after the Trump administration rescinded the Obama administration's transgender students restroom-use protections, and coincides with LGBT Pride Month. In the wake of Trump administration policy, the City University of The City of New York (CUNY) reaffirmed its policy of non-discrimination on the basis of gender identity or expression.

In a gathering held on June 8, a group of Brooklyn College students, faculty, and staff, placed signs on restrooms that read "Under the law, all individuals have the right to use this single-sex facility consistent with their gender identity or expression" and "This single-use restroom may be used by persons of all genders."

Adjunct English Professor David P. McKay '93 watches as senior and LGBTA President Sami Binder installs the first gender-inclusive restroom sign.

"After working for years to achieve this, the senior-level administration at Brooklyn College took it very seriously and decided that this needed to be done quickly," said David P. McKay '93, adjunct professor of English, faculty adviser for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Alliance (LGBTA), member of the GLBTQ Advocacy in Research and Education (GLARE), and founding director of the college's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning (LGBTQ) Resource Center. "We also hope that we are setting an example. This is a tremendous show of the college's support for the LGBTQ community."

The campaign for inclusive restrooms began more than three years ago when members of LGBTA advocated for change. Former LGBTA president, Charlie Kerr '15, and current president, Sami Binder—with support from the LGBTQ Resource Center, Brooklyn College Student Government, Assistant Vice President for Facilities, Planning, and Operations Francis X. Fitzgerald, and special assistance from President Michelle J. Anderson—cleared hurdles to make the inclusive restrooms a reality.

"I think it's important to have all-gender restrooms so that everyone feels safe and comfortable on campus to do the most basic human things," said Binder, a senior who double majors in women's and gender studies and theater, and minors in LGBTQ studies. "I know a lot of trans, non-binary, and gender non-conforming cisgender people who don't feel comfortable using the bathrooms on campus because they don't know if someone will say they don't belong there. I think getting President Anderson involved was a really big help because she was able to use her access and resources to speed things along."

To ensure a smooth transition and curtail any transphobia that may arise, select members of the Brooklyn College community will participate in the Adopt-a-Bathroom Program. Students, faculty, and staff volunteers will choose a bathroom on campus and report on any broken or defaced signage, vandalism, or any other issues that might arise that are contrary to the college's inclusive policy.

Brooklyn College's community of students, faculty, and staff join forces to install gender-inclusive restroom signs on campus.

The Brooklyn College LGBTQ Resource Center was founded in 2014 to consolidate the talents of students, faculty and staff, and create programming about issues that affect the LGBTQ community. In September of this year, the center, in conjunction with the Office of Diversity and Equity Programs, plans to bring back to campus the Honest Accomplice Theatre, a performance group whose mission is "to generate dialogue and stimulate change by focusing on topics that are often silenced, seen as shameful, or portrayed as one-dimensional, specifically through the lens of the women and trans experience." The center's staff is currently working on a full program of events for LGBT History Month in October, which they hope will include a Queer Homecoming and an exhibit on the history of the LGBTQ community at the college. Additionally, they will be co-hosting the Leadership Mentors Luncheon with the Women's and Gender Studies Program for the second year.

For questions about the restroom policy, please contact David P. McKay or Francis X. Fitzgerald. To report incidents of vandalism, please contact the LGBTQ Resource Center.
Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


ICYMI:  Ending the Curse of Remedial Math  

In an op-ed published yesterday in The New York Times, David L. Kirp, a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, wrote that “CUNY Start holds some clues on how to solve an education crisis,” noting that the innovative remedial program is getting more than half of the students who complete the program ready for college in just one semester, “something that’s almost impossible with regular remedial courses.”

The success has prompted a pilot program to train New York City high school teachers in the CUNY Start model of teaching.  “It’s the classic ounce-of-prevention approach — improve teaching in high school, so students won’t have to take remedial math in college.”

The column also highlights the success of CUNY’s nationally acclaimed ASAP initiative that helps students receive associate degrees faster.

Kirp concludes by pointing out that “CUNY Start and ASAP aren’t City University’s only success stories.  Researchers at Stanford, Berkeley and Brown universities have shown that CUNY is a more powerful engine of mobility than almost any university in the nation.”

The text of the article can be viewed below and is available online here.

Ending the Curse of Remedial Math

BY DAVID L. KIRP
Can you simplify this square root?” Erica Fells asks her class, and hands wave in the air. All but one of the students believe that it’s impossible to do so. The dissenter, Leslie Alcantara, lays out her argument. “What do the rest of you think of Leslie’s reasoning?” Ms. Fells asks, and after some back-and-forth, they agree — she’s correct.

These students have been admitted to one of the City University of New York’s community colleges. They didn’t score high enough on CUNY’s math, reading and writing tests to take the college-credit courses they must pass to earn an associate degree, so they were steered into a catch-up program called CUNY Start. Its track record shows that, with good teaching and I-have-your-back counseling, youths who otherwise would likely drop out have a solid shot at making it.

The strategy is working: More than half the students who complete the program are ready for college in just one semester, something that’s almost impossible with regular remedial courses.

At the start of the term last fall, Ms. Fells told me, many of the students couldn’t handle negative numbers and decimal points. Ten weeks later, they have powered through arithmetic to algebra and are ready for college math.
CUNY Start holds some clues on how to solve an education crisis. Nationwide, only 35 percent of those who start community college receive any form of credential within six years. At urban community colleges, the six-year graduation rate is only 16 percent.
The biggest academic stumbling blocks are remedial math and English courses. More than two-thirds of community college students must take at least one such class, and there they languish. Only a third of those referred to remedial math, and less than half those who take remedial reading, pass. Just 15 percent of students who take remedial classes at two-year colleges earn a certificate or degree on time.

Typically, those students fell behind in elementary school, and as new concepts were piled on every year, they never caught up. The “Strasbourg goose” school of teaching, in which students’ heads are stuffed with formulas that bear no relation to the real world, left them convinced of their own incompetence. Old- school remedial education in college — skill and drill, lecture-style classes, taken at the same time as college-level courses — offered more of the same.

The CUNY Start model is different. Full-time students are exclusively in Start classes for 25 hours a week — substantially more than the usual course load — for one semester. The focus is on thinking, not memorization.

“Math isn’t just memorization,” Ms. Fells told me. “I teach them how to investigate problems — how to think. The first sentence on the first day is a question. We start by making a connection to real life and slowly build a foundation of knowledge for more abstract algebraic problems. I never say you are right or wrong. The answers come from them.”

Ms. Fells knows, firsthand, what the students are going through. “I grew up in the same neighborhood, attended the same mediocre schools,” she said. “They’re as smart as students anyplace — they just haven’t been given the opportunity.”

Typically, these students are juggling school, jobs and family obligations. One student told me that at lunch she pumps breast milk while studying. “I work full time, and my husband requires kidney dialysis,” she said.

Jessica Mingus, the director of CUNY Start at Hostos Community College, told me that many have gotten the message that they are no-hopers. When she was a high school freshman, one student was informed by her high school counselor that she should drop out. “You’re going to get pregnant by the time you’re 16 — why waste everyone’s time by staying in school?”

Counseling is vital to the success of the program, because it gives students someone to talk with about their lives. “They aren’t comfortable telling their teachers about the court date, the pending eviction, the abusive foster parent,” Ms. Mingus said.

During orientation, students are asked to list the ups and downs in their lives. “Sex experience with a family member,” “Guns fired all the time,” one student wrote matter-of-factly. All that took place while she was still in elementary school. In middle school, she added, she had a miscarriage, tried to join a gang and wound up in jail.

Abandonment, homelessness, fickle boyfriends and thoughts of suicide were among the “downs” other students mentioned.

“They say they’re not cut out for this,” Ms. Mingus said. “We remind them that they passed their New York State Regents exams, after as many as five tries. We tell them that’s a great accomplishment, and you can do the same here.”

Once they start taking college-credit classes, nearly three-quarters of the eligible students will enroll in another CUNY initiative, called Accelerated Study in Associate Programs, which I’ve written about in the past. The package includes financial help, carefully constructed class schedules and one-on-one advising. Sixty-four percent of ASAP students earned a degree within six years.

Educators elsewhere are paying attention; colleges in upstate New York, Ohio and California are starting their own ASAP initiatives. And a group of New York City high school teachers are, in a pilot program, being trained in CUNY Start’s model of teaching. It’s the classic ounce-of-prevention approach — improve teaching in high school, so students won’t have to take remedial math in college.

CUNY Start and ASAP aren’t City University’s only success stories. Researchers at Stanford, Berkeley and Brown universities have shown that CUNY is a more powerful engine of mobility than almost any university in the nation. Places like CUNY, Stony Brook University and California State University, Los Angeles, are the workhorses of higher education, and they’re doing a fine job.

 

David L. Kirp (@DavidKirp), a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, is the author, most recently, of “Improbable Scholars: The Rebirth of a Great American School System and a Strategy for America’s Schools.”

####

 

 


Celebrating 25th Anniversary of Queens Pride Parade – New Exhibit at Queens Museum Through July 31

Celebrating 25th Anniversary of Queens Pride Parade

The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens

Queens Museum
Now until July 31, 2017

Exhibition Opening At Queens Museum Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Queens Pride Parade
Queens Pride Parade, 1993
Photo Credit: Courtesy Daniel Dromm Collection, LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY

What:  The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens is a multimedia exhibition at the Queens Museum that marks the 25th anniversary of the Queens Pride Parade, the first LGBTQ-rights parade in one of NYC’s outer boroughs.

The exhibition showcases historical and contemporary work, which chronicles the largely unknown history of LGBTQ activism in Queens from the 1990s to the present, in particular the impact of the hate crime murder of Julio Rivera, and the rejection of the Children of the Rainbow Curriculum.

Coming Out in Queens draws from the collection of Queens City Council Member Daniel Dromm, recently acquired by the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College. City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer and producer-director Richard Shpuntoff contributed materials from their personal archives.

Click here to watch a NY1 story about the exhibit.
Why: While Manhattan is recognized as the birthplace of NYC’s LGBTQ movement, the stories of LGBTQ activism in Queens are largely absent from the historical narrative. It's an incredible story of activism in the face of tremendous opposition, and helped motivate Council Member Dromm's career shift from teaching to public office.
When: Open to Museum visitors, during regular Queens Museum hours (Wednesday through Sunday 11am-5pm) through July 31, 2017

Where: Queens Museum
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Corona, NY 11368

*Free Parking On-Site

Who: Hundreds of guests attended the exhibit's opening on June 9, including NYC First Lady Chirlane McCray, Comptroller Scott Stringer, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer, & featuring City Council Member Daniel Dromm. Additional attendees included:

- Alan Sack, Julio Rivera’s former partner and longtime friend
- Peg Fiore, Julio Rivera’s sister-in-law
- Dr. Gail O. Mellow, President of LaGuardia Community College
- Curators of the exhibition, LaGuardia faculty Thierry Gourjon and Javier Larenas
- Two of LaGuardia’s Gardiner-Shenker Student Scholars who worked on the exhibit: Ryan Tiscareno, Photography Scholar Student and Jham Valenzuela, English Scholar Student
[The additional LaGuardia Community College students who worked on the exhibit were: Allison Minto, Stanley Olivera, Gianni Sanchez, and Paul Yanchyshyn.]
- Laura Raicovich, Director of the Queens Museum

 ####


Spitzer students win Art + Science Leonardo da Vinci Challenge

Johannah Deegan and Zara Tamton

Art + Science Leonardo da Vinci Challenge winners Johannah Deegan (left) and Zara Tamton.

Architecture majors Johannah Deegan and Zara Tamton are winners of the inaugural Art + Science Leonardo da Vinci Challenge at The City College of New York. The team won for their artwork entitled “Flock,” which was created by using robots and coding.

Teams of two or more students submitted artwork expressing a scientific principle, concept, idea, process, and/or structure. A panel, using criteria based on both scientific and artistic considerations, named Deegan and Tamton, from the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture, winners.

The team created “Flock” by using Arduino microcontrollers, a procedural text based software, to build and program two robots to create human-like strokes and lines. The C++ language commanded the servomotors to rotate at varying speeds in different directions.

The two rotating servomotors were attached to arms that drew the underlying ink layer with a pen. A vibrating robot painted the colored overlay by moving bristles that brushed paint along the page.

View the robots and masterpiece here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.


Baruch College Confers More Than 4,800 Degrees during 2017 Commencement

Nearly 18,000 People Fill Barclays Center in Brooklyn for the Celebration

Baruch graduates at commencement

Baruch College graduates at Commencement exercises at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn

 

NEW YORK, NY-June 6, 2017 – Baruch College conferred 4,872 degrees from its Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, and Zicklin School of Business  on June 5 at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York.  More than 18,000 people filled the Center for the celebration. Dr. Mitchel B. Wallerstein, president of Baruch College, and Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs David Christy, PhD, presided over the Commencement exercises.

The Class of 2017 included 343 bachelor’s and master’s degree recipients from the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs becoming the first students to graduate under the Marxe name; 1,111 bachelor’s and master’s degree recipients from the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences; and 3,437 bachelor’s and master’s degree recipients from the Zicklin School of Business.

The College also awarded 16 doctoral degrees to students who completed coursework and dissertations under the supervision of faculty. These doctoral degrees were previously awarded at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall, and the students were recognized as graduates of Baruch College during Commencement.

In his remarks to the Class of 2017, President Wallerstein touched on the current political turmoil in the United States and around the world, and called on the graduates to pay it forward for future generations by becoming involved in their communities and at all levels of government.

“We strive to develop students and future professionals who can collaborate across racial, ethnic, and religious lines, and who appreciate the value and importance of international engagement and respect for those who come from different backgrounds. Too much is at stake for our planet and there’s too much to do together,” he said.

Commencement Speaker also a 2017 Alumnus

Adam Neumann, co-founder and CEO of WeWork, delivered the Commencement address. In 2010, Neumann and co-founder Miguel McKelvey started the company in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood with the idea of creating a workspace environment that centered on community. Today, WeWork provides workspace, community, and services to over 100,000 members in more than 44 cities around the world.

Neumann is also a member of the Class of 2017, graduating with a Bachelor of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship from the Zicklin School of Business. In 2002, Neumann entered Baruch but, by the fall of 2005, left the college to launch a career as an entrepreneur. Since then, his grandmother had been encouraging him to finish his education. Despite his tremendous success in business, Neumann returned to Baruch College this year, and completed the required coursework to obtain his degree 15 years since he was a first-year student.

"I know everyone here is a graduate, but in the pursuit of personal growth, we’re all students for life,” said Neumann. “And I think every night before you go to sleep, ask yourself: ‘Did I learn something important today? Did I have a big lesson? Or a small one?’ And if the answer is no, think harder, because every day there is one."

This year’s valedictorian, Caitlin Larsen, received a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Macaulay Honors College at Baruch. She addressed her fellow graduates saying, “As we graduate today in these times of deep political and international division, who we are and how we choose to treat people with all sorts of backgrounds and identities, becomes even more crucial."

During the event, Provost David Christy also acknowledged Quamid Francis, the salutatorian and former US Marine, who received a Bachelor of Science degree in Public Affairs. Francis had previously spoke at the College’s recent Student Achievement Awards ceremony.

Recognizing Outstanding Faculty

Baruch College bestowed honors on four faculty members. Eric Mandelbaum, an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy, received the Presidential Excellence Award for Distinguished Research. The Presidential Excellence Award for Distinguished Faculty Service went to Thomas Halper, who is a professor in political science. Jessica Lang, associate professor in the Department of English, and Henry Shevlin, an instructor in the Department of Philosophy, received the Presidential Excellence Award for Distinguished Faculty Service.

Honorary Degree Recipients

This year’s Honorary Degree recipients were Neil deGrasse Tyson and Allan E. Goodman.

Dr. Tyson, who received a Doctor of Pedagogy degree for his extraordinary accomplishments, is a renowned astrophysicist and the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. In this role, he has been a leader in advancing the understanding of science and particularly astronomy and astrophysics by the general public.

Dr. Goodman, president and CEO of the Institute of International Education (IIE), accepted a Doctor of Humane Letters degree for his exemplary accomplishments in international education IIE is the leading not-for-profit organization in the field of international educational exchange and development training. The organization conducts research and administers the Fulbright Programs, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, as well as several hundred corporate, government, and privately sponsored programs on international education.

Special Guest

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) made a surprise appearance at the Commencement ceremony. In offering his best wishes, Senator Schumer exclaimed, “To the great class of 2017 at Baruch College, one of the best colleges in the country, congratulations!”

 

Watch Commencement video here

Watch Adam Neumann's Commencement address here (courtesy of WeWork)

 

# # #


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of June 12, 2017  

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

As previously announced, Monday June 12th is a non-attendance day for K-8 students in all NYC Department of Education schools.

For students in Grades 9-12, Monday June 12 is the final day of instruction prior to Regents Week. During the Regents testing period, students in grades 9-12 only attend school for specified exams.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz

Principal

# # #

Lower Grades Announcements:

Our Orientation for incoming Kindergarten Families takes place on Tuesday morning.

Wednesday 6/14, End of Year Chess Celebration hosted by PTA, 5pm

Middle Grades Announcements:

To ensure that students have access to course-specific support beyond that which is provided within our regular instructional periods, please see the following link which specifies when academic supports for Grades 6-12 will be provided with an eye toward Summative Assessments:

Open Classroom Tutoring & Regents Review Schedule – Grades 6-12

Middle Grades Summative Assessments: (End-of-Year Projects, Papers, Final Exam Schedules, and Regents).

6th Grade:

·       ELA: Final Exam on 6/19/2017

·       Math: Final Exam on 6/14/2017

·       Science: Final Exam on 6/13/2017

·       Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/21/2017

·       Theater/Literacy: Final Project on 6/23/2017. This project has not been announced to students yet.

·       World Language: Final Exams on 6/15/2017-6/16/2017

 7th Grade:

·       ELA: Revised Paper due on 6/9/2017

·       Math: Final Exam on 6/9/2017

·       Science: Final Project Presentation the week of June 19th

·       Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/23/2017

·       World Language:  Final Exams on 6/15/2017-6/16/2017

 8th Grade:

Please Review the June 2017 Regents and SLP Schedule. Passing the Regents course and corresponding exam is necessary to earn high school credit in 8th Grade. If a family makes a choice to opt-out of a Regents exam or SLP, students will not be able to earn high school credit for that course.

8th Grade families that wish to opt out of a Second Language Proficiency Exam, the final day to do so will be Tuesday, June 6th. Please complete the SLP Opt Out Request Form below:     https://goo.gl/forms/shKWePGnbcy8pQp93

Regents exams are non-attendance days for students participating in the exams. Students will come in to take the exam only and then will be dismissed. 8th Grade Courses will not be in session on the following dates:

  • 6/13/2017
  • 6/15/2017
  • 6/19/2017

 

  • For non-Regents courses or students not taking the Regents exams or SLP, the non-Regents Finals are occurring on:
    • ELA: 6/14/2017
    • Math: 6/13/2017
    • Science: 6/16/2017
    • Social Studies: 6/16/2017
    • World Language: 6/14/2017 & 6/16/2017
  • All Finals above with the exception of Math, will occur during the class period, i.e., the regular scheduled time students have the classes above.

 For 8th grade students and families:

·      6/13 – Report for US History Regents and then Algebra Regents. Alternative Algebra I Final occurs on this day as well.

·      6/14 – Normal day of school. ELA and Alternative World Language Finals occur on this day.

·      6/15 – Report for Earth Science Regents only

·      6/16 – Normal day of school except for students taking Geometry Regents. Alternative Science, Social Studies, and World Language Finals occur on this day as well.

·      6/19 – Report for World Languages Second Language Proficiency (SLP) exam only

·      6/20 – Normal day

·      6/21 – Normal day, 8th Grade Cruise at night

·      6/22 – Report for Graduation only at Cooper Union

·      6/23 – Report to school normal time. 8th grade Field Day Field Trip.

Upper Grades Announcements:

This week begins our June Regents Examination Cycle. Please Review the June 2017 Regents SLP and LOTE Schedule and note the following:

  • Regents exam days are non-attendance days for Upper Grade Students. Students will come to school only if they are taking an exam and then will be dismissed from school when finished. Students taking two exams on a single day should be prepared with food and snacks as they will have limited break time (45 minutes) between tests.
  • For morning Regents Exams students should arrive to school by 8:45am and be seated in their exam room by 9:00am for attendance and test directions
  • For afternoon Regents Exams students should be seated in their Exam Room by 1:00pm
  • Students who finish a morning exam early may not leave the Regents Exam room before 10:30am. Students who finish an afternoon exam may not leave the Regents Exam room before 2:30pm.
  • All students taking Regents Exams should bring a copy of their Regents ticket and school ID with them on Exam Days.
  • Student Cell Phones must be powered off and stored in hallway lockers before the beginning of any Regents Exam. Cell Phones brought into an Exam room must be given to the testing room proctor before the exam begins and will be held by the testing room proctor until the test’s conclusion. Students may NOT wear or use any electronic device during a Regents Exam– this includes Smart Watches and bluetooth enabled fitness bands.

Monday, June 12th:

Textbook return and locker clean-out day.

–Students, please return all school issued textbooks to your classroom teachers by the end of the day. Each textbook must be returned and logged back to the teacher who issued it to you. Do not leave books in lockers, on hallway floors, or in random classrooms– as these books will be reported missing and you will be charged for the book.

–If you are studying for a Regents Exam and need to keep a book for study, you may do so as long as the book is returned no later than the day of the Regents Exam. Please return the book to your teacher or the Department Chair so the book may be properly logged in.

–Please clean out the contents of your locker by the end of the day. You may leave your lock attached to store your cell phone or Electronic Device on Regents Exam Days. After your last Regents, please remove your lock. If you are not taking any Regents Exams please remove your lock by the end of the day.

Tuesday, June 13:

US History Regents (9:00am)

Algebra I Regents (1:00pm)
Wednesday, June 14:

Common Core ELA Regents (9:00am)

Living Environment Regents (1:00pm)
Thursday, June 15:

Global History Regents (9:00am)

Physics Regents (1:00pm)

Earth Science Regents (1:00pm)
Friday, June 16:

Geometry Regents (9:00am)

Algebra 2 Regents (1:00pm)
Monday, June 19:

Second Language Proficiency Exams (9:00am)

LOTE – Languages Other than English Exams (1:00pm)
Tuesday, June 20:

Chemistry Regents (9:00am)
Wednesday, June 21st

Regents Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students
Thursday, June 22nd

Upper Grades Commencement at Cooper Union Great Hall

Regents Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students
Friday, June 22nd

Regents Rating Day

Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students
Monday, June 26th

Eid al-Fitr (schools closed)


Tuesday, June 27th

Upper Grades classes are in session (Normal School Day)
Wednesday, June 28th

Final Day of School (½ day with dismissal at 11:30am)

–Please be sure all textbooks have been turned in and that your locker is clean / without lock


Looking ahead

  • Monday, June 12
    • Clerical day for Lower Grades and Middle Grades students (Non Attendance Date, Grades K-8).
    • This is a regular instructional day for Grades 9-12. It is the last day of instruction prior to Regents Week.
  • Tuesday, June 13- Thursday June 22:  Regents Week
  • Wednesday June 21
    • 5th Grade “Stepping Up/Graduation” Ceremony at NEST+m, 8:30am
  • Thursday, June 22
    • 8th Grade Stepping Up Ceremony, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 12:30pm
    • 12th Grade Graduation, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 9:00am
  • Friday, June 23
    • Regents Rating Day for High schools
  • Monday, June 26
    • Eid al-Fitr. All schools are closed
  • Tuesday, June 27
    • Regular instructional day
  • Wednesday, June 28
    • Scheduled half day. Last Day of School


LaGuardia Community College Marks Largest-Ever Graduating Class of 1,700+!

#BLACKLIVESMATTER Co-Founder Alicia Garza Gave Keynote at
College’s 45th Commencement!

#LAGCCGrad2017

LONG ISLAND CITY, NY (June 8, 2017)—Earlier today, the largest graduating class in the history of LaGuardia Community College—1,735—celebrated earning their associate’s degrees at the college’s 2017 Commencement. The ceremony, which marked the 45th graduation for the college, a member of the City University of New York (CUNY), had an audience of over 10,000 family members and friends of the graduates, college faculty and staff, CUNY Trustees, elected officials, and invited guests. The event was held at Barclays Center.

“LaGuardia graduates are what our city and nation need to thrive! Because our students overwhelmingly come from low-income, recent immigrant, or other disadvantaged backgrounds, earning their associate’s is an incredible accomplishment,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “And the grit that many have shown—learning English, juggling work, raising young children, and dealing with other obstacles along the way, often with optimism, humor, and perseverance—is sure to serve them well in a senior college or in the job market. These 2017 graduates represent our greatest achievement.”

Co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter and special projects director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance, Alicia Garza, gave the keynote address. Lorelei Salas, JD, commissioner of NYC’s Department of Consumer Affairs, gave the alumni speech. Commissioner Salas is a 1993 graduate of LaGuardia.

“LaGuardia Community College graduates represent just about every possible background—every color and culture, every faith and walk of life. I was pleased and honored to have delivered the 2017 Commencement keynote today,” said Garza, who will receive the Sydney Peace Prize, Australia’s international peace prize, later this year. “The world needs the best and the brightest thinkers, strategists, and tech gurus, to build the world that we want to see. A world where all lives matter.”

“My presence at today’s graduation is proof that LaGuardia creates opportunities for those with perseverance and intellect,” said Commissioner Salas.

The 2017 Class Speech was given by Remy Patrick Lavilla, age 19, who moved to the United States in 2015 after Typhoon Haiyan devastated his hometown in The Philippines. He received his associate's in accounting; this fall he’ll begin pursuing his bachelor’s in economics at Columbia University. During his time at LaGuardia, he was awarded numerous awards and honors, including ThinkGeek’s National Innovation for Tomorrow Award. At LaGuardia, Lavilla was a President’s Society Ambassador, a member of both the Honors Program and Phi Theta Kappa. He managed his many on-campus activities while consistently making the Dean’s List; maintaining a 3.9 GPA.

“I thank the professors at LaGuardia for making learning our passion, for instilling in us the hunger for knowledge, and the passion to learn,” said Lavilla. “Today, we became LaGuardia alums and I encourage my fellow Class 2017 graduates to continue to fight against stereotypes about community college students. We are the ultimate measure of the success of community colleges!”

Among the oldest graduates is Verdia Hart, 72-years-old, a retired African-American woman who’s traveled to NYC from her home in Columbia, South Carolina, to pick up her associate’s degree. After raising her six children, all of whom will be in the audience, and helping with her 12 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, Mrs. Hart is fulfilling her life-long goal of earning her college degree. Next step, a bachelor’s!

According to data about the 2017 graduates from LaGuardia’s registrar office, 48 percent are 25 years old or older, and 60 percent are female. Nearly 50 percent self-identify as Hispanic/Latino. The next largest student demographic is Asian, 23 percent; followed by 16 percent Black/African-American. Fifty-nine percent of graduates live in Queens, while 18 percent live in Brooklyn. The top three majors of the class of 2017 were: Business Administration, Liberal Arts: Social Science & Humanities, and Criminal Justice. To download a print-ready infographic about LaGuardia’s Class of 2017, click here.

Jonathan Morales, one of three LaGuardia honors program students selected for the prestigious and generous Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship, which provides up to $40,000 a year towards their bachelor’s, will graduate. He dropped out of high school and worked as a carpenter for several years before finding his way to LaGuardia. This fall he’ll start pursuing his bachelor’s at Stanford University.

Mahmudur Rahman, a Bengali-American from Jamaica, Queens, transferred to LaGuardia after two years at a SUNY college. He earned his associate’s in business administration, and plans to pursue his bachelor’s at Brooklyn College. “LaGuardia created a space where I could take chances exploring what most interests me, and because of LaGuardia’s open access admissions, I’ve met people from all walks of life,” said Rahman, who was a member of the first-ever cohort of President’s Society: Tech, an enrichment program for high-achieving students interested in the tech industry.

The LaGuardia Student Choir performed the Star Spangled Banner, arranged and conducted by LaGuardia Associate Professor of Music and Theater, Lisa DeSpain.

Click here for more information about LaGuardia’s 45th Annual Commencement.

To download a print-ready infographic about LaGuardia’s Class of 2017, click here.

To view/download commencement photos, click here.

####

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.


Professor Ocejo Tackles Tradition in New Book, Masters of Craft

 

Professor Ocejo Tackles Tradition in New Book, Masters of Craft

In a simpler time, back when Silicon Valley still produced pears and apricots and the notion of putting a man on the moon seemed as far off as the moon itself, the livelihoods of middle-class men and women were defined by their craft. There were apprentices and journeymen and masters of craft who survived and sometimes thrived on skills like basket weaving, barrel making, embroidery, metalworking, pottery, woodworking, and glassblowing to name a few. In his latest book, Associate Professor of Sociology Richard Ocejo contends that despite modern developments like the Internet and the digital economy, some crafts are alive and well due to a resurgence of interest in making things well and doing it by hand.

In Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Economy, Ocejo zeroes in on four distinct crafts — barbering, butchering, bartending, and distilling — and sets out to understand why they are more popular today among employment-seekers and consumers than they have been in nearly a century.

While working in crafts had never died out completely, Ocejo sets out to discover why increasing numbers of middle-class individuals are rejecting traditional employment opportunities in favor of jobs that might otherwise be characterized as below their skill level.

“I was surprised,” he said. “They were all people who had college degrees, they were well-educated, some had worked in other professions and had other careers, but they all chose to work these jobs.”

Ocejo became fascinated in craftwork in 2007 when he noticed two new cocktail bars on the Lower East Side that didn’t quite fit into the neighborhood.  “I was blown away by what was going on inside of them,” he said. “It was dark and there was jazz playing, fruity aromas in the air, and bartenders using really meticulous techniques to make drinks that all had weird ingredients and names.”

Studying the techniques and motivations of craft bartenders and the cocktails they made eventually led Ocejo to the world of distilling, where he became introduced to a cohort of passionate creators at Tuthilltown Spirits in upstate New York. Through an internship there, Ocejo observed young, enthusiastic distillers taking great pride in what only recently was referred to as a manufacturing job.  The difference is that unlike factory-made spirits, at the places Ocejo studied, “human input is an essential part of every step of the process.”

By studying bartenders, butchers, and barbers, Ocejo concluded that craft workers are often far more satisfied in their current vocations than any previous jobs they held.

According to Ocejo: “A lot of them latched onto the idea that work should be something that is meaningful and fulfilling, that it should not just be for material reward but should have some psychological component. They didn’t see themselves fitting into the more typical paths for well-educated middle-class folks.”

 

Working with their hands to create products that have come to be known as authentic and individualized, craft workers have helped evolve a strong consumer demand for such products, albeit in mostly urban areas.

As he summarized: “It wasn’t so much about serving drinks as knowing what goes into the drinks. It wasn’t about mass-producing a spirit, but understanding why that spirit was authentically made. It was not so much about quickly cutting hair as it was about cultivating a certain style and conveying a sense of masculinity. Cutting meat wasn’t about being in food retail, it was promoting this philosophy of what is ethical, sustainable, good meat.”

Ocejo also observed a tension between this new class of educated craft workers and those who held such jobs before the “craft revolution” rose to prominence. In many cases, jobs at craft businesses are not accessible to the average bartender or barber if they lack the cultural understanding to appreciate why making the product “authentically” is significant. Further, if they cannot communicate the notion of authenticity to the consumer — explain where the beef came from or why a drink is being mixed a certain way — they don’t fit into the craft economy.

“If you’re in central Ohio, a former manufacturing capital, these opportunities are really not there. The sense of aesthetics that is undergirding these jobs really doesn’t exist,” Ocejo noted. “People who are closer to scarcity have less freedom or will to seriously intellectualize what they consume.”

Ocejo said workers in the craft economy are not displacing traditional jobs as much as developing a new industry. And what the educated cocktail master has in common with the disaffected Ohioan factory worker is that both share the end goal of carving out a middle class living that gives them enough to survive while offering some kind of psychological satisfaction.

“People are searching for something authentic, something real. I don’t see where this ends — it will keep expanding,” Ocejo said.

Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Economy was published in April by Princeton University Press.


Watson Fellowship Taps Three John Jay Students

 

Watson Fellowship Taps Three John Jay Students

Three John Jay students — sophomores Jasmine Awad and Lisa Nishimura, and freshman Alexandra Shoneyin — have been selected for the 2017 cohort of the prestigious and highly competitive Jeanette K. Watson Fellowship program.

Awarded by the Thomas J. Watson Foundation, the fellowships provide New York City undergraduates with three consecutive summers of fully-funded internship opportunities with leading nonprofit, for-profit, government, and law organizations. Coupled with workshops and seminars, the fellowships allow students to pursue a wide range of academic and personal interests to develop their personal, professional and cultural potential.

Watson Fellow Jasmine AwadAwad is a Criminal Justice major and Human Services minor who said she’s excited to explore her identity professionally, personally and academically. “I’m extremely excited, because I wanted to apply freshman year, but was discouraged because of how prestigious it is – I didn’t think I was good enough,” she said. But Awad was encouraged to apply by her close friend, 2016 Watson Fellow Kadeem Robinson.

Awad is an Honors student, a Student Council representative, and soon-to-be treasurer of the Youth Justice Club, where she advocates for juvenile justice awareness on campus.  She aspires to go to law school and has a special interest in cases involving wrongful convictions. “In 10 years I can picture myself in a courtroom, but it’s important to stay open. Go after all of your goals no matter what they are,” she said. Awad will start off her fellowship as the President’s Intern at the Institute of International Education.

Watson Fellow Alexandra ShoneyinAlexandra Shoneyin has yet to declare a major but is leaning toward English and Philosophy because, in her own words, “I feel like it’s a better lens to look at social issues in the world and learn more about myself.” Shoneyin plays guitar, is curious about filmmaking and rejects the idea of declaring what she wants to do with her life at such a young age.

“I think the Watson Fellowship gives people the power and the confidence to do whatever it is they want to do,” she said. “It’s like I’m at the bottom of the ladder and Watson is the ladder and my goals are on top. It gives me that extra push to pursue other opportunities.”

Shoneyin said her selection for the fellowship may have had something to do with how vulnerable she was in her application. “I went to a predominantly white high school and I thought I had to preserve my blackness,” she said. “I was angry, but I decided that I need to have an approach that unites people and creates discussion instead of violence and divisiveness.”

She insists on maintaining an attitude of openness in terms of how to pursue her social justice goals. “I want to create some sort of change,” she said. “It could be through law or policy, which could involve going to law school, or it could be through creating music that is social justice-oriented. It could also be though film or art, which helps people to heal and learn more about social issues.”

Shoneyin will serve as an education intern at the Studio Museum in Harlem. Both Shoneyin and Awad hail from Staten Island.

Watson Fellow Lisa NishimuraLisa Nishimura is currently a Criminology major, but is planning to create her own major through the CUNY B.A. program. She aims to study the Asian diaspora and Latin America, inspired by her experience being raised by a single Japanese mother in Manhattan’s predominantly Dominican neighborhood of Washington Heights. “People called me ‘China,’” she said, “and I didn’t grow up with my father [from El Salvador], so I never felt like I could own up to my Latina identity.”

At one point, Nishimura and her mother were homeless. “It’s a miracle that I’m still alive today,” she said. “It’s had a great impact on me because I know what it fees like to not have the tools or resources to succeed in the world. So I want to give back to my community and those who feel like they’re alone.”

Nishimura is president of the Women’s Empowerment Society, and said she wants to start a new multiculturalism club at John Jay to bring people together to talk about the experiences of being multiracial.

“For me, Watson is very unique in the sense that they push you out of your comfort zone,” she said. “You can try a field that you would never have thought of getting into and broaden you perspective. What I want to get out of this fellowship is a better sense of who I am as a person and how I identify myself.”

Nishimura will start off her fellowship as a Culture and Inclusion intern at Foote, Cone & Belding, an advertising agency.


Crunching the Numbers to Gauge Extremist Crime

 

Crunching the Numbers to Gauge Extremist Crime

The Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, the mass shooting at the Charleston AME church and the Boston Marathon bombing are three recent examples of violent attacks that have shocked the nation. While each was carried out by different assailants under different circumstances, they share a common thread: these events are among many others that are being tracked by the United States Extremist Crime Database, created by John Jay Professor Joshua Freilich.

Developed in collaboration with Steven Chermak, a professor at Michigan State University, Freilich’s work is currently funded through nearly $2.5 million in grants provided by the Office of University Programs at the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Institute of Justice. The Extremist Crime Database tracks violent attacks, homicides, and financial crimes carried out by extremists inside the United States, with the aim of arming law enforcement with knowledge and best practices that may help prevent a future domestic terrorist attack.

Freilich, a member of the Department of Criminal Justice, focuses his tracking efforts primarily on two distinct groups: Islamic jihadists and extreme-right nationalists. “The way you come into the system is you have to commit either a violent crime or a financial crime and subscribe to an extremist belief system,” said Freilich. In the case of far right extremism, he said, “We look for indicators that the individual was a far rightist themselves. It could be media reports that someone had a copy of Mein Kampf, maybe a swastika tattoo — something that connects the person to the movement. But we also look for indicators to see if the crime was ideologically motivated, to further the ideology.”

The database shows that since 1990, supporters of jihadist movement have committed 45 fatal events, while far right extremists committed 195 fatal events during the same time frame. In this context an event means an attack such as a bombing, shooting, or other violent assault that resulted in at least one death.  The 9/11 attack, for example, is considered four separate events: attacks on each of the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, and the hijacked plane that crashed in Pennsylvania. Some events tracked by the database, like the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, resulted in multiple fatalities, while many others resulted in only one death. Far-rightists also committed more than 650 financial crimes during this time frame, while jihadists committed around 180 financial and material support crimes.

The database also tracks violent attacks perpetrated by environmental or animal rights extremists. While these represent a smaller percentage of attacks overall, and only a handful of homicides, eco-terrorists have committed 180 ideologically motivated arsons and bombings since 1995.

Initially, the data lead one to believe that far-right extremists are in fact more dangerous than jihadists because they are responsible for nearly four times as many events. But the data also show that attacks by jihadists have resulted in more overall deaths than those by right wing extremists.

Over 40 percent of all fatal attacks carried out by right-wing extremists targeted racial minorities such as African Americans, Latinos, and Asians. Anti-government attacks represent the second largest share, with roughly 20 percent, with the remainder of attacks targeting other marginalized groups including the LBGT community, abortion rights advocates, homeless people, and religious minorities.

In Freilich’s view, equally important to tracking completed fatal violent attacks by extremist groups is tracking attempts that were prevented by law enforcement. “We think the data could be very useful,” he said, “We can compare successful to unsuccessful attacks to identify what policies and interventions are useful to law enforcement, thus identifying best practices.”

In a new study, Freilich has examined deadly far-right attacks in the context of various preventive measures, interventions, and other terrorist attacks to examine the effect that prior attacks and laws passed to prevent such attacks may have on future events.

“We looked at 15 things,” Freilich said, “including the Patriot Act, Obama’s election in 2008, and the impact of certain al Qaeda attacks, among others.” What he found surprised him: The only measure that had any effect was the Patriot Act, which resulted in a decrease in violent events. Freilich chalks this up to relaxed privacy protections, and increased surveillance by the intelligence community and increased law enforcement resources, among other factors.

“The big takeaway is that a lot of the things that were done to influence or prevent violence had no effect,” he said.

Freilich recently co-authored an article for The New Republic in which he contextualized information from his database to shed light on the Pulse nightclub shooting. Read the article here


An Inside Look at the Machinery of Government

 

An Inside Look at the Machinery of Government

“When you’re in the Senate, you can feel the power. Everything is slow and deliberate and done withgreat intention. But the House is really scrappy and super fast-paced. It’s the voice of the people. It’s hard to pick between the two of them.”

While those words sound like they came from a seasoned politician, in fact they are born of the personal experience of John Jay alumna Katie Spoerer (B.A./M.A. ’12). Spoerer’s interest in politics surfaced early in her career, and through a series of internships including the Edward T. Rogowsky internship, she was hired to work in the office of New York’s junior U.S. Senator, Kirsten Gillibrand, as a deputy scheduler, all before she had completed her degree.

“I would go to work all day, come home, and continue working on my thesis,” she said. “It was a lot of work but eventually I finished.”
At John Jay, Spoerer completed dual bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Criminal Justice, with an undergraduate minor in Political Science. She conducted an original study to understand how people perceived youth through the criminal system, with a focus on the moral panic theory. But during the day she worked closely with Gillibrand, helping to manage a bulging schedule of meetings and engagements.

Her next job on Capitol Hill brought Spoerer right back to her hometown of Cumberland, R.I., working for Representative David Cicilline, her local Congressman. “The House and Senate are so different, they’re literally worlds apart,” she said. In addition, she went on to note, the Senate at the time had a Democratic majority, while the House was led by Republicans. “It’s tough because being in the House minority, there’s very little you can do — it’s difficult to pass legislation,” she said. “So much of your focus is constituent casework. It was really fun working for my hometown member, because I saw what he was doing for my community where my family still lives.”

Most recently, Spoerer was working at the Department of Energy as Special Assistant in the Office of the Secretary. She was required to submit her resignation as a result of the recent presidential transition, but says that working at the DOE was nonetheless an excellent experience. “I was working at the highest level of an agency that had an enormous impact under Obama in everything from climate action to the Iran deal,” she said.
Two things that surprised her about transitioning from Capitol Hill to an executive agency was just how big the agency was, and how it functioned in a completely bipartisan way.

“One thing that’s overlooked is that there are so many career people who have been through numerous transitions,” she said. “There are people who’ve been working at the DOE for 40 years. They’ve seen transitions over and over again. They know how to function and maintain and continue projects, even with a new administration.”

Spoerer is optimistic about finding another position in government, and says her long term goal is to be a chief of staff, a position that she says requires someone who can see the bigger picture and understand how the wheels of politics turn together.

“Transferring to John Jay was one of the best decisions I ever made,” said Spoerer, who was honored in 2016 as a Distinguished Young Alumna. “It put me on the trajectory that I’m on now. I worked with people who were experts in their field, and I have some of the most amazing mentors and connections because of it.”


Graduate Students’ Research Papers Find a Niche in Security Journal

 

Graduate Students’ Research Papers Find a Niche in Security Journal

John Jay graduate students Stephanie Gootman and Christine Vega have made a lasting contribution to the growing body of knowledge on cybersecurity while earning significant new lines on their résumés — they had their research papers published in the Journal of Applied Security Research.

Titled “Securing Cyberspace: Man versus Machine,” Vega’s paper focuses on the importance of cybersecurity and protection, while Gootman focused on last year’s hack of the federal Office of Personnel Management, in a paper titled “OPM Hack: The Most Dangerous Threat to the Federal Government Today.” Both students were surprised to hear the news, and both commented that they were mostly preoccupied with achieving good grades in the class, and did not expect to be published.

Picture of Christine Vega The papers appear in the October-December 2016 issue of the journal.

“I focused on OPM because it was so large scale, and it shook the federal government to its core,” said Gootman, a first-year graduate student pursuing her master’s in Protection Management. The OPM hack affected nearly 20 million employees whose sensitive personal information was. “In terms of security, one of our biggest concerns is assets and info that can be stolen and used to conduct economic espionage and it really affects the foundation of government,” she said.

Professor Robert McCrie of the Department of Security, Fire and Emergency Management was thrilled by his students’ achievement. “John Jay students have been successfully published in this journal and others in the past, but never two at the same time,” he noted. Gootman, he added, “wrote a brave critique that deserved a wider audience, and now has received it.”

Picture of Stephanie GootmanGootman herself was ensnared in the OPM hack after applying for an internship with a government agency, only to learn subsequently that her personal information had been stolen. She said that this partly inspired her work. “This is something I’m passionate about and it’s a topic that I spent months researching,” she said.

A native of East Brunswick, N.J., Gootman said she came to John Jay after interning at the Red Cross and meeting several John Jay students who spoke highly of the emergency management program. She currently works for the federal government as an emergency management specialist. “It works out that I got the job but I got my info taken in the process,” she laughed.

Gootman and Vega have a shared concern that the general public is insufficiently aware of the dangers posed by cyber threats. Vega, a second-year student in the Protection Management program, recalls a past job at a nonprofit in which this issue became particularly apparent. The IT manager sent out a fake email as a test, in which he asked employees to respond with their username and password — a classic phishing technique used by hackers worldwide. To Vega’s dismay, nearly all employees responded with their credentials, proving to her and the IT manager that there is a serious lack of awareness or willingness to protect the integrity of data.

Vega’s article stresses responsibility. “Everyone depends on this machine [the computer], but humans are the only ones that can solve this problem,” she pointed out. “It’s not only employees getting hacked, but your trade secrets, copyrights, your legal documents. . . . Your competition could find out everything you know.”

“IT security represents a great risk to our national coherence. No organization is immune, as Vega observes,” said McCrie.
Vega is currently a crisis management analyst at Goldman Sachs, where, she said, “a lot of what I’m learning from John Jay is now getting applied.” She grew up in Staten Island and earned her bachelor’s degree at Pace University. She decided to pursue a master’s at John Jay while interning with the New York City Office of Emergency Management, and has her sights set on a long-term goal of working as a continuity planner.


CLASS ACTS — Snapshots of members of the Class of 2017

Grace Theresa Agalo-OsAmazing Grace

For Grace Theresa Agalo-Os, John Jay's Student Council president, "Progress feels amazing." Few would know the feeling better than her. During her three-year tenure on the Student Council, Agaolo-Os has overseen a wide range of accomplishments, and will graduate leaving behind a serious legacy.

Agalo-Os was born in the Philippines and has a spinal disability, one of the reasons she came to the Untied States. "A lot of my work here at John Jay is about accessibility rights," she pointed out. "Before I came here, we did not have equal access to exit the building through Haaren Hall." In three years on the Student Council, she mobilized support for campus accessibility through conversations, petitions, and testimony given to CUNY officials. Because of her efforts, a state-funded lift will be installed at the 59th Street mezzanine and the 10th Avenue entrance to Haaren Hall.

"For those future students who won't have to struggle with the degradation of your friends having to pick up your wheelchair so you can join them, it will be incredible for them to be able to feel that way."

Other accomplishments by Agalo-Os and the Student Council include the hiring of a full-time nurse practitioner and an LGBTQ task force coordinator in the fall; renewed funding for Single Stop; and new earmarks for the Office of Accessibility Services.

Agalo-Os, a Political Science major with a minor in Anthropology, she plans to visit her family in the Philippines after graduation, before return-ing to apply for internships at City Hall and, eventually, attending law school.

Jessica JeanHead of the Class

Not even a severely broken leg during her junior year could stop Jessica Jean from being a four-year member of the women's soccer team, or a four-year member of the Honors Program, or president of both the City University and John Jay Student-Athlete Advisory Committee.

Highly motivated, service-oriented and goal-driven, Jean will be earning her under- graduate degree through the CUNY Baccalaureate program, with a double
major in Education Psychology and Communication. She'll be putting her talents -- learned and innate -- to work in the fall as part of the Teach for America initiative.

"I've been pretty much able to do what I wanted through the CUNY B.A.," said Jean, who dabbled in three different majors at John Jay before a handful of caring mentors suggested she try the CUNY degree route. In Teach for America, she'll make a two-year commitment to teach in one of New York City's middle or high schools. "Whatever school I'm assigned to, I'm going to make the best contribution I can."

The TFA program will put Jean through graduate school, and she hopes eventually to earn a Ph.D. and become a college professor.

If success is a product of hard work and dedication, Jean is a sure bet. In addition to her involvement as a student athlete, she has been a Peer Ambassador, a Peer Mentor with the Urban Male Initiative, and campus recruitment coordinator for the CUNY Service Corps. She says of her future, "There's a really big picture outside of where you are, and even if you can't see it now, you have to keep trying to build a better version of yourself. Personal growth doesn't stop."

Piotr TandekService ACE

It's not that Piotr Tandek doesn't like John Jay -- far from it, in fact -- but he is about to complete his B.S. degree in Criminal Justice in just two years from admission to Commencement.

Tandek, who is all of 19 years old, was part of the first cohort of the ACE (Accelerate, Complete, Engage) program, and will be the first to graduate from the two-year-old student-success initiative. He entered John Jay already armed with more than 30 credits thanks to high school AP classes, proficiency tests, foreign language skills (he's trilingual), and the Police Cadet Corps.

"I told my advisor I wanted to graduate in three years," said Tandek, "and I was told ‘What's your hurry? It might be hard." So instead, with full course loads year-round, including winter and summer mini-semesters, he's finishing in two.

Tandek's service in the Cadet Corps is part of his preparation for a career with the NYPD. While he will have to wait until age 21 to be sworn in, he plans to use the time to good advantage by pursuing a master's degree in history at the College of Staten Island, in order to teach after his NYPD career ends.

"I have a goal to do 25 years, and get to lieutenant by age 30," said Tandek. "I want to have the power to change things. I want to be proactive. I want to be on the job to serve people."

Farah Chichgar-SinghOnline, and On Her Way

Credit John Jay Online with providing the flexible workspace Farah Chichgar-Singh needed to make her dreams come true.

Chichgar-Singh, the daughter of Indian immigrants, came to John Jay College as the first in her family to pursue a higher education. Having watched her parents work hard to provide
for the family's needs, Chichgar-Singh devoted herself to higher education as a gateway to a better life. "My parents work hard," she explained "We had everything we needed, but not much of what we wanted."

Her own hard work is about to pay off, with a Master of Public Administration degree via the Inspector General track.

Chichgar-Singh started at John Jay as a traditional student but soon transitioned to John
Jay Online to take advantage of the flexible schedule -- her second son was born while she worked toward her master's degree. Her sons, ages 7 and 2, serve as her motivation to finish her degree and pursue the career of her dreams. "My sons see me working and doing homework,"

Chichgar-Singh said. "They are learning how important education is." Her oldest son dreams of becoming a police officer, and Chichgar-Singh hopes someday to have another John Jay College graduate in the family.
She is now the first in her family to obtain a college degree. "There were some tough times, but I pushed through them. I thought of my boys and I knew I couldn't give up." With her degree, Chichgar-Singh will pursue a career in fraud investigation. When asked what advice she would pass on to her boys, she said simply, "Never give up, no matter what."

Victoria DePrimoNo Bones About It

Victoria DePrimo says she's wanted to work in forensic science since grammar school, and she chose to attend St. Joseph Hill Academy because it was the only high school on Staten Island that offered a forensic science class. As a student in John Jay's PRISM program, DePrimo has diver-sified her skills by picking up a biology minor and a concentration in toxicology, bringing her ever closer to her dream of working in a crime lab.

"I came in with an open mind for forensics," she said. "What I like about it is that that it's always changing, never stationary. There's always something brand new that has come to light in research that changes the way we examine different evidence, and that's what I love about this."

An Honors Program student, DePrimo has been working with Professor Angelique Corthals
in studying bone density, with an aim toward discovering how marks on bones can be used to trace the implements or weapons used in assault or murder cases.

The typical forensic technique is to blanch bones before conducting evaluations, but De Primo says her research suggests changes in the protocol for forensic anthropology identification. "It's possible that if they don't blanch it they could have more accurate results," she said.

The real-world impact of the work is what De-Primo says turns her on about forensics, which she plans to continue studying in graduate school at the University of New Haven. "I'm so excited for what the future holds," she said.

Marcus JohnsonMaking the Most

Just how badly did Marcus Johnson want to attend John Jay College? When he applied to but was not accepted by the College, he was devastated. Fortunately, his mother did some online research and learned about the SEEK program. And so, on the day of his high school graduation, still robed in his cap and gown, he and his mother headed to John Jay, met with SEEK officials and won his coveted admission. Now the 22 year old single father is about to earn his bachelor's degree in International Criminal Justice, the first step toward what he hopes will be a career as a Foreign Service officer.

Johnson will leave behind a record of increasingly high achievement at John Jay, including three years in the Honors Program, appointment as a John Jay-Vera Fellow, and a term as president of the College's chapter of Chi Alpha Epsilon, the national SEEK honor society.

Johnson believes in both internal and external motivation. "Internal is wanting to be the change in the world. External includes family and friends, who push me to go past my limits" Among those motivators is his 4-year-old daughter, of whom he says, "I want to expose my child to opportunities I was never presented with, and have a life that's better than mine."

A veteran of numerous internships, including placements with UNICEF, the Clinton Founda-tion and the National Urban League, Johnson is quick to credit them with "helping me figure out what I feel passionate about, and helping me realize that my goals are possible."

Service is his guiding ethos. "I'm not doing this just for me," said Johnson, who is going
on to graduate school at Columbia University. "I've been able to take full advantage of every opportunity that John Jay has to offer. It would be dishonest if I didn't try to give back -- to my family, my friends, my community."

Ariana CastilloActivism Awakened

Ariana Castillo recalls having heard a saying: "If your parents recognize you intellectually after graduating from college, the institution hasn't done its job." Apparently John Jay did its part. "The one fundamental thing that I'll always remember," she said, "is my mom all of the sudden realizing who I was and how much I had developed. Now, she's concerned that I'm too much of an advocate."

Castillo, a Forensic Psychology major, says that her four years at John Jay awoke an activist inside of her that she is prepared to bring with her wherever she goes.

In her freshman year, Castillo developed connections with the Prisoner Reentry Institute, and participated in a learning exchange at the upstate Otisville Correctional Facility, taking classes with inside students through the Prison to College Pipeline. "It solidified the fact that I wanted to work with incarcerated individuals," she said.

This experience influenced Castillo to pursue a master's degree studying clinical psychology, through which she aims to apply her understanding of psychology to the criminal justice field. In the fall, she will be enrolling in the University at Buffalo (SUNY), an institution she became connected with through her involvement with McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program.

Castillo, who beat cancer during her junior year, also studied abroad in Tanzania, working with a theater arts program for local youth.

"No one of these opportunities can outweigh the other," she said. "Being in P2CP, being in McNair, working as a peer success coach on campus, and being a Vera Fellow – they each played a major role in developing who I am today."

 


New Code for Creating Melanin-Like Materials

Scientists across the City University of New York (CUNY) have created the first successful process for developing materials that mimic the properties of melanin — the pigments that give color to skin, hair, and eyes — according to a paper published in the journal Science. The discovery could enable the development of novel cosmetic, skin care, and biomedical products.

Researchers have only begun to understand the broad functional range of melanin, but they have already identified a number of very useful qualities, including providing protection from cancer-causing UV radiation and free radicals, enabling electronic conductance and adhesiveness, and having the capacity to store energy. A new protocol developed by researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC), at the Graduate Center, CUNY (GC) will allow scientists to produce materials that mimic the properties of melanin, and it will provide unprecedented control over expressing specific properties.

Polymeric pigments produced by guided oxidation of peptide assembliesTo produce these materials, researchers had to overcome a major molecular challenge. Unlike other biopolymers, such as DNA and proteins, where a direct link exists between the polymers’ ordered structures and their properties, melanin is inherently disordered, so directly relating structure to function is not possible. As a result, laboratory-based synthesis of melanin has been thwarted by the difficulty of engineering its disorderly molecular structure.

Principal investigator Rein V. Ulijn, director of the Nanoscience Initiative at the ASRC, and his team solved the dilemma by using tripeptides — proteins consisting of just three amino acids — to produce a range of molecular architectures with precisely controlled levels of order and disorder. When those peptide structures oxidized, they produced polymeric pigments with a range of colors, from light beige to deep brown.

Lead author Ayala Lampel, a postdoctoral fellow in the Ulijn Lab, explained that the tripeptide sequences that the researchers discovered yielded templates that the team used to produce melanin-like materials featuring a range of variable properties such as UV absorbance and energy storage capacity.

Ulijn, who is the Albert Einstein Professor of Chemistry at Hunter College and a member of the biochemistry and chemistry doctoral faculty at the GC, and his team will now turn their attention to expanding the resulting functionalities and properties of the melanin-like materials they produce and pursuing commercialization of the new technology, which includes near-term possibilities in cosmetics and biomedicine.

Read the press release.


Five CCNY undergrads Stanford-bound

CCNY's 2017 Stanford summer interns (clockwise from top left): Romiesa Ahmed, Maria Claudia Chaname, Samantha Nicole Dauer and Sophie Ziner.

A fifth cohort of City College of New York students is headed to Palo Alto, California, this month for the annual CCNY-Stanford Summer Research Program. The competitive program is designed for outstanding undergraduates considering graduate school -- specifically doctoral research -- in the humanities.

The students, their majors and research topics, are:

  • Junior Romiesa Ahmed (English literature and sociology), literature that reflects the portrayal of women and their roles in society in the novels of Jane Austen;
  • Senior Maria Claudia Chaname (Spanish), the literary work of Peruvian writer Carmen Ollé as a key moment in the evolution of female Latin American writers;
  • Junior Samantha Nicole Dauer (English), analysis of “slash” fanfiction using   queer theory and transnational feminism;
  • Senior Yessica Gomez (history and political science), history of the racial relationship between Dominicans and Haitians after the signing of the first official border treaty between Haiti and the Dominican Republic in 1929;
  • Senior Sophie  Ziner (English), what constitutes “women writers” in the examples of Virginia Woolf, Gertrude Stein, Katherine Mansfield, Kate Chopin, and other early 20th century Anglophone women who broke language and form in unprecedented ways.

Stanford University will match each CCNY student with a Stanford faculty member who will mentor the student's research project. Students will participate in a weekly seminar on the graduate application process and research in the humanities. A free Graduate Record Exam (GRE) preparation course will be provided for those interested.

Established in 2013 by CCNY’s Division of Humanities and the Arts, this year’s program runs from June 16 through August 18, 2017.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Equality Indicators Expands to Five Cities Across the Country

CUNY ISLG Working with Dallas, Oakland, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Tulsa to Measure and Track Equality Among Residents

The CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG), in partnership with The Rockefeller Foundation and 100 Resilient Cities (100RC), announced the selection of five cities to receive support to develop a tool to track progress towards equality, helping decision makers craft more effective policies to assist communities in each city. This work will build on the model developed by ISLG to measure equality among diverse groups (e.g., racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, individuals with disabilities) in New York City. The NYC model measures equality across six broad areas, including economy, education, health, housing, justice, and services.

The selected cities—Dallas, Oakland, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Tulsa—will each work with ISLG to build a tool that prioritizes the needs of each city and will complement the comprehensive Resilience Strategies being developed or implemented as member cities of 100RC.

The tool will include a number of specific indicators to measure disparities across various sectors and groups that will be identified by each site. ISLG will work with each city and the local community to solidify their priorities and determine which broad areas to focus on. ISLG and the partner cities will then determine a list of final indicators drawing from local data in each of these areas, and together, these indicators will provide practical means to assess progress—or lack of progress—over time and connect it to policy development.

ISLG Executive Director Michael Jacobson said, "We're proud to expand our work with The Rockefeller Foundation to measure equality in five diverse cities across the country. At this critical time when there is increased scrutiny of local government policies and practices, it's important for jurisdictions look closely at the data they have to really understand what's going on, what's working, and where improvement needs to be made. This work will go a long way towards helping jurisdictions do this in a thoughtful and transparent way."

"Achieving greater equality within our cities has been one of the defining challenges of the last few years," said Peter Madonia, Chief Operating Officer, The Rockefeller Foundation. "Policy makers are committed to addressing these disparities through public programs, but traditionally lack the data that allows them to better identify the problems and ultimately the most effective solutions. The Rockefeller Foundation is proud to support CUNY in its efforts to help cities navigate the realities of these disparities so they can work towards policies that offer the greatest impact to achieving equality."

Otis Rolley, North America Regional Director for 100 Resilient Cities said, "Our cities agree that increasing equity is key to building resilience, and this tool will be critical in helping them understand where they need to focus their efforts. If cities better understand where they're equitable and where they're not, their leaders both inside and outside government can tailor programs and initiatives in the most efficient and effective way possible. The selected cities will not only work to improve equity in their cities, but by developing and piloting this tool, will be helping cities all over the world address this critical challenge."

Dallas City Manager T.C. Broadnax said, "Notwithstanding the tremendous wealth and prosperity that Dallas has long enjoyed, many of our residents continue to struggle to provide for themselves and their families. If Dallas is to achieve her highest potential as a truly resilient 21st century city, we must strive to expand this abundance of opportunity to our most vulnerable residents. Through the good work of this partnership and the knowledge that we gain, Dallas will endeavor to build an equitable and just city that supports all of our residents in their success and nurtures our children to thrive."

"The City of Oakland is excited to be part of this cohort of cities working alongside Rockefeller to ensure we are measuring equity outcomes, particularly around our housing and economic security work which are key pillars of our Resilient Oakland playbook," said Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf. "True equity is when our entire community has equal access to opportunities that enable them to attain their full potential. Resilience in the face of chronic stresses, such as housing affordability or long-term unemployment, cannot be achieved until we focus on building this equity."

"Participating in this selected cohort of the Equality Indicators Project is a great opportunity to tie together many of the leading efforts locally to build equity across the City. Using CUNY's framework will allow us to tailor a Pittsburgh based equity measurement tool," said Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto.

"August of 2014 has become a defining moment for both St. Louis and our nation," said Mayor Lyda Krewson of the City of Saint Louis. "The protests that began in Ferguson marched down the streets of nearly every major American city. As a result, St. Louis now stands at the forefront of the national conversation about equity and the debilitating racial disparities across our communities. What we've learned through this conversation is that real equity cannot be defined by merely one indicator, but rather many, and it is something that we have to work toward continuously and with intention. The CUNY Equality Indicators grant and our partnership with 100 Resilient Cities presents St. Louis with an unparalleled opportunity to collaborate with other leading cities and experts in order to better inform our local decisions and utilize data to drive the policies that will close our equity gaps."

"This grant is another important national partnership for Tulsa as we work to ensure that no matter what area of town you live in, everyone has the same access to education and health needs that are vital to the quality of life of Tulsans," Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum said. "This grant will be an initial step in the use of data to address racial disparities that exist in Tulsa today."

About the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance

The Equality Indicators are a project of the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG). The CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance bridges the gap between researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to address the challenges and opportunities confronting government. ISLG works with government agencies, as well as nonprofit organizations, philanthropic institutions, and the private sector, to improve public systems to produce better results that are worthy of public investment and trust. For more information, please visit equalityindicators.org and islg.cuny.edu.


CCNY Alumni Association honors Pamela Laskin and Vernon Ballard

Pamela Laskin

Vernon Ballard

Pamela L. Laskin, director of Poetry Outreach in the English Department, and Vernon Ballard, director of Front Line User Support Services in IT, are this year’s CCNY service award honorees at the Alumni Association of The City College of New York’s 165th annual meeting, June 15.

Laskin will receive the Faculty Service Award for her outstanding commitment to City College’s Poetry Outreach Center. She leads its mission to encourage poetic activity at all levels of public education.

In addition, Laskin serves as a mentor to the MFA faculty she trains and sends out to teach poetry to public school students, mostly in under-served communities.

Ballard will receive the Administrative Staff Service Award. A member of CCNY’s Office of Information Technology since 1991, he oversees the IT service desk, client service analysts, the Tech Center and the Office of Information Security. For CCNY students, his primary responsibility is to foster a technology environment that can enable them to thrive in life and perform in the 21st century.

The program in CCNY’s Faculty Dining Room at 7 p.m. includes Alumni Service Awards presentations to the following:

  • Stanley P. Schwartz ’53,  AVA Alumni Group;
  • Pereta Rodriguez ’59, Latino Alumni Group;
  • William (Bill) Mandelbaum ’61ME (posthumous), Connecticut Chapter;
  • Emerald E. Daniel ’86, Black Alumni Group; and
  • Venesa Alicea ’05Arch, Architecture Alumni Group.

Guest speakers include CCNY Interim President Vince Boudreau and Michael Arena ’82, president of the New York City Society of Professional Journalists.

A buffet dinner at 6 p.m. precedes the meeting. Tickets are $40 per person and can be ordered through the Alumni Association at 212-234-3000. The meeting is free and open to the public.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Baruch College Receives Record-Breaking Number of Fulbright U.S. Student Program Awards

Fulbright Logo

Fulbright Winners will travel to Malaysia, Mexico, and the Netherlands

during the 2017-18 Academic Year

 

Baruch College received three Fulbright U.S. Student Program Awards, representing the largest number of U.S. Student Fulbright Awards for the College in a single competition. Kristina Sarkissyan ’17 and two recent alumni, Maneesha Bhugwansing (’14) and Hasin Ishraque (’16) will be traveling to Mexico, the Netherlands, and Malaysia respectively, during the 2017 and 2018 academic year to pursue studies, professional development, and teaching opportunities.

“We are both thrilled and proud to have Fulbright winners in a single competitive season,” said Valeria Hymas, Deputy Director of the Office of National & Prestigious Fellowship Advising. "A record-breaking year for this internationally recognized program that truly exemplifies the drive and talent of those in the Baruch community.”

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State. The highly selective awards are granted to candidates who demonstrate academic excellence, a passion for their fields of interest, and the ability to serve as cultural ambassadors between the U.S. and other countries. Each of the Fulbright winners will interact with their host communities on a daily basis allowing them to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs creating an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding.

According to Hymas, more Baruch College students are applying to the Fulbright Awards and other opportunities since the opening of the Office of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising in 2013. Increasingly, these applicants come from a wide variety of backgrounds and have diverse interests in their fields of study and career goals.

“We encourage students from all backgrounds to explore the numerous international and national fellowship opportunities available today,” said Hymas. “At Baruch, each student receives personal mentoring and advising which makes a tremendous difference in navigating the fellowships world.”

Meet Baruch College’s Fulbright U.S. Student Program Awardees:

Maneesha Bhugwansing Fulbright Award Winner

 

 

 

 

Maneesha Bhugwansing (’14), a Zicklin School of Business alumna and the Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, has been awarded a U.S. Student Fulbright Study/Research Award to the Netherlands. There, she will be earning a Master’s Degree in Economics at Maastricht University.

I hope to find ways to engage with the local community and learn more about policies and culture in the Netherlands.”

 

Hasin Ishraque Fulbright Winner

 

 

 

 

Hasin Ishraque (’16), an alumnus of the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, was awarded the U.S. Student Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Award in Malaysia. Currently working in the field of emergency management, where he wants to build a career, Ishraque also looks to help with potential rescue efforts.

“In Malaysia, I expect to learn just as much as I’ll teach, if not more.”

 

Kristina Sarkissyan Fulbright Winner

 

 

 

 

Kristina Sarkissyan ’17, who will graduate with a BBA in International Business from the Zicklin School of Business, will be in Mexico City on the Mexican Fulbright Commission’s Binational Internship program. This program is designed to enhance knowledge, expertise, and understanding of post-NAFTA Mexico.

“I’m very excited, extremely honored, and grateful for this wonderful opportunity.”

 

For more information about fellowship opportunities, contact the Office of National & Prestigious Fellowship Advising.


Baruch College Holds Dedication Ceremony Formally Celebrating Austin W. Marxe (’65) and His $30 Million Gift

Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein and Austin W. Marxe ('65)

On Wednesday, May 24, Baruch College held a dedication ceremony formally celebrating Austin W. Marxe (’65) and his $30 million gift to the College. Announced in September 2016, the gift endowed and named the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs at Baruch College.

“This gift will allow students who come here—for years and years to come—to fulfill their dreams,” said Baruch President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, who awarded Marxe a Bernard Baruch maquette (a small model of the iconic full-size statue of Bernard Baruch sitting on a park bench). “I want to thank you and the entire Marxe family for sharing and believing in the vision we have for the school.”

Lawrence Zicklin (’57, HON ’99)—who named and endowed the Zicklin School of Business in 1997—presented Marxe with a Scroll of Honor recognizing his remarkable gift.

“Austin Marxe is a true visionary and public servant,” Zicklin said. “We thank you for inspiring generations of future policy leaders who can follow your remarkable lead.”

Concluding the event, Marxe addressed the crowd and emphasized the important mission of the school that now bears his name.

“In the last decade, we’ve seen a tremendous increase in violence, bigotry, hatred, and greed,” Marxe noted. “We’ve seen dysfunctional governments and partisanship take precedence over doing the right thing to people and for the country. It is my hope that as we graduate these students into the world of public policy, their influence will help reverse this trend for future generations to come.”

Prior to the dedication ceremony, the event featured a panel discussion on today’s political climate featuring New York Times writers Thomas B. Edsall and Bret Stephens and Marxe Faculty Director Carla Anne Robbins.

View the full photo album here


Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and NYC Public Advocate Letitia James to Speak at Kingsborough Community College’s 52nd Commencement Exercises


Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and NYC Public Advocate Letitia James will each deliver remarks to more than 2,500 graduating students, their families and friends at Kingsborough’s 52nd Commencement Exercises on Thursday, June 15, 2017. The program starts 11:00 AM at the College’s Manhattan Beach location.

Borough President Adams, has, for the past three decades, served the residents of Brooklyn as a police officer, state senator, and coalition builder. Elected in 2013, Borough President Adams has been an advocate for Brooklyn throughout his career, bringing people and communities together to create progressive change, and working with private and public sectors to invigorate the borough’s economy by encouraging job growth and investment in every neighborhood.

From 2006 to 2013, he represented the 20th Senate District, working on a broad range of issues from civil rights and public safety to transparency in government and quality of life. His legislative record in the New York State Senate underscored his strong commitment to the rights of every citizen, including protecting the right to privacy, supporting marriage equality, defending women's right to choose, and fighting for the rights of students, workers, and animals.

As the second, highest-ranking elected official in the city, and the first woman of color to hold citywide office in New York City, Public Advocate Letitia James serves as a direct link between New Yorkers and their government, acts as a watchdog over city agencies, and investigates complaints about city services. Before becoming Public Advocate, she served from 2004 to 2013 as a member of the City Council fighting for paid sick leave and passage of the Safe Housing Act ensuring that families in rental buildings would receive prompt and full apartment repairs.

Public Advocate James is a strong advocate for criminal justice reform, led the push for police body cameras in the NYPD, and was among the first to call for special prosecutors in all cases of police misconduct.

 About Kingsborough Community College  

At Kingsborough, the community comes first, and as Brooklyn’s only community college, we promote student learning and development as well as strengthening and serving a highly diverse borough. Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 16,000 full- and part-time students annually in credit and non-credit bearing courses in liberal arts and career education, Kingsborough also serves an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education and workforce development programs on- and off-campus.

###

Dawn Walker (718) 368-5060 / (917) 588-6305


Exhibition Opening At Queens Museum Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Queens Pride Parade

The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens

Queens Museum
Friday, June 9, 2017
6—8 p.m.

Exhibition Opening At Queens Museum Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Queens Pride Parade
Queens Pride Parade, 1993
Photo Credit: Courtesy Daniel Dromm Collection, LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY

VIP GUESTS EXPECTED:
NYC First Lady Chirlane McCray, Comptroller Scott Stringer, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer, & featuring City Council Member Daniel Dromm

What: Opening reception for The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens featuring performances by SALGA, a well-known troupe of South East Asian Transgender Dancers.

The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens
is a multimedia exhibition at the Queens Museum that marks the 25th anniversary of the Queens Pride Parade, the first LGBTQ-rights parade in one of NYC’s outer boroughs.

The exhibition showcases historical and contemporary work, which chronicles the largely unknown history of LGBTQ activism in Queens from the 1990s to the present, in particular the impact of the hate crime murder of Julio Rivera, and the rejection of the Children of the Rainbow Curriculum.

Coming Out in Queens draws from the collection of Queens City Council Member Daniel Dromm, recently acquired by the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College. City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer and producer-director Richard Shpuntoff contributed materials from their personal archives.

Refreshments will be served

Why: While Manhattan is recognized as the birthplace of NYC’s LGBTQ movement, the stories of LGBTQ activism in Queens are largely absent from the historical narrative. It's an incredible story of activism in the face of tremendous opposition, and helped motivate Council Member Dromm's career shift from teaching to public office.

When: Friday, June 9th, 2017, 6—8 p.m.

Who: Hundreds of guests are expected to attend including:

  • NYC First Lady Chirlane McCray
  • Comptroller Scott Stringer
  • Queens Borough President Melinda Katz
  • City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer
  • City Council Member Daniel Dromm
  • Alan Sack, Julio Rivera’s former partner and longtime friend
  • Peg Fiore, Julio Rivera’s mother
  • Dr. Gail O. Mellow, President of LaGuardia Community College
  • Curators of the exhibition, LaGuardia faculty Thierry Gourjon and Javier Larenas, and two of LaGuardia’s Gardiner-Shenker Student Scholars who worked on the exhibit
  • Laura Raicovich, Director of the Queens Museum

Where: Queens Museum
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Corona, NY 11368

*Free Parking On-Site

####


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON SIGNING ‘WE ARE STILL IN’ PLEDGE

“The City University of New York enthusiastically supports the ‘We Are Still In’ commitment to the critical goals of the Paris Climate Agreement.  The future of our planet depends upon the kinds of actions that our University and State are already taking to create a clean-energy future.  At CUNY, we have reduced energy consumption on our campuses by retrofitting older buildings and erecting energy-efficient new buildings.  The $520 million that Governor Andrew M. Cuomo invested recently in energy efficiency on CUNY campuses will greatly help in this effort.  In addition, our Sustainable CUNY office leads the NYSolar Smart Plan, a strategic partnership with New York State and City agencies, municipalities and more than 70 utility, industry and other organizations to promote solar energy and reduce the soft costs of going solar.  The importance of addressing climate change and global warming cannot be overstated.”


Students Give EoW Presentations to Society for Human Resource Management Staff

Chris Martin, Beth Shefflan and Grace Beasley from the Society for Human Resource Management.

On June 5, students from Professor Mary Gatta’s Ethnographies of Work class presented their research on the many challenges employees face in the workplace to members of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). The presentations were part of the students’ semester-long ethnographic research project.

Four groups presented their findings on issues facing today’s workforce: the experiences of minority groups (women and people of color) in top leadership positions; the challenges workers face integrating work and family; the challenges and opportunities in recruiting and retaining a diverse workforce; and the experiences of workers as they engage in managing workers of different generational groups.

Chris Martin, Grace Beasley, and Beth Shefflan of the SHRM followed the presentations with questions and feedback.

As part of the project, students got a chance to visit and interview staff at six organizations: West Harlem Group Assistance, Inc., Carl Marks, ADP, JASA (Jewish Association Serving the Aging), Serino Coyne LLC, and Unite Here. The on-site visits greatly enhanced the students’ experiential learning experience. At the end of the session, students got a chance to present their own elevator pitches to the SHRM professionals.

 

 

 

 


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, week of June 5, 2017

 

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you to every NEST+m student, family and community member for supporting our students and ensuring that we have a strong academic finish to our 2016-2017 school year!

This week features many special events. Please note that Thursday June 8th is “Anniversary Day.” Students are not in attendance for all NYC Department of Education schools.

Monday, June 5th, at 5:30 pm

  • Our Upper Grades Orientation for incoming 9th / 10th Grade students (School Year 2017-18) is this Monday 6/5 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm in the auditorium. We look forward to welcoming new and returning NEST+m students and families into our school community. Please note, this event is for both new to NEST+m families and our current 8th Grade families that will be returning to NEST+m for Grade 9.

Tuesday, June 6th, at 5:30 pm

  • Our Middle Grades Orientation for incoming 6th/7th Grade students (School Year 2017-18) is this Tuesday 6/6 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm in the auditorium. We look forward to welcoming new and returning NEST+m students and families into our school community. Please note, this event is for both new to NEST+m families and our current 5th Grade families that will be returning to NEST+m for Grade 6.

Also on Tuesday, June 6th, at 7:15 pm

  • Author and Psychotherapist Sean Grover speaks about how parents can support the needs of adolescents navigating academics, friendships, families and identity. This event is open to all NEST+m community members.

Wednesday, June 7th & Friday June 9th at 5:30 pm

  • 6th Grade Original Play Festival, NEST+m Auditorium, Free Admission.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.
Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

Lower Grades Announcements

Fourth grade students will be completing the written component of the NY State Science Exam on Monday June 5th.

Middle Grades Announcements

To ensure that students have access to course-specific support beyond that which is provided within our regular instructional periods, please see the following link which specifies when academic supports for Grades 6-12 will be provided with an eye toward Summative Assessments:
Open Classroom Tutoring & Regents Review Schedule – Grades 6-12

Middle Grades Summative Assessments: (End-of-Year Projects, Papers, Final Exam Schedules, and Regents)

6th Grade:

  • ELA: Final Exam on 6/19/2017
  • Math: Final Exam on 6/14/2017
  • Science: Final Exam on 6/13/2017
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/21/2017
  • Theater/Literacy: Final Project on 6/23/2017. This project has not been announced to students yet.
  • World Language: Final Exams on 6/15/2017 – 6/16/2017

7th Grade:

  • ELA: Revised Paper due on 6/9/2017
  • Math: Final Exam on 6/9/2017
  • Science: Final Project Presentation the week of June 19th
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/23/2017
  • World Language:  Final Exams on 6/15/2017-6/16/2017

8th Grade:
Please Review the June 2017 Regents and SLP Schedule. Passing the Regents course and corresponding exam is necessary to earn high school credit in 8th Grade. If a family makes a choice to opt-out of a Regents exam or SLP, students will not be able to earn high school credit for that course.

8th Grade families that wish to opt out of a Second Language Proficiency Exam, the final day to do so will be Tuesday, June 6th. Please complete the SLP Opt Out Request Form below:     https://goo.gl/forms/shKWePGnbcy8pQp93

Regents exams are non-attendance days for students participating in the exams. Students will come in to take the exam only and then will be dismissed. 8th Grade Courses will not be in session on the following dates:

  • 6/13/2017
  • 6/15/2017
  • 6/19/2017
  • The ELA Final exam is on 6/14/2017

Upper Grades Announcements

Our 12th Grade “Senior Trip” to Frost Valley YMCA in the Catskills was terrific. Students participated in a wide variety of outdoor activities and really enjoyed this final class bonding time together.

This week is final exams week in our Upper Grades for all Non-Regents courses.
Please Review the June 2017 Regents SLP and LOTE Schedule and note the following:

  • Regents exam days are non-attendance days for Upper Grade Students. Students will come in to take the exam only and then will be dismissed from school. Students taking two exams on a single day should be prepared with food and snacks as they will have limited break time between tests.
  • On Monday of this week students will receive their Regents / LOTE Exam Invitations. Any student that has signed up to take a Regents Exam to earn a better score but no longer wishes to take the Exam must notify his or her Guidance Counselor no later than Wednesday, June 7th. Outside of this extenuating circumstance, all other students enrolled in Regents courses must sit for the Regents Examination.
  • Regents / SLP Opt Out Request Form:    https://goo.gl/forms/shKWePGnbcy8pQp93

 

Looking ahead

  • Monday, June 12
    • Clerical day for Lower Grades and Middle Grades students (Non Attendance Date, Grades K-8).
    • This is a regular instructional day for Grades 9-12. It is the last day of instruction prior to Regents Week.
  • Tuesday, June 13- Thursday June 22:  Regents Week
  • Wednesday June 21
    • 5th Grade “Stepping Up/Graduation” Ceremony at NEST+m, 8:30am
  • Thursday, June 22
    • 8th Grade Stepping Up Ceremony, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 12:30pm
    • 12th Grade Graduation, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 9:00am
  • Friday, June 23
    • Regents Rating Day for High schools
  • Monday, June 26
    • Eid al-Fitr. All schools are closed
  • Tuesday, June 27
    • Regular instructional day
  • Wednesday, June 28

Scheduled half day. Last Day of School


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, week of June 5, 2017

 

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you to every NEST+m student, family and community member for supporting our students and ensuring that we have a strong academic finish to our 2016-2017 school year!

This week features many special events. Please note that Thursday June 8th is “Anniversary Day.” Students are not in attendance for all NYC Department of Education schools.

Monday, June 5th, at 5:30 pm

  • Our Upper Grades Orientation for incoming 9th / 10th Grade students (School Year 2017-18) is this Monday 6/5 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm in the auditorium. We look forward to welcoming new and returning NEST+m students and families into our school community. Please note, this event is for both new to NEST+m families and our current 8th Grade families that will be returning to NEST+m for Grade 9.

Tuesday, June 6th, at 5:30 pm

  • Our Middle Grades Orientation for incoming 6th/7th Grade students (School Year 2017-18) is this Tuesday 6/6 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm in the auditorium. We look forward to welcoming new and returning NEST+m students and families into our school community. Please note, this event is for both new to NEST+m families and our current 5th Grade families that will be returning to NEST+m for Grade 6.

Also on Tuesday, June 6th, at 7:15 pm

  • Author and Psychotherapist Sean Grover speaks about how parents can support the needs of adolescents navigating academics, friendships, families and identity. This event is open to all NEST+m community members.

Wednesday, June 7th & Friday June 9th at 5:30 pm

  • 6th Grade Original Play Festival, NEST+m Auditorium, Free Admission.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.
Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

Lower Grades Announcements

Fourth grade students will be completing the written component of the NY State Science Exam on Monday June 5th.

Middle Grades Announcements

To ensure that students have access to course-specific support beyond that which is provided within our regular instructional periods, please see the following link which specifies when academic supports for Grades 6-12 will be provided with an eye toward Summative Assessments:
Open Classroom Tutoring & Regents Review Schedule – Grades 6-12

Middle Grades Summative Assessments: (End-of-Year Projects, Papers, Final Exam Schedules, and Regents)

6th Grade:

  • ELA: Final Exam on 6/19/2017
  • Math: Final Exam on 6/14/2017
  • Science: Final Exam on 6/13/2017
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/21/2017
  • Theater/Literacy: Final Project on 6/23/2017. This project has not been announced to students yet.
  • World Language: Final Exams on 6/15/2017 – 6/16/2017

7th Grade:

  • ELA: Revised Paper due on 6/9/2017
  • Math: Final Exam on 6/9/2017
  • Science: Final Project Presentation the week of June 19th
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/23/2017
  • World Language:  Final Exams on 6/15/2017-6/16/2017

8th Grade:
Please Review the June 2017 Regents and SLP Schedule. Passing the Regents course and corresponding exam is necessary to earn high school credit in 8th Grade. If a family makes a choice to opt-out of a Regents exam or SLP, students will not be able to earn high school credit for that course.

8th Grade families that wish to opt out of a Second Language Proficiency Exam, the final day to do so will be Tuesday, June 6th. Please complete the SLP Opt Out Request Form below:     https://goo.gl/forms/shKWePGnbcy8pQp93

Regents exams are non-attendance days for students participating in the exams. Students will come in to take the exam only and then will be dismissed. 8th Grade Courses will not be in session on the following dates:

  • 6/13/2017
  • 6/15/2017
  • 6/19/2017
  • The ELA Final exam is on 6/14/2017

Upper Grades Announcements

Our 12th Grade “Senior Trip” to Frost Valley YMCA in the Catskills was terrific. Students participated in a wide variety of outdoor activities and really enjoyed this final class bonding time together.

This week is final exams week in our Upper Grades for all Non-Regents courses.
Please Review the June 2017 Regents SLP and LOTE Schedule and note the following:

  • Regents exam days are non-attendance days for Upper Grade Students. Students will come in to take the exam only and then will be dismissed from school. Students taking two exams on a single day should be prepared with food and snacks as they will have limited break time between tests.
  • On Monday of this week students will receive their Regents / LOTE Exam Invitations. Any student that has signed up to take a Regents Exam to earn a better score but no longer wishes to take the Exam must notify his or her Guidance Counselor no later than Wednesday, June 7th. Outside of this extenuating circumstance, all other students enrolled in Regents courses must sit for the Regents Examination.
  • Regents / SLP Opt Out Request Form:    https://goo.gl/forms/shKWePGnbcy8pQp93

 

Looking ahead

  • Monday, June 12
    • Clerical day for Lower Grades and Middle Grades students (Non Attendance Date, Grades K-8).
    • This is a regular instructional day for Grades 9-12. It is the last day of instruction prior to Regents Week.
  • Tuesday, June 13- Thursday June 22:  Regents Week
  • Wednesday June 21
    • 5th Grade “Stepping Up/Graduation” Ceremony at NEST+m, 8:30am
  • Thursday, June 22
    • 8th Grade Stepping Up Ceremony, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 12:30pm
    • 12th Grade Graduation, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 9:00am
  • Friday, June 23
    • Regents Rating Day for High schools
  • Monday, June 26
    • Eid al-Fitr. All schools are closed
  • Tuesday, June 27
    • Regular instructional day
  • Wednesday, June 28

Scheduled half day. Last Day of School


CUNY APPOINTS LORETTA MARTINEZ TO SERVE AS GENERAL COUNSEL AND VICE CHANCELLOR FOR LEGAL AFFAIRS  

Chancellor James B. Milliken and Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr. announced today that the Board of Trustees has appointed Loretta P. Martinez to serve as General Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs for The City University of New York.

Ms. Martinez, a graduate of the Harvard Law School and Yale University, has held leadership positions in higher education for more than 18 years and has been an important voice for creating opportunities for students from underrepresented groups and for broad access to higher education. She has served as the general counsel at a variety of public and private institutions, including, most recently, Metropolitan State University of Denver, where she also serves as secretary to the board of trustees. Previously, she served as general counsel at Colorado College, a private college, the Colorado State University System and in the office of the general counsel at Harvard University.

Ms. Martinez, a graduate of the Harvard Law School and Yale University, has held leadership positions in higher education for more than 18 years and has been an important voice for creating opportunities for students from underrepresented groups and for broad access to higher education. She has served as the general counsel at a variety of public and private institutions, including, most recently, Metropolitan State University of Denver, where she also serves as secretary to the board of trustees. Previously, she served as general counsel at Colorado College, a private college, the Colorado State University System and in the office of the general counsel at Harvard University.

“Loretta Martinez brings wide legal experience to this important position and has demonstrated knowledge in all areas of the law affecting higher education,” said James B. Milliken, CUNY’s Chancellor. “Like all of us at CUNY, she has fought for creating opportunity, especially for underrepresented groups, and we will benefit from her experience and her legal skills. I am delighted that she will be joining the CUNY family.”

Loretta Martinez

In her efforts to expand workplace opportunities for students, Ms. Martinez has been instrumental in creating public-private partnerships across a variety of industry sectors for improved experiential learning and she co-founded a coalition of Latino educators focused on improving recruitment, retention and graduation rates for Latino students. These objectives are also important elements of CUNY’s new strategic framework.

Chairperson of the Board of Trustees William C. Thompson, Jr. commented, “We are delighted to be welcoming someone who has not only been a leader in higher education legal issues but who has a real appreciation for our history and our very special mandate at CUNY. Loretta Martinez will be a great asset not just to CUNY but also to New York City.”

“I have devoted my career to supporting excellent institutions of higher education and improving opportunity for all, and I’m delighted to be pursuing those aims at an even broader level at CUNY, an extraordinary university with a very special mission,” said Ms. Martinez. “I look forward to getting to know the university and embracing all the excitement of and becoming a part of New York City.”

The Chancellor and William C. Thompson, Jr., Chairman of the board of trustees, expressed their deep gratitude to Trustee Lorraine A. Cortés-Vázquez, who chaired the search committee, and the other members of the committee for their excellent work.

“We were fortunate that we had an outstanding pool of applicants and that we were able to recommend four excellent finalists to the Chancellor and the Chairperson for consideration,” said Trustee Cortés-Vázquez. “This will strengthen CUNY and support our legal responsibilities.”

Ms. Martinez is a native of Colorado and has long served in leadership positions in higher education in the state. She was appointed in 2013 by Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to serve as one of three commissioners from the state on the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education (WICHE) and currently serves on the executive committee.  She also was appointed by former Colorado Governor Bill Owens to serve on the Board of the Colorado Educational and Cultural Facilities Authority (CECFA) for three terms and was Chair of the Board.  She is frequently invited to speak on a variety of topics nationally, including public-private partnerships, Title IX, undocumented students and legal issues in higher education.

In her career, Ms. Martinez has served as general counsel of a number of institutions, including Colorado College, a private college, and large public systems like the Colorado State University System and the Metropolitan State University of Denver.  Among other initiatives, she helped create an affordable non-resident tuition rate for undocumented students at MSU Denver and helped craft Colorado’s Dream Act bill, which supports undocumented students and was passed by the state legislature in 2013. She has been a strong advocate for the transformative power of education, particularly for students from lower income and underrepresented groups.

Martinez also devotes volunteer time to local and national boards and associations in the legal and education fields.  She is President of the Latin American Education Foundation and was appointed in 2013 to serve on the national board of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  She also serves on the board of the ACLU of Colorado and is a longtime member of the National Association of College and University Attorneys and the Association of Governing Boards.

“What is clear from her background is that Loretta deeply understands the many communities and constituencies that CUNY serves and that make the extraordinary diversity of CUNY such a source of creativity, energy and strength,” said Chancellor Milliken. “As we implement our new strategic vision for making the university even more accessible and effective, I know that Loretta will play an important role in helping us achieve success on behalf of our students.”

Ms. Martinez received her juris doctorate from Harvard Law School in 1991 and her bachelor’s degree in political science from Yale University in 1988.  Prior to her work in higher education, Ms. Martinez clerked for the United States District Court of Colorado and worked in private practice, specializing in employment law, public law, and commercial and products liability litigation.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

 

 


CUNY APPOINTS LORETTA MARTINEZ TO SERVE AS GENERAL COUNSEL AND VICE CHANCELLOR FOR LEGAL AFFAIRS  

Chancellor James B. Milliken and Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr. announced today that the Board of Trustees has appointed Loretta P. Martinez to serve as General Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs for The City University of New York.

Ms. Martinez, a graduate of the Harvard Law School and Yale University, has held leadership positions in higher education for more than 18 years and has been an important voice for creating opportunities for students from underrepresented groups and for broad access to higher education. She has served as the general counsel at a variety of public and private institutions, including, most recently, Metropolitan State University of Denver, where she also serves as secretary to the board of trustees. Previously, she served as general counsel at Colorado College, a private college, the Colorado State University System and in the office of the general counsel at Harvard University.

Ms. Martinez, a graduate of the Harvard Law School and Yale University, has held leadership positions in higher education for more than 18 years and has been an important voice for creating opportunities for students from underrepresented groups and for broad access to higher education. She has served as the general counsel at a variety of public and private institutions, including, most recently, Metropolitan State University of Denver, where she also serves as secretary to the board of trustees. Previously, she served as general counsel at Colorado College, a private college, the Colorado State University System and in the office of the general counsel at Harvard University.

“Loretta Martinez brings wide legal experience to this important position and has demonstrated knowledge in all areas of the law affecting higher education,” said James B. Milliken, CUNY’s Chancellor. “Like all of us at CUNY, she has fought for creating opportunity, especially for underrepresented groups, and we will benefit from her experience and her legal skills. I am delighted that she will be joining the CUNY family.”

Loretta Martinez

In her efforts to expand workplace opportunities for students, Ms. Martinez has been instrumental in creating public-private partnerships across a variety of industry sectors for improved experiential learning and she co-founded a coalition of Latino educators focused on improving recruitment, retention and graduation rates for Latino students. These objectives are also important elements of CUNY’s new strategic framework.

Chairperson of the Board of Trustees William C. Thompson, Jr. commented, “We are delighted to be welcoming someone who has not only been a leader in higher education legal issues but who has a real appreciation for our history and our very special mandate at CUNY. Loretta Martinez will be a great asset not just to CUNY but also to New York City.”

“I have devoted my career to supporting excellent institutions of higher education and improving opportunity for all, and I’m delighted to be pursuing those aims at an even broader level at CUNY, an extraordinary university with a very special mission,” said Ms. Martinez. “I look forward to getting to know the university and embracing all the excitement of and becoming a part of New York City.”

The Chancellor and William C. Thompson, Jr., Chairman of the board of trustees, expressed their deep gratitude to Trustee Lorraine A. Cortés-Vázquez, who chaired the search committee, and the other members of the committee for their excellent work.

“We were fortunate that we had an outstanding pool of applicants and that we were able to recommend four excellent finalists to the Chancellor and the Chairperson for consideration,” said Trustee Cortés-Vázquez. “This will strengthen CUNY and support our legal responsibilities.”

Ms. Martinez is a native of Colorado and has long served in leadership positions in higher education in the state. She was appointed in 2013 by Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to serve as one of three commissioners from the state on the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education (WICHE) and currently serves on the executive committee.  She also was appointed by former Colorado Governor Bill Owens to serve on the Board of the Colorado Educational and Cultural Facilities Authority (CECFA) for three terms and was Chair of the Board.  She is frequently invited to speak on a variety of topics nationally, including public-private partnerships, Title IX, undocumented students and legal issues in higher education.

In her career, Ms. Martinez has served as general counsel of a number of institutions, including Colorado College, a private college, and large public systems like the Colorado State University System and the Metropolitan State University of Denver.  Among other initiatives, she helped create an affordable non-resident tuition rate for undocumented students at MSU Denver and helped craft Colorado’s Dream Act bill, which supports undocumented students and was passed by the state legislature in 2013. She has been a strong advocate for the transformative power of education, particularly for students from lower income and underrepresented groups.

Martinez also devotes volunteer time to local and national boards and associations in the legal and education fields.  She is President of the Latin American Education Foundation and was appointed in 2013 to serve on the national board of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund.  She also serves on the board of the ACLU of Colorado and is a longtime member of the National Association of College and University Attorneys and the Association of Governing Boards.

“What is clear from her background is that Loretta deeply understands the many communities and constituencies that CUNY serves and that make the extraordinary diversity of CUNY such a source of creativity, energy and strength,” said Chancellor Milliken. “As we implement our new strategic vision for making the university even more accessible and effective, I know that Loretta will play an important role in helping us achieve success on behalf of our students.”

Ms. Martinez received her juris doctorate from Harvard Law School in 1991 and her bachelor’s degree in political science from Yale University in 1988.  Prior to her work in higher education, Ms. Martinez clerked for the United States District Court of Colorado and worked in private practice, specializing in employment law, public law, and commercial and products liability litigation.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

 

 


ICYMI: HOW CUNY BECAME POETRY U.

In a story published this weekend, The New York Times reported that The City University of New York is home to a number of very highly accomplished poets, including this year’s Pulitzer Prize winner, Tyehimba Jess, who teaches at the College of Staten Island and joins a long list of winners of prestigious awards and honors teaching at CUNY.

The Times reported that “many poet-professors said they enjoyed working with students who were new to the country, people with jobs and children and full lives outside of the classroom.”  The former poet laureate of the United States, Billy Collins, who taught at Lehman College for nearly 50 years, described CUNY as the “academic version of the Statue of Liberty.”

Faculty members are not the only poets at CUNY—before Mr. Jess, Gregory Pardlo, a CUNY graduate student at the time, won the Pulitzer in 2015.

“CUNY has to be one of the most diverse universities in America, and it seems self-evident to me that diversity of all kinds contributes to creativity,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said.  “Add to that the fact that we’re in New York City.”

The text of the article can be viewed below and is available online here.

How CUNY Became Poetry U.

The City University of New York is many things. It is vast. It is accessible to students without a lot of money. It is exceptionally diverse. It is not, however, particularly fancy, the kind of place that oozes exclusivity or prestige.

And yet CUNY is home to a surprising number of extremely accomplished, recognized — some might even say fancy — poets.

This year, the Pulitzer Prize for poetry went to “Olio,” a book by Tyehimba Jess, an associate professor of English at the College of Staten Island.
Mr. Jess joins an extensive list at CUNY. Ben Lerner, a MacArthur Fellow, teaches at Brooklyn College. Kimiko Hahn, winner of the prestigious PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry, teaches in the Queens College M.F.A. program. Grace Schulman is at Baruch College, Patricia Smith is at the College of Staten Island, Meena Alexander and Tom Sleigh are at Hunter College. Billy Collins, the former poet laureate of the United States, retired last year after teaching at Lehman College for almost 50 years.

As it happens, poets at CUNY have won the Pulitzer in two out of the past three years — before Mr. Jess’s award, Gregory Pardlo, a CUNY graduate student at the time, took the prize in 2015. And, in a related category, Sarah DeLappe, a Brooklyn College M.F.A. student, was a finalist this year in the drama category for a play about a girls’ high school soccer team.

“I’m not sure that ‘fancy’ is the key to creativity,” James B. Milliken, the CUNY chancellor, said in an interview. “CUNY has to be one of the most diverse universities in America, and it seems self-evident to me that diversity of all kinds contributes to creativity. Add to that the fact that we’re in New York City.”

It is difficult to overstate the city’s draw for many poets. The expense can be daunting, but it is the center of their industry. It is where publishing happens, and where poets from all over the world come to read their work. And since the number of poets who can make an actual living just by their writing is tiny, many of them turn to teaching — though you wouldn’t necessarily know it to read their work.

“There are two things people don’t often write about: wives and teaching,” Mr. Collins said in an interview. “I think they want to give the impression they’ve transcended bourgeois activities.”

From there, it becomes a matter of where: Where can you get a job, and where would you like to go?

“New York is a city where poets really want to live,” said Cate Marvin, the founder of VIDA, an organization for women in the literary arts, a poet and an English professor at the College of Staten Island. “So at the College of Staten Island, for example, when we run searches and hire people, it’s often really competitive because people really want to move to New York.”

“Poets,” she added, “will kill to live in New York.”

Teaching at CUNY in particular appeals to those who like the idea of teaching students who don’t have access to exclusive, cloistered classrooms, Ms. Marvin said. Many poet-professors said they enjoyed working with students who were new to the country, people with jobs and children and full lives outside of the classroom. Mr. Collins described the system as an “academic version of the Statue of Liberty.”

Ms. Schulman, a much lauded poet and a former Guggenheim fellow who has taught at Baruch College for 45 years, said a few years ago an undergraduate in one of her classes won a prestigious award for a poem she wrote about walking through Chinatown.

“I said, ‘Look, Susan, don’t you think we ought to talk about graduate school?’” Ms. Schulman recounted. “And she said, ‘Oh, no, I want to be an accountant.’”

Most students do not attend CUNY for reasons of poetry. A spokesman for the university said the largest majors at its senior colleges were in areas like business and psychology.

Mr. Lerner, who teaches at Brooklyn College, said the diversity of a CUNY classroom, like the diversity of the city itself, was a draw. “The linguistic density and diversity of New York is unlike any place else in the country,” Mr. Lerner said. “With so many languages coming into contact in the classroom, really any undergraduate course at CUNY, no matter what the subject, becomes a kind of poetry course.”

In his work, Mr. Jess, this year’s Pulitzer winner, focuses on African-American history and biography, frequently writing about black artists whose names we should know, he said, but often don’t.

Mr. Jess describes New York as a “literary feast,” and he tells his students that with the readings and poets from all over the world converging here, they can basically go out and get themselves a free education by being active and attentive. But he does have a word of caution for those new to the city: “You can’t succumb to the hype.”

“There is that cartoon about how there’s New York, and then there’s the rest of the planet,” said Mr. Jess, who is from Detroit. “It’s the most international yet provincial place. Some people believe the world will come to them.”

Despite his recent win, Mr. Jess has no plans to give up teaching.


Professors Publish Article about Hybrid Course Learning

Kristina Baines, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Faculty for Academic Technology, Sebastien Buttet, Associate Professor of Economics, Forest Fisher, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Vanita Naidoo, Instructor of English, and Paul Naish, Assistant Professor of History, have authored Students as Producers in Hybrid Courses: Case Studies from an Interdisciplinary Learning Circle in IJSoTEL (International Journal for Scholarship of Technology Enhanced Learning, Vol. 1, No. 2 (2017) ).

Using five case studies from the hybrid course initiative at Guttman Community College, this paper explores a focus on students as active participants in the learning process, ways to foster inquiry in the out-of-classroom space and how to maintain the dynamic nature of producing knowledge through innovative and engaging assignments in the teaching and learning process. It relates the experiences of faculty members, who were inaugural participants in an interdisciplinary hybrid learning circle, in designing and teaching hybrid courses (50% in class and 50% online/out of class) to increase student engagement and the student creation of products beyond written assignments for the online space, using multiple technologies as tools. It also highlights benefits and challenges of discussing and developing hybrid courses in community with a focus on the simultaneous co-development and integration of pedagogical strategies and technological components to promote inquiry, connection, active learning and, ultimately, social justice through the collaborative coproductionof knowledge with both colleagues and students.

The full text for this article is available as a PDF.


Faculty books discuss public parks, development models and Schomburg

The transformation of public parks, alternative development models for emerging economies and a study of formidable Black scholar Arturo Alfonso Schomburg are some of the new book topics by City College of New York faculty.

John Krinsky, political scientist in City College’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership is the co-author of, "Who Cleans the Park? Public Work and Urban Governance in New York City” (Chicago Press).

Infrastructural Ecologies: Alternative Development Models for Emerging Economies” (The MIT Press), is the latest book by Hillary Brown, professor in the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture. Byron Stigge is her co-author.

Diasporic Blackness: The Life and Times of Arturo Alfonso Schomburg” (SUNY Press), by associate professor Vanessa K. Valdés, examines the life of the great scholar.

Following are other new and forthcoming titles from CCNY faculty:

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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The Class of 2017 is a Record-Setter

The Class of 2017 is a Record-Setter

On Wednesday, May 31, the largest graduating class in John Jay College history — 3,690 students —became the newest alumni when they received bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the College’s 52nd Commencement ceremonies, which were held this year at Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing, Queens.

“The Class of 2017 is our biggest ever,” said President Jeremy Travis, “and I could not be happier. I am confident that our newest graduates, like the tens of thousands who have preceded them, will go forth from John Jay ready to make their mark locally, nationally and globally as fierce advocates for justice.”

“No other institution in the world – none – can claim John Jay College’s mission of educating for justice,” Travis told the graduates. “No other educational community commits itself to being fierce advocates for justice. You have been tested. You have succeeded. You are ready to change the world.”

Data from the College registrar’s office showed a graduating class that is roughly 57.5 percent female, with graduates ranging in age from 18-year-old Kenyatta LeSeur to 65-year-old Mary Bost. The class includes 190 military veterans and 440 international students representing 64 countries.

Nine pairs of siblings are in the Class of 2017, including three sets of twins: Caitlin and Brittany Ancone; Brian and Vincent Eco, and Hema and Harini Maragh. Also represented in the class are the first graduates of the Macaulay Honors College at John Jay, and the first graduate of the ACE (Accelerate, Complete, Engage) program, 19-year-old Piotr Tandek.

Academically, the graduating class was led by valedictorian Giuseppe (Joey) Fattorusso, an English major with a perfect 4.0 grade-point average, and salutatorian Samuel Choi, a Forensic Psychology major.

Honorary doctorates were be presented at the 10:30 A.M. and 3:30 P.M. ceremonies to Mary Bonauto, a leading civil rights attorney who has led the legal fight for marriage equality, and Jose Antonio Vargas, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and activist whose disclosure of his undocumented immigration status helped to jump-start a national conversation on the experiences of the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States.

Bonauto, who received an honorary Doctor of Civil Laws degree at the 10:30 A.M. ceremony, has been Civil Rights Project Director at GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders since 1990. In that role she has been the lead or co-counsel in many recent groundbreaking state and federal court cases, including the historic 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which established the freedom to marry for same-sex couples nationwide.

A forceful advocate on discrimination issues, parental and children’s rights, relationship recognition, and free speech and religious liberty, Bonauto led the federal court challenges to the Defense of Marriage Act. She has won court cases on civil union laws in Vermont and right-to-marry laws in Massachusetts and Connecticut. She is the Shikes Fellow in Civil Liberties and Civil Rights at Harvard Law School.

Honored with a Doctorate of Humane Letters at the 3:30 P.M. ceremony, Vargas was part of the news team at The Washington Post that won the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Virginia Tech shooting massacre in 2007. In 2011, in an essay written for The New York Times Magazine, he revealed and chronicled his life in America as an undocumented immigrant, and in so doing became a leading voice for immigrant rights.

In addition to his award-winning journalism, Vargas is also a filmmaker and media entrepreneur, who followed up his essay in The Times by producing and directing “Documented,” a documentary feature film on his immigrant experience. As the founder and CEO of Define American, a nonprofit media and cultural organization, he works to elevate the conversation surrounding immigration and citizenship in the United States. He also founded #EmergingUS, a media start-up focusing on the intersection of race, immigration and identity in multicultural America.


CCNY Engineering and computer science students compete in NYC hackathon

CCNY’s NYC Hackathon participants Kirstyn Natavio [left] and Michael Ousseinov.

Teams Good Bot and SignThis, comprising engineering and computer science students from The City College of New York, collaborated on creative coding challenges in a 24-hour coding sprint in the Spring 2017 hackNY Student Hackathon. Team Good Bot received the Hack Harassment Prize, which is the Major League Hacking’s themed prize against online harassment.

Good Bot’s five members built a social media application called SlackBot to monitor Slack channels looking for inappropriate content or content that may be considered harassment. The bot uses artificial intelligence to identify such content, and when it does, it alerts administrators to shut down or censure of offending accounts.

Team SignThis, designed a web application that translates sign language into English to ease communication between the speaking and non-speaking world. It is able to detect and discern letters and will use the same application to expand into recognition of signs and translate them into text, and ultimately audio feeds.

“The hackathon has boosted our coding skills and introduced us to technologies that I would not have otherwise learned in school,” said Kirstyn Natavio, SignThis member. “The frameworks and APIs we learned are definitely used to solve real-world problems, and learning them in HackNY made the 24-hour all-nighter worthwhile.”

Team Good Bot:

  • Michael Ousseinov (Electrical Engineering)
  • Melvin Cherian (Computer Science)
  • Chieh-Huang Chen (Computer Science)
  • Satyam Sharma (Computer Engineering)
  • Adomas Hassan (Computer Science)

Team SignThis:

  • Kirstyn Natavio (Computer Science)
  • Meghna Pai (Computer Engineering)
  • Tahsin Jahin (Computer Engineering)
  • Yinuo Huang (Computer Science)
  • Tubaa Shahid (Electrical Engineering)

To find out more about the teams and what it takes to compete in a hackathon, click here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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CUNY SPS Student Receives CUNY Student Leader of the Year Award

New York, NY – May 29, 2017 - The CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is delighted to announce that Shakima Williams-Jones, an online MS in Business Management and Leadership student, received this year’s CUNY Student Leader of the Year Award for her academic achievement and service to CUNY SPS and the University.

Williams-Jones, who was instrumental in launching the newly formed CUNY SPS Student Association, also led the effort to develop the Association’s constitution, by-laws, structure, and policies. She has served on the CUNY SPS Student Technology Fee Committee, on the CUNY Arts Initiative Student Advisory Committee, and has worked closely with faculty and staff as the 2016-17 student alternate member of the CUNY SPS Governing Council, to which she has been elected as a 2017-18 student representative.

“This award is incredibly meaningful to me as it represents the culmination of the hard work and dedication that my fellow Student Association members and I have devoted to building student life at CUNY SPS,” says Williams-Jones. “I am so proud to represent CUNY SPS. Were it not for this School, I would not have been able to continue my graduate studies.”

Williams-Jones owns and operates Love Management, LLC, an accounting and business management firm with clients in the entertainment, education, and non-profit world. She has served as the sole accountant for the International Academy of Television Arts & Science (International Emmy Awards) since 2007. Additionally, she is on the board of directors of Uncommon Schools NYC, a charter management organization that operates 22 K – 12 charter schools in New York City.  She holds a BA in Accounting from Baruch College, is a high school basketball coach, and is the proud parent of five.

CUNY Student Life Director Kevin Tucker presented Williams-Jones with this award at CUNY SPS’s Annual Spring Reception on Thursday, May 18, 2017.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE OBSERVES ITS 60TH ANNIVERSARY COMMENCEMENT A Valedictorian from Bangladesh, A Salutatorian from Ghana Highlight BCC’s Open Door to the World on its Diamond Jubilee

MAY 31, 2017 — “In my country, education for women is only in the constitution,” says Shahin Sultana, born in Bangladesh. But with a supportive family, Shahin went to school and was the top student in every class — a distinction she has continued at Bronx Community College, where on June 2, she will address the BCC Class of 2017 as its Valedictorian.

The ceremonies will begin at 9:30 a.m. under a field of tents erected on BCC’s Ohio Field. In addition to Ms. Sultana’s address, the Class of 2017 and family and friends will hear greetings from elected officials from the borough, city and state and be addressed by BCC president Thomas A. Isekenegbe.

As the President notes in his Commencement message, “This year’s Commencement marks a major event in BCC history. On April 11, 1957, the building blocks for Bronx Community College were set. Our community of dreamers and achievers started after many years of campaigning by local activists for additional higher education in the Bronx. We are excited to honor the Class of 2017 this year as part of our 60th Anniversary and Diamond Jubilee celebration.”

The Class reflects the diversity BCC as a whole. The 2209 graduates were born in 43 different countries, with 50% USA-born, 30% born in the Dominican Republic and 4% in Jamaica. Around two thirds are female. The two youngest graduates are 19, the oldest is 66. Forty-six of them are veterans.

Commencement caps off a week of activities for the Class of 2017, including the Graduation Rehearsal and Senior Reception on Thursday, June 1. On Wednesday, May 31st, the Honors Convocation will be addressed by the Class Salutatorian Mohammed Mfosa. The Ghanaian-born Mr. MFosa actually graduated in December and is already majoring in biology at the State University of New York in Binghamton. Like the Valedictorian, he is planning on a career as a doctor.

By noon on Commencement Day, the men and women who entered the tents on Ohio Field as BCC students will leave it as freshly minted-alumni.


HILLARY CLINTON, BERNIE SANDERS AMONG LEADERS IN PUBLIC SERVICE, LAW, BUSINESS, STEM,EDUCATION AND ARTS TO SPEAK AND BE HONORED AT CLASS OF 2017 CUNY COMMENCEMENT CEREMONIES

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders lead a roster of distinguished leaders in public service, law, science, technology, business, the arts and education who will speak and be honored at the Class of 2017 commencement ceremonies of The City University of New York.

Secretary Clinton, who has spent four decades in public service as First Lady, a U.S. Senator from New York, Secretary of State and as the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, is also the author of five best-selling books. She will address the Medgar Evers College graduating class and receive an honorary doctorate from the college at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Sen.

Sanders, a Brooklyn native and progressive, activist Independent, who has represented Vermont in the House and the Senate and was Clinton’s rival in the Democratic presidential primary, spoke at Brooklyn College’s commencement and receive an honorary degree, also at the Barclays Center.

“These joyful commencement ceremonies represent years of hard work, of sacrifice and of goals fulfilled,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said. “The City University of New York congratulates our graduates and takes great pride in their achievements.
“Commencement also celebrates our dedicated faculty and staff, and the families, friends, alumni and college donors whose support is critical to our students’ success,” the Chancellor added. “CUNY graduates – the majority of whom stay in New York to work, study, and contribute to their communities and the economy – make this University, this city and this state very proud.”

This year’s commencement speakers and honorees include New York elected and appointed officials, a 103-year-old scholarship benefactor, an Internet pioneer, attorneys fighting for the rights of the gay community, immigrants and other vulnerable groups, a cartoonist who spoke for a generation, and an accomplished actress, writer and singer best known to several generations of young people for her inspiring role on Sesame Street.

They include Tony Award-winning Broadway producer and bestselling author Vivek Tiwary, who will be the executive producer of a TV series based on his own acclaimed graphic novel, The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story, and will address City College’s commencement ceremonies. CCNY will also present honorary degrees to alumni David Diaz ’65, an award-winning WNBC-TV and WCBS-TV reporter for close to three decades, technology pioneer Robert E. Kahn ’60, who initiated the U.S. government’s Internet program and co-created the TCP/IP protocols, and Deborah Meier, longtime public educator, advocate and writer, founder of the acclaimed Central Park East schools and a leader of the school reform movement. Rep. Grace Meng, the first female member of Congress from Queens since Geraldine Ferraro, the first Asian-American Congressional representative from New York State, and a Queens native, will address Queens College graduates and receive the President’s Medal. Honorary degrees will also be presented to Donald Brownstein ’65, chief investment officer and CEO of one of the country’s best-performing hedge funds, and to Saul Kupferberg, member of the Queens College Foundation and a founding member and current chair of the Kupferberg Center Arts Advisory Board at Queens College.
Alphonso B. David, Counsel to the Governor, who has served in state civil and human rights posts and litigated, as staff attorney at Lambda Legal Defense and Educational Fund, precedent-setting LGBT rights cases, will keynote Hunter College’s commencement. Nisha Agarwal, commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, public-interest lawyer and a leading voice for immigration reform, will address CUNY School of Professional Studies graduates. Brooklyn College gave its Distinguished Alumnus Award to Fredy Peccerelli ’96, executive director and founding member of the Guatemalan Forensic Anthropology Foundation, an NGO established in 1997 that helps to identify victims of Guatemala’s 36-year internal conflict.

At one of two John Jay College commencement ceremonies, litigator Mary L. Bonauto, the Civil Rights Project Director at GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders who successfully argued the U.S. Supreme Court case that established same-sex couples’ freedom to marry nationwide, will address graduates and receive an honorary degree, as will Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, filmmaker and media entrepreneur Jose Antonio Vargas at the second ceremony. The College of Staten Island will give honorary degrees to New Dorp High School Principal Deirdre DeAngelis for her leadership; Peter and Robin Jovanovich for their support of the Ellen Knowles Harcourt Scholarships for Teacher Education Honors Academy students; Margaret Ricciardi ’86, a 103-year-old entrepreneur, artist and benefactor who endows scholarships for Italian language and studio art majors, and Andy Shih, senior vice president for public health at Autism Speaks, an international NGO dedicated to autism awareness, research, and access to services.

Garry Trudeau, MFA, who in 1970 launched the iconic “Doonesbury” comic strip, now appearing in nearly 1,400 daily and Sunday newspapers, and is the first comic strip artist to win the Pulitzer Prize, will keynote the Macaulay Honors College commencement and receive an honorary doctorate. Sonia Manzano, an actress, screenwriter, author and singer-songwriter best known for playing “Maria” on Sesame Street for more than four decades, will speak at Hostos Community College’s commencement. Lehman College graduates will hear speaker Betty A. Rosa, chancellor of the New York State Board of Regents, who holds degrees from City College, Lehman College and Harvard University, and will be given an honorary doctorate. Lehman will also present honorary degrees to Jeffrey Gilbert ’72, an internist and international authority on sexually transmitted diseases, and to renowned Latin jazz pianist Eddie Palmieri, whose six-decade career has brought him numerous accolades including the Latin Grammys’ Lifetime Achievement Award, and the highest honor the United States bestows upon jazz musicians, the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master.

 

The Graduate Center’s Presidents’ Alumni Medal will go to prominent publisher and editor LuAnn Walther, who has published and worked with many of the most celebrated and influential novelists, playwrights, literary critics and translators of our time. The Graduate Center will also present honorary degrees to Vanita Gupta, who recently served in the Obama administration as head of the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice; to celebrated Middle Eastern artist Wael Shawky, who uses film, performance and narrative to present history from a non-Western perspective; and to Lord Nicholas Stern, a former chief economic adviser to the UK who published a groundbreaking 700-page report on the economic impact of climate change. WeWork co-founder and CEO Adam Neumann, whose company provides equipped workspace and services in more than 44 cities worldwide, will speak at the Baruch College commencement, and New York Secretary of State Rossana Rosado, whose 30-year media career included 18 years at El Diario-La Prensa as publisher and CEO, will address York College graduates.

Borough of Manhattan Community College graduates will hear Manhattan Congressman Adriano Espaillat, the first Dominican-American elected to a state legislature, and Jane Rosenthal, who co-founded the Tribeca Film Festival and Tribeca Film Institute in 2002 in response to 9/11’s effects on Lower Manhattan. Rosenthal will receive the BMCC President’s Medal. At New York City College of Technology’s commencement, Miguel Gamiño, New York City’s Chief Technology Officer, is guest speaker, and Lorelei Salas, commissioner of the New York City Department of Consumer Affiars, is the alumni speaker at LaGuardia Community College’s graduation ceremonies. At the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy commencement, Linda Sarsour, co-organizer of the National Women’s March and former executive director of the Arab American Association of New York, will give the keynote speech, New York City First Lady Chirlane McCray will receive an honorary Doctor of Science in Public Health degree, and Mary Bassett, commissioner of the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, will receive the Champion of Public Health award. At Kingsborough Community College, graduates will be addressed by Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams and New York City Public Advocate Letitia James. Thomas Bailey, George and Abby O’Neill Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University and director of the Community College Research Center and two national education research centers, will receive the President’s Medal at the commencement for Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

 

May 31

 

CUNY School of Professional Studies: 6 p.m., David Geffen Hall, 10 Lincoln Center Plaza, Manhattan

 

Speaker: Nisha Agarwal.  Agarwal, the commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA), is an accomplished public interest lawyer and a leading voice on immigration reform. She led the development and implementation of IDNYC, the country's largest municipal identification program, to ensure that all New Yorkers have the peace of mind and security that comes from recognized identification. Her tenure as commissioner of MOIA has been marked by her entrepreneurial drive and proven record of enacting pro-immigrant legislation. Commissioner Agarwal has received numerous recognitions, including being listed in Crain’s New York Business’ “40 Under 40.” She received her B.A. summa cum laude from Harvard College, her JD from Harvard Law School, and was a Marshall Scholar at Oxford University.

 

Contact: Andrea Fagon, 646-664-8690

 

 

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. ceremonies, Arthur Ashe Stadium, 124-02 Roosevelt Ave., Flushing, Queens

 

10:30 a.m. Speaker and Honorary Degree – Doctor of Law: Mary L. Bonauto. Bonauto is a renowned litigator and civil rights advocate who has been the Civil Rights Project Director at GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) since 1990. She has litigated in the state and federal courts of New England on discrimination issues, parental and children’s rights, free speech and religious liberty, and relationship recognition. In 2015, she successfully argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in the historic case Obergefell v. Hodges, establishing the freedom to marry for same-sex couples nationwide. Bonauto and two co-counsels won a 1999 ruling in Baker v. State of Vermont that led to the nation’s first civil union law.  She was lead counsel in the groundbreaking case Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which in 2004 made Massachusetts the first state where same-sex couples could legally marry. She was also co-counsel in Kerrigan v. Department of Public Health, in which the Connecticut Supreme Court also ruled for marriage. Bonauto led GLAD’s federal court challenges to the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) leading to the first federal court rulings against DOMA, and then coordinated amici briefs for the Windsor case at the Supreme Court.  As a member of the legal team in the Michigan marriage case DeBoer v. Snyder, she became the Supreme Court oral-argument presenter on behalf of the plaintiffs in Obergefell case. Her work has been recognized with numerous awards, including a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship. She is the Shikes Fellow in Civil Liberties and Civil Rights and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, serves on an advisory board for the American Constitution Society and has also served as co-chair of the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Committee of the American Bar Association’s Section on Individual Rights and Responsibilities.

3:30 p.m. Speaker and Honorary Degree - Doctor of Humane Letters: Jose Antonio Vargas. Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, filmmaker and media entrepreneur whose work centers on the changing American identity. He is the founder and CEO of Define American, a nonprofit media and culture organization that seeks to elevate the conversation around immigration and citizenship in America; and the founder of #EmergingUS, a media startup that lives at the intersection of race, immigration and identity in a multicultural America. In June 2011, The New York Times Magazine published a groundbreaking essay he wrote in which he revealed and chronicled his life in America as an undocumented immigrant. He then produced and directed “Documented,” a documentary feature film on his undocumented experience, which received a 2015 NAACP Image Award nomination for Outstanding Documentary. Vargas’ second documentary film, “White People,” has expanded his focus to race relations. He has written for the daily newspapers, Philadelphia Daily News, and San Francisco Chronicle, and national magazines, Rolling Stone and The New Yorker, and was a Senior Contributing Editor at the Huffington Post, where he launched the Technology and College sections. Prior to that, he covered tech and video game culture, HIV/AIDS in the nation’s capital, and the 2008 presidential campaign for the Washington Post, and was part of the team that won a Pulitzer Prize for covering the Virginia Tech massacre. In 2007, Politico named him one of 50 Politicos to Watch. His other accolades have included a Public Service Award from the National Council of La Raza, the country’s largest Latino advocacy organization; the Salem Award from the Salem Award Foundation, and the Freedom to Write Award from PEN Center USA.

 

Contact: Doreen Viñas, 212-237-8645

 

 

June 1

 

CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy:  5 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. (Doors  close at 4:50 p.m.),  Apollo Theater, 253 West 125th St., Manhattan

Ceremony for Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 graduates

Speaker: Linda Sarsour, co-organizer of the National Women’s March and former executive director of the Arab American Association of New York, will deliver the keynote address. Honorary Doctor of Science: Chirlane McCray, First Lady of New York City, will receive an honorary Doctor of Science in Public Health degree in recognition of her leadership of ThriveNYC, the most comprehensive mental health plan of any city or state in the nation. Champion of Public Health Award: Mary Bassett, commissioner of the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, receives the Champion of Public Health award for her transformational work addressing population health in New York City.

Contact:  Barbara Aaron, 646-364-9772

 

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College: 3 p.m., United Palace, 4140 Broadway, Manhattan

 

Speaker and President’s Medal:  Sonia Manzano. An actress, screenwriter, author, singer-songwriter and a first-generation American of Latino descent, Sonia Manzano is best known for playing “Maria” on “Sesame Street” for more than four decades. Raised in the South Bronx, her acting career began at the High School of Performing Arts, and she is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University. Manzano appeared in the original production of the classic off-Broadway musical “Godspell, after which she joined the cast of Sesame Street.” Her work on the series encompassed script writing and performing. Manzano has performed on the New York stage in the critically acclaimed plays, “The Vagina Monologues,” “The Exonerated,” and “Love, Loss and What I Wore,” and has extensive film and television appearances to her credit. She has written for the Peabody Award-winning children’s series Little Bill” and penned a parenting column for the “Sesame Workshop” website, Talking Out Loud.”  She is the author of a children’s book, No Dogs Allowed! a young adult novel, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano; a memoir, Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx; and two picture books, Miracle on 133rd Street and The Lowdown on the Highbridge. Manzano is an adviser for the literary New York institution Symphony Space, where she is a frequent reader for Selected Shorts” and for its adult literacy program, All Write! She is also a volunteer for the Bronx River Alliance. In 2016, Manzano was honored with a Daytime Emmy Lifetime Achievement Award.  Sonia Manzano will also be receiving the President’s Medal, the highest honor our institution can bestow. It is awarded to individuals who have achieved noteworthy professional accomplishments that reflect dedication and commitment to the mission and vision of Hostos.

 

Contact:  Soldanela Rivera Lopez, 917-627-9097

 

Lehman College: 10 a.m., 250 Bedford Park Blvd. West, South Field, Bronx

Speaker and Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters:  Betty A. Rosa. Rosa was elected to two, five-year terms, April 2008 - March 2013, and reelected, April 2013 - March 2018, as the Regent for the 12th Judicial District - Bronx County. In March 2016, she was elected by her Board of Regents colleagues as Chancellor for another term (April 2016 through March 2019). Dr. Rosa received a B.A. in psychology from City College and holds two Master of Science in Education degrees, one in administration and supervision from City College, the other in bilingual education from Lehman College. She also received an Ed.M. and Ed.D. in administration, planning, and social policy from Harvard University. Honorary Degree ­– Doctor of Science: Dr. Jeffrey Gilbert holds the distinction of being a member of the first graduating class of Lehman College (1972). After graduating from Lehman, he attended the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, graduating in 1975. Dr. Gilbert is an internist and an international authority on the diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs. Currently, he is the medical director of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) for BioReference Laboratories, where he is pioneering new testing methods for STIs. Prior to this, he was medical director for the STD Center of Excellence at Montefiore Medical Center, which he founded in 1992 at Mount Vernon Hospital and then relocated to Montefiore Hospital in 1996. The STD Center of Excellence was the STD training site for New York State for nearly two decades and was a Center for Disease Control training site for five years. Early in his career, Dr. Gilbert was in charge of the New York City Department of Health’s Bronx STD Clinic where he started the first teaching program for Einstein medical students and then for all NYC doctors. Dr. Gilbert is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Amazon Biotech Inc. and holds the prestigious designation of a World Health Organization Expert in Human Diseases, including HIV. In addition, he has extensive clinical experience with HIV drugs and is affiliated with an HIV clinic in Nigeria. Honorary Degree - Doctor of Music: Eddie Palmieri. Known as one of the finest Latin jazz pianists of the past 50 years, Eddie Palmieri is also a bandleader of both salsa and Latin jazz orchestras. His professional career as a pianist took off in the early 1950s when he played with various bands. In 1961, he formed his own band, La Perfecta, which created an innovative sound that mixed American jazz into Latin performances. In 1970, Palmieri released several recordings that reflected his unorthodox approach to music, such as the groundbreaking release of “Harlem River Drive,” which merged musical categories into a free-form sound that encompassed elements of salsa, funk, soul and jazz. In 1975, Palmieri won the first ever Grammy Award for Best Latin Recording for his album “The Sun of Latin Music.”  He has received 10 Grammys, including two for his recordings with Tito Puente, “Obra Maestra/Masterpiece.” In addition to the Grammy Awards, Palmieri has received numerous other honors including: the Eubie Blake Award, 1991; the Award for Most Exciting Latin Performance presented by the BBC in London, 2002; Yale University’s Chubb Fellowship for his work building communities through music, 2002; the Harlem Renaissance Award, 2005; the Jay McShann Lifetime Achievement Award, 2008; along with his induction into the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. In 2009, the Library of Congress added Palmieri’s composition “Azucar Pa’ Ti” to the National Recording Registry. In 2013, he was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Latin Grammys and honored as a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master. The Jazz Masters Fellowships are the highest honors that the United States bestows upon jazz musicians.

 

Contact: Joseph Tirella, 718-960-8013

 

 

June 2

 

 

Borough of Manhattan Community College: 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. ceremonies, The Theater at Madison Square Garden, 4 Pennsylvania Plaza, Manhattan

 

11 a.m.

Speaker and President’s Medal Honoree – morning ceremony: Adriano Espaillat, U.S. Congressman, 13th District – NY. Espaillat became the first Dominican-American elected to a state legislature, and served in the New York State Assembly. In 2002, he was elected Chair of the New York State Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus. Before entering elected office, he served as Coordinator of Manhattan Court Services for the NYC Criminal Justice Agency, Director of the Washington Heights Victims Services Community Office, and Director of Project Right Start.

3:30 p.m. Speaker and President’s Medal Honoree: Jane Rosenthal. Rosenthal, co-founder of Tribeca Productions, co-founded the Tribeca Film Festival and Tribeca Film Institute in 2002 with Robert De Niro and Craig Hatkoff in a response to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and the impact of those events on the economy and vibrancy of Tribeca and lower Manhattan. In 2008, Rosenthal and her co-founders received the inaugural “Notes of Hope Award” for Distinction in Rebuilding, from the September 11 National Museum and Memorial Foundation.

 

Contact: Manuel Romero, 212-220-1238

 

 

 

Bronx Community College: 9:30 a.m., Bronx Community College, Ohio Field, 2155 University Ave., Bronx

 

 

Speaker: Shahin Sultana, Valedictorian. “In my country, education for women is only in the constitution,” says Shahin Sultana, the Bangladesh-born Valedictorian of the BCC Class of 2017.  “Realistically, higher education only serves males.”  Shahin was the top student in every class – a distinction she has continued at Bronx Community College as a Liberal Arts: Biology major with a 4.0 GPA, a member of the Phi Thet, a Kappa honor society, included on the President’s list, and a winner of the Guttman Transfer Scholarship and Hunter Transfer Achievement Scholarship. Shahin’s goal was to become a doctor. But that dream was sidetracked when a traditional early marriage halted her education at high school. But in 2009, she came to the United States, where a doctor changed her life helping bring her son into the world. “I made up my mind to go back to school to fulfill my dream and be an example for my son.”
Contact: Diane M. Weathers, 718-289-5770

 

City College of New York:  9 a.m., South Campus Great Lawn, 135th Street and Convent Avenue, Manhattan.

 

Speaker: Vivek Tiwary. Tiwary, the Tony Award-winning Broadway producer and New York Times best-selling author, founded the multiplatform arts and entertainment company, Tiwary Entertainment Group. His Broadway productions have won a combined 25 Tony Awards and garnered more than 44 Tony nominations. They include “Green Day’s American Idiot,” “A Raisin in the Sun,” and Mel Brooks’ “The Producers.” Tiwary’s graphic novel, The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story, based on the untold life story of the Beatles’ manager, has earned a number of prestigious literary awards, including the Will Eisner Comic Industry Award for Best Reality-Based Work and a Harvey Award for Best Original Graphic Novel. It was added to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives Permanent Collection. As executive producer, he will adapt The Fifth Beatle into a multipart TV event series with unprecedented access to Beatles music. Tiwary is a graduate of both the Wharton School of Business and the University of Pennsylvania’s College of Arts and Sciences. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: David Diaz. A 1965 City College alumnus, Diaz spent 27 years as a reporter at WNBC/Channel 4 and WCBS/Channel 2 in New York. His coverage of both city news and national events, such as the Oklahoma bombing, the 9/11 World Trade Center and presidential elections, earned him numerous awards for journalism excellence. Diaz received five Emmy Awards, two Sigma Delta Chi Awards and an Associated Press Award. He has served as Distinguished Lecturer at CCNY. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Science: Robert E. Kahn. The 1960 CCNY alumnus initiated the U.S. government’s Internet program and is co-creator with Vinton Cerf of the TCP/IP protocols, the fundamental technology underpinning the Internet. In his recent work, Kahn has been developing the concept of a Digital Object Architecture to provide a framework for interoperability across heterogeneous information systems. His numerous awards include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the National Medal of Technology, the Japan Prize, the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering and the A.M. Turing Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and an inductee into the Inventors Hall of Fame and the Internet Hall of Fame. Kahn is president and CEO of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, a nonprofit organization focused on research and development for the national information infrastructure. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Deborah Meier. Public educator, writer and advocate since the early 1960s, Meier is one of the most acclaimed leaders of the school reform movement in the U.S. She founded the acclaimed Central Park East Schools and helped revitalize public schools in New York City’s East Harlem District 4. She also founded Mission Hill, a K-8 school in Roxbury, Mass., and helped establish the Coalition of Essential Schools. Her books include The Power of Their Ideas, Lessons to America from a Small School in Harlem, and In Schools We Trust. She received a MacArthur “genius” award for her work in public education.

 

Contact: Jay Mwamba, 212-650-7580

 

The Graduate Center:  1:30 p.m., David Geffen Hall, 10 Lincoln Center Plaza, Manhattan

 

Presidents’ Alumni Medal:  LuAnn Walther. She has published novelists including Ha Jin, winner of the National Book Award and two PEN Faulkner Awards, and Ali Smith, three-time finalist for the Man Booker Award; Pulitzer Prize-winning playwrights Sam Shepard and David Mamet, as well as John Guare and Anna Deavere Smith, recipient of the National Humanities Medal presented by President Barack Obama. She has also published literary critics such as Alfred Kazin, Irving Howe and Elaine Showalter; biographers including Hermione Lee and Morton Cohen; and PEN Award-winning translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, whose translation of War and Peace became a national bestseller. Walther was the founding editor of the Bantam Classics imprint, where she published more than 100 titles before moving on to Penguin/New American Library, where, as executive editor, she oversaw the Signet Classics, Meridian Books, and Plume trade paperback imprints, as well as acquiring hardcover titles. In 1988 she went to Alfred A. Knopf.  As editorial director of Vintage/Anchor she has worked with celebrated authors including Margaret Atwood, Toni Morrison, Alice Munro, Oliver Sacks, Chinua Achebe, Colson Whitehead, Patti Smith, Maxine Hong Kingston, Henry Louis Gates and many others. At Everyman’s Library she has overseen the U.S. publication of 650 hardcover classics including the popular Pocket Poets series.

 

Honorary Degree - Doctor of Humane Letters: Vanita Gupta. She helped successfully overturn the wrongful drug convictions of 38 individuals in Tulia, Texas. From 2006 to 2010, she served as a staff attorney with the ACLU’s Racial Justice Program, where she won a landmark settlement on behalf of immigrant children. That ruling later prompted the Department of Homeland Security to take steps toward reforming the nation’s immigration detention system. Gupta went on to become the Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General and head of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice. In that role, she emerged as one of the nation’s most prominent advocates for social justice. She joined the Justice Department in the fall of 2014, just nine weeks after Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. For the next two years, she met with mayors, police chiefs, and citizens nationwide in an effort to repair the relationships between police departments and their communities ­–and gained the support of liberal and conservative activists, as well as law enforcement leaders, to find common ground on criminal justice reform. Gupta has also prosecuted hate crimes and human trafficking, promoted disability rights, protected the rights of LGBT individuals, and fought discrimination in education, employment, housing, lending, and voting – seeking justice at every stage of her career for our nation’s most vulnerable residents. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Wael Shawky. He is one of the most celebrated artists from the Middle East, achieving international renown for his use of film, performance, and narrative in work that retells history from a perspective seldom seen in the West. He is perhaps best known for his epic trilogy of films, featuring puppets and marionettes, that present the history of the Crusades through an Arab lens. The films were shown at MoMA PS1 in 2015 as part of Shawky’s first solo exhibition at a major U.S. museum. Writing for New York magazine, art critic Jerry Saltz called it “one of the best exhibitions of the season.” Shawky’s work is found in museums including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Canada, and the Tate Collection in London. He has been awarded many prizes, including the Ernst Schering Foundation Art Award in 2011 and the first Mario Merz Prize in 2015. Shawky was born in Alexandria, Egypt, where he currently lives and works. He is also the founder of MASS Alexandria, an educational space. He earned his BFA from Alexandria University and a MFA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Fine Arts. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Lord Nicholas Stern. He made headline news around the world when he published the 700-page “Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change,” a groundbreaking report examining the economic impact of climate change. Stern, who is currently Chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, is world renowned for his research on the economics of global warming. He has led the Grantham Research Institute since its founding in 2008 at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he is also the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and the Head of the India Observatory. A former chief economic adviser to the UK government, Stern served as the Chief Economist and Senior Vice President of the World Bank from 2000 to 2003. He also played a key role in Europe’s economic development as the Chief Economist and Senior Adviser to the Director of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Stern is the author of more than 15 books and 100 articles, and currently serves as president of the British Academy and is also a Fellow of the Royal Society. He has held academic appointments at the University of Oxford, University of Warwick, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, École Polytechnique, and the Collège de France in Paris, the Indian Statistical Institute in Bangalore and Delhi, and the People’s University of China in Beijing.

 

 

Contact: Tanya Domi, 212-817-7283

 

Queensborough Community College: 10 a.m. (rain or shine) Queensborough Community College Athletic Field, Queensborough Community College, 222-05 56th Ave., Bayside, N.Y.

 

 

Speaker: Diane B. Call, President of Queensborough Community College. Diane B. Call, appointed president of the college in January 2013, has a career that spans three decades at Queensborough and CUNY, and has held positions that have encompassed virtually all major areas of administration and academics at Queensborough. As provost, Call led the Academic Affairs Division in creating a student-centered learning environment in collaboration with faculty and Student Affairs colleagues through curriculum and pedagogical innovations, undergraduate research, as well as instructional support programs. Among her many achievements are programs for the recruitment and retention of faculty and faculty development programs, high-impact practices, e-learning, academic leadership and pedagogical research in community college teaching. Her partnership with Student Affairs led to the implementation of the Freshman Academies for all full-time, first-time freshmen. Based on the success of the initiative on student learning outcomes, the Freshman Academies was scaled up to the Queensborough Academies in the fall of 2013. The Academies offer full-time students personalized support services based on academic and future goals throughout the student’s academic career at Queensborough. Call holds a Doctor of Education degree in College and University Administration, a Master’s degree in Community College Administration and a second Master’s degree in Student Personnel Administration, all earned from Teachers College, Columbia University. Additionally, she holds a Certificate in Curriculum Development from Harvard Graduate School of Education.  Call was an adjunct professor at Long Island University, C.W. Post, Graduate School of Education; and an adjunct associate professor at Queensborough Community College, Department of English. Call’s academic credentials, along with her publications and research presentations at academic conferences on “at risk” students, gained her the rank of full professor in Student Personnel Services in 1994, having acquired tenure in 1978. In her years at Queensborough, Call also instituted the Instructional Support Services Center and Learning Lab and has led Admissions Services; Skills Assessment Testing; Academic Advisement; the Freshman Year Program; College Discovery; and CSTEP. She consolidated Tutorial Services and the Writing Center, substantially increasing the number of students served.

 

 

Contact: Alice Doyle, 718-281-5591

 

 

York College: 9 a.m., York College Athletic Field behind the Health and Physical Education Building at 160-02 Liberty Avenue between Guy R. Brewer Boulevard and 160th St.

 

Speaker: NYS Secretary of State Rossana Rosado; New York Secretary of State. From becoming the first woman to serve as editor and publisher of the largest Spanish-language newspaper in the country, to championing prisoner re-entry initiatives, and to work as an award-winning producer, Rossana Rosado brings a depth and diversity of experience to her role as New York Secretary of State. Gov. Andrew Cuomo appointed Secretary Rosado to the position on Feb. 3, 2016, and she was unanimously confirmed by the New York State Senate on June 15, 2016. Her leadership has helped make the Department of State one of the most dynamic agencies in state government. Secretary Rosado is best known for her successful tenure as publisher and CEO of El Diario La Prensa, where she spent 18 years overseeing more than $22 million in annual revenue. Whether it was women’s empowerment, the re-entry and reintegration of prisoners into society, or a fairer and more humane immigration policy, Rosado advocated in the paper's editorial pages for advancement on issues affecting a wide array of New Yorkers. During her 30-year media career, she earned an Emmy Award, a STAR Award from the NY Women's Agenda, and a Peabody Award for Journalism. A native New Yorker, Secretary Rosado received her B.A. in Journalism from Pace University.

 

Contact: Marcia Moxam Comrie, 718-262-3865

 

 

June 5

 

 

June 5

 

Baruch College: 9:30 a.m. Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn

 

Speaker: Adam Neumann is the co-founder and CEO of WeWork, which provides workspace, community, and services to over 100,000 members in more than 44 cities around the world. Neumann, with co-founder Miguel McKelvey, started WeWork in 2010 in New York’s Soho with the intention of creating a workspace environment centered around the idea of community, and the belief that people will achieve more together than they can on their own. Neumann and the team want to grow WeWork everywhere, expanding globally and focusing on building technology that connects members around the world so they are empowered to do what they love. Previously, Neumann co-founded and ran Big Tent Inc., where he developed Egg Baby and Krawlers, well-known brands of children’s clothing. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Pedagogy: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Ph.D., is a renowned astrophysicist and the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History. In this role, he has been a leader in advancing the understanding of science—and particularly astronomy and astrophysics—by the general public. As a scientific communicator, he continues to educate and inspire the public, and in particular young people, to pursue discovery and understanding of the world through science. A native New Yorker, Dr. Tyson was educated in public schools clear through his graduation from the Bronx High School of Science. He went on to earn his B.A. in physics from Harvard and his Ph.D. in astrophysics from Columbia. Dr. Tyson was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal in 2004, hosted NOVA ScienceNow on PBS, and he received the Public Welfare Medal by the National Academy of Sciences in 2015 for his “extraordinary role in exciting the public about the wonders of science.” Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Allan E. Goodman, Ph.D., is president and CEO of the Institute of International Education (IIE), the leading not-for-profit organization in the field of international educational exchange and development training. IIE conducts research and administers the Fulbright Programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, as well as several hundred corporate, government, and privately sponsored programs on international education. Dr. Goodman was executive dean of the School of Foreign Service and professor at Georgetown University, and served as presidential briefing coordinator for the director of central intelligence in the Carter Administration. Dr. Goodman has served as a consultant to the Ford Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the United States Information Agency, and IBM. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Goodman has a Ph.D. in government from Harvard, an M.P.A from the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and a B.S. from Northwestern University.

 

 

 

 

 

Contact:  Suzanne Bronski, 646-660-6093

 

 

 

 

New York City College of Technology: 5:30 p.m., Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn

Speaker: Miguel A. Gamiño Jr., New York City Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and Civic Technologist Miguel A. Gamiño has unique experience in government, blended with a deep knowledge of technology, the industry that fuels it, and the culture it inspires. As CTO, Gamiño works with all city agencies to develop a Smart City and “Internet of Things” strategy that ensures coordination, collaboration and innovation across the city. He leads the city’s Broadband Program, partnering with agencies, private industry and academia to further the mayor’s goal of ensuring that every New Yorker and New York City business will have access to affordable, reliable, high-speed broadband service by 2025. Gamiño serves on several executive advisory committees in industry and has served on the Intergovernmental Advisory Committee of the Federal Communication Commission. He is a founding member of the Connected City Advisory Board and a founding member of the Council of Global City Chief Information Officers. Before coming to New York City, Gamiño served as the Chief Information Officer for the city and county of San Francisco and executive director of the Department of Technology. As a technology entrepreneur, he founded two technology companies, and managed them through the startup phase and into successful operations. He is a graduate of the University of Texas, El Paso.

Contact: Denise H. Sutton, 718-260-5979 or Stephen Soiffer, 718-260-5992

 

 

June 8

 

LaGuardia Community College:  4 p.m. Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y.​

 

Keynote Speaker:  Alicia Garza, co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter. She and two friends founded #BlackLivesMatter, an online forum dedicated to connecting people interested in learning more about and fighting against Black/African-American racism following the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin. For her work fighting gentrification and environmental racism in San Francisco’s largest remaining Black community, she has been honored twice by the Harvey Milk Democratic Club with the Bayard Rustin Community Activist award. Currently, she’s special projects director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance. Previously, she was executive director of People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER) in San Francisco. Alumni Speaker: Lorelei Salas, Commissioner of the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs. In this role, she leads the City’s Office of Labor Policy and Standards, which includes paid sick leave, commuter benefits, and future efforts to protect New York City workers. An accomplished labor law advocate who has committed her career to fighting inequality, Commissioner Salas previously held roles with the United States Department of Labor (appointed by President Obama as Wage and Hour Administrator), the New York State Attorney General’s Office in the Litigation and Labor Bureaus, the New York State Department of Labor, Catholic Migration Services, and Make the Road New York. She earned her JD from the Benjamin N. Cardozo Law School, and is admitted to practice law in New York State and in federal courts. Class of 2017 Representative: Remy Patrick Lavilla, who will receive his associate degree in accounting and will pursue his bachelor’s in economics at Columbia University. He was selected for ThinkGeek’s National Innovation for Tomorrow Award for his prototype of a mobile app to help college students more easily and efficiently navigate the college transfer process. He was one of seven college students nationwide selected for the National Student Leadership Committee – part of President Obama’s campaign to make community colleges tuition-free. Lavilla, a native of the Philippines, moved to the United States in 2015 at age 17, after the infamous Typhoon Haiyan hit his hometown. Upon arriving in New York City, he enrolled as a foreign student at LaGuardia and quickly immersed himself in the many opportunities and activities at the college. His achievements at LaGuardia include being selected as a President’s Society Ambassador, an Honors Program member, a Phi Theta Kappa member, and a college assistant in the Office of the President. He managed his many on-campus activities while consistently making the Dean’s List; maintaining a 3.9 GPA.

 

Contact: Elizabeth Streich, 718-482-6131

 

 

 

 

 

Medgar Evers College: 9 a.m., Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn

 

Speaker and Honorary Degree - Doctor of Humane Letters: Hillary Rodham Clinton.  Hillary Rodham Clinton has spent four decades in public service as an advocate, attorney, first lady, U.S. senator, U.S. Secretary of State, and presidential candidate. After graduating from Wellesley College and Yale Law School, she began her lifelong work on behalf of children and families by joining the Children’s Defense Fund. As first lady of the United States, from 1993 to 2001, Hillary Clinton championed health care for all Americans and led successful bipartisan efforts to improve the adoption and foster care systems, reduce teen pregnancy, and create the Children's Health Insurance Program. In 2000, Clinton made history as the first first lady elected to the United States Senate, and the first woman elected to statewide office in New York. As a senator, she worked across party lines to expand economic opportunity and access to quality, affordable health care. In the 2008 general election, she campaigned for Barack Obama and Joe Biden, and in December, she was nominated by President-elect Obama to be Secretary of State. In her four years as America's chief diplomat and the president's principal foreign policy adviser, Clinton played a central role in restoring America’s standing in the world and strengthening its global leadership, visiting 112 countries over 4 years, restoring America’s standing in the world. In 2016, Clinton made history again by becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major U.S. political party. Hillary Rodham Clinton is the author of five best-selling books, including her groundbreaking book on children, It Takes A Village; Dear Socks, Dear Buddy; An Invitation to the White House; her memoir, Living History; and Hard Choices.

 

Contact: Felicia R. Lee, 718-270-5046

 

June 12

Macaulay Honors College: 3 p.m., United Palace Theater, 4140 Broadway at 175th St., New York, N.Y. 10033

Keynote Speaker and Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Garry Trudeau, MFA, is the first comic strip artist to win a Pulitzer Prize. Trudeau launched the comic strip “Doonesbury” in 1970, and it now appears in nearly 1,400 daily and Sunday newspapers in the U.S. and abroad. Trudeau’s work has been collected in 60 hardcover, trade paperback and mass-market editions. He has contributed articles to publications such as Harper's, Rolling Stone, The New Republic, The New Yorker, New York, and The Washington Post.  For five years he was an occasional columnist for The New York Times op-ed page, and was later a contributing essayist for Time magazine. He has been inducted as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2015, he received the George Polk Career Award. He has a B.A. and an MFA degree from Yale University in graphic arts. In awarding Garry Trudeau the honorary degree, Doctor of Humane Letters, Macaulay will recognize his creativity, analytical sharpness, and commitment to equality and telling the stories of Americans of diverse backgrounds.

 

Contact: Sheila Stainback, 212-729-2924

 

June 15

 

Kingsborough Community College: 11 a.m., Kingsborough Community College, 2001 Oriental Blvd., Brooklyn

Speakers: Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams and Public Advocate Letitia James.

For the past three decades, Eric L. Adams has served the residents of the city of his birth as a police officer, state senator, and coalition builder. He was elected as Borough President of Brooklyn in 2013. Borough President Adams has been an effective advocate for Brooklyn throughout his career, bringing people and communities together to create progressive change, and working with private and public sectors to invigorate the borough’s economy by encouraging job growth and investment in every neighborhood. From 2006 to 2013, Adams represented the 20th Senate District, working on a broad range of issues from civil rights and public safety to transparency in government and quality of life. His legislative record in the New York State Senate underscored his strong commitment to the rights of every citizen, including protecting the right to privacy, supporting marriage equality, defending a woman’s right to choose, and fighting for the rights of students, workers and animals.

Letitia James is the Public Advocate for the City of New York, the second highest-ranking elected office in the city. As Public Advocate, she serves as a direct link between New Yorkers and their government, acts as a watchdog over city agencies, and investigates complaints about city services. She made history in 2014 as the first woman of color to hold citywide office in New York City. Before becoming Public Advocate, James served from 2004 to 2013 as a member of the City Council, where she fought for paid sick leave and passed the Safe Housing Act ensuring that families in rental buildings receive prompt and full repairs to their apartments. She is a strong advocate for criminal justice reform, led the push for police body cameras in the NYPD, and was among the first to call for special prosecutors in all cases of police misconduct.

Contact: Dawn Walker, 917-588-6305 / 718-368-5060

 

 

 

June 19

 

Stella and Charles Guttman Community College: 10:30 a.m., Borough of Manhattan Community College-Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers St., Manhattan

 

President’s Medal Recipient: Thomas Bailey. Bailey is the George and Abby O'Neill Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is also director of the Community College Research Center and two national centers funded by a grant from the Institute of Education Sciences: the Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, established in 2011, and the Center for the Analysis of Postsecondary Readiness, established in 2014. From 2006 to 2012, Bailey directed another IES-funded center, the National Center for Postsecondary Research.

 

Contact: Linda Merians, 646-313-8023

 

 

Prior 2017 Commencements

 

May 12

CUNY School of Law: Kupferberg Center for Arts at Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, N.Y.

Speaker and Honorary Degree – Doctor of Law: Sherrilyn Ifill. Sherrilyn Ifill is the seventh president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Inc. (LDF), the nation's premier civil rights legal organization. During her tenure at LDF, Ifill has litigated numerous cases including the landmark Voting Rights Act case, Houston Lawyers’ Association v. Attorney General of Texas, in which the Supreme Court held that judicial elections are covered by the provisions of section 2 of the Voting Rights Act. As a faculty member at the University of the Maryland School of Law, she developed an environmental justice clinical offering and co-founded one of the first legal clinics in the nation focused on removing legal barriers to formerly incarcerated persons seeking to responsibly re-enter society. As a leader of LDF, Ifill has increased the visibility and engagement of the organization in cutting edge and urgent civil rights issues including policing reform, the Detroit water crisis and transportation inequity. She is a sought-after speaker and strategist whose counsel is sought by government officials, civic and community leaders and national civil rights colleagues. A critically acclaimed author, her scholarly articles and her 2007 book, On the Courthouse Lawn: Confronting the Legacy of Lynching in the 21st Century, reflect Ifill's lifelong engagement in and analysis of issues of race and American public life.

 

Contact: Elizabeth Dickinson, 718-340-4006

 

 

May 26

Queens College: 9 a.m., Queens College Quad, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, Queens

Speaker and President’s Medal: Congresswoman Grace Meng – a Queens native and the first female member of Congress from Queens since the late vice presidential nominee and former Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro – is described as “a consistent and powerful advocate for the college” by President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. Meng began her association with QC when she represented the 22nd Assembly District for two terms in the New York State Assembly. Now serving her third term in the House of Representatives, representing the 6th Congressional District of New York, which encompasses west, central, and northeast Queens, Meng is a member of the Appropriations Committee, which is responsible for funding every agency, program and project within the federal government. Previously, she served on the House Foreign Affairs Committee and the House Small Business Committee. Meng is the first Asian American member of Congress from New York State and the only member of Congress of Asian descent in the entire Northeast. Born in Elmhurst and raised in Bayside and Flushing, she graduated from Stuyvesant High School and the University of Michigan. Meng earned a law degree from Yeshiva University’s Benjamin Cardozo School of Law. Before entering public service, she worked as a public-interest lawyer. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Donald Brownstein ’65, whose career has spanned academia to Wall Street, enrolled at age 16 at Queens College, where he earned a B.A. in philosophy in 1965. He went on to earn a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Minnesota in 1969. After teaching philosophy at two universities, Brownstein moved into the financial realm, becoming CEO and chief investment officer of Structured Portfolio Management, an innovative hedge fund known for its mix of traders, academics and researchers who bring theory to bear on markets and investments. In 2012, he established a scholarship fund in the name of one of his most influential teachers, professor John J. McDermott. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Saul Kupferberg is a devoted member of the Queens College Foundation and a founding member and current chair of the Kupferberg Center Arts Advisory Board at Queens College. Kupferberg is the son of the late Max and Selma Kupferberg, in whose honor Colden Center was renamed the Kupferberg Center for the Arts, and former vice president of sales and marketing for Kepco, a family-founded and owned global power supply and electrical equipment company, based in Flushing. As a businessman, philanthropist, and working trustee, Kupferberg has offered extensive service to the college and the community – from keeping good jobs in the borough to supporting the arts and education.

Contact: Maria Matteo, 718-997-5593

 

 

 

May 30

Brooklyn College:  Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn

Speaker and Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Bernie Sanders. U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders, an Independent from Vermont, campaigned for the Democratic Party’s 2016 U.S. presidential nomination. The longest-serving Independent in congressional history, Sen. Sanders served as a congressman for 16 years until his election to the Senate in 2006. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he graduated from James Madison High School in 1959 and briefly attended Brooklyn College, transferring in 1960 to the University of Chicago, where he received a degree in political science in 1964. Sanders’ lifelong career as an activist for civil rights and progressive causes began as a student organizer for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). A plainspoken defender of what he calls “real family values,” Sanders made women’s, immigrant and LGBTQ rights, and causes such as a living wage, equal pay for equal work, and parental leave the cornerstone of his presidential campaign. He continues to be a tireless champion of the interests of working- and middle-class Americans. As chairman of the Committee on Veteran’s Affairs (VA), he has helped pass legislation to reform the VA health care system, fought to protect Medicare and Social Security, and has introduced bipartisan legislation to extend and modernize the Older Americans Act, a landmark law that provides a wide range of services. Sanders has been unwavering in his efforts to make higher education accessible to all, introducing legislation to increase Pell grants for students from low-income families and calling for tuition- and debt-free college. A member of the Environmental and Public Works and Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Sanders has also made combating climate change and transforming America’s energy program from fossil fuels to renewable sources priorities. Distinguished Alumnus Award: Fredy Peccerelli ’96. Mr. Peccerelli is a forensic anthropologist and executive director and founding member of the Guatemalan Forensic Anthropology Foundation (Fundación de Antropología Forense de Guatemala, or FAFG), a nongovernmental organization established in 1997 that exhumes mass graves of victims of the Guatemala’s 36-year internal conflict, and helps identify the remains. The evidence has helped convict perpetrators of genocide and crimes against humanity in that country, as well as aided families in locating missing loved ones. Mr. Peccerelli and the FAFG have collected more than 325 interviews from survivors of the Guatemalan conflict, testimonies that have been included in the University of Southern California’s Shoah Foundation’s Witness Education System. Born in 1971, Mr. Peccerelli and his family fled Guatemala to New York City when they received death threats from government death squads. He attended Brooklyn College, graduating with a B.A. in anthropology in 1996, and received a post-graduate diploma with distinction in forensic and biological anthropology at Bournemouth University in England in 2004. An affiliate professor for postgraduate masters in forensic sciences at the University of San Carlos of Guatemala, Mr. Peccerelli is considered one of the top 50 Latin American Leaders for the New Millennium by CNN. He has been named the 2015 Chancellor Dunning Trust Lecturer at Queens University, been awarded a Special Honors Medal by Canadian Governor General David Johnston, and received human rights activism awards from the Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives and the Puffin Foundation.

 

College of Staten Island: Great Lawn, College of Staten Island, 2800 Victory Blvd., Staten Island

 

Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Deirdre DeAngelis. Deirdre DeAngelis is the principal of New Dorp High School and has served in that capacity since 1999, making her the longest-serving principal on Staten Island. Since that time, she has been honored locally and by the State of New York for her accomplishments. She has received accolades from the New York Daily News as one of 11 top educators in 2012, and as a Hometown Hero, in part for her leadership during and after Superstorm Sandy. In 2013, she was honored as one of two New York State Senate Women of Distinction, again for her leadership and her creative approach to the restructuring of her school. The Staten Island Advance has reported increased enrollments and a 90 percent student attendance rate under her leadership. At New Dorp High School, she has created a structure of eight small learning communities, with each community addressing curricular or career interests of students, creating a more personal, small-school feel within a very large school. In addition, she has partnered with the College of Staten Island and other area schools to launch the 30,000 Degree Initiatives to increase the percentage of Island residents who hold college degrees. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Humane Letters: Peter and Robin Jovanovich. Peter and Robin Jovanovich have been uniquely supportive and generous friends of the College of Staten Island. Their efforts over the last five years have resulted in generous support of the Ellen Knowles Harcourt Scholarships awarded to Teacher Education Honors Academy students, as well as additional annual financial commitment. This scholarship money guarantees that the recipients will graduate with no debt, which is critically important for students who are working toward a career in teaching. What distinguishes these scholarships is the special role that Peter and Robin Jovanovich themselves play. Peter (the President Emeritus of the Alfred Harcourt Foundation) and Robin (the current President of the Alfred Harcourt Foundation) both take a personal interest in each Harcourt Scholar. Every semester they visit the College of Staten Island and meet individually with the Harcourt Scholars, review each student’s record and discuss their achievements and problems. They have observed many classes taught by Teacher Academy graduates at Staten Island high schools and they have frequently met with CSI administrators to reinforce their commitment to the College. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Arts: Margaret Ricciardi. Margaret Ricciardi received her bachelor’s degree in Art from the College of Staten Island in 1986. She has long-standing ties to Staten Island and the College of Staten Island community as a resident, entrepreneur, student, artist, and benefactor. She has continued her studies in sculpture and painting at CSI over three decades. Mrs. Ricciardi had a solo exhibit in the CSI Student Art Gallery soon after receiving her degree and has subsequently shown her work at the Museo dell’ Emigrante in Naples, the Snug Harbor Cultural Arts Center, and at the National Arts Club. In 2006, she received the Award for Cultural and Artistic Accomplishments at the third annual Festi dei Campani nel Mondo.  She endowed the Margaret and Frank Ricciardi Scholarship award for Italian language majors, enabling them to study abroad, as well as the Margaret Ricciardi Art Award, given annually to a graduating Studio Art major. Mrs. Ricciardi continues to commute to the college twice a week at the age of 103 and serves as a role model for students eager to be in the presence of a phenomenal artist. Honorary Degree – Doctor of Science: Andy Shih. Andy Shih is the Senior Vice President for Public Health and Inclusion at Autism Speaks, an international NGO dedicated to enhancing autism awareness, research, and access to services. He leads the development, implementation and management of the organization’s research portfolios in public health and international development. As a researcher, Shih has published studies on the development of ribozyme-based diagnostics and therapeutics, AIDS/Kaposi’s Sarcoma-related molecular virology, and the identification of novel GTPases involved in cell cycle regulation and genetic risk factors for autism. As a professor, he has led graduate seminars and designed curriculum for university upper-division cell biology and pharmacology courses. Shih currently oversees the development and management of international scientific and public policy activities in collaboration with key stakeholders from governments outside of the U.S., including heads of state, ministers and other officials and policymakers. He has provided leadership for several existing high-impact research consortia and large high-profile collaborations that have yielded hundreds of peer-reviewed publications over the past decade. He currently serves on the “Investing in Young Children Globally” and “Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health” forums at the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, and is also a member of the U.S. National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council.

 

Contact: Sara Paul, 718-982-2200

 

 

 

 

Hunter College: 3 p.m., Radio City Music Hall, 1260 Sixth Ave., Manhattan

 

Speaker: Alphonso B. David. An attorney, law professor, and policy adviser with significant litigation and management experience in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors, David was appointed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in 2015 to serve as Counsel to the Governor. In this role, he functions as the governor’s chief counsel and principal legal adviser, and oversees all significant legal and policy deliberations affecting New York State, including evaluating proposed legislation, implementing laws and policies, and formulating the state’s posture in both affirmative and defensive litigation. Prior to his appointment as the governor’s counsel, David served for four years in the governor’s cabinet as the Deputy Secretary and Counsel for Civil Rights, the first position of its kind in New York State. In this capacity, he was responsible for a range of legal, policy, legislative and operational matters affecting civil rights and labor throughout the state. David also previously served as Special Deputy Attorney General for Civil Rights for the Office of the New York State Attorney General, where he managed Assistant Attorneys General on a variety of investigations and affirmative litigation, including employment and housing discrimination, fair lending, reproductive rights, and anti-bias claims. Further, he previously served as Deputy Commissioner and Special Counselor at the New York State Division of Human Rights. Prior to working in the public sector, David served as a staff attorney at the Lambda Legal Defense and Educational Fund. At Lambda Legal, David litigated precedent-setting civil rights cases across the nation affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals as well as those living with HIV. He handled matters relating to marriage, parenting rights, discrimination in schools, and access to health care. In addition, David served as a litigation associate at the law firm Blank Rome LLP. He began his legal career as a judicial clerk to the Honorable Clifford Scott Green in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. For the past decade, David has served as an adjunct professor of law. He began his work in academia with Fordham University Law School and most recently with Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, teaching “Constitutional Law: Sexuality and the Law.” He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and Temple University School of Law.

 

Contact: Devin Callahan, 212-396-6590

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

 


Bernie Sanders Inspires the Brooklyn College Class of 2017 at Commencement Ceremony Held at the Barclays Center

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) helped Brooklyn College celebrate its 92nd commencement ceremony on Tuesday, May 30, 2017, delivering a rousing keynote address as well as accepting an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters for his groundbreaking career in politics, visionary approach to public policy and higher education, dedication to civic welfare, and commitment to equality.

More than 4,100 graduating students—2,957 baccalaureate and 1,147 master's candidates—made the class of 2017 the largest among Brooklyn higher education institutions. For the first time in the college's history, the ceremony was held at the Barclays Center in Downtown Brooklyn.

Alumnus and U.S. Senator for Vermont Bernie Sanders, spoke to the Brooklyn College Class of 2017 about the necessity for active political engagement.

"My childhood in Brooklyn was shaped by two profound realities," said Senator Sanders to the crowd of over 17,000 cheering students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of the college. "First, my mom, dad and older brother Larry, who graduated from Brooklyn College, lived in a three-and-a-half-room, rent-controlled apartment. As with many families who don't have a lot of money, financial pressures caused friction and tension within our household. From those experiences, I have never forgotten that there are millions of people throughout this country who struggle to put food on the table, pay the electric bill, try to save for their kids' education or for retirement –people who face painful and stress-filled decisions every single day."

He continued: "The second reality that impacted my life was that my father left Poland at the age of 17 from a community which was not only very poor, but from a country where Antisemitism, pogroms, and attacks on Jews were not uncommon. While my father emigrated to the United States, and escaped Hitler and the holocaust, many in his family did not. For them, racism, right-wing extremism and ultra- nationalism were not ‘political issues'; they were issues of life and death—and they died. From that experience, what was indelibly stamped on me was the understanding that we must never allow demagogues to divide us up by race, by religion, by national origin, by gender or sexual orientation. Black, white, Latino, Asian American, Native American, Christian, Jew, Muslim, and every religion, straight or gay, male or female we must stand together. This country belongs to all of us."

Sanders is perhaps best known for his campaign for the Democratic Party's 2016 U.S. presidential nomination. After graduating from high school in 1959, Sanders enrolled at Brooklyn College. It was here that he was introduced to the school's vigorous political culture, occasionally joining his older brother, Lawrence (Larry) Sanders '56, a leader in student government, at campus meetings of the college's Young Democrats. In 1960, Sanders transferred to the University of Chicago, where his lifelong career as an activist for civil rights and progressive causes began, first as a student organizer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and then with the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). Sanders graduated from the University of Chicago in 1964 with a bachelor's degree in political science and continued his role as an activist.

He was a conscientious objector to the Vietnam War. He ran two times each for the U.S. Senate and the governorship of Vermont, where he had moved in 1968. Running as an independent, Sanders was elected mayor of Burlington, Vermont's largest city, in 1981, and defended his seat in three subsequent elections. In 1990, he ran for Congress and won, becoming the first independent elected to the House of Representatives in 40 years. In 2006, Sanders ran for office as U.S. senator from Vermont after incumbent Jim Jeffords decided not to seek re-election. Sanders won by a margin of nearly 2–1, and six years later was re-elected with 71 percent of the vote. Today, Sanders continues to be a tireless champion for the interests of working-class, middle-class, and marginalized Americans.

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson and Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs William A. Tramontano present U.S. Senator for Vermont Bernie Sanders with the honorary degree, Doctor of Humane Letters.

"We are a richer academic community because of our diversity," said Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson, who was officially installed as president at the ceremony and also presented Sanders with his honorary degree. "We believe that one of the goals of higher learning is to make us stronger citizens in this way, better able to participate in the democratic process and to defend our constitutional order." Evoking Brooklyn College alumna Shirley Chisholm '46, as an example to inspire the graduating class, she continued: "The candidates for graduation today are the hard-working, remarkable, and striving students that Shirley Chisholm once was. They are expanding the realm of what is possible in their lives through the transformative power of higher education."

Also in attendance was Fredy Peccerelli '96, who received the Distinguished Alumnus Award. Peccerelli is a human rights advocate, forensic anthropologist, and a founding member of the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala (FAFG), a non-governmental organization that he and other human rights advocates opened in 1997, that exhumes from mass graves the remains of victims of Guatemala's 36-year internal armed conflict and helps to identify them. The evidence uncovered thus far has helped convict perpetrators of genocide and crimes against humanity in that country, as well as aided families in locating their dead and missing loved ones.

"I appreciate this honor from Brooklyn College—especially since I missed my own commencement ceremony back in 1996," said Peccerelli. "Instead, I was back in Guatemala finding holes, thousands of holes that contained thousands of those lives. These were not just holes; they were hidden graves. This award is also a tribute to the families who have never given up on their searches for truth and justice."

The valedictorian of the Class of 2017, and television and radio major, Kevin LaMonte Jones, addressed his classmates by sharing his personal journey and indicated that his testimony is proof that any obstacle can be overcome.

"I tenaciously self-advocated while fighting through my academic insecurities, to rightfully gain my seat in the academy," Jones said. "I realized that I am not confined to my history, and that my perceived limitations are actually my greatest strengths. Brokenness transformed into a brilliant new beginning."

Michael A. Franco, salutatorian and psychology major, also encouraged the audience to push past fears and realize their unlimited potential.

"If there's one thing you gain out of this speech—one thing—let it be that your destiny is your choice," said Franco. "What happens to you is not a product of the limitations other place upon you, but a direct result of the limits you create for yourself."

Other distinguished guests and speakers included U.S. Senator for New York Charles E. Schumer, Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams, New York City Councilman Jumaane D. Williams, Public Advocate for the City of New York Letitia James, and members of the Brooklyn College 50th Anniversary Class of 1967.

For more than 85 years, Brooklyn College has provided a rigorous and well-rounded education to generations of students. Known for its renowned faculty of academics, professionals, and artists who are among the best in their field, Brooklyn College students learn on a campus considered one of the most beautiful and culturally diverse in the country, with well-equipped facilities, studios, smart classrooms, and production and practice rooms — all with a highly affordable tuition. To learn more about the college, and how to apply, please visit the website.

 

 
Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Queens College to Offer the Only Master’s in Science Education Degree in NYS for Teaching Both Math and Computer Science

-- New Degree Recognizes Need to Develop Students’ Computer Skills
and Computational Thinking Early in Life --

QUEENS, NY, May , 2017 – As the college that graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area, Queens College has long played a major role in “educating the educators” to help their students succeed. With recent New York City and New York State Department of Education approvals of a unique new graduate degree program, QC leads the way in fostering the teaching of computational thinking and computer skills in middle school and high school.

The degree, which will be offered in fall 2017, is a Master’s in Science in Education (grades 7-12). Students will graduate with the specialized knowledge and skills in computer science (CS) that are needed to teach the subject, including AP courses in CS, in secondary schools.

“It’s crucial that students learn the practical skills and critical thinking needed to be effective citizens—not just digital consumers—in our technology-focused society,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, a member of the mayor’s NYC Tech Talent Pipeline Academic Council. “Through our new program, highly qualified teachers of math and computer science will be reaching younger students and perhaps also inspiring them to pursue careers in science.”

“Our goal as a City is to guarantee that every single student in our schools has the opportunity to learn computer science, enabling them to become better thinkers, problem-solvers, and creators. It’s exciting that Queens College is preparing teachers to enter our classrooms ready to lead this new type of learning for our students,” said Phil Weinberg, Deputy Chancellor for Teaching and Learning

In September 2015, New York City launched Computer Science for All (CS4All), a ten-year initiative to bring CS education to the 1.1 million students in all of the city’s public schools. The stated goal is to introduce “at least one meaningful, high-quality CS learning experience at each school level: elementary, middle and high school.”

To meet that objective, nearly 5,000 teachers will have to be trained in CS. Last September, a CS for All Consortium was launched with National Science Foundation funding. It is comprised of more than 320 organizations from the nonprofit, government, industry and education sectors.

“Developing our new master’s degree program was a true collaboration,” said Professor Craig A. Michaels, dean of the Queens College Division of Education. QC chairpersons in education (Prof. Eleanor Armour-Thomas) and computer science (Prof. Zhigang Xiang) and mathematics education Prof. Alice Artzt worked with colleagues in the New York City and New York State Departments of Education, he said. QC also had a close consulting relationship with Dr. Leigh Ann DeLyser, the director of Education and Research for CSNYC and co-chair of the CS for All Consortium.

“We wanted to make sure that our program made sense conceptually and responded to the needs of the city’s CS for All initiative,” said Michaels.

 In New York State, students receive “initial” teacher certification at the undergraduate level and are given five years to complete an appropriate master’s degree. Candidates for Queens College’s mathematics-computer science teaching degree must have Initial New York State certification in mathematics (grades 7-12), take the Graduate Record Exams, and have an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0.

“Ideally, candidates will be relatively new teachers working in New York City public high schools,” said Michaels, whose next goal for his Education Division is to develop a Post-Master’s Certificate Program in computer science education. “Although all teachers can learn to better integrate technology into their teaching, computer science at QC and most other colleges and universities is grounded in mathematical proficiency,” said Michaels. “That’s why our new degree program is designed for current mathematics teachers.”

With math comes computational thinking which, educators say, may well be the 21st century’s fourth “R,” joining the time-honored “Reading, w-Riting and a-Rithmetic” as the foundation of a necessary, skills-oriented education.

The application deadline is August 15. Apply online here.

About Queens College:
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY Launches New Master’s Program Track in Dominican Studies

Rep. Adriano Espaillat keynotes launch of new master's program in Dominican Studies at The City College of New York.

Popular MA Program in the Study of the America’s gets a new focus

The City College of the City University of New York (CCNY) is pleased to announce a new program, the Dominican Studies Track in the Master in the Study of the Americas Program in the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education.  The program is the first of its kind in the nation, and will welcome its first students in the Fall of 2017.

“City College’s new master’s degree recognizes the importance of the Dominican Republic and Dominicans in our city, in our culture and at our university,” said CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Nearly 10 percent of CUNY’s students are of Dominican ancestry, but we expect that students from many backgrounds will be interested in a program that examines and highlights the Dominican society and economy. This institute brings a wealth of new academic opportunities to CUNY and City College provides an excellent location for the scholars and scholarship.”

“I commend the students, faculty and administrators at CCNY on today’s launch of the new Dominican Studies specialization in the Master in the Study of the Americas Program,” said Congressman Adriano Espaillat. “This Master track program is a first of its kind in the United States and offers participating students a unique perspective into the legacy and socioeconomic development of the Dominican people in the Dominican Republic, the United States, across the Americas, and in communities around the world. Through their studies, scholars will gain an invaluable understanding of the Dominican culture and have the ability to produce and disseminate research based work as part of the program’s comprehensive approach in Dominican Studies.”

The MA in the Study of the Americas, under the direction of CWE Assistant Professor Alessandra Benedicty-Kokken, is an interdisciplinary, 30-credit graduate program that addresses questions and concepts about the Americas as it focuses on topics such as racial and ethnic identities, migration and immigration, popular culture, politics, gender, and human rights. The Dominican Studies specialization will focus on the legacy and the socioeconomic development of the Dominican people in the Dominican Republic and in the United States and on the relationships between the two countries.

“A rigorous academic program in Dominican Studies will be a real draw to students from the vital Dominican diaspora surrounding CCNY,” said CCNY Interim President Vince Boudreau. “It will also serve as a unique center of intellectual activity for anyone interested in exploring the immigrant experience in America or the interplay of different peoples in the fabric of our society.”

The Program finds a natural home at City College, where the Dominican Studies Institute of the City University of New York (CUNY DSI) is the nation’s first and only university-based research institute devoted to the study of the history of the Dominican Republic and people of Dominican descent in the United States and across the wider Dominican Diaspora.

“The CUNY Dominican Studies Institute brings unparalleled resources to the table for this exciting new program,” according to Director Ramona Hernández, “including possibilities for internships as well as research and conference participation. We will work with Dr. Kathleen McDonald, Chair of the Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Department, to ensure that this program has the resources over the long term to compete for the best students and offer them the best education in the field.”

About the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute
Founded in 1992 and housed in The Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at CCNY, the Dominican Studies Institute of the City University of New York under the leadership of Dr. Ramona Hernández produces and disseminates research and scholarship about Dominicans, and about the Dominican Republic.

About the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at CWE
The Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education under the leadership of Dean Juan Carlos Mercado offers an innovative and flexible curriculum that provides working adults and transfer students with a framework that allows them to connect their learning in the classroom in ways that are relevant to the workplace and the world.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

CONTACT:  Candace Randle Person– 202-225-4365; Candace.Person@mail.house.gov
Jay Mwamba – 212- 650 -7580; jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu.

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Letter To NEST+m Students & Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of May 29, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

As we enter the final weeks of our 2016-17 school year, please be aware of the following information related to end-of-semester assessments in grades 8-12.

For Grades 8-12 courses that end in a NY State Regents Exam, the Regents exam will be your child’s final assessment.

In certain instances High School students may have already taken the NYS Regents typically aligned with this course (Ex. 11th grade US History students who completed the NYS US History Regents exam as 8th graders). In these instances your child’s teacher will provide a Regents-aligned final assessment but it will not be the June 2017 NYS Regents.

Please assist norms within our K-12 community by actively reviewing our schoolwide norms and expectations:

Cell Phones And Other Electronic Devices In Schools
https://nestmk12.net/school-reports-regulations/

school policies & regulations | New Explorations Into …
nestmk12.net
Adopted June 21, 2016 As New York City’s K-12 citywide gifted and talented school, NEST+m has students who are members of a community of learners that spans from …

NEST+m Dress Code
https://nestmk12.net/school-reports-regulations/

school policies & regulations | New Explorations Into …
nestmk12.net
Adopted June 21, 2016 As New York City’s K-12 citywide gifted and talented school, NEST+m has students who are members of a community of learners that spans from …

As always, citywide norms and expectations can be found on the NYC Department of Education homepage:
Respect for All:
http://schools.nyc.gov/RulesPolicies/RespectforAll/default.htm
 
Citywide Behavioral Expectations to Support Student Learning:  
http://schools.nyc.gov/RulesPolicies/DisciplineCode/default.htm

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,
Mark Berkowitz
Principal

Middle Grades Announcements:
Thank you to the NEST+m families and community for supporting our students last week during our Middle Grades Spring Art and Music Festival. Congratulations to the students for exhibiting their high level demonstrations of learning.

Please see our Open Classroom Tutoring & Regents Review Schedule – Grades 6-12 which has been composed by AP Tessa Derfner and is attached to this message.

For 8th Grade Students and Families: Please Review the June 2017 Regents and SLP Schedule. Passing the Regents course and corresponding exam is necessary to earn high school credit in 8th Grade. If a family makes a choice to opt-out of a Regents exam or SLP, students will not be able to earn high school credit for that course.
Please know that Grade Team Leaders are finalizing the End-of-Year Projects, Papers, and Final Exam Schedules for non-Regents courses. We will be releasing this information shortly.
 
Upper Grades Announcements:
Thank you to Melanie Siokalo and Doug Rich for organizing a visit from Jane Emery to our 12th Grade Government classes this past week. Ms. Emery was the editor of her high school newspaper in Little Rock, Arkansas during the racial integration of the Little Rock Central High School. Ms. Emery’s presentation was both engaging and moving for our students.

Thank you to Michael Albertson, Pieter Voorhees, Valeria Shkop, and our Upper Grade students for the wonderful Spring Music Concert this past week. Thank you families for your continued support of our NEST+m Music Program and for your attendance at this special concert

On Friday, June 2nd, our 12th Grade students will be leaving for their Senior Trip to Frost Valley YMCA, in the Catskills. Students will return to NEST+m on Sunday afternoon at approximately 4pm. We’re looking forward to a wonderful team building and celebratory trip for our students.

On Tuesday, May 30th, during period 3 we will be holding a mandatory final Senior Trip planning session. The meeting is only for students who have both submitted a signed parental permission slip and payment in full for the trip.

Semester 2 Final Assessments and Regents Exams are quickly approaching.
Non-Regents Final Assessments will be administered between June 5th – June 9th.

Regents Examinations will be administered from June 13 – June 20th. See the full Schedule of Examinations here: June 2017 Regents and SLP Schedule

Students should be actively studying and reviewing in preparation of these important exams. Please see the most updated schedule of our teacher’s before / after school Regents Review Sessions below:
Open Classroom Tutoring & Regents Review Schedule – Grades 6-12

# # #

Our Week Ahead
 
Monday May 29: Memorial Day: Schools closed.
Wednesday May 31st:  Evening information session for current NEST+m 7th grade Families re: NEST+m Upper Grades (HS) and HS Articulation Process. 5:30pm, Auditorium.
Thursday June 1st 
5:30pm, Special Education orientation for incoming Students and Families (Middle Grades & Upper Grades)
Friday June 2: 12th grade Trip.

# # #

Looking ahead:
6/5: 5:30pm, Orientation for all incoming Upper Grades Students and Families
6/6: 5:30pm, Orientation for all incoming Middle Grades Students and Families
6/6: 7:15pm: Author and Psychotherapist Sean Grover speaks about how parents can support the needs of adolescents navigating academics, friendships, families and identity.
6/7 & 6/9: 6th Grade Original Play Festival, 5:30pm, NEST+m Auditorium, Free Admission.
6/8:  “Anniversary Day”, No K-12 students on site.
6/12: Last Day of Instruction Grades 9-12. Clerical Day—No school for Grades K-8 Students.
6/13-6/22:  Regents Week:
6/21: 5th Grade “Stepping Up/Graduation” Ceremony at NEST+m, 8:30am
6/22: 8th Grade Stepping Up Ceremony, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 12:30pm
6/22: 12th Grade Graduation The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 9:00am


Anna Halprin’s “Parades and Changes” Will Be Performed Again at the Kaye Playhouse 50 Years After the Controversial Premiere at Hunter

Radical Bodies, An Evening of Dances by Anna Halprin, Simone Forti and Yvonne Rainer  performed by dancers of the University of California Santa Barbara Dance Company and guest artist Simone Forti will be presented at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, 68th Street between Lexington and Park Avenues on Wednesday, May 31 @ 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7:00 p.m.  This event is FREE and open to the public.

To RSVP visit http://bit.ly/2oa0V2d or call 212-772-4007.

The program commemorates 50 years since the legendary performance of Parades and Changes at Hunter College and will include 'The Paper Dance' from Halprin's Parades and Changes, Chair Pillow by Yvonne Rainer, José Limón's Dances for Isadora, presented as an homage to Isadora Duncan, a pioneer and trailblazer for women in dance, and guest artist Simone Forti.  A post-performance panel includes Forti as well as Charles Reinhart and Alice Teirstein, both of whom attended the famous 1967 performance, and is moderated by Wendy Perron.

In the spring of 1967, Anna Halprin received a summons after the performance to appear before the court for "indecent exposure" as Parades contains nudity. 50 years later, Parades and Changes is returning to the same stage.

"It is an extraordinary honor for Hunter College to welcome back these three remarkable artists to the Kaye Playhouse," said Jennifer J. Raab, President of Hunter College.  "50 years ago, when Parades and Changes premiered at Hunter, it garnered arrest warrants. Today, it's greeted by an outpouring of enthusiasm and celebration for its innovative vision. Hunter remains dedicated to creating spaces where important artistic works can be seen and celebrated."

Radical Bodies is underwritten by Jody and John Arnhold.  Hunter College is donating the Kaye Playhouse for this historical performance.  A concurrent exhibition on the history of Radical Bodies will be brought to the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts beginning May 24th and through September 26, 2017, curated by UCSB's Ninotchka Bennahum.  Henning Rübsam is the producer of Radical Bodies.  Delila Moseley is the Director of UCSB Dance Company.

Also on the program is an improvisational solo, News Animations, by Simone Forti, now 82 years of age, as well as Yvonne Rainer's Chair Pillow (1970).


School of Education’s Undergraduate Program Receives a “Top Tier” rating by the National Council on Teacher Quality

Thomas Hunter founded this college in 1870 to teach teachers how to teach. Now, in 2017, Hunter College's School of Education has been named one of only 16 out of 717 undergraduate programs that prepare secondary school teachers to receive a "Top Tier" rating by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ). In their recent report, "Landscapes in teacher prep: Undergraduate secondary," the watchdog group found that only a few training programs offered sufficiently excellent preparation in subject matter and classroom management. Out of the 16 that made the cut, Hunter was the only one in NY, and the program with the lowest tuition.


Hunter College Professors Receive High Acclaim and Awards

Several Hunter College professors have received highly coveted prizes, including the prestigious Rome Prize Fellowship, The Berlin Prize, The Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Vilcek Prize.  In addition, Colum McCann, a renowned writer and member of the Creative Writing MFA faculty, has been inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

"We are very proud to work with all of these exceptional members of the Hunter faculty," said Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab. "Our students and the entire Hunter community are fortunate to have the opportunity to learn from each of them and appreciate the knowledge they all have to offer.  We know they are distinguished scholars, but we very proud to have other organizations recognize them as well."

The American Academy in Rome announced that Suzanne Farrin, the Frayda B. Lindemann Professor of Music at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center, has received a 2017 Rome Prize Fellowship for her musical composition of "The Hour of the Star."  Farrin, a composer, has been Professor and Chair of Music at Hunter College since 2015 after leading the Composition Department at the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College, S.U.N.Y. The Rome Prize annually supports advanced independent work in the arts and humanities within a unique residential community.  Out of an applicant pool of 900, Professor Farrin and 30 other artists/scholars were selected. Winners receive a stipend, workspace, and room and board for a period of six-months to two years at the Academy's eleven acre campus in Rome.  Winners are selected through a national competition process by an independent juries of distinguished scholars and artists in several different disciplines.

Nancy Foner, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center has received two prizes.  The American Academy in Berlin has announced Dr. Foner will receive a 2017-18 Berlin Prize.  In addition, Foner is receiving a Guggenheim Fellowship that honors individuals who have demonstrated exceptional scholarship or creativity in the arts.  Foner is the author or editor of fourteen books including Ellis Island to JFK: New York's Two great Waves of Immigration.  Her research areas are immigration, Race and Ethnicity.  While in Berlin, she will examine how post-1965 immigration has reshaped the demographic contours and social life of the United States. The Berlin Prize, a semester-long fellowship in Berlin, was awarded to 22 scholars, writers and artists from the U.S. who represent the highest standards of excellence in their fields.  They receive a monthly stipend, partial board, and accommodations at the Academy's lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in Berlin-Wannsee.

Out of nearly 3,000 applicants, Foner was one of 173 selected winners for the Guggenheim Fellowship.  The fellowship is given to scholars and artists allowing them to engage in research under the "freest possible conditions and irrespective of race, color, or creed."   They are given to those who have already shown "impressive achievement in the past and exceptional promise for future accomplishment."

The prestigious Vilcek Prize has been awarded to Hunter Professor of Studio Art Nari Ward, an acclaimed sculptor.  Nari Ward's award is given annually by the Vilcek Foundation, and honors immigrants who have made lasting contributions to American society through their extraordinary achievements in biomedical research, the arts and the humanities. This is the first time in elevent years that the prize honored a practitioner of the fine arts.

And finally, Colum McCann, writer and member of Hunter's Creative Writing MFA faculty, has been inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.  McCann is the author of six novels and three collections of stories.  He teaches fiction writing each spring semester in the MFA program.  His novel won the National Book Award for Let the Great World Spin.  The American Academy of Arts and Letters is an honor society of the country's 250 leading architects, artists, composers, and writers. Each year it elects new members, administers over 70 awards and prizes, exhibits art and manuscripts, funds performances of new works of musical theater, and purchases artwork for donation to museums across the United States.


New Exhibit at Roosevelt House on Enduring Impact of The New Deal on NYC

Beginning May 11, 2017, the Roosevelt House Public Policy InstituteNew Exhibit at Roosevelt House on Enduring Impact of The New Deal on NYC at Hunter College presents a three-month-long exhibition celebrating—and, for the first time, chronicling—the vast range of public projects funded by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s administration over its first 10 years. The New Deal in New York City, 1933-1943: Posters, Murals, Maps, and Photographs, running through August 19, occupies the very home where FDR and his Brain Trust actually planned the outlines of the New Deal during the presidential transition of 1932-33. The exhibition is made possible by a generous grant from the Stepanski Family Charitable Trust.

The exhibit traces the evolution and local impact of President Roosevelt’s New Deal programs.  When he took office in March 1933, one in four Americans was unemployed and millions were destitute. At his inauguration he declared:  “Our greatest primary task is to put people to work. This is no unsolvable problem if we face it wisely and courageously.” New York City—the largest American city with almost seven million people—was the single greatest recipient of New Deal public works in the country. Its leaders organized quickly to apply for funds for such monumental endeavors as the Triborough Bridge, La Guardia Airport, the Lincoln Tunnel, the East River (FDR) Drive, and the first public housing projects.

From brick-and-mortar jobs to positions in the theater, arts, or education, the New Deal employed thousands of people, transformed the city, and boosted morale.  Hundreds of surviving New Deal projects have been identified on a new map just published by the Living New Deal project, now featured in New York for the first time. The exhibition’s opening night, featured a panel of New Deal experts, including the dean of FDR scholars, William Leuchtenberg, and moderated by Hunter College professor of urban planning Owen Gutfreund.

"How appropriate that Roosevelt House, the very site where Franklin D. Roosevelt and his Brain Trust conceived so much of the New Deal after the election of 1932, now serves as a venue to celebrate its impact on his beloved New York,” said President Jennifer J. Raab. “FDR made sure his plans for national recovery embraced art, architecture, public works, and culture--from Post Office murals to the Triborough Bridge to neighborhood swimming pools to the north building at our own Hunter College. For the first time, the enduring impact of this wave of creativity—its transformative influence on society, not to mention its extraordinary impact on economic recovery—have been quantified and recorded. It is a privilege to present this glorious accounting to students, faculty, and visitors at the Roosevelt family home that incubated so much of this innovative outpouring of creativity."

Added Harold Holzer, the Jonathan Fanton Director of Roosevelt House: "The Works Progress Administration (WPA) inspired what amounts to an urban gallery of artistic innovation. In bringing together a sampling of posters, paintings, prints, photographs, and publications, Roosevelt House will remind visitors that economic revitalization can be accomplished hand in hand with transformative creativity--a model for putting people back to work and improving the cityscape in the bargain."

Visitors should come away from the exhibit with a new or renewed appreciation of the New Deal era, and the extraordinary opportunities it offered Americans to maintain their dignity through employment, and have access to everything from art exhibits to home health care provided by public funding.


Class of 2017 shines at CCNY

Class of 2017

Some outstanding members of CCNY’s Class of 2017 (clockwise): Annika Lüdke, Alexander Chait, Shereese Trumpet and Natalia Rodriguez.

Annika Lüdke, a graduate of the Master’s Program in International Relations from the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, is one of the many outstanding members of the Class of 2017. After a stint as an au pair in the United States and an introduction to intercultural communications at a community college, Lüdke knew that small town life in Germany was not for her. So she made her way to The City College of New York.

“I looked for programs, and I found City College and the Colin Powell School. I was totally convinced this would be a great school, so I looked into professors and saw how involved they were with the United Nations,” said Lüdke, who earned a bachelor’s degree in Holland. “I worked four long years in the Netherlands with the dream of coming back here.”

A Colin Powell Fellow, Lüdke worked on a project to address urgent public problems in underserved communities. The goal of the project was to attract students, ages 8 to 12, in Harlem to come to CCNY.

After graduating, Lüdke hopes to stay in New York and work in organizations that promote women and children’s rights as well as diplomacy and exchange.

Other standouts in the Class of 2017 include:

  • Alexander Chait, BS Psychology, Macaulay Honors College, will pursue both MD and MPH degrees after a year of travel. He was both a Colin Powell and S Jay Levy fellow. Chait hopes to practice clinical medicine and be an advocate for individuals suffering from mental illness.
  • Natalia Rodriguez, BA English, was a top two finisher in The Kathryn Irene Glascock Intercollegiate Poetry Competition at Mount Holyoke. She also received The Margaret Halmy Prize for general excellence. Rodriquez plans to attend graduate school at either the CUNY Graduate Center or the California Institute of the Arts.
  • Shereese Trumpet, B. Arch , was one of 20 distinguished minority architects and designers featured in the “Say It Loud” exhibition. Among her numerous accolades were the nycobaNOMA Diversity Award and the Center for Architecture Heritage Ball Scholarship.

The Class of 2017 comprises approximately 3,820 students. Other Class of 2017 stars includes Valedictorian Ellianna Schwab, Salutatorian Elaine Johnson and other members of CCNY’s 2017 “Great Grads” selection.

Click here for the latest information on City College’s 171st commencement exercises.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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#BCGrad2017: Now Ready to Pursue Her Ph.D. at Yale University, Teanu Reid ’16 Reflects on How Brooklyn College Prepared Her for Success

Teanu Reid technically received her B.A. in history from Brooklyn College in 2016, but her journey to the next phase of her academic career begins with the Class of 2017. Rather than attend graduate school immediately, Reid decided utilize a gap year to work at the college and to ensure the highest-quality responses on her graduate school applications. As a result, Reid was accepted to Ph.D. programs in history at Yale University, Brown University, Columbia University, New York University, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, and the University of Virginia. She chose Yale not only because of its academic reputation, but also because of its sizeable community of Brooklyn College alumni, particularly those from the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, which she said helped make the campus feel like a second home.

Teanu Reid

B.A. in history

I have had an amazing experience in my journey from college student to college graduate at Brooklyn College. The college has pushed me to be successful academically and encouraged me to be socially responsible by providing numerous opportunities for civic engagement and community service through its clubs and events. The college has even given me the opportunity to travel through study abroad programs.

Teanu Reid '16

I have had some of the most supportive faculty who created a great environment to foster growth academically and professionally. Along the way, I have gained tutoring and teaching experience as a volunteer history tutor at the Learning Center. As a volunteer tutor, I helped students, who were usually not history majors, with their reading assignments, essays, and exams, and tried to share with them what my professors had shared with me.

I also had a chance to develop professionally through my time as a college assistant in the Division of Student Affairs. Combined, I feel like I have a clear understanding of academia and a better sense of what my future holds if I pursue employment in a college or university. No journey is without its road bumps and throughout my time as a student there were several things I had to overcome. Despite the fact that I didn’t qualify for financial aid because of my parents “high income,” their income on paper wasn’t reflective of the inconsistent financial support I actually received. I worked diligently to receive scholarships and other forms of merit aid to finance my own education the best I could. Additionally, I had to maintain a balance between scholarship applications and my coursework, my job, volunteering, club involvement, and family responsibilities.

I did all of this while also combatting stereotypical expectations of young black women. From this entire experience I learned that I am a very strong-minded and strong-willed person, and with careful planning and pockets of support, I can achieve goals that I have set for myself. I’ve learned to have patience, to trust myself and believe in my ability to get things done, and to reorient myself as needed when things don’t go as expected.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


High School Youth Ambassadors from Trinidad & Tobago Visit Kingsborough for International College Exploration Initiative

A group of 21 high school students from Trinidad & Tobago recently visited Kingsborough Community College (KCC) as part of the twin islands’ Youth Ambassador Program sponsored by local charitable organization En ToTo’s International College Exploration Initiative. The students spent a day with faculty, staff, students, and administrators who shared positive stories and experiences of and at Kingsborough.

Students from six high schools were selected based on their academic performance, and En ToTo membership were accompanied by five chaperones, including En ToTo president JoAnne Harroo-Blackman, teachers, counselors, and parents, as they completed the organization’s first-ever International College Exploration Initiative. En ToTo, formed in 2007, promotes the enhancement of life skills for youth in the academic, social, cultural, and financial areas.

Organized in part by Trinidad & Tobago native and KCC Assistant Professor and Paramedic Program Director Kirt Bowen, the one-week program allowed the students to explore New York City while enjoying new social and cultural experiences, as well as participating in similar exchanges at Kingsborough. They met and spoke with administrators, staff, and students about educational interests including human services, culinary arts, mental health, criminal justice, tourism and hospitality, maritime technology, and emergency medical services. Some the students expressed interest in attending Kingsborough following graduation.

“This was a very positive experience for the visiting group,” said Prof. Bowen. “Many of the students agreed that the trip made all the difference as they are now exploring college opportunities. They feel much more comfortable having visited the actual campus, and learning about the various programs and activities, rather than just reading a brochure.”

During the campus tour, they learned about former KCC Testing & Assessment Director and Trinidad native Kelvin Gift, who spent 22 years at KCC before his death. His portrait now hangs at the College as a testament to his commitment and dedication to the students. They also met KCC Government Relations Director Anthony Andrews and Continuing Education Dean Christine Beckner, also Trinidad natives.

“As an international student from Trinidad, Kingsborough provided a great start to my collegiate and professional career,” said Mr. Andrews, who recapped his academic career highlighting the powerful connection between the twin-island republic and Kingsborough. “It is a perfect example of the Kingsborough’s tagline, ‘Dreams begin here.’”

About En ToTo  

Founded in 2007, En ToTo is a Trinidad & Tobago charitable organization dedicated to the growth and development of the Islands’ youth in the areas of academics, social skills, personal development, and financial independence. To date, the life-skills organization has impacted more than 6,000 young lives in the twin-island Republic of Trinidad & Tobago.

About Kingsborough Community College  

At Kingsborough, the community comes first, and as Brooklyn’s only community college, we promote student learning and development as well as strengthening and serving a highly diverse borough. Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 16,000 full- and part-time students annually in credit and non-credit bearing courses in liberal arts and career education, Kingsborough also serves an additional 20,000 students in expanding continuing education and workforce development programs on- and off-campus. Approximately 23 percent of Kingsborough students are of Caribbean descent.

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Dawn Walker (718) 368-5060 / (917) 588-6305

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Queens College Offers Over 600 Affordable Summer Courses in Three Sessions From June Through August

 -- Courses Open to All CUNY Students & General Public; Quicken Degree Completion or Explore Personal Interests; Free Options Available to H.S. Students --

Queens, N.Y., May 25, 2017—Queens College Summer Session courses are now open for enrollment, with three convenient sessions that provide students the opportunity to earn a total of 15 credits. Anyone—from Queens College and CUNY students to the general public—can choose from over 600 undergraduate and graduate courses taught by world-class faculty (there are also online options). Students will find classes in popular majors such as accounting and psychology, as well as everything from ancient civilizations to urban studies. The extraordinarily diverse student body, with over 170 nations represented, provides a culturally enriching experience at an affordable price, all on a beautiful 80-acre campus.

For those who will qualify for the new Excelsior Scholarship program, Summer Session credits might be counted toward fulfilling the program’s requirement of completing 30 credits a year.​

Summer Session 2017 Schedule
Summer Session 1: June 5–28 (4 weeks) – deadline: June 5
Summer Session 2: July 5–31 (4 weeks) & July 5–August 15 (6 weeks) – deadline: July 5

Queens College students can register through CUNYfirst. Students from other CUNY campuses must obtain an e-permit from CUNY and then register through CUNYfirst. Visiting undergraduate and graduate students who do not attend a CUNY school—including those from SUNY and private colleges, and high school students with proof of a diploma—may apply through our Undergraduate Visiting Student Application and Graduate Visiting Student Application. Those not enrolled at another higher education institution wishing to take courses on a non-matriculated basis must complete the non-degree application.

For more information, please visit the Summer Session homepage.

High School students may also take advantage of free opportunities for academic development through two offerings in the College Now Program—the Summer Institute for theHumanities and Social Sciences and the Queens College Summer Science Program. The Summer Institute runs during Queens College Summer Session 2, Monday through Thursday, and is designed to address high school students’ academic, cultural and social interests and needs. The overall purpose of the Summer Science Program is to expose students to hot topics in the major scientific fields. Part of a city-wide initiative between the CUNY and the NYC Department of Education, College Now’s primary goals are to improve the academic achievement of high school students and to ensure that graduating students are ready to do college-level work. All courses, workshops and textbooks are free to NYC Public High School students.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Faculty Share Positive Experiences With Melissa Riggio Students

Students, faculty, staff, mentors and guests gather for Melissa Riggio Faculty Year-End Celebration.

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Office of Student Affairs, Office of Accessibility and Office of Academic Affairs — in collaboration with AHRC New York City — hosted the Second Annual Melissa Riggio Faculty Year-End Celebration on May 24 at the BMCC campus.

The Melissa Riggio Higher Education Program engages young adults with disabilities in academic and social experiences, and provides a CUNY-based program in four boroughs of New York City.

BMCC joined the Melissa Riggio Higher Education Program in 2015. Coordinated by Nicole Leach, Assistant Director in the BMCC Office of Accessibility, the program brings together BMCC professors with Melissa Riggio students who audit their classes with the assistance of a CUNY student mentor.

“The purpose of the May 24 event was to recognize faculty who participated in the project,” says Leach. “The Melissa Riggio students, supported by a BMCC student mentor, have a very positive experience. Their self-esteem changes dramatically. They’re so incredibly happy to be part of the college community. They make friends and do the work. It’s transformative.”

Three students; Sean, Joseph and Shayleen, attended the luncheon and spoke about their experience. Their artwork was displayed around the room.

Michael Decker, Chief Operating Office at AHRC, presented the Melissa Riggio Higher Education Scholarship Awards to Esmeralda Bretoux and Gabrielle Richards, two BMCC alumni who are serving as mentors to the Melissa Riggio students at BMCC.

“We’re very thankful for this community at CUNY and BMCC,” Decker said. “There are 80 Melissa Riggio students throughout CUNY and about 10 at BMCC. It’s emblematic of BMCC — a community college — that when we talk about community, we include people with disabilities.”

Michael Hutmaker, BMCC Dean for Student Affairs; Marva Craig, BMCC Vice President of Student Affairs and Barbara Bookman, University Director for Disability Programs, were also in attendance.

Other special guests included Nikki Spicer, Program Director, and Jessica Giorgio, Community Support Supervisor, who are both with the Melissa Riggio Higher Education Program at AHRC.

BMCC professors share their experience

Margaret Carson, BMCC Professor of Modern Languages, had two Melissa Riggio students in her Spanish class. “Both Joseph and Sean brought into the class, knowledge of other languages including Spanish, German and Swiss,” she says. “Learning a language is like taking a journey, and we had fun learning from each other along the way.”

Professor of History Jacob Kramer is also part of the program. “My Melissa Riggio student, Charlie, did a good job interpreting the material into his own words,” he said.

Modern Languages Professor Kristina Varade said, “The Melissa Riggio student in my class was one of the first to ask questions, and that opened up the conversation for other students.”

According to English Professor Aimee Rexcord, “having the Melissa Riggio students in my class set the tone for us to be a community in the classroom. They contributed to the maturity of our classroom.”

Other BMCC faculty who have been involved in the project include Jessica Ramirez, Philip Belcastro, Simon Carr, Patricia Genova, Michael Morford, Glenda Blakely, Karl Williams, John Johnson, Kerry Ruff, Michael Mazzeo, Thaddeus Radell, Michael Basile, James Dennis Hoff and Chaumtoli Huq.


CCNY-UTEP partner to produce next generation Latino professors

CCNY's Grove School of Engineering

$3.7 million NSF grant to fund project

The City College of New York is partnering with the University of Texas at El Paso to educate the next generation of Hispanic professors in environmental sciences and engineering. Entitled “Collaborative Research: The Hispanic AGEP Alliance for the Environmental Science and Engineering Professoriate,” the five-year project is funded by a $3.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation. It begins July 1, 2017.

Harlem-based City College, which is designated a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education by the U.S. Department of Education, will receive $2.315 million of the funding and UTEP $1.3 million.

Under the administration of CCNY’s NOAA CREST, the two institutions will collaborate to develop, implement and study a model for training and transitioning Hispanic environmental sciences and engineering (ESE) doctoral students to STEM instructional faculty positions at community colleges and other institutions. Candidates must have completed all coursework and be dissertating, as they transition.

Participants will primarily include Hispanic doctoral students of Caribbean or   Mexican origin, who are advanced level doctoral candidates majoring in ESE fields. These include civil, electrical, mechanical or biomedical engineering; earth and atmospheric sciences; ecology and evolutionary biology, among other disciplines.

The project will be led by CCNY faculty Jorge E. Gonzalez, Fred Moshary, Joseph Barba, Kyle McDonald and Ellen E. Smiley.  UTEP experts include: Miguel Velez-Reyes, Craig Tweedie, and Ivonne Santiago.

The CCNY-UTEP partnership is in response to the NSF's Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program solicitation.  AGEP seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success of historically underrepresented minority (URM) graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields.

There are three community college partners in the Hispanic AGEP Alliance: LaGuardia Community College, Queensborough Community College and El Paso Community College in El Paso, TX.

The NSF grant to CCNY and UTEP brings up to $23 million in awards to City College since last fall for training underrepresented minority scientists and engineers. Last September CCNY won a $15.5 million NOAA grant to produce mostly minority STEM scientists.

In addition, $5.2 million was received from the U.S. Department of Education in October to promote STEM education, particularly among underrepresented groups.

Click here for more about the University of Texas at El Paso.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Annual Gala Supports Student Achievement

Annual Gala Supports Student Achievement

The annual Educating for Justice Gala sponsored by the John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees drew 250 friends and supporters of the College and raised more than $450,000, the net proceeds from which will support scholarships and programs that help students achieve their academic and career goals.

Held on May 8 at The Plaza Hotel, the event honored Anna Deavere Smith, the actress, playwright, educator and activist, outgoing John Jay College President Jeremy Travis, and the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation. The evening also featured a tribute to the founding supporters of the John Jay-Vera Fellows Program: Jeffrey R. Gural, Ronay A. and Richard Menschel, Arthur J. Mirante II, Ron L. Moelis, Frederick A. O. Schwarz Jr., and Herbert Sturz.

To view photos from the Educating for Justice Gala, click here.

At the gala, which was hosted by award-winning journalist and filmmaker Bill Moyers, College officials also announced that the Jeremy Travis Study Abroad Scholarship, created to honor Travis’s 13 years of leading John Jay, had met its initial $100,000 fundraising target. The scholarship will enable undergraduate and graduate students to pursue immersive study-abroad opportunities that might otherwise be out of reach due to financial need.

Deavere Smith was cited for her innovative use of theater and film to raise awareness on issues of equity and justice. A 2013 recipient of the National Humanities Medal, she recently launched the Anna Deavere Smith Pipeline Project, which uses theater and film to focus on the forces that cause some impoverished children to leave school and head toward cycles of incarceration.

(l-r) LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, Beth Lief and Jules Kroll
(l-r) LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, Beth Lief and Jules Kroll

The Petrie Foundation promotes quality public education in New York City. The foundation’s support helped create an emergency fund at John Jay that has provided financial relief for students in desperate situations and enabled them to stay in school and complete their degrees. The Petrie Cyber Security Pipeline Program prepares community college students to advance into John Jay’s undergraduate cybersecurity program and careers in a growing field.

“I am delighted to be honored alongside these fierce advocates for justice,” said President Travis, who will step down on Aug. 1. In his acceptance remarks, he paid special tribute to John Jay’s students, noting: “You have been my inspiration, my reason for going the extra mile. And you are the grounds for our optimism about our country’s future. You give life to our mission of educating for justice.”

(l-r) President Jeremy Travis, Bill Moyer and Anna Deavere Smith
(l-r) President Jeremy Travis, Bill Moyer and
Anna Deavere Smith

The Evidence Will Show. . . Forensic Scientist Thomas Kubic, 2017 Distinguished Faculty Honoree

The Evidence Will Show. . . Forensic Scientist Thomas Kubic, 2017 Distinguished Faculty Honoree

It is often said that one thing that sets John Jay apart from other colleges is a faculty that seamlessly integrates academic theory with real-world experience. Few faculty members embody that idea as well as Thomas A. Kubic, an associate professor of forensic science and chemistry. He is an attorney, a 23-year police veteran, and as of April 21, the recipient of the Alumni Association’s 2017 Distinguished Faculty Award. (He also happens to be a John Jay alumnus.)

Kubic began working full-time at John Jay in 1996, and since then has taught forensic science classes while continuing his research in the field of microspectrophotometry, the use of light to analyze microscopic particles. Kubic deals in what he calls transfer evidence, and his work should be familiar to anyone who has watched programs such as “CSI.” Fibers, hairs, chips of paint or glass — these are examples of transfer evidence, the tiny, sometimes microscopic particles that remain at the scene of a crime. Through the use of specialized instruments, Kubic investigates these materials to determine what they are, where they came from, and how they might be used to identify the perpetrator of a crime.

“Today, everyone talks about DNA, and it’s very important,” Kubic said, “but what if there is no DNA transfer?  During a rape, clothing could transfer fibers. We could take samples from [a suspect’s] hands for gunshot residue to find out if he recently fired a weapon. Or it could be soil on a guy’s car that leads to an area where a body was dumped.”

While working in the crime laboratory of the Nassau County Police Department, Kubic was regularly called to the scene of burglaries, sexual assaults, homicides and other major crimes, and would take the stand as an expert witness during trials. He says helping take dangerous criminals off the streets gave him the sense that he was making a positive impact on the community, but the constant exposure to the grisly details of murder scenes took its toll. “It was very satisfying, but also very depressing at times,” he said.

In 1980, while working full time at the police department, Kubic completed law school and passed the bar exam. Becoming an attorney helped him understand the interplay between obtaining transfer evidence and using it effectively within the legal system, a complex dynamic that Kubic continues to emphasize to his students.

“Most scientists work in a field where you’re judged by your peers,” he said. “We’re not only judged by our peers, but by the legal system, the courts and the juries. You have to be able to effectively transfer your understanding about a case to the jury.”

More often than not, he said, when one detail about a piece of evidence is proven wrong, the whole case falls apart. So it’s not only sound science that wins cases, but the ability of the scientist to communicate effectively with the jury.

When it comes to sound science, Kubic says the biggest obstacle is resources.  “The problem is a lack of quality education and a lack of resources in the crime lab,” he said. “There have been a number of cases where people have pressured scientists not to do all the tests they’re supposed to do.”

For example, he noted, a chemist may have been taught to complete five analyses of a substance before submitting a finding, but the forensics lab may only be able to pay for three. This can lead to mistakes that make their way into the courtroom, sometimes leading to wrongful convictions. “The attorneys don’t understand that bad science is taking place, and then you get a bad conviction. Similar to how bad eyewitness testimonies are being turned around because of DNA testing, which the Innocence Project has been doing,” he said.

After leaving the police department in 1995, Kubic came to John Jay where he pursued his Ph.D. and began teaching classes. “I was over 50 when I fell in love with teaching, and I’m still here because I like dealing with the students. I feel this is a contribution.”

Kubic said he was “shocked and flabbergasted” to learn that he would be receiving the Distinguished Faculty award. “As a professor, it’s hard enough to get students to write something down for their own benefit,” he said. “That a former student sat down and wrote a letter for my benefit, that’s amazing.”


CUNY Appoints Former U.S. Assistant Attorney General As President Of John Jay College Of Criminal Justice

CUNY Appoints Former U.S. Assistant Attorney General As President Of John Jay College Of Criminal Justice

New York, NY, May 1, 2017 - The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York today voted to appoint Karol V. Mason, a legal pioneer and former United States Assistant Attorney General, as the fifth president of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

In her long legal career in both the private and public sectors, President-Designate Mason has been an exceptional voice for equality, fairness and criminal justice reform, issues that are at the heart of John Jay’s mission. She was a leader in the Obama Administration on juvenile justice issues, bail reform and re-entry for individuals leaving prison, and in her distinguished career at Alston & Bird LLP she was the first African American woman elected as chair of the management committee at any major national firm.

President-Designate Mason, who will assume office on August 1, was recommended by Chancellor James B. Milliken after an extensive national search. She will be the first woman and the first minority to serve as president of the college, whose motto is, “educating for justice.”

L-R: Chancellor James Milliken, John Jay Student Council President Grace Theresa Agalo-Os, President-Designate Carol Mason, President Travis.“Karol Mason has established herself as a bold, visionary leader in the fields of law and criminal justice reform and she will be ideal for continuing the history of excellence and inspiration at John Jay College,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “I am delighted that she will be bringing her skills, energy and insights to our outstanding students and I am proud of the choice of such a gifted new president.”

As head of the Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs, President-Designate Mason oversaw an annual budget of $4 billion to support an array of state and local criminal justice agencies, juvenile justice programs and services for crime victims, oversaw the National Institute of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, among a wide range of other efforts.  She led the Department of Justice’s work to address the issue of community trust in the justice system through a variety of programs, including the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, a partnership with John Jay College and other academic institutions across the country designed to address bias in the criminal justice system.

Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr. said: “We could not be happier that Karol Mason has chosen to continue her extraordinary career at CUNY, or prouder of the historical significance of her appointment.  A thoughtful and innovative leader on some of the most important criminal justice issues of the day, she is uniquely qualified to lead a new era at one of the country’s premier criminal justice and liberal arts institutions.”

Eric Holder, the United States Attorney General from 2009 to 2015, commented: “In a nation grappling with issues surrounding its criminal justice system, the appointment of Karol Mason at John Jay College is a welcome sign that evidence-based solutions to these issues will be championed. Throughout her career, and especially during her time at the Department of Justice, Karol was an advocate for principled research and the development of new ways to deal with issues that we have confronted for so long.  In this new role at this prestigious institution I am confident she will be a leader in helping to make the progress our nation so sorely needs."

President-Designate Mason said: “John Jay has been a progressive leader in improving law enforcement and addressing the toughest issues in our criminal and juvenile justice systems, while also educating the next generation of law enforcement and other criminal justice professionals.  Serving as the college’s president will afford a unique opportunity for me to combine my passion to improve access to higher education, generally, and particularly for communities often marginalized, with my desire to continue to improve our criminal and juvenile justice systems so that they reflect our highest ideals.”

President-Designate Mason succeeds Jeremy Travis, who has served as president since August, 2004.  President Travis has been a leading researcher and advocate on criminal justice issues, particularly police reform, and helped transform John Jay College into a broad-based, exceptionally diverse liberal arts institution. Under his leadership the college built and moved into its state-of-the-art, expanded campus. President Travis will continue to be affiliated with CUNY.  He will be University Professor at the CUNY Graduate Center, where he will teach in the doctoral program in criminal justice and conduct research.

The search for his successor was conducted by a Board of Trustees committee chaired by Trustee Charles A. Shorter.  At the conclusion of an extensive national search, the committee recommended three finalists.  Chancellor Milliken recommended Ms. Mason to the board of trustees for approval.

Previously, Ms. Mason served as Deputy Associate Attorney General, from April 2009 to February 2012.  She also led the Office of Justice Programs from June 2013 to January 2017 after being nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate. President-Designate Mason spent almost three decades at Alston & Bird, LLP, where she chaired the Public Finance Group. Ms. Mason was also a member of the Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 2001 to 2009 and Vice Chair of that Board from 2007 to 2009.

Statement by President Jeremy Travis
--------- MEDIA COVERAGE ------------

The Wall Street Journal
Karol Mason to Be Next President of John Jay College

U.S. News & World Report
Former Obama Justice Official to Lead John Jay College

New York Daily News
CUNY hires Obama assistant attorney general as president

citybizlist
Cuny Appoints Karol V. Mason as President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Black Star News
Karol V. Mason, Former Obama Assistant Attorney General is New President of John Jay 

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education
Former Obama Justice Official to Lead John Jay College
Watch President-Designate Mason's remarks. Read the full prepared text.

NNSC National Conference 2015: Karol V. Mason

About The City University of New York
The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in New York City in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 270,000 degree-seeking students and 260,000 adult and continuing education students.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice
An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to more than 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law.


Renowned Civil Rights Litigator Mary L. Bonauto and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist/Activist Jose Antonio Vargas to Receive Honorary Degrees and Address the Class of 2017

Renowned Civil Rights Litigator Mary L. Bonauto and Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist/Activist Jose Antonio Vargas to Receive Honorary Degrees and Address the Class of 2017

New York, NY, May 1, 2017 – Led by President Jeremy Travis, who is stepping down after 13 years of outstanding leadership, students, alumni, faculty and guests will gather at Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing, N.Y., for John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s 52nd Commencement exercises on Wednesday, May 31, at 10:30 AM and 3:30 PM. Honorary doctorates will be presented to Mary L. Bonauto, a principal legal architect of marriage equality in the United States, and Jose Antonio Vargas, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and immigration reform activist, who will also address the graduating class.

Through their work in law, journalism, and social advocacy, the 2017 honorees have demonstrated their commitment to the cause of justice.

Mary L. BonautoWith her skills inside and outside the courtroom, Mary Bonauto has led in efforts to win full marriage and family equality for the LGBT community. Bonauto’s advocacy for gays and lesbians began in 1990 when she became the chief litigator for the GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders, or GLAD.  In 1999, GLAD partnered with Vermont co-counsel to win the first major battle for equal marriage rights in Baker v. Vermont, resulting in a state system for same-sex couples to obtain marital protections and obligations. Bonauto was at the helm of GLAD’s legal team when it won the case for full-fledged marriage equality in the United States in Goodridge v. Massachusetts Department of Public Health in 2003. She worked on numerous cases and legislative and ballot efforts to win marriage and defeat discriminatory measures.  After more state challenges began to find success, she and GLAD turned their attention toward ending “DOMA” and federal discrimination against married same-sex couples, as well as requiring states to allow same-sex couples to marry under the federal constitution.  Bonauto’s leadership of the marriage equality movement was made most apparent by her being chosen as lead counsel for the oral arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges. Bonauto won that case, and full marriage equality became the law of the land in the United States in 2015.

Jose Antonio VargasWell-known for his advocacy for human rights, Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, a filmmaker, and an activist.  In 2011, he wrote an essay for The New York Times Magazine in which he disclosed his undocumented immigration status and jump-started a national conversation on the experiences of the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. While attending San Francisco State University, Vargas interned for the Philadelphia Daily News before becoming a full-time staff reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle. For five years he was a reporter at the Washington Post, where he was part of the news team that covered the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007, the assignment that earned him the Pulitzer Prize. He eventually became a Senior Contributing Editor for the Huffington Post, overseeing the launch of the technology and college verticals, and he has written for Rolling Stone, the New Yorker and The Atlantic. After writing his New York Times essay in 2011, Jose founded the organization Define American — a nonprofit media organization that uses storytelling and specially curated events to shift the way society discusses immigration and issues like racial identity.  He transformed his life story into the documentary film "Documented,” which was released in theaters in 2014 and was broadcast on CNN. His next film project was producing and directing "White People," an Emmy Award-nominated MTV special. At great personal risk, he stepped forward to give voice to the millions of immigrants that live on the margins of society as undocumented persons. In his role as CEO, he is producing the second annual Define American Film Festival, taking place in Charlotte, NC May 11-13.

For more information about John Jay’s Commencement ceremonies, visit http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/graduation.

Profiles of Honorary Degree Recipients

10:30 A.M. Ceremony – Speaker and Honorary Degree: Doctor of Law

Mary L. Bonauto, is a renowned litigator and civil rights advocate who has been the Civil Rights Project Director at GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders since 1990. She has litigated in the state and federal courts of New England on discrimination issues, parental and children’s rights, free speech and religious liberty, and relationship recognition. In 2015 she successfully argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in the historic case Obergefell v. Hodges, establishing the freedom to marry for same-sex couples nationwide. Bonauto and two co-counsel won a 1999 ruling in Baker v. State of Vermont that led to the nation’s first civil union law.  She was lead counsel in the groundbreaking case Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, which in 2004 made Massachusetts the first state where same-sex couples could legally marry. She was also co-counsel in Kerrigan v. Department of Public Health, in which the Connecticut Supreme Court also ruled for marriage. Bonauto led GLAD’s federal court challenges to the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) leading to the first federal court rulings against DOMA, and then coordinated amici briefs for the Windsor case at the Supreme Court.  As a member of the legal team in the Michigan marriage case DeBoer v. Snyder, she became the Supreme Court oral-argument presenter on behalf of the plaintiffs in Obergefell. Her work has been recognized with numerous awards, including the 2014 MacArthur Fellowship. She is the Shikes Fellow in Civil Liberties and Civil Rights and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, serves on an advisory board for the American Constitution Society and has also served as co-chair of the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Committee of the American Bar Association’s Section on Individual Rights and Responsibilities.

3:30 P.M. Ceremony – Speaker and Honorary Degree: Doctor of Humane Letters

Jose Antonio Vargas, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, filmmaker, and media entrepreneur whose work centers on the changing American identity. He is the founder and CEO of Define American, a nonprofit media and culture organization that seeks to elevate the conversation around immigration and citizenship in America; and the founder of #EmergingUS, a media start-up that lives at the intersection of race, immigration, and identity in a multicultural America. In June 2011, the New York Times Magazine published a groundbreaking essay he wrote in which he revealed and chronicled his life in America as an undocumented immigrant. He then produced and directed “Documented,” a documentary feature film on his undocumented experience, which received a 2015 NAACP Image Award nomination for Outstanding Documentary. Vargas’s second documentary film, “White People,” has expanded his focus to race relations. He has written for daily newspapers (Philadelphia Daily News, San Francisco Chronicle) and national magazines (Rolling Stone, The New Yorker), and was a Senior Contributing Editor at the Huffington Post, where he launched the Technology and College sections. Prior to that, he covered tech and video game culture, HIV/AIDS in the nation’s capital, and the 2008 presidential campaign for the Washington Post, and was part of the team that won a Pulitzer Prize for covering the Virginia Tech massacre. In 2007, Politico named him one of 50 Politicos to Watch. Among other accolades he has received are: a Public Service Award from the National Council of La Raza, the country’s largest Latino advocacy organization; the Salem Award from the Salem Award Foundation, which draws upon the lessons of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692; and the Freedom to Write Award from PEN Center USA.


State of the College Address by President Travis

State of the College Address by President Travis

On April 26,  President Jeremy Travis delivered his final State of the College address, documenting the remarkable progress the College has made over the past dozen years and pointing to opportunities for change and reform in the next chapter of the John Jay story:

“We are gathered together today for one of the signature ceremonies in our annual calendar, the time when we step back from our day-to-day activities to assess the State of our College. I recognize that this State of the College address is different because it is the last one I will deliver as your President. This provides us an opportunity to look back at the progress we have made over the last dozen years. We have much to celebrate—indeed, we can say without hesitation that John Jay is a college transformed—but we should also be clear that much remains to be done. As we embrace the challenges that lie ahead we can also be proud, very proud, of the John Jay success story.”

To read the full speech, please click here.


Two Teams, Two Championships

Two Teams, Two Championships

The winningest sports team at John Jay College, hands-down, is the coed rifle team, which in March brought home its 12th and 13th Mid Atlantic Conference (MAC) championships in air rifle and small-bore — more titles than any other team in Bloodhound history. The team’s long-time coach, Vincent Maiorino, also now holds the distinction of winning the most championships of any coach at John Jay.

And while the rifle team was continuing its string of recent successes, the high-flying Cheerleading team captured its first-ever CUNY Athletic Conference championship on March 9, defeating four-time defending champion Brooklyn College.

"The energy was high, their jumps were even higher, and their confidence was through the roof,” said head Cheerleading coach Kayla Harkness. “I honestly couldn't have asked for a better performance, and I couldn't be more proud of our champions!"

Four team members took home individual honors in the championship competition. Sophomore Sonja "Kiba" Spencer won the gold medal in tumbling, while another sophomore, Kayla Sanes, took the silver in jumping.  CUNYAC Performer of the Year honors went to junior Isis Samuels. Sanes also won the CUNYAC Sportsmanship of the Year award.

Harkness was voted the CUNYAC Coach of the Year. "Coaching is fun for me,” she said. “It's an opportunity to have fun and enjoy teaching and sharing my love for the sport."

Rifle coach Maiorino, meanwhile, attributed the team’s success to rigorous discipline and a high level of devotion among athletes. “We run a tight ship,” he said, noting that John Jay shooters won’t be seen wearing long hair, beards or even baseball caps indoors. “We like to make a clean-cut impression,” he said.

The old-school mentality has proven effective partly because successful rifle shooting relies heavily on mental discipline. Coach Maiorino and his assistant, alumnus David Vegvari, even brought in a counselor to assess the students’ mental attitudes and break down some causes of stress to help them improve their focus.

According to Vegvari, good shooters must also possess “dedication and a willingness to learn.” Rifle differs from other John Jay sports because all rifle teams compete in NCAA Division I, and while other competitive universities have recruitment programs and scholarship programs to develop the best shooters, a lot of John Jay’s stars are walk-ons or homegrown talent. One such student is Anjelica “Peanut Butter” DeAraujo, last year’s MVP.

Other John Jay shooters were recruited, such as sophomore Lily Graham, who placed second in the conference and was named MAC Small-bore Shooter of the Month. Graham recently returned from Colorado Springs where she competed in the Junior Olympic Rifle Championships. Graham’s teammate, freshman Marc Suda, was named MAC Air Rifle Shooter of the Month.

Coach Maiorino was named MAC Coach of the Year for the 2017-2017 season. “His accomplishment has not gone unnoticed,” said Vegvari.


Alumni Reunion Celebrates the Then and Now

Alumni Reunion Celebrates the Then and Now

Hundreds of John Jay College alumni returned to their alma mater on April 21 and 22 for the annual Alumni Reunion Weekend, which included a special Founding Generation symposium to celebrate the 13-year tenure of President Jeremy Travis, who is stepping down on Aug. 1.

The awards dinner recognized three alumni — one of whom is a respected professor in John Jay’s Sciences Department — and a current John Jay sophomore, and was followed once again by a festive after-party.

To begin the reunion weekend, President Travis sat for an interview conducted in a casual, conversational style by alumna and John Jay Foundation trustee LaBrenda Garrett Nelson and Distinguished Professor of English John Matteson. With a format that loosely followed that of the popular TV show “Inside the Actors Studio,” Travis fielded questions on a variety of topics, including his signature accomplishments as John Jay’s president, his interactions with various college constituencies, his plans for life after John Jay, and even his tastes in music. The conversation also included questions from the alumni in attendance.

The celebratory dinner, which filled the Student Dining Hall, opened with words of welcome from Alumni Association president Shauna-Kay Gooden, and a toast to President Travis offered by Gooden’s predecessor, Michael McCann. “Jeremy Travis’s inspiration and commitment are responsible for what the Alumni Association is today,” said McCann. His commitment to John Jay is beyond compare.”

On behalf of the Alumni Association, McCann presented Travis with a framed engraving of Travis’s hero, the abolitionist Frederick Douglass. “I’m not speechless, but I’m close,” said Travis, who went on to tell the assembled alumni, “My job as president has been to make your John Jay diploma more valuable every day.”

The annual Michael F. McCann Alumni Scholarship, named for and underwritten by the former head of the Alumni Association, was awarded this year to Victoria Fix, a sophomore in the Honors program who expects to receive her bachelor’s degree in Political Science in 2019. Fix, a native of Syracuse, N.Y., who was recently hired as a research assistant to Professor Jeffrey Mellow, said her professional goal is to work on reform of the public education system and to “continue solving social justice concerns.”

President Travis and Alumni Association president Shauna-Kay Gooden (r.) with reunion honorees Alden Foster, Joseph McGrann, Victoria Fix, and Professor Thomas Kubic.The Alumni Association’s 2017 Outstanding Young Alumnus award was presented to Alden I. Foster (A.S./B.S. ’12). Appointed last August to the post of Deputy Director for Youth Services and Community Engagement for the NYPD, Foster is a firm believer in the importance of mentoring. “I believe in helping young people,” he said in receiving the award. “I believe they are our future.” Mentoring, he noted, is his way of “trying to pay it forward.”

Professor Thomas Kubic, a member of John Jay’s Sciences Department and Program Director of the Doctoral Program in Forensic Science at the CUNY Graduate Center, received the annual Distinguished Faculty Award, with a sizable contingent of family members, friends and former students on hand to celebrate with him. In his acceptance remarks, Kubic, who earned his Ph.D. from the John Jay/CUNY Graduate Center forensic science program in 2003, offered a wry shout-out to his students, saying, “How come they like me? It can’t be because I go easy on them.”

Joseph P. McGrann, the Chief of Operations for the MTA Police Department, called his 2017 Outstanding Alumnus award “a tremendous honor,” and offered fond memories of how “John Jay College came to my rescue.”

McGrann, who retired from the NYPD after 37 years on Feb. 28 and began his new job with the MTA the next day, was a sergeant in the 1980’s when he was assigned to the newly formed Police Cadet Corps. He didn’t have a college degree at the time, but now-retired Professor James Curran convinced him to enroll at John Jay. “But for John Jay,” said McGrann, “I would not be standing on this stage tonight. But for John Jay, many of us would not be where we are today.”

He earned his B.S. in Criminal Justice Administration and Planning in 2012.

The Alumni Reunion Weekend continued on Saturday with the 5K Race for Justice, followed by a brunch and Family Day Carnival.

John Jay Alumni Reunion 2017


President Travis Receives Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Award

President Travis Receives Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Award

New York, New York, April 25, 2017 – President Jeremy Travis has been recognized as thought-leader at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival’s Eighth Annual Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Awards (TDIA).  He was presented with the TDIA for his work on prison reform and social justice issues during a ceremony held on April 25 at the Tribeca Festival Hub in Manhattan.

“I am deeply honored to be included in this stellar group of policy innovators and social entrepreneurs,” said President Travis.  “I accept this award on behalf of colleagues around the country who are doing the hard work of bringing change to our nation’s criminal justice policies.  Now is the time for new and big ideas that advance the cause of justice.  We welcome the recognition of this reform movement by the Tribeca Film Festival.”

According to the award organizers, “This year, TDIA will celebrate an exciting roster of visionaries, rebels, and game changers who are upending their industries, altering the human experience through their novel approaches to social justice and activism, and affecting the future of intelligence, both human and artificial.” Paula Kahumbu, CEO of Kenyan Conservation NGO Wildlife Direct; Tory Burch, CEO and Designer of the Tory Burch lifestyle brand; Vivian Nixon, Executive Director of College & Community Fellowship; and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas are among the diverse field of 2017 honorees.

In addition to his 13 years of transformational leadership at John Jay College, President Travis has been a leading voice in the criminal justice reform movement. Most prominently, he served as Chair of the National Research Council Committee on the Causes and Consequences of High Rates of Incarceration which produced a landmark report recommending significant reductions in the nation's prison population and was a member of The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform that recently called for the closing of Rikers Island.

President Jeremy Travis with Tribeca co-founder Craig HatkoffTDIA is a collaboration with Harvard Business School Professor Clayton M. Christensen and helmed by Tribeca co-founder Craig Hatkoff. Christensen’s original Disruptive Innovation Theory was immortalized in the Innovator’s Dilemma, now celebrating its 20th anniversary. Disruptive innovation explains how simpler, cheaper technologies, products, and services can decimate industry leaders almost overnight, for the betterment of society. TDIA showcases applications of disruptive innovation which has spread far beyond the original technological and industrial realms into the fields of healthcare, education, international development, politics and advocacy, media, and the arts and entertainment. For more information, visit https://www.disruptorawards.com/.

 

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit  www.jjay.cuny.edu.


Research team tracks complex web of criminal-justice monetary sanctions in 9 states

Research team tracks complex web of criminal-justice monetary sanctions in 9 states

New York, NY, April 21th, 2017 – The phrase “criminal justice system” may conjure images of courtrooms, juries and prison. But, increasingly, people’s wallets are the target of punishment, according to Karin Martin, a professor of Public Management at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Martin is the lead investigator for New York as part of a research project at nine universities that is exploring the role of monetary sanctions in the criminal justice system. They recently completed a review of financial punishments in their home states. And based on their preliminary findings, the impact to a person’s pocketbook depends largely on his or her location on a map.

“There is an extreme amount of variation – both between states and within states – on how, when and where monetary sanctions are imposed by court officials,” said Alexes Harris, lead Primary Investigator and a Sociologist at the University of Washington. “It’s a mess, and there are few guidelines and no national framework governing the use of monetary sanctions.”

Monetary sanctions include fines, court fees, restitution, surcharges and even interest on unpaid sanctions. They can be imposed for offenses ranging from traffic violations and misdemeanors to felony convictions. Though these types of financial punishments have a long history in the United States, state and local governments have been imposing monetary sanctions with increasing frequency over the past 30 years. The result is a national patchwork of financial punishments, which the research team is working to blueprint as part of a five-year grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

On April 20th, the group released a detailed report of the first year of their work, which was a comprehensive review of financial punishments, law and policy across nine states: California (Bryan Sykes), Georgia (Sarah Shannon), Illinois (Mary Pattillo), Minnesota (Chris Uggen), Missouri (Beth Huebner), New York (Karin Martin), North Carolina (April Fernandes), Texas (Becky Pettit) and Washington (Alexes Harris). These states account for more than one-third of the nation’s 2.2 million incarcerated people. These nine states also are home to the more than 40 percent of people in the U.S. who are under community-based supervision.

In general, the researchers found wide variation on the fee amount, the circumstances in which they’re imposed and even when courts allow people to pay their fees. But all nine states impose monetary sanctions on a routine basis. In some states, the fines are specific: For example, Washington, North Carolina and Georgia have detailed lists of mandatory fees for each offense. Other states, like Texas and Minnesota, specify only maximum fines for certain crimes.

New York stands out for having a variety of mandatory surcharges for every level of offense: violations ($95), misdemeanors ($175), and felonies ($300). New York also has hefty penalties for driving without a license ($750) and the “Driver Responsibility Assessment” that requires payments of up to $250 every year for three consecutive years for certain offenses. New York also has one of the harshest policies about garnishing any money people earn or receive while they are in prison. While the average prison wage is about $1 per day, up to 40% of these wages can be taken to pay for monetary sanctions. But if someone receives money from outside (e.g. from family), then the state can take up to 100% of these receipts.

Usually, the offense, rather than the person’s ability to pay, determines the amount of the monetary sanction. Martin and her colleagues found that judges and other officers of the court often have little leeway in imposing monetary sanctions. In New York, judges have very little discretion for charging some surcharges and fees. In Washington, judges can waive interest payments on certain fines once the principal has been paid. In general, these sanctions cannot be revoked – only paid.

“What monetary sanction you get can depend on where you are, not only in the country, but which county, which courthouse, and even which judge,” said Martin.

The researchers also found variation among states and municipalities not just in the size of the monetary fines and the crimes for which they are imposed, but also the consequences for failure to pay. Though debtors’ prisons have long been abolished, people still end up in jail due to non-payment, since courts can still issue warrants for persistent failure to pay or to comply with the conditions of probation related to paying monetary sanctions. Since people in the criminal justice system are more likely to be poor, the consequences for falling behind in payments can be far-reaching.

The researchers have found that failure to pay a fine can lead to suspension of a driver’s license, which can affect a person’s ability to get to a job. In many states, non-payment can affect a person’s right to vote, as Martin wrote about in a Washington Post op-ed.

The absence of a national framework governing monetary sanctions ultimately led to this variation. But in 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice went so far as to issue a “Dear Colleague” letter on fines and fees. In 2015, Missouri’s Ferguson Commission noted how monetary sanctions can contribute to inequality in the justice system. As these and other efforts draw attention to the disparate monetary sanction policies across states, they may prompt states to revisit those policies.

“We need to start asking ourselves if it’s truly worth trying to extract money from those least able to pay, when doing so is costly both to taxpayers and to the person who owes,” said Martin. “What are we trying to achieve with a system of punishment that many people can never successfully escape?”

Martin and her colleagues are building on this initial review by conducting analyses in eight states of fines and fees from state court data, observing court proceedings and interviewing court officers and debtors.

The national research team endeavors will help resolve the details of monetary sanctions and how they differ among states, they will also examine, among other questions, the underlying question of why monetary sanctions have become such a prominent part of the modern criminal justice system nationally.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations.  In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.

###

For more information, contact Martin at kamartin@jjay.cuny.edu.


John Jay’s Model United Nations Team Reaps Top Awards at 2017 National Model U.N. Conference.

John Jay’s Model United Nations Team Reaps Top Awards at 2017 National Model U.N. Conference.

For the 13th consecutive year, John Jay ranked among the top 5 percent of colleges and universities from over 30 countries that participated in the annual National Model United Nations (NMUN) competition. The John Jay team received a Distinguished Delegation award during the week-long competition that brought together approximately 5,500 students from April 9-14 at the Sheraton and Hilton hotels in New York City.

Each year, NMUN delegations represent a different member state of the United Nations, with John Jay this year representing the Oriental Republic of Uruguay.

Delegates served on a number of committees in which they deliberated, negotiated, drafted and adopted resolutions and reports on a wide range of politically sensitive and topical issues. This year’s agenda included topics ranging from the role of science and technology in international security and disarmament, the eradication of poverty through a green economy to the prevention of violence and discrimination based on sexual and gender identity, among many others.

John Jay’s Model United Nations Team Reaps Top AwardsIn addition to receiving the Distinguished Delegation award, which recognizes the overall delegation’s superior performance in all committees, the team garnered additional awards.  Team members Izabela Qafa and Amanda Jamal were recognized for their work on the Commission on the Status of Women; Veeana Singh, Dillon Epperson, and Sean Skeeters for the International Atomic Energy Agency; and Eugenio Rotondi and Neesa Rajkumar for the General Assembly First Committee. Gabriell Caceres, Kyle Roberts, and Jerry Cho who participated in the Security Council were also recognized for their Outstanding Position Papers. In addition, Gabriell Cacares and Kyle Roberts of the Security Council, and Kadeem Roberts and Nairy Soto of the General Assembly Third Committee, received Outstanding Delegates in Committee Awards.

The 28-member team’s success is the product of rigorous and systematic training under the guidance and mentorship of Professor Jacques Fomerand of the Department of Political Science. During the fall and spring semesters, the team met for two to three hours every Friday evening, in addition to countless hours of preparation throughout the week. They honed their research skills, drafted position papers, rehearsed public speaking skills, refined their mediating and consensus-building techniques and mastered the intricacies of U.N. procedures.

John Jay’s 2016-2017 NMUN team included students from a wide variety of academic disciplines, the executives of numerous student organizations, Presidential Interns, Watson Fellows, McNair Scholars, members of the Honors Program and Student-Athletes. These students, with roots in over a dozen countries, were: Jamil Ahmed, Hanna Amodine (Treasurer, UNSA), Andrea Arturo, Gabriell Caceres, Jerry Cho, Alondra Cuevas, Chhimi Dorji, Amanda Jamal, Eduardo Lopez Echeverria, Dillon Epperson, Jonila Fetiu, Niven Hemraj, Amena Othman, Nikaury Payano, Izabela Qafa, Fariza Rakhmanova, Neesa Rajkumar, Muhammad Rehman (President, UNSA) Kyle Roberts, Kadeem Robinson, Eugenio Rotondi, Sidiki Savadogo, Asia Shkreli (Vice President, UNSA) Sean Skeeters, Nairy Soto, Monica Zambrano, and Veeana Singh.


Anne Milgram Joins John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees

Anne Milgram Joins John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees

Former New Jersey Attorney General Anne Milgram, now a professor and scholar-in-residence at New York University School of Law, is the newest member of the John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees.

Prior to joining NYU, Anne Milgram served as Vice President of Criminal Justice for the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.  Milgram championed the use of smart data, analytics, and technology as a way to reinvent the criminal justice system. At the Arnold Foundation, she led the creation, development and national implementation of a new pretrial risk assessment tool to provide judges with more information for when they decide whether to release or jail people who have been arrested.  In addition to developing the Public Safety Risk Assessment tool, Milgram spearheaded more than $55 million in philanthropic grants and operational projects. This included significant efforts to: shift the national focus from the back end of the criminal justice system (probation, parole, and reentry) to the front end of the system (pretrial); expand the research base for criminal justice; create state and local criminal data warehouses; work cross-sector to combine crime, health, education, housing and social service data to identify and test new areas of intervention and diversion; and develop a broader strategy for national criminal justice reform.

Milgram served as New Jersey’s Attorney General from June 2007 to January 2010, where she headed the 9,000-person Department of Law and Public Safety. Milgram became Attorney General after serving from February 2006 to June 2007 as First Assistant Attorney General. As Attorney General, Milgram supervised eight divisions and multiple commissions and boards, including: the Division of Criminal Justice; the Division of Law; the Division of Consumer Affairs; the Bureau of Securities; the Division of Civil Rights; the Juvenile Justice Commission; the Division of Gaming Enforcement; the Division of Highway Traffic Safety; the Racing Commission; and the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Milgram also supervised the Division of the New Jersey State Police and its 3,000 sworn members and the Camden Police Department.

As the state’s Chief Law Enforcement Officer, she was responsible for overseeing and directing the 21 New Jersey county prosecutors and the approximately 30,000 state and local law enforcement officers. She spearheaded investigations into street gangs, public corruption, gun violence and trafficking, securities fraud, and mortgage fraud. She also implemented a statewide program to improve public safety through prevention of crime, criminal justice and law enforcement reform, and re-entry programs and services. As Attorney General, Milgram oversaw affirmative and defensive civil litigation for the state, providing legal representation to all state departments and agencies in approximately 25,000 civil matters each year. She also served as a member of the US Attorney General’s Executive Working Group on Criminal Justice and as a co-chair of the National Association of Attorneys General Criminal Law Committee.

Milgram received her law degree from NYU School of Law, and also holds degrees from Rutgers College and the University of Cambridge.


Anna Deavere Smith, The Petrie Foundation And President Jeremy Travis To Be Honored At John Jay College Educating For Justice Gala

Anna Deavere Smith, The Petrie Foundation And President Jeremy Travis To Be Honored At John Jay College Educating For Justice Gala

With a special recognition for the Founding Supporters of John Jay-Vera Fellows Program

New York, NY, April 19, 2017 – John Jay College of Criminal Justice will honor Anna Deavere Smith, acclaimed actress, playwright, educator and activist, as part of its Educating for Justice Gala on Monday, May 8. Jeremy Travis, President of John Jay College, will be honored for his thirteen years of outstanding leadership, along with the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation for its advocacy in support of quality education in New York City. Bill Moyers, award-winning journalist and filmmaker and president of the Schumann Media Center, will host the event program. The gala will take place at 6:00 PM at the Plaza Hotel in New York City.

“I am delighted to be honored alongside these fierce advocates for justice,” said President Travis.  “With her groundbreaking performances, Anna Deavere Smith has created a new form of theater that shines a light on some of the most pressing social justice issues of our time.  The generous support of the Petrie Foundation has provided a lifeline to students facing financial crises that would prevent them from completing their college education.”

This year’s extraordinary honorees have made notable impacts within their respective fields and on the cause of justice. Deavere Smith, celebrated for her innovative, one-woman plays, has sought to use theater and film to raise awareness on issues of equity and justice including the forces that cause some impoverished children to leave school and head towards cycles of incarceration.

The Petrie Foundation’s Emergency Fund has helped thousands of John Jay students by offering financial relief for those in desperate situations and enabling them to stay in school and complete their degrees. In addition, the Petrie Cyber Security Pipeline Program had prepared community college students for John Jay’s rigorous cyber security program and a career in a fast growing and crucial field.

Under President Travis’s visionary leadership, John Jay College transitioned to a dynamic senior college, offering a dozen liberal arts degrees and boasting a record of academic excellence and increased research funding. President Travis has also been a leading voice in the criminal justice reform movement. He served as Chair of the National Research Council Committee on the Causes and Consequences of High Rates of Incarceration which produced a landmark report recommending significant reductions in the nation's prison population and was a member of The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform that recently called for the closing of Rikers Island.

The event will include a special tribute in honor of the founding supporters of the John Jay-Vera Fellows Program. The founding supporters include Jeffrey R. Gural, Ronay A. and Richard Menschel, Arthur J. Mirante II, Ron L. Moelis, Frederick A. O. Schwarz Jr. and Herbert Sturz. This partnership between John Jay College and the Vera Institute of Justice provides unique internship and academic experiences to outstanding undergraduate students committed to social justice and public service. Nearly 100 students have now participated in the Program and have gone on to rewarding and meaningful careers.

Proceeds from the gala support scholarships and programs that help John Jay students achieve their academic and career goals in order to serve the public interest as engaged citizens and fierce advocates for justice. Previous honorees include Lin-Manuel Miranda, award-winning composer and lyricist, Mariska Hargitay, award-winning actor of NBC’s “Law and Order SVU”; Jim McCann, founder and CEO of 1-800-Flowers; Arthur Mirante II, Principal and Tri-State President of Avison Young Real Estate; Peter Beshar, Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Marsh & McLennan, General David Petraeus; the Ford Foundation, the Tow Foundation, and Maria Cuomo Cole.

HONOREE BIOS:

Anna Deavere Smith
Anna Deavere Smith is an actress, playwright and teacher who has been recognized for creating a new form of theatre. She received the National Humanities Medal, presented to her by President Obama in 2013. She was the 2015 Jefferson Lecturer for the National Endowment for the Humanities and a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow for Theatre Arts (for the development of Notes From the Field). She is a MacArthur Fellow and received The Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize. She is the recipient of two Tony nominations and two Obie Awards. She was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for her play Fires in the Mirror: Crown Heights, Brooklyn and Other Identities.

She has created over 18 one-person shows based on hundreds of interviews, most of which deal with social issues. Fires in the Mirror premiered at The Public Theater. Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, about the Los Angeles race riots of 1992, was performed around the country and on Broadway. Let Me Down Easy focused on health care in the U.S.  Her new endeavor is The Anna Deavere Smith Pipeline Project, which seeks to use theater and film to raise awareness about the forces that cause some impoverished children to leave school and head towards cycles of incarceration.  Her current play, Notes From the Field, is a part of that project.

In popular culture she has been seen in Nurse Jackie, Black-ish, The West Wing, The American President, Rachel Getting Married and Philadelphia. Her books include Letters to a Young Artist and Talk to Me: Listening Between the Lines.

She has a number of honorary degrees including those from Yale, University of Pennsylvania, Juilliard and Union Theological Seminary, and The Radcliffe Medal. She is a recipient of the Stanford University School of Medicine’s Dean’s Medal. She sits on the boards of trustees for the American Museum of National History, the Aspen Institute, The Playwrights Realm, Grace Cathedral in San Francisco and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She is University Professor in the department of Art & Public Policy at New York University and is affiliated with the School of Law. She also directs the Institute on the Arts and Civic Dialogue at New York University.

The Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation
A private nonprofit organization, the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation’s mission is to promote quality education for the more than 1.5 million students who attend public schools in New York City. There are two channels through which the foundation supports doing this: 1) To advance the likelihood that students at the City University of New York and at other notable colleges can survive emergencies and stay in school to finish their degrees; and 2) To build the expertise of teachers and principals to help them become effective in middle and high schools in the New York City Department of Education, so that vulnerable and disadvantaged students can succeed at graduating ready for college.

Jeremy Travis
Jeremy Travis is president of John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York. Under his leadership, John Jay has been transformed. John Jay is now a senior college offering a rigorous undergraduate liberal arts program and, in 2012, joined the prestigious Macaulay Honors College of CUNY. John Jay offers 13 masters programs on campus and online – John Jay Online launched in 2014 – and houses three nationally recognized doctoral programs. During his tenure, freshman enrollment has increased by half, full-time faculty have increased by a third and external funding for faculty research has tripled. The College completed its first capital campaign for $50 million in 2014, and initiated a new $75 million campaign soon after, raising more than $45 million to date for this initiative that will end in 2020.

Prior to his appointment, he served as a Senior Fellow in the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center, where he launched a national research program focused on prisoner reentry into society. From 1994-2000, Travis directed the National Institute of Justice, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice.  Prior to his service in Washington, he was Deputy Commissioner for Legal Matters for the New York City Police Department (1990-1994), a Special Advisor to New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch (1986-89), and Special Counsel to the Police Commissioner of the NYPD (1984-86).

He is the author of But They All Come Back: Facing the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry (Urban Institute Press, 2005), co-editor (with Christy Visher) of Prisoner Reentry and Crime in America (Cambridge University Press, 2005), and co-editor (with Michelle Waul) of Prisoners Once Removed: The Impact of Incarceration and Reentry on Children, Families, and Communities (Urban Institute Press, 2003). Most recently he co-edited (with Bruce Western and Steve Redburn) the National Research Council report The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences (The National Academies Press, 2014). He has published numerous book chapters, articles and monographs on constitutional law, criminal law and criminal justice policy.

He has received several awards, including the Ellis Island Medal, the American Society of Criminology’s August Vollmer Award, the Gerhard O.W. Muller Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and the Margaret Mead Award from the International Community Corrections Association. He earned a JD, cum laude, from the New York University School of Law, an MPA from the New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and a BA, cum laude, in American Studies from Yale College.

 

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit  www.jjay.cuny.edu.


Student Travel Abroad Scholarship Honors President Travis

Student Travel Abroad Scholarship Honors President Travis

In honor of President Jeremy Travis, who will step down on August 1, 2017, John Jay College has launched the Jeremy Travis Scholarship for Study Abroad to increase opportunities for student study abroad. The scholarship will help undergraduate and graduate students participate in immersive cultural and academic experiences that they otherwise could not financial afford.

During his tenure, President Travis has worked to expand study abroad programming at the college. Over the last eight years, 679 John Jay students have benefited from such transformative opportunities, learning about key institutions and the practices of distinct cultures. Having personally experienced the impact of study abroad, President Travis has made preparing students for global citizenship a cornerstone of the John Jay mission. Honoring his legacy through the study abroad scholarship will have a significant impact on current and future John Jay students.

It’s my hope that the scholarship will enable more John Jay students to take part in meaningful experiences with other cultures,” said President Travis. “As true global citizens, students who study abroad will be enriched and energized by their time away and will also gain a competitive advantage in the global workforce.”

The average summer study abroad program costs $3,000-$5,000, an expense out of reach for many students at John Jay.  Donations to the Jeremy Travis Scholarship for Study Abroad fund will help to provide life-changing experiences to deserving students. By funding students with financial need, the scholarship will expand the number of students traditionally underrepresented in study abroad including first-generation college students, those in law enforcement, ethnic minority students, LGBTQ students, and student with disabilities.

As Natalia Giaccio commented about her study abroad experience in Tanzania, ““It’s like a culture shock. But the second you immerse yourself, it’s so much more that you could have wished for.”

To help John Jay students explore justice on a global scale, DONATE here.

For more information, call 212-393-6810.


Statement from President Jeremy Travis on the New York State Budget

Statement from President Jeremy Travis on the New York State Budget

Dear Colleagues,

With the final enactment of the budget for the State of New York last night, we should take a moment to celebrate the budget’s good news for our College, the City University of New York, and the mission of public higher education beyond our boundaries. Most importantly, we applaud the enactment of Governor Cuomo’s Excelsior scholarship program which will provide free tuition to thousands of middle class families across the state.  This landmark legislation sets the pace for the rest of the country.  Here in New York, this investment in our students will result in more students graduating without the crushing burden of student loans.  These graduates will in turn contribute to our economy, thereby repaying the state’s investment in their education.

With Governor Cuomo’s leadership, the Legislature has also approved a five-year predictable tuition plan under which tuition for senior colleges may be increased up to $200 a year.  This will allow us to make much needed investments in faculty hiring and student services.  The state budget also provides additional support for our basic operations, raises the cap on the Tuition Assistance Program, invests in critical maintenance and capital programs, and creates an innovative funding initiative for online textbooks for our students.  These investments will ensure that CUNY continues to provide high quality and innovative education to our students.

Below is the statement from CUNY Chancellor James Milliken and Chairman of the Board of Trustees, William Thompson.

We are grateful to Governor Cuomo and the state Legislature for this vote of confidence in our faculty, students and staff and for this timely support for our mission of providing high quality and affordable college education.

Sincerely,
Jeremy Travis
President
Statement on the New York State budget from Chairman of the Board of Trustees William C. Thompson Jr. and Chancellor James B. Milliken
The City University of New York 

Under Governor Cuomo’s leadership, New York State has passed a farsighted budget that opens the door to a college education for more New Yorkers and enhances the quality of higher education. The Governor’s landmark Excelsior scholarship program provides free tuition to thousands of middle class families, making our state a national leader. This is an investment in our students, and our state, that will pay dividends for years to come. The budget also provides substantial support for CUNY’s facilities and provides much needed operational funding. And, in another significant boost to our students, the state will be providing innovative support for online textbooks that will greatly reduce the cost for thousands of CUNY students. We are grateful for Governor Cuomo's leadership in expanding access to affordable, quality college education for so many New Yorkers, helping ensure that we have the educated and skilled workforce that is necessary to grow the economy for a better New York for all.


Closing Rikers: Statement by President Travis

CLOSING RIKERS: STATEMENT BY PRESIDENT TRAVIS

On April 2, an impressive group of elected officials, criminal justice leaders and community activists convened in the Moot Court Room at John Jay College to mark the release of a landmark report recommending the closure of Rikers Island.  The recommendation was the result of work by The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform, created by New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and chaired by former Chief Judge, Jonathan Lippman.

At the press conference at John Jay, Judge Lippman and Speaker Mark-Viverito said that “closing Rikers Island is a moral imperative.” They said they were grateful that Mayor Bill de Blasio had also embraced the recommendation to close Rikers.  Everyone at the press conference recognized that, with this remarkable political alignment, now comes the hard part: to institute reforms at multiple stages of the criminal justice process that will reduce the jail population in half, build new jails close to the courthouses in all five boroughs, and implement plans for a new use of Rikers Island.

We should be proud of the role that John Jay College played leading up to this historic moment.  Many of the ideas embraced by the Lippman Commission were first advanced by Martin F. Horn, a Distinguished Lecturer at John Jay and John Jay alumnus. Ten years ago, as the New York City Correction Commissioner, he proposed significantly reducing the number of persons confined on Rikers Island by expanding jails in Brooklyn and the Bronx as part of an overall effort to phase out Rikers Island.  During his tenure, from 2002 to 2009, he also convened a Discharge Planning Collaborative which identified many of the same issues discussed in the Commission’s report, including the challenge of the high volume of pretrial detainees staying less than three days and the large numbers of frequent users who come in and out of corrections custody. Now, a decade later, although his ambitious plan was stymied by opposition to the new facilities, the recommendations and analysis advanced by Professor Horn have been adopted as City policy.

In 2015, in an interview published by City and State, I was asked about the future of Rikers Island.  This topic had come to the forefront of the City’s discourse on criminal justice policy because of some high profile events.  The Southern District of New York, under the leadership of Preet Bharara, had released a scathing report citing the “culture of violence” on Rikers.  A chilling article in the New Yorker detailed the tragic story of Kalief Browder who spent three years on Rikers, including many months in solitary confinement.  Following his release, Kalief took his own life and he became a rallying cry to close Rikers.  In response to the question, I said that any vision for a future of criminal justice policy in New York City could not include Rikers Island; I recommended that Rikers be closed and replaced with small community-based facilities.  City and State published a series of articles on the idea of closing Rikers, Neil Barsky, founder and chairman of the Marshall Project, penned an op-ed in The New York Times endorsing that idea, and Crain’s published ideas for new uses of Rikers. Given added impetus by a community organizing effort to #CloseRikers, the stage was set for a new look at the idea advanced by Commissioner Horn.

In her February 11, 2016 State of the City Address, Speaker Mark-Viverito announced the creation of a Commission to explore the future of the City’s pretrial detention system, including the future of Rikers Island.  I was honored to be invited by Speaker Mark-Viverito to serve with 26 other New Yorkers as a member of this Commission.   I was named to the subcommittee examining the future of jails in New York City, chaired by former John Jay Professor Michael Jacobson.  I was supported in this work by Bettina Muenster, Executive Associate for Research and Special Projects who provided crucial assistance at meetings of the Commission and the subcommittee.   Bettina and I often referenced the insights we had gained on the Vera-John Jay study trip to learn about prisons in Germany.  Those insights are reflected in the Commission report.  I consider my service on the Lippman Commission as a high point in my professional career.

In the fall of 2016, the College collaborated with filmmaker Bill Moyers and his Public Square Media team to raise awareness of conditions on Rikers Island with film screenings of his documentary, RIKERS. A private screening of the film, prior to the official release, was attended by members of the Independent Commission, and was followed by a panel discussion moderated by journalist Ellis Cose with panelists including Judge Lippman, Keith Ford, a formerly incarcerated individual, Executive Assistant Corporation Counsel Thomas Giovanni, and Moyers. The discussion captured reactions to the documented experiences of inmates and examined potential implications for the Commission findings and recommendations.

The College hosted a second public screening of RIKERS in the Gerald W. Lynch Theater. This screening generated considerable community interest and media attention regarding the disturbing realities at Rikers. The theater was filled to capacity, mostly with John Jay students.  After the screening, there was a “talk back” with individuals whose experience on Rikers was reflected in the documentary.  The discussion was high quality and urgent, reflecting genuine concern over issues of mass incarceration and conditions of confinement, as well as our community’s deep interest in criminal justice reform.

Special recognition is due to Herb Sturz, a member of the Lippman Commission who first proposed the transfer of Rikers to the state and the creation of borough based facilities 37 years ago when he was Deputy Mayor under Mayor Koch. Mr. Sturz is well known to the John Jay community for his connection to the Vera Fellows program,   his receipt of an honorary doctorate in 2006, and as an honoree of the 2009 Educating for Justice Gala.

Finally, through a remarkable coincidence, as the Commission was engaged in its deliberations, the John Jay research team called the Misdemeanor Justice Project was deeply engaged in analysis of data from the city Department of Correction.  The MJP team, headed by Dr. Preeti Chauhan, Associate Professor of Psychology, released two reports on trends in correction. The first, released in December 2016, documented the steep decline in admissions to DOC custody over the past twenty years.  The second, released days after the Lippman Commission report, highlighted changed in bail conditions, the length of stay in DOC custody, and methods of release from custody. As these analyses were completed over the past few months, they were presented to Judge Lippman, the relevant subcommittees and commission staff.  The final report acknowledged the contributions of Professor Chauhan and the MJP team.  We can expect that, in the years to come, the ground-breaking work of the MJP will provide the basis for tracking the City’s progress in reducing the jail population.

We should be proud of John Jay’s contributions, directly and indirectly, to this historic commitment to shutter Rikers Island.  We have been part of a movement to create a more humane, efficient, and safe environment for those New Yorkers who are held in corrections custody or work in these vitally important institutions.


Hitting His Stride on the John Jay Stage

Hitting His Stride on the John Jay Stage

Nicholas Smith, a sophomore Law and Society major, has only been in the United States for about eight months, yet this week he’ll take to the stage in a lead role in a new theatrical production at John Jay, “The African Company Presents Richard III.” Smith moved to New York City from the island of Jamaica this past summer and enrolled in John Jay, where he says he had a tough time adjusting to the new pace of life. That no longer seems to be the case — this international student has hit his stride.

“I enjoy singing, performing, whatever gets me on stage. But I also enjoy using my talents for advocacy,” he said.

The new production seems to fit this requirement. The show, which opens for five performances at the Gerald W. Lynch Theater beginning April 6, explores the true story of the first black theater company in New York.

The African Company operated out of a theater called The African Grove, which was located near the whites-only Park Theater. Fearful of the competition (the African Grove welcomed huge crowds of both whites and blacks), the Park Theater’s white owner staged a riot in order to close down The African Grove. But The African Company prevailed, renting a hall next door and staging a performance of “Richard III” on the very same night as their neighbors.

“They were proud of their work, and determined to put it on,” said Smith, who plays William Henry Brown, the owner of the African Company and the first black theater owner in the United States. “I encourage everyone to see the show. It has a great message, a talented cast, talented directors, and a very talented team.”

Smith says working on the production and being involved in theater arts at John Jay has benefited him on a personal level as well. “When I just came to John Jay, I had a hard time adjusting, not only to a new school, but to the U.S. I knew that the best way shake the homesickness was to start getting involved.”

With the encouragement of his best friend Kadeem Robinson, he was elected to the Student Council as a Sophomore Representative. Robinson had attended high school with Smith in Jamaica, and is now Secretary of Student Council. He will also join Smith on stage this week as Papa Shakespeare.

“My interpersonal skills improved, I would engage more with people, I would feel comfortable in strange places,” said Smith. “All of the skills I learned from being in theater helped me with the adjustments to school and New York City. Smith also credits the John Jay Wellness Center as being a “treasure trove of support.”

The upcoming show at John Jay may be Smith’s first production in the U.S., but his acting debut came in 2014, when he performed in “Where Is Melissa,” a play about human trafficking, written by a Jamaican playwright. “Most of the plays I’m involved in have an aspect of advocacy,” he said.

Smith grew up in Spaldings, a rural town in central Jamaica known as one of the first free villages in the country following the abolition of slavery. His father was a police officer and his mother a seamstress who later became an art teacher. “They have always been the ones to encourage me to follow my dreams, and to ensure that whatever I set my mind to, I do it to the absolute best of my abilities,” Smith said.

In addition to performing in plays and serving on the Student Council, Smith is also a Macaulay Honors student and hopes to pursue a career as a lawyer working in international, immigration, or human rights law. “I want a profession that allows me to be of service to my fellow man. That’s a passion for me,” he said.

“The African Company Presents Richard III” will be at the Gerald Lynch Theater April 6 and 7 at 1:45 P.M. and 7:30 P.M., and April 8 at 5:30 P.M.


Hostos Community College Set For 46th Commencement Ceremony Sonia Manzano To Deliver Keynote Address

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of The City University of New York is proud to announce that the College’s 46th Commencement Ceremony will be held on Thursday, June 1, 2017, at 3:00 p.m. For the first time at the landmark United Palace in Washington Heights, the ceremony will recognize the extraordinary achievements of 1,232 graduates.

Serving as keynote speaker will be actress and author Sonia Manzano, who played the popular character María on Sesame Street.  She will be receiving the President’s Medal, the highest honor our institution can bestow.  It is awarded to individuals who have achieved noteworthy professional accomplishments that reflect dedication and commitment to the mission and vision of Hostos.

“As we close in on Hostos’ 50 anniversary in 2018, it is important to celebrate the achievements of the most important facet of the College’s storied history:  its incredible students,” said Hostos President Dr. David Gómez. “Their stories, their hard work, and their dedication to being change agents themselves have made the college what it is today. And, they will be the ones who continue to build on what is already an incredible legacy of learning and opportunity for all.”

38 students from Hostos Lincoln Academy (HLA) become the 8th class to graduate from the Early College High School, a national initiative that allows students to take high school and college-level courses simultaneously.  HLA is one of the 12 Early College High Schools in the CUNY system.  In addition, we will have the first five graduating students of the Melissa Riggio Higher Education program, which is a three-year, fully-inclusive college-based certificate program designed to prepare students with intellectual and developmental disabilities for adult life through coursework, career development and civic engagement.

Hostos’ 2017 Valedictorian is Jasmine Rodríguez. Born and raised in New York City, Jasmine studied Liberal Arts and Sciences at Hostos, and will graduate with a 4.0 GPA. She plans to transfer to City College/CUNY where she’ll study Psychology. Her dream is to work in the medical field, possibly as a psychiatrist. Evelyn T. Capellán will serve as Salutatorian.

The ceremony will also salute two newly retired faculty members, Professor Dennis Gibbons (who will serve as grand marshal) and Professor Linda Watkins-Goffman (who will be the Mistress of Ceremonies), among others.

What:  Hostos Community College’s 46th Commencement Ceremony.
When:  Thursday, June 1 at 3 p.m.
Where:  United Palace, 4140 Broadway, Manhattan.
Keynote Speaker:  Sonia Manzano, actress and author.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.

Press contact: Soldanela Rivera
sriveralopez@hostos.cuny.edu
718-518-4410 / 917-627-9097


CCNY BIC trio wins LAGRANT Foundation national scholarships

LAGRANT Foundation scholarship recipients Charisse Holder and Erica Lopez.

Charisse Holder, Sean Feol-Baugh and Erica Lopez, all from The City College of New York’s Masters in Branding + Integrated Communications (BIC) program, are recipients of 2017 LAGRANT Foundation scholarships.  The scholarships support students from ethnically diverse backgrounds pursuing careers in advertising, marketing and public relations. Twenty graduate students nationally have been honored by the Los Angeles-based LAGRANT Foundation (TLF).

Holder, a resident of Valley stream, N.Y., is in BIC’s strategic management track.  She received her undergraduate degree in international marketing and business communications from Baruch College.

Jamaican-born Feol-Baugh, who lives in Brooklyn, is in the management/planning track. He earned a BA in media and communications from the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica.

Lopez is a Manhattan resident working in the nonprofit sector and as a freelance journalist. Her credits include ABC News, CNN and Fox News. She studied English and journalism at SUNY Albany.

This is the fourth year in a row -- in BIC's four years of existence -- that The LAGRANT Foundation has selected BIC students for this highly selective scholarship. Fred Garcia and Amber Jackson, BIC '15, Donna Dei-Baning, BIC '16, Dalisbeth Galvez, Melissa Julien, and Priscilla Parra (BIC '17) received the $5,000 scholarship in 2014, 2015, and 2016 respectively. With the addition of this year's recipients, BIC has now received the most scholarships given to a school/program on the east coast, including NYU, Columbia University and the entire CUNY.

TLF is awarding a total of $150,000 in scholarships this year, the 19th anniversary of the program. The recipients include 30 undergraduates.

About The LAGRANT Foundation

Since its inception in 1998, The LAGRANT Foundation has provided $2.13 million and 411 scholarships to continue its mission to increase the number of ethnic minorities in the fields of advertising, marketing and public relations. With the generous support of its major donors and supporters, TLF provides  scholarships, career & professional development workshops, mentorships and internships/entry-level positions to African American/Black, Alaska Native/Native American, Asian American/Pacific Islander and Hispanic/Latino undergraduate and graduate students.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Macaulay Honors College Alumna Wins a Thomas R. Pickering Fellowship

Photo of Rausan Borujerdi, winner of Pickering Fellowship

Rausan Borujerdi

Macaulay Honors College alumna Rausan Borujerdi, ‘16 (City College) is the recipient of a Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship. The political science major is one of 20 stellar graduates nationwide selected for the program, which prepares candidates to become members of the U.S. Foreign Service. Hundreds of applicants from over 270 colleges and universities competed for the fellowship managed and funded by the U.S. Department of State and administered by The Washington Center.

Born in New York to Iranian-American parents, Borujerdi will attend Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs this fall. She will study international security with a specialization in the Middle East.

At City College, Borujerdi traveled to the Dominican Republic as a Colin Powell School Partner for Change Fellow at CCNY. She also participated in the   U.S. Foreign Service Internship Program. She interned in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State in summer 2014 and at the U.S. Embassy in Bahrain in summer 2015.

Pickering Fellows receive up to $37,500 in annual financial support toward a full-time Master’s degree program in a field related to international affairs and diplomacy. They also participate in one domestic and one international internship. Employment in the Foreign Service follows upon completion of the program and meeting Foreign Service entry requirements.


CUNY’S ASSOCIATE DEGREE-COMPLETION PROGRAM HUGE COST-SAVER OVER TRADITIONAL APPROACH, INDEPENDENT STUDY FINDS

CUNY’s nationally acclaimed program that helps students receive associate degrees faster provides taxpayers with a big bang for the buck, a new independent study indicates. The benefits will only increase as the program scales up to 25,000 students by the 2018-2019 academic year.

For every 1,000 students enrolled in The City University of New York’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), the benefit to taxpayers is “more than $46 million relative to enrolling in the conventional degree program,” Henry M. Levin, Emma García and colleagues at the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, write in the Journal of Higher Education. “ASAP results demonstrate that an effective educational policy can generate returns to the taxpayer that vastly exceed the public investment required.”

“We have known for some time that ASAP offers unparalleled results, graduating two to three times the number of students in three years,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “But this important study verifies what we long believed – that the economic contributions of the program far outweigh the public investment. This makes a compelling case for expansion of this transformational program.”

The article – the first in a peer-reviewed journal evaluating ASAP’s economic impact – explains how the researchers arrived at that estimate: “The returns on investment to the taxpayer include the benefits from higher tax revenues and lower costs of spending on public health, criminal justice, and public assistance. For each dollar of investment in ASAP by taxpayers, the return was $3 to $4. For each additional graduate, the taxpayer gained an amount equal to a certificate of deposit with a value of $146,000 (net of the costs of the investment).”

As a headline in the article put it, ASAP is “a highly productive investment.”

The Teachers College team is not the only independent organization whose findings endorse ASAP’s approach. MDRC, a research group that looked at the program’s effectiveness, randomly assigned CUNY students at three colleges, including those needing remedial help, to either ASAP or the traditional CUNY experience. In 2015, MDRC reported that ASAP nearly doubled the three-year associate-degree completion rate, as well as resulting in higher transfer rates and accumulation of more credits. In a finding that dovetails with the Teachers College study, MDRC found that, because CUNY ASAP generates so many more graduates than the usual college services, the cost per degree is lower, despite the significant investment required to operate the program.

Launched in 2007 as a pilot, CUNY ASAP graduates more than half of its students within three years, more than double the national rate of about 20 percent. Few other programs in the nation can match that accomplishment, and educators elsewhere are taking notice. Replication efforts are well underway at three community colleges in Ohio, and CUNY ASAP is providing technical assistance to Westchester Community College in Valhalla, N.Y., and Skyline College in San Bruno, Ca., to support their efforts for a fall 2018 launch.

ASAP requires full-time study, offers consolidated class schedules and supports transition to baccalaureate study or entry into the workforce. With generous city and state support, it removes financial barriers by waiving any gap between financial aid and the cost of tuition and fees, defrays the cost of textbooks and provides MTA MetroCards. It builds in regular, personalized academic advisement, career counseling and tutoring support for students with remedial needs or who struggle academically.

Since 2007, there have been 10 ASAP cohorts totaling more than 22,000 students across nine CUNY campuses. In the current academic year, ASAP serves more than 15,000 students. In 2014, when ASAP had 4,000 students, the decision was made to scale up to 25,000 total students CUNY-wide by 2018 and to demonstrate its potential with a bold experiment: converting Bronx Community College into an all-ASAP institution for first-time, full-time freshmen.

The Teachers College researchers limited their analysis to estimating the benefit of obtaining an associate degree within three years, but there are also additional benefits and costs associated with the option that many ASAP graduates take to move onto a baccalaureate or higher degree.

The study compared benefits and costs from several perspectives. From the standpoint of overall savings to the city and state it stated: “From a policy perspective, it is important to keep in mind the full magnitude of the returns to the taxpayer by taking into account the highly superior effectiveness of ASAP in comparison with the conventional program (completion rates of about 55 percent for ASAP versus 24 percent for the conventional program, for students meeting ASAP's eligibility requirements when the program was launched in 2007). For every 1,000 enrollees in ASAP, about 549 would be expected to complete the associate degree requirement in three years compared with only about 241 in the conventional program. When converted into overall benefits generated by the 1,000 enrollees, the considerably higher productivity of ASAP in producing associate degrees would provide fiscal benefits to taxpayers of $46 million beyond those of investing an approximately equal amount in the conventional degree program.”

Researchers also looked at the benefits and costs from the standpoint of the University and students: “Although the cost per ASAP student was higher than for the traditional student because of the extra services, the institutional cost for each graduate was less for students in ASAP because of the considerably higher graduation rates for ASAP,” the study found. The researchers determined a total institutional cost per graduate of $59,300 for the Fall 2007 ASAP cohort (assuming a 23-year-old graduate in 2010 dollars), compared with $65,900 for a student in a comparison group.

The researchers arrived at their finding of a $146,200 net benefit to the taxpayer per ASAP graduate by subtracting the $59,300 institutional cost from the $205,500 in gross benefits per additional degree that they estimated that taxpayers would enjoy.

Similarly, the cost borne by ASAP students is less, the researchers determined – $13,100 versus $21,000. Those figures take into consideration earnings that students forgo for their studies and the cost of materials, tuition and transportation, which are counterbalanced by ASAP’s subsidies for tuition, fees, books and transportation.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs of New York City. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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A Conversation on the NYC Film Industry with Julie Menin, Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment

Business Forum Breakfast
Friday, June 9, 8–10 am

WHAT:
Presentation by Julie Menin, commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, on the development of the New York City film industry, with an audience Q&A session to follow. Breakfast will be served.

Free and open to the public, but seating is limited.

Public RSVP deadline is June 6: Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5252, or register online here.

Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background:
Julie Menin has been commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment (MOME) since 2012. In that role, she leads two agencies responsible for an economic sector important to all five boroughs: The Office of Film, Theatre, and Broadcasting oversees the entertainment industry, which contributes almost $9 billion to the city’s economy and employs more than 130,000 New Yorkers, while NYC Media manages the city’s media assets in broadcast television, radio, and cable. Before heading MOME, Menin served for two years as commissioner of the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs.

Menin is well known for promoting the city’s economic revitalization. As a small business owner affected by September 11, she founded and ran the non-profit Wall Street Rising, which helped local companies and organizations apply for government assistance programs that enabled more than 600 of them to stay in operation. She worked with Jane Rosenthal and Robert de Niro to start the Tribeca Film Festival and, through Wall Street Rising, initiated the Art Downtown and Music Downtown events. As chairperson of Community Board 1 for seven years, she helped build new schools, parks, and the World Trade Center Performing Arts Center. Menin has received many public service awards and has been a trustee of numerous arts and public-interest organizations. She earned her BA magna cum laude from Columbia University and her JD at Northwestern University School of Law. She lives in Manhattan with her husband and three children.

Launched in 2005, the QC Business Forum brings together the business community, local government, academia, and students to provide an opportunity for town and gown to interact. Influential leaders in a number of fields serve as keynote speakers at its breakfast and lunchtime lectures, touching on issues vital to the local business community.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Congresswoman Grace Meng Will be Speaker and President’s Medal Recipient at Queens College 93rd Commencement Ceremony, May 26

-- Philosopher, Financier and Alumnus Donald Brownstein and QC Foundation Board Member and Chair of the Kupferberg Center Arts Advisory Board Saul Kupferberg to Receive Honorary Doctorates --

WHAT:
Queens College’s 93rd commencement exercises

WHO:
Over 3,000 degree candidates are expected to attend, including students from the classes of September 2016, February and May 2017, and prospective September 2017 graduates. Total audience expected, including graduates, will number more than 10,000.

DATE:
Friday, May 26, rain or shine

TIME:
9 am

PLACE:
Campus Quadrangle, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY
Directions:           http://www.qc.cuny.edu/directions
Campus map:      http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/directions/2d/Pages/default.aspx

MEDIA SIGN-IN: Table located to right of the stage when facing it. Pick up press kits and programs here, and we will escort you to reserved seating.

MEDIA PARKING IS AVAILABLE: You must enter the campus at Gate 2 on Melbourne Avenue and 150th Street no later than 8 am (the Kissena Boulevard gate will be closed). Please bring press ID.

Flushing, Queens, May 22, 2017—Congresswoman Grace Meng—a Queens native and the first female member of Congress from Queens since the late vice presidential nominee and former Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro—is this year’s commencement speaker and President’s Medal recipient. Described as “a consistent and powerful advocate for the college” by President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, Meng began her association with QC when she represented the 22nd Assembly District for two terms in the New York State Assembly. Now serving her third term in the House of Representatives, representing the Sixth Congressional District of New York, which encompasses west, central, and northeast Queens, Meng is a member of the Appropriations Committee, which is responsible for funding every agency, program, and project within the federal government. Previously, she served on the House Foreign Affairs Committee and the House Small Business Committee.

Donald Brownstein ’65, whose career has spanned academia to Wall Street, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Brownstein enrolled at age sixteen at Queens College, where he earned a BA in philosophy in 1965, and went on to earn a PhD in philosophy from the University of Minnesota in 1969. After teaching philosophy at two universities, he moved into the financial realm, becoming chief investment officer and CEO of Structured Portfolio Management. An innovative hedge fund, the company is known for its mix of traders, academics, and researchers who bring theory to bear on markets and investments. Under Brownstein, it is reliably one of the best-performing hedge funds in the country. In 2012 he established a scholarship fund in the name of one of his most influential teachers, Professor John J. McDermott.

Saul Kupferberg, devoted member of the Queens College Foundation and a founding member and current chair of the Kupferberg Center Arts Advisory Board at Queens College, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. Kupferberg is the son of the late Max and Selma Kupferberg—in whose honor Colden Center was renamed the Kupferberg Center for the Arts—and former vice president of sales and marketing for Kepco, a family-founded and -owned global power supply and electrical equipment company, based in Flushing. As a businessman, philanthropist, and working trustee, Kupferberg has offered extensive service to the college and the community—from keeping good jobs in the borough to supporting the arts and education.

The student speaker is Nina Bakoyiannis, who is graduating summa cum laude with majors in psychology and English. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, she also served as the president of her sorority and editor of Utopia Parkway, the college’s literary journal. Bakoyiannis worked as a research assistant for Professor Renee Goodwin’s study on the psychological impact of smoking during pregnancy, and is a coauthor of a forthcoming article on the findings. She intends to pursue graduate study in clinical psychology.

This year’s outstanding graduates include White House intern Naomi Ducat; U.S. Fulbright recipient Alexander Alvarado; Jeannette K. Watson Fellow Kaitlin McDermott; and two record-setting members—who also happen to be sisters—of the historic 2017 Queens College Knights Women’s Basketball team.

A media studies and psychology major who minored in business, Naomi Ducat served as a White House intern for the Obama administration, working in Vice President Joseph Biden’s Office of Foreign Affairs. Among her duties were conducting background research on subjects assigned by her supervisors, who were advisors to Biden; prioritizing news for Biden’s daily update; and writing arrival reports he would read when he traveled overseas.

Alexander Alvarado will teach English in Malaysia this fall as a recipient of a U.S. Fulbright award. Alvarado is the latest representative of the college’s legacy as a Top Fulbright-producing Institution: Queens College has had multiple Fulbright winners, with a total of 12 graduates receiving the honor in the past three years alone.

Kaitlin McDermott, a history major who attended the Macaulay Honors College at Queens College, recorded oral histories in immigrant communities as part of her research. McDermott will intern with Broadway Housing Communities, a New York City non-profit housing developer committed to providing innovative permanent housing for individuals and families in the greatest need.

Madison Rowland, a media studies major, is the only player in NCAA history (DI, DII or DIII) to officially record career totals of 2,000 points, 1,000 rebounds, 500 steals, 400 assists, and 100 blocks. She finishes her career as first in Queens College Athletics Program history in career points, single-season points and single-season steals, as well as second in assists and fourth in rebounds. Rowland was also named the 2017 NCAA Division II Conference Commissioners Association Ron Lenz National Player of the Year, while earning All-America honors from both the D2CCA and WBCA.

MacKenzie Rowland, a sociology major, exceeded 1,000 points and 1,000 rebounds for her career this season, and was second in the East Coast Conference (ECC) in scoring, first in rebounds, second in blocks and fifth in steals. She finished the season as the DII leader in double-doubles and was named ECC Defensive Player of the Year, while earning first team all-conference, first team All-Met and second team all-region honors.

About Queens College Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


#BCGrad2017: Brooklyn College Is Where Ervin Seytgazi ’17 Discovered His Potential

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2017 share some details of their journeys from students to graduates. Find more student commencement profiles and videos on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2017 hashtag to join the conversation!

Ervin Seytgazi

B.S. in accounting

My academic journey has been one of the best experiences I will probably encounter in my life.

I first attended Kingsborough Community College and was a part of their honors program. I was challenged academically and culturally since I had arrived to the United States from Simferopol, Crimea in the Ukrainian region. I came to the U.S. only two years prior to my admission into the higher education system. I was able to meet wonderful people and explore the country. I've traveled twice to California, Tennessee, and upstate New York and met with Billie Jean King through the Phi Theta Kappa organization I was a part of.

Ervin Seytgazi '17

I enjoyed student life at Brooklyn College the moment I stepped onto its beautiful campus. Watching people relax or play guitars on the quad was a cherry on top of the academic cake.

Brooklyn College is responsible for my career growth. With the help of faculty, and the staff at the Magner Career Center, I was able to land an internship that led to a full-time offer at one of the largest accounting firms in the country, KPMG. During my time at the college, I learned a lot about myself, particularly how to perceive and respect my fellow classmates and myself. That was one of the most important aspects, because it helped me to build strong relationships with other students.

“People skills” was one of the main things I was able to gain attending Brooklyn College. It is crucial to be able to communicate, whether in a class setting, speaking to professor, potential employer, or a loved one. I am very proud to be a part of the Toastmasters Club on campus, where public speaking skills are honed and improved through various extra-curricular workshops.

Looking back to when I first entered the gates of Brooklyn College, I can say for sure that I am now more confident in my abilities and feel exceptionally prepared for the career I am embarking on. Equally important, I made friends on whom I can count in any situation—connections that will last a lifetime.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Meet Guttman’s Valedictorian and Salutatorian for the Class of 2017

Daniel Plastrik

Guttman Community College is proud to announce its Valedictorian, Daniel Plastrik, and Salutatorian,  Miralem Dervisevic, for the 2017 graduating class. Both students embody perseverance, dedication, and a strong desire to succeed and both will continue their studies at four-year colleges in the fall.

Daniel Plastrik is a New Yorker who chose to attend Guttman Community College because of its small, nurturing environment and its central location in the heart of New York City. The 2017 Valedictorian is a Liberal Arts major who is most proud of his participation at Guttman as a co-facilitator for a Deliberative Dialogue forum on internet safety.  He also enjoyed his recent volunteer experience at the New York Public Library, where he assisted in planning and implementing programs geared towards engaging children and young adults with literary works by female authors. Daniel will be transferring to Hunter College this fall. He plans to pursue a bachelor’s degree in film and media studies.

Born in Montenegro, Miralem Dervisevic, the 2017 Salutatorian, immigrated to New York with his family when he was 5. He was raised in the Bronx and attended Marie Curie High School.

Miralem is the first in his family to graduate from college. He credits his parents for instilling in him a passion for education. At Guttman, he has majored in Business Administration, and he will study international business at Baruch College. He is grateful to Guttman for giving him such a great start with his undergraduate education.

Miralem Dervisevic


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of May 22, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you to all of our students, teachers and families who made last week’s first ever K-12 Curriculum Showcase a great success. It was wonderful to see high level demonstrations of student learning exhibited throughout our K-12 community.
As always, our calendar and updates below provide additional information about our week ahead.

 

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,
Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

Grades K-5 Announcements:

May 24th and 25th

  • The 4th Grade Science Performance Task is a 60 minute hands-on science task.
  • 4th grade students will take the exam on either Wednesday or Thursday.

Grades 6-12 Announcements:
NEST+m has been selected by NY State to conduct “Regents Field Testing,” a non-evaluative assessment of Regents Exam questions that is scheduled to take place this week. Please direct Regents field testing questions to AP’s Greg Farrell or Keshia Souffrant.
May 23rd

  • Common Core English Field Test – 2 Hour Administration, 11th Grade students, Periods 4-6
May 25th
  • US History & Gov’t Field Test – 40 minute administration, 11h Grade Students & 8th Grade Students, Period 1
  •  CC Geometry Field Test – 40 minute administration, (All Geometry Students – from Grades 8, 9, 10), Period 5
 A reminder re: School based norms and expectations:

Other Special Events in Our Week Ahead

Tuesday May 23
  • 10th Grade Family Meeting re: College Process, 8:30am, Library
Wednesday May 24th
  • Upper Grades Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am, Cafeteria
  • 4th Grade State Science Performance Task – Day one
  • Upper Grades Spring Concert, 6pm, Auditorium
Thursday May 25th
  • Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am, Cafeteria
  • 4th Grade State Science Performance Task – Day two
  • 12th Grade Student Panel re: College Application Process for 11th Grade Students, 3:30 pm, Library
  • Middle Grades Spring Art and Music Festival. Art show starts at 5 pm, Music concert starts at 6 pm, Auditorium
Friday May 26th:
  • Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am, Cafeteria. Ms. Gerstein will present on our K-2 science program.
  • 4th Grade State Science Performance Task (Make Up Testing) Day
  • School Spirit Day, Show your colors! All Students & Faculty are Encouraged to wear NEST+m Spirit Wear.

Looking ahead
5/29: Memorial Day: Schools closed.
5/31: Evening information session for current NEST+m 7th grade Families re: NEST+m Upper Grades (HS) and HS Articulation Process
6/1: 5:30pm, Special Education orientation for incoming Students and Families (Middle Grades & Upper Grades)
6/5: 9:00 am. Internet Safety Parent Presentation by the Manhattan DA’s office

6/5: 5:30pm, Orientation for all incoming Upper Grades Students and Families

6/6: 5:30pm, Orientation for all incoming Middle Grades Students and Families
6/6: 7:15pm, Following MG Orientation and open to all NEST+m families, Author and Psychotherapist Sean Grover speaks about how parents can support the needs of adolescents navigating academics, friendships, families and identity.
6/7 & 6/9: 6th Grade Original Play Festival, 5:30pm, NEST+m Auditorium, Free Admission.
6/8:  “Anniversary Day”, No school for students.
6/12: Last Day of Instruction Grades 9-12. Clerical Day—No school for K-8 Students.
6/13: 8:45 am. Orientation for all incoming Lower Grades Students and Families
6/13-6/22:  Regents Week
6/21: 5th Grade “Stepping Up/Graduation” Ceremony at NEST+m, 8:30am
6/22: 12th Grade Graduation The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 9:00am
6/22: 8th Grade Stepping Up Ceremony, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 12:30pm


Professor Discusses Best Practices for Writing Assignments to Engage Students

Ria Banerjee, Assistant Professor of English

Ria Banerjee, Assistant Professor of English, discusses how a good assignment for a typical writing course should meet students at different levels of academic skills and engagement in The Hechinger Report (May16, 2017).


#BCGrad2017: Accepted to 11 Medical Schools, Chelsea Batista ’17 Reaches the Next Step in a Lifelong Dream of Becoming a Physician

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2017 share some details of their journeys from students to graduates. Read first-person accounts of what they learned both in and out of the classroom, and where they go from here. Find more student commencement profiles and videos on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2017 hashtag to join the conversation!

Chelsea Batista

B.S. in biology

I started as a freshman knowing exactly what I wanted to do with my life: become a physician.

Chelsea Batista '17

I am one of the lucky ones where I found my path early in life and have stayed steady on it. One of the most important things I learned about myself is that no obstacle can deter me for long. As an overzealous freshman, I joined several clubs, as well as a sorority, and started hunting for a job, all during my first semester in college. I didn't do as well as I hoped, but instead of giving up and dropping everything, I figured out what I did wrong, fixed it, and continued on.

No matter how many times I fell, it was never a thought in my head to not get back up. It was an instinct to jump up and keep running. When the academic side of things got hard, I made sure not to let go of my extracurricular ventures, because having ways to do things I love and unwind was important to me. My junior year—one of the most difficult years for a pre-medical student—I held an executive position in my sorority, worked a part-time job as a BC Navigator on campus, volunteered in the emergency department at Woodhull Medical Center, and managed to ace my classes.

The biggest revelation I had, looking back on my four years at Brooklyn College, is that I have learned how to work well under pressure. High intensity situations and stressful work environments only stimulate me to focus and remain calm in the midst of chaos, which I believe will be an extremely valuable skill as a future physician. Brooklyn College gave me the genuine college experience I had always longed for. But, it also provided me with a strong support system and educational foundation, which has helped me achieve above and beyond the goals I have set for myself.

I have been accepted into 11 medical schools, with several full tuition scholarships, and many amazing opportunities before me. That is, in part, due to me having the resources from the Macaulay Honors College and from Brooklyn College. I am a better person, a more focused student, and a more knowledgeable member of my community because of my time at Brooklyn College.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


#BCGrad2017: Deanna Ng ’17 M.S. Lands a Job With Morgan Stanley Thanks to the Magner Career Center

By ROBERT JONES JR.

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2017 share some details of their journeys from students to graduates. Find more student commencement profiles and videos on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2017 hashtag to join the conversation!

Deanna Ng

M.S. in business administration

My past five years at Brooklyn College have been the most fulfilling years of my life.

I've spent four years here as an undergraduate student majoring in economics and psychology, with a minor in neuroscience. This past year, I've been working to complete my master's in business administration.

Deanna Ng '17 M.S.

During my time at the college, I've made a countless numbers of friends, had new experiences, interacted with different clubs and organizations, and made lasting connections with faculty. I've learned not only information to apply to my career, but I've also discovered who I am as a person because the college has given me an open and understanding environment to be different.

The Magner Career Center, through its amazing alumni mentorship program, has also not only helped me to obtain my current internship with Morgan Stanley, but it has aided me in the process of understanding and accepting my full-time offer at the company. I start after graduation on June 5.

Looking back, I need to thank Brooklyn College's undergraduate freshman orientation staff for their hard work. It was at orientation where everything started for me. I joined clubs, interacted with current and new students, and truly became involved on the campus. It was also the day I met the love of my life, even though we didn't know it until a semester later. I owe so much to the Brooklyn College community for where I am in my life right now and for that I am forever grateful.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan

River networks on Mars, Earth, and Titan. From top to bottom, images span ~100 km on Mars, ~2000 km on Earth, and ~400 km on Titan. Credit: Benjamin Black, adapted from images from NASA Viking, NASA/Visible Earth, and NASA/JPL/Cassini RADAR team.

The surfaces of Earth, Mars, and Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, have all been scoured by rivers. Yet despite this similarity and the amazingly Earth-like landscapes of Titan complete with valleys, lakes, and mountains, researchers led by City College of New York geologist Benjamin Black report new evidence that the origins of the topography there and on Mars are different from on Earth.

In their paper “Global drainage patterns and the origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars, and Titan,” published in the latest issue of “Science,” the team identifies plate tectonics on Earth as one key difference.

Plate tectonics is the theory that Earth's crust is made up of large, moving pieces called plates. The relative motions, regeneration, and recycling of these plates continuously reshape the surface of the Earth, in the process uplifting topography in some areas much more than others. As mountain ranges jut up, they can divert rivers as they flow toward the sea.

While the origins of the topography on Titan remain somewhat mysterious, Black’s research team discovered that the rivers there, likely carved by liquid methane, have not been as thoroughly rerouted as rivers on Earth. “It’s important to realize that almost every aspect of Earth’s surface has been shaped by plate tectonics,” Black says. “So there is nowhere we can look to see what landscapes would look like without plate tectonics. That’s where Mars and Titan come in. We can use these three worlds as natural experiments. They are like siblings that have followed different life paths.”

“Before the discovery of plate tectonics, there were all kinds of theories for the origins of Earth’s topography,” Black adds. “What really fires my imagination is thinking about the sheer possibilities even in our solar system. One of the big takeaways from our research is that each world seems to strike its own balance in terms of the processes that are shaping the surface we see.”

The research team also included Taylor Perron (MIT), Douglas Hemingway

(UC Berkeley), Elizabeth Bailey (Caltech), Francis Nimmo (UC Santa Cruz) and Howard Zebker (Stanford University).

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Students Share Stories of Triumph With CUNY TV

Nineteen CUNY valedictorians and student graduation speakers met in a CUNY TV studio to talk with Tinabeth Pina, the host of the award-winning show “Study with the Best,” about the impact that their CUNY educations had on their lives. Their stories of personal and academic challenge and triumph will be compressed into a video to be shown at the June Board of Trustees meeting.

“Thanks for all you do for the City University of New York in shinning the light so bright for what this great institution is,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken who met with the students during the taping.

The students are, front row from left: Caitlin Larsen, Baruch College, Palwasha Syar, College of Staten Island, Stephin Jose, Macaulay Honors College, Bebi Rajendra, York College and Daniela Mikhaylov, Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College.

Middle row, from left: Nina Bakoyiannis, Queens College, Giuseppe (Joey) Fattorusso, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Jasmine Rodriguez, Hostos, Community College, Natalie Alcide, New York City College of Technology (City Tech), Kevin Lamonte Jones, Brooklyn College and Razieh Arabi, Queensborough Community College.

Back row, from left: Rina Schiller, Hunter College, James Street, Lehman College, Daniel Chan, CUNY School of Professional Studies, Daniel Plastrik, Guttman Community College, Haris Khan, Queensborough Community College and Olasumbomi Ayomide Efuniyi, Borough of Manhattan Community College.

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Orientation for Incoming 6th Grade and 7th Grade Families

Dear Students and Families,

Congratulations on your acceptance to NEST+m for the 2017-18 School Year! We are so excited to welcome you into our school community.

At NEST+m, intellectualism, inclusivity, collaboration and exploration within and beyond our school community enable our students to lead lives filled with learning, discovery and purpose.

To best support your transition to NEST+m we will be holding our Orientation Day for incoming 6th and 7th Grade students / families on June 6th, 2017 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm in our school auditorium.

It is essential that both our incoming students and parents / guardians are in attendance.

Following this special event, author and Psychotherapist, Sean Grover, will deliver a talk in our auditorium about how parents can support the needs of adolescents navigating academics, friendships, families and identity. Interested parents may stay and attend this talk from 7:15pm – 8:30pm.

We look forward to seeing you soon.

Best regards,
Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Special Orientation for Families of Incoming Students with Disabilities (Grades 6-12)

Dear Students and Families,

Congratulations on your acceptance to NEST+m for the 2017-18 School Year! We are so excited to welcome you into our school community.

At NEST+m, intellectualism, inclusivity, collaboration and exploration within and beyond our school community enable our students to lead lives filled with learning, discovery and purpose.

In addition to your grade specific orientation, this is an opportunity to learn about the specifics of NEST+m’s Special Education Programming, including ICT, SETSS, 504s, IEPs and Related Services. To best support your child’s transition to NEST+m we will be holding this additional Orientation Day for incoming students with disabilities and their families on June 1st, 2017 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm in our school auditorium.

Please bring a copy of your student’s current IEP or 504 as well.

We look forward to seeing you soon.

Best regards,

Mark Berkowitz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Upper Grades Open House for Current NEST+m 7th Grade Students & Families

 

Dear NEST+m 7th Grade Students and Families,

We are pleased to announce a special Upper Grades Open House for current NEST+m 7th Grade students and their families on May 31st from 5:30pm – 7:30pm in our auditorium.

The evening will include a sneak preview of the High School Articulation process and presentations about the academic, social and athletic programs that make our Upper Grades special.

We look forward to seeing you at this special event,

Best regards,

Mark Berkowitz


City Colleges announces 2017 commencement speaker

Vivek Tiwary

Vivek Tiwary, the Tony Award-winning Broadway producer and New York Times best-selling author, is the guest speaker at The City College of New York’s 171st Commencement Exercises on Friday, June 2. The ceremony starts at 9 a.m. on CCNY’s South Campus Great Lawn, 135th St. and Convent Ave., Manhattan.

The Class of 2017 comprises approximately 3,820 students. Of these 2,894 are receiving undergraduate degrees and 926 graduate degrees.

Tiwary returns to City College after delivering its 2017 Samuel Rudin Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture in March.

He founded the multiplatform arts and entertainment company, Tiwary Entertainment Group, and his Broadway productions have won a combined 25 Tony Awards and over 44 Tony nominations. They include “Green Day’s American Idiot,” “A Raisin in the Sun,” and Mel Brooks’ “The Producers.”

Mr. Tiwary’s graphic novel, “The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story,” based on the untold life story of the Beatles’ manager, won a number of prestigious literary awards, including the Will Eisner Comic Industry Award for Best Reality-Based Work and a Harvey Awards for Best Original Graphic Novel. It was added to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives Permanent Collection. As executive producer, he will adapt “The Fifth Beatle” into a multi-part TV event series with unprecedented access to Beatles music.

He is a graduate of both the Wharton School of Business and the University of Pennsylvania’s College of Arts and Sciences.

CCNY will also present honorary degrees to three honorees for their professional accomplishment. The recipients are:

  • David Diaz, CCNY Class of 1965 and an Emmy Award-winning reporter at WNBC/Channel 4 and WCBS/Channel 2 in New York during a distinguished journalism career;
  • Robert E. Kahn, Class of 1960 and a pioneering electrical engineer considered a “father of the Internet”;
  • Deborah Meier, public educator, writer and advocate acclaimed as a leader of the school reform movement in the U.S.

Click here for the latest information on City College’s 171st commencement exercises.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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CUNY Law Celebrates the Class of 2017

At CUNY Law’s 32nd commencement held on May 12, Sherrilyn Ifill urged the 91 graduates to stand up and protect public life and institutions.

“All we have to do is go to our battle stations and prepare to fight for the soul of this democracy.  That’s all. That’s kind of a big job.  I know.  I know.  But it is what we signed up for,” she said.

Ifill is the president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. and served as the commencement speaker. She shared some of her personal story, namely that 37 years ago, she sat in the same seat as the audience, for her high school graduation ceremony, also held at Colden Auditorium at Queens College. She described the impact that the investment in public institutions had on her life as a child of Barbadian immigrants with nine other children, growing up in Queens.

“Those public schools, public parks, public transportation, public universities force us to interact with each other and really see one another and see our destinies as interconnected.”

Sherrilyn Ifill

She noted that the right to vote is a key aspect of public life that needs protection.

“I want to encourage you to fight for the maintenance of all other aspects of public life, not just in this city but in this country that give working class people the chance to improve their lives and be in a position to see the humanity in one another.  Whether it’s the public university, the public park or the public square, fight for it.”

Ifill also had some practical advice for the graduates such as to exclusively focus on studying for the bar exam for the next couple of weeks, enrich their perspectives by working outside of NYC at some point, drink lots of water, dance, read novels and visit their families often.

Ifill received an honorary Doctors of Law from CUNY Law and shared the stage with Ann Cammett ’00 who received the Outstanding Professor Award, and Shoshana M. Brown ‘17, who was selected as the student speaker by her peers.

Ann Cammett ’00 honored with the Outstanding Professor Award

In her speech, Brown noted that CUNY Law gave her a chance when other schools wouldn’t. Prior to entering CUNY Law, she was part of the Pipeline to Justice program which prepares individuals underrepresented in the legal profession for law school.

“For many of us, today marks the day when we become the first law school graduates in our families,” Brown said. “Together we are breaking the mold of centuries of oppression as women, as people of color, as gender non-conforming individuals and as LGBT people. We are opening the gateway of a law school education for our children, our grandchildren and the many future generation of non-traditional law school students to come.”

Student Speaker Shoshana Brown ’17

Brown pointed out numerous practical ways in which the Class of 2017 has already fought for justice. She recognized the considerable challenges that lie before them at this time but reminded her classmates that they are boosted by the trailblazers before them.

“We are anchored by the bravery and resilience of the leaders who have come before us and we are carving an umistakable path for the next generation of fighters to follow. We see the humanity in people and we can invoke this vision into the law. The time is now when we must not be afraid to tear down the darkness with our legal arguments and our advocacy on behalf of our clients.”

Class of 2017

The enormous need for effective public interest lawyering and the ability of CUNY Law graduates to fill this need was a sentiment echoed throughout the 2017 graduation ceremonies. At the Lawyer’s Pledge the night before, Tracey Dorval, a staff member selected for the Community Service Award reminded the graduates that they are capable of meeting the challenges before them, while Professor Ramzi Kassem, selected by the graduates as a Distinguished Public Interest Leader urged them to “seek allies, not admirers.”

Professor Ramzi Kassem selected as a Distinguished Public Interest Leader by the Class of 2017

Speaking to her classmates, Kathryn Joseph ’17, recipient of the Dave Fields Prize for Student Achievement and Leadership noted that “now is a moment when your background in public interest, your clinical experience, your willingness to advocate, to appear in court on behalf of people who would not have anyone to advocate for them, if not for you, will be called upon.”

The Class of 2017 takes the Lawyer’s Pledge

Judge Ronald Ellis who led the Class of 2017 in taking the Lawyer’s Pledge when they first came to law school in 2014 and now again, when they are ready to enter the legal profession expressed confidence that their time at CUNY Law has equipped them with “the strength and courage to make the difficult decisions ahead.”

Watch the video of commencement

Watch the video of the Lawyer’s Pledge


CCNY’s BIC team wins Gold Pencil again at One Show

BIC Team VIDEALL at One Show

2017 GOLD Pencil winners Yulia Lesnichaya, Tung-Han Lin, Enmanuel Vargas and Surabhi Govindarajan.

For the second year in a row, a team from City College of New York’s Master’s Program in Branding + Integrated Communications (BIC) is a GOLD Pencil Winner at The ONE Show’s 2017 Young Ones Competition, one of the most prestigious student advertising, interactive and design competitions in the industry. Enmanuel Vargas, Yulia Lesnichaya, Surabhi Govindarajan and Tung-Han Lin won for their partnership proposal “VIDEALL.”

A plug-in, VIDEALL is the product of the partnership between Google’s Chrome browser and Microsoft’s Sign Language Translator. It converts audio, subtitles or closed captioning from online video into sign language, providing digital access to 360 million hearing impaired.

Winners are chosen from a large, selective pool of international submission—from Milan to Mumbai, Rio de Janeiro to Stockholm—by a jury of top industry professionals and educators.

A second BIC team, comprised of Sean Feol-Baugh, Kacy Charles, Fidel Frias, and Joseph Yoo, was a MERIT award winner for “Three to Free,” a one-of-a-kind partnership between five of the world’s largest telecoms companies to help stop human trafficking.

“BIC bested more established programs to bring home the Gold, “ BIC Program Director Nancy Tag said. “This year, four multi-disciplinary teams made it to the finals. It’s quite amazing. We’re thankful to BIC Instructor Jason Stefanik who once again led BICsters to victory.”

The One Show awards the best advertising from the around the world and is widely regarded as the industry’s equivalent to the Oscars for creative excellence in advertising and branding.

About The City College of New York


Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Guttman among the Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges for 2017

Guttman Community College is among 11 institutions selected by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education as the 2017 Most Promising Places to Work in Community Colleges. The findings are published in the May 18, 2017, edition of the magazine.

Through partnership with the Center for Higher Education Enterprise (CHEE) at Ohio State University and the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development (NISOD), Diverse is able to present this important research to the public.

With a focus on workplace diversity, staffing practices, and work environment, the CHEE research team used a web-based survey approach to examine categories such as family friendliness, salary/benefits, and professional development opportunities.

The 11 most promising places to work in community colleges (in alphabetical order) include:

  • Blinn College
  • El Centro College
  • Montgomery County Community College
  • Mountain View College
  • Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology
  • Pierpont Community and Technical College
  • Seward County Community College – Area Technical School
  • South Florida State College
  • Southwest Virginia Community College
  • Stella and Charles Guttman Community College
  • Tallahassee Community College

Diverse: Issues In Higher Education is the nation’s only news magazine dedicated exclusively to diversity issues in higher education.

NISOD is pleased to join Diverse: Issues in Higher Education and the Center for Higher Education Enterprise at The Ohio State University in recognizing Guttman Community College’s best-in-class student and staff recruitment and retention practices, inclusive learning and working environments, and meaningful community service and engagement opportunities. NISOD applauds member colleges committed to serving as advocates for equal opportunities for their students, staff, and communities.


#BCGrad2017: Cheyanne Clarke ’17 Turned Adversity in Achievement

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2017 share some details of their journeys from students to graduates. Read first-person accounts of what they learned both in and out of the classroom, and where they go from here. Find more student commencement profiles and videos on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2017 hashtag to join the conversation!

Cheyanne Clarke

B.A. in psychology

Cheyanne Clarke '17

My academic journey was a rather stressful but rewarding one.

I worked as hard as I possibly could in high school—getting top grades, becoming involved in volunteer work and student government—to be able to get into my top college choice. When I got accepted, I knew my hard work wouldn't go to waste. But when I found out that my dream college was no longer an option due to my single mother's inability to help pay for me after receiving a lower than expected financial aid package, I felt heartbreak like I've never known before. I found myself walking the halls of a community college my first semester while all my friends and peers were away having the time of their lives away from home. I was devastated.

But I had to decide for myself, "Do I want to sulk and keep holding on to the hurt of my wasted efforts or do I make the most of this path I'm on?" And I chose the latter and transferred to Brooklyn College. During my first two years at the college, I got involved in my campus honors program, getting on the Dean's List every semester, taking on leadership roles like vice president of the honors club, and enrolling in only honors courses.

At the end of my four years, I learned to take the cards that have been dealt for me and make the most out of it. I had to learn what it meant to truly trust in God and know that his plans for me will always be more effective than the plans I have for myself. I learned how to work hard even in times of trouble. I learned how to sacrifice time to get what I truly wanted.

While in college, I worked three jobs just to be able to afford the part of my tuition that wasn't covered. I worked countless nights without sleep or much support so that I'd be able to say "I did it!" The road wasn't easy. I lost many friends along the way; I lost sleep and actually had to attend college an extra semester, despite my hard and consistent efforts. But I am more resilient than I've ever been and I'm a go-getter! I do whatever it takes to succeed without expecting any handouts along the way. I made it through four long years with the intrinsic motivation it truly takes to get to the finish line. Thanks to Brooklyn College, I am now a woman who is more in love with learning and evolving than I've ever been and have learned to do it in style and with grace.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


CCNY Grad Rausan Borujerdi wins top foreign service fellowship

Rausan Borujerdi, a 2016 graduate of the Macaulay Honors College at CCNY, is a Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship winner.

Rausan Borujerdi, a 2016 graduate of the Macaulay Honors College at The City College of New York, is the recipient of a Thomas R. Pickering Graduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship. The political science major is one of 20 stellar graduates nationwide selected for the program, which prepares candidates to become members of the U.S. Foreign Service.

Hundreds of applicants from over 270 colleges and universities competed for the fellowship managed and funded by the U.S. Department of State and administered by The Washington Center.

Fellows receive up to $37,500 in annual financial support toward a full-time master’s degree program in a field related to international affairs and diplomacy. They also participate in one domestic and one international internship. Employment in the Foreign Service follows upon completion of the program and meeting Foreign Service entry requirements.

Born in New York to Iranian-American parents, Borujerdi will attend Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs this fall. She will study international security with a specialization in the Middle East.

At City College, Borujerdi traveled to the Dominican Republic as a Colin Powell School Partner for Change Fellow at CCNY. She also participated in the   U.S. Foreign Service Internship Program. She interned in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State in summer 2014 and at the U.S. Embassy in Bahrain in summer 2015.

Borujerdi is the second City College graduate to win a Pickering Fellowship since 2014, when Oluwadamisi “Kay” Atanda was a recipient.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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President Cruz Addresses Washington Policy Conference

Lehman President José Luis Cruz took part in an important educational panel in Washington D.C. last Thursday, discussing and debating how to translate America’s perception of higher education and economic mobility into policy.

The panel entitled “Diving into the Data: Translating America’s Perceptions Into Policy,” was organized by New America, a non-partisan think tank that recently surveyed 1,600 Americans about their opinions on the country’s higher education system. A link to the video is available here.

On the panel, Cruz conveyed his hopes and concerns facing the country’s public higher education system. He talked about Lehman’s high economic mobility rate (fourth in the nation according to a study published in The New York Times), the College’s goal to double its credentials to 90,000 by 2030, and how cuts in government funding are especially problematic for public colleges and universities.

“It is important for [policymakers] to realize that two-year and four-year public sector institutions are really the ones that are disproportionately serving students in the U.S., particularly low-income students and students of color,” said President Cruz. “For our nation to be secure and prosperous moving forward, they have to start looking at these two- and four-year institutions and providing us the resources we need.”

President Cruz’s fellow panelists were Cheryl Oldham, vice president of education policy, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Scott Ralls, president, Northern Virginia Community College; and Deborah Santiago, chief operating officer and vice president for policy, Excelencia in Education. The moderator was Rob Nabors, director of U.S. policy, advocacy, and communications, at The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The panel was part of New America’s public release of a report entitled “Varying Degrees: How America Perceives Higher Education.” The report includes a few institutional profiles of innovative and effective higher education programs, among which Lehman’s Adult Degree Program (ADP) is highlighted. A link to the ADP profile is available here.


Another Season of High Honors for Hunter-Educated Scientists: Celebrating Six Recipients of NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

Hunter congratulatesAnother Season of High Honors for Hunter-Educated Scientists: Celebrating Six Recipients of NSF Graduate Research Fellowships the four recent graduates and two graduating seniors whose work has just won major funding from the National Science Foundation. For the next three years, NSF Graduate Research Fellowships will support the doctoral studies and independent research of these outstanding young scientists:

Munazza Alam ’16 – now at Harvard pursuing her PhD in astrophysics, Alam is exploring the atmospheres of planets that orbit distant stars. Read more.

Dina Buitrago ’17 – a biology major headed to a doctoral program in pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacogenomics at the University of California, San Francisco, Buitrago is investigating the effects of genetic mutations on the body’s response to drugs for hard-to-treat diseases. Read more.

Hila Tzipora Chase ’15 – now at the University of Montana pursuing her PhD in organismal biology, Chase is conducting research on the biomechanics and skeletal changes that enable flight in today’s birds and their dinosaurian ancestors. Read more.

Hala Haddad ’17 – a psychology major headed to a doctoral program in neuroscience at Brown University, Haddad is studying the impact of the environment on brain structure and motor development. Read more.

Thomas Hart ’15 – now at Rockefeller University pursuing his PhD in neuroscience, Hart is examining how the organization of ant brains enables ants to communicate. Read more.

Lashawn Peña ’15 – now at Stanford pursuing his PhD immunology, Peña is looking for the ways cancer cells can be reprogrammed into immune cells. Read more.

Past NSF Fellows include eight Nobel laureates and Google founder Sergey Brin.


Baruch Traders, Cool and Disciplined, Slice Up the Top-Name Competition  

For the Baruch College students, it’s a familiar scene: A trading floor buzzing with adrenaline, the sound of furious tapping on keyboards, shouts of “Yay” and “Oh, my God” as millions are gained and lost in the securities market.

But when these Baruch students exit the trading floor, they leave as profit-making winners. Out-maneuvering schools including Columbia and Princeton, Baruch’s trading teams took the top slot in three recent prestigious, student trading competitions where the millions were imaginary, but the stakes high.

“The proud legacy of CUNY students counts 13 Nobel Prizes and innumerable honors for historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said.  “By now, that CUNY students can compete successfully with the best and brightest from some of the world’s most highly regarded universities should be a surprise to no one.  But that in no way diminishes our enormous pride in these extraordinarily talented young people and the work of the faculty, administrators and staff at Baruch.  Congratulations to all on a job exceedingly well done.”

The Baruch trading teams’ most recent victory was in April, when a four-student team from the undergraduate Baruch Traders Club, which started two years ago, won first place in the fifth annual, University of Chicago Midwest Trading Competition, beating 29 teams from schools including Columbia, Dartmouth, M.I.T., Northwestern, New York University, Princeton and Chicago.

The all-day event, held at the University of Chicago, is the nation’s premier algorithmic trading competition, attracting undergraduates from top schools in Canada and the U.S.

At the events, teams compete in fast-paced simulated trading that challenges the technical and programming abilities of the students, who receive “cases” and trading rules in advance so they can devise strategies and codes before they hit the trading floor.

In the Chicago contest, Baruch’s team – Yifan Hu ’19, studying financial mathematics; Jaime Abbariao ’17, math; Bell Chen ’17, math; and Dmitriy Treyger ’17, statistics and quantitative modeling – won both rounds of Options Market Making and placed fourth in the Pairs Trading case.

In February, four graduate students from Baruch’s Master of Science in Financial Engineering program – the top program of its kind in the country – joined by two undergraduates who were among the winners of the Traders@MIT competition in November 2016, scored a third victory for Baruch at the University of Toronto’s 14th   annual Rotman International Trading Competition.

The Rotman, says Dan Stefanica, co-director of the Baruch program, is the “unofficial world championship of academic trading.” The win, over 51 institutions including Columbia, Carnegie Mellon, and University of Toronto, marked the second consecutive victory for Baruch following its record-breaking success in 2016. Baruch first won the top Rotman prize in 2012. This year’s winning students were Bell Chen ’17, Hongshan Chu, Qinkai Mao, Dimitriy Treyger ’17, Zhaoyue (Robert) Wei, and Gongshun (Gordon) Yin.

November 2016 saw another win for the undergraduates. Three two-person teams from the Baruch Traders Club swept the Ninth Annual Traders@MIT Fall Intercollegiate Competition, placing first, second and third against more than 90 students from 12 schools including M.I.T., Harvard and Yale. The winning Baruch teams in the M.I.T. contest were first place, Bell Chen '17 and Kevin Cheng '17; second, Raymond Wong ’17 and Lirek Kulik ’18; and third, Dmitriy Treyger ’17 and Mike Szczepankiewicz ’17.

The Baruch Traders Club was created in April 2015. Its faculty adviser, Jarrod Pickens, a math lecturer who has coached the undergraduate and graduate-student teams to success, said, “It just goes to show how dedicated and prepared our students were, and how well they were able to stick to the strategy that they developed."

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs of New York City. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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CCNY-led team breaks down social networking behavior

New big-data analytics by a City College of New York-led team suggests that both an individual’s economic status and how they are likely to react to issues and policies can be inferred by their position in social networks.  The study could be useful in maximizing the effects of large-scale economic stimulus policies.

A team led by City College physicist Hernan A. Makse was legally granted access to two massive big datasets: all the phone calls of the entire population of Mexico for three months and the banking information of a subset of people. All the data, approximately 110 million phone calls and 500,000 bank clients, was anonymous with no names.

“It is commonly believed that patterns of social ties affect individuals' economic status, said Makse, whose research interest includes the theoretical understanding of complexity. “We analyzed these two large-scale sources – the telecommunications and financial data of a whole country's population. Our results showed that an individual's location, measured as the optimal collective influence to the structural integrity of the social network, is highly correlated with personal economic status.”

The social network patterns of influence observed mimicked the patterns

of economic inequality. For pragmatic use and validation, Makse and his colleagues carried out a marketing campaign that showed a three-fold increase in response rate by targeting individuals identified by their social network metrics as compared to random targeting.

Makse’s collaborators included Shaojun Luo and Flaviano Morone from CCNY’s Levich Institute, and Matias Travizano and Carlos Sarraute from Grandata Labs in San Francisco.

Their paper, entitled: "Inferring Personal Economic Status from Social Network Location," appears in the journal “Nature Communication.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Landscape architecture student is Olmsted Scholar finalist

Ruth Nervig

M. Arch major Ruth Nervig is the 2017 National Olmsted Scholars Program finalist.

Ruth Nervig, an M. Arch major at The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at The City College of New York, is a 2017 National Olmsted Scholars Program finalist. The honor is for her thesis project on drinking water and hydraulic infrastructure in southern Senegal. The Olmsted Program is the premier national award and recognition program for landscape architecture students.

Nervig first became interested in landscape architecture as a Peace Corps Volunteer teaching sustainable agriculture techniques in rural Senegal. For her thesis project, Nervig walked an east-west transect through a rapidly urbanizing city, mapping seasonal and spatial variations in water access and hydraulic infrastructure.

“I worked with another American MLA student and a Senegalese farmer to establish the survey scope, route and questions, and I carried out a survey in the city over January,” said Nervig, who designed a soft infrastructure network that preserves the connection to the hydrologic cycle in that city. “The thesis project is based around the responses and observations that I made on that trip.”

Her long-term plan after graduating this June is to teach in West Africa and introduce landscape architecture to students through a curriculum that she hopes to develop.

“CCNY has challenged me to think broadly; I can work towards changing the dialogue about climate change and human settlements as urbanization rates increase in the future,” she said.

About The City College of New York


Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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2017 Student Awards and Recognition Ceremony

Honors List students 2016-2017.

On May 11 Guttman Community College held its third annual Student Awards & Recognition Ceremony to honor outstanding academic achievement, leadership, and community engagement. The event was hosted by Charles H. Pryor, II, Dean of Student Engagement, with student performances by Angel Rodrigues, Khali James, and Onasis Cirineo.

AWARD PRESENTATIONS

Beta Phi Gamma Phi Theta Kappa

  • Nanci Arevalo
  • Tenzin Choeyang
  • Billy Corporan
  • Hannia Delgado
  • Miralem Dervisevic
  • Phaedra Dimitriou
  • Marcos Fermin Lopez
  • Alexa Henry
  • Suzanne Herrera
  • Yahdira Ixcoy
  • Mamassa Jabbi
  • Andrea Larios
  • Michelle Mears-Harry
  • Tahir Mitchell
  • Erika Pacas
  • Natacha Peguero
  • Daniel Plastrik
  • Sorabegim Raimova
  • Emerald Sanjurjo
  • Jessica Urena
  • Mildrian Villar
  • Edwin Wu

PTK USA Today All-Academic Team Members

  • Daniel Plastrik
  • Jessica  Urena

Student Research

  • Gabrielle Blevins
  • Leonardo Cedillo
  • Onasis Cirineo
  • Billy Corporan
  • Laura Feliz
  • Marcos Fermin Lopez
  • Anderson German
  • Shenice Greene
  • Anaisa Herandez
  • Miguel Hidalgo Almonte
  • Yahdira Ixcoy
  • Dwayne McCallum
  • Tahir Mitchell
  • Erika Pacas
  • Brandon Ramirez

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Leadership Award

  • Onasis Cirineo
  • Jessica Urena

Guttman Community College Foundation Leadership Award

  • Tasreen Rahman
  • Kareem Small

Guttman Community College Foundation Award for Outstanding Community Engagement
Marcos Fermin Lopez

Dean of Students Award
Phileshia Partridge

Student Honors List 2016-2017 and Student Group Recognition

Women of GRIT 2016-2017.

 


City Tech Professor Receives CUNY Feliks Gross Award

City Tech congratulates Professor Viviana Acquaviva of the Physics Department who was selected to receive CUNY’s Feliks Gross Award. The Feliks Gross Awards are presented each year to assistant professors “in recognition of outstanding research, or potential for such, in the humanities or sciences, including social and life sciences.” Professor Acquaviva received an honorarium and a plaque at a ceremony at the CUNY Graduate Center on April 27.

l to r: Vazquez-Poritz, Acquaviva, and Provost Bonne August.

In nominating Professor Acquaviva, Dean Justin Vazquez-Poritz noted her outstanding research in astrophysics. “Her work on determining the physical properties of galaxies has relied on her expertise in a number of different fields, including astrophysics, advanced statistical methods and machine learning.” said Vazquez-Poritz. “The novel techniques and sophisticated tools that she has developed has led to a fundamentally new understanding of the evolution of galaxies, including the surprising discovery that galaxies can give rise to new generations of galaxies which contain younger stars. Professor Acquaviva’s work is internationally renowned, as evidenced by more than 4,000 total citations that includes five famous papers with more than 250 citations each.”
 
Along with Professor Giovanni Ossola, Professor Acquaviva developed the recently approved Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Computational Physics, which will be inaugurated this fall.   


New York City Chief Technology Officer Miguel A. Gamiño to Deliver Commencement Address at City Tech

City Tech’s 77th Commencement ceremony will take place on June 5, 2017, 5:30 p.m., Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. City Tech will celebrate more than 2,900 graduates in the 2016-2017 academic year.

Miguel A. Gamiño, Jr., New York City’s Chief Technology Officer (CTO), will deliver the commencement address. Gamiño has unique experience in government, blended with a deep knowledge of technology, the industry that fuels it, and the culture it inspires. As CTO, Gamiño works with all City agencies to develop a Smart City and “Internet of Things” strategy that ensures coordination, collaboration and innovation across the City. He leads the City’s Broadband Program, partnering with agencies, private industry, and academia to further the Mayor’s goal to ensure every New Yorker and NYC business will have access to affordable, reliable, high-speed broadband service everywhere by 2025.

Gamiño serves on several Executive Advisory Committees in industry and has served on the Intergovernmental Advisory Committee of the Federal Communication Commission. He is a founding member of the Connected City Advisory Board and a founding member of the Council of Global City Chief Information Officers (CIO).

Credit: Jessica Mulholland, Government Technology

Before coming to NYC, Gamiño served as the Chief Information Officer for the City and County of San Francisco and Executive Director of the Department of Technology. As a technology entrepreneur, Gamiño founded two technology companies, managed them through the start-up phase and into successful operations. He is a graduate of the University of Texas, El Paso.

Natalie Alcide, City Tech’s 2017 Valedictorian

A student of visual media as far back as she can remember, Natalie found her intellectual home at City Tech where the students and faculty in the Communication Design Department (COMD) speak her language—and practice the art of visual storytelling. It was at City Tech where Natalie discovered her passion for social justice and learned how her design creations could actually affect change for good. With a BTech degree in Communication Design, Natalie plans to pursue a career in advertising.

Credit: A. Vargas

Natalie’s particular focus on social change through design was sparked through her involvement with the City Tech student Art + Design Club. The club had hosted a screening of a documentary film about a Cuban journalism student who had overcome his battle with cerebral palsy. His story shed a different light on Cuba—offering a perspective unlike anything she had seen from mainstream US media. It was an eye-opener for Natalie and mirrored the type of storytelling she wants to pursue. Soon after, she joined Women’s Press Collective—the group that organized the film tour of The Power of the Weak.
  
“City Tech fueled my passion for social justice, and helped me realize my career goals. Change happens when we reach beyond our fears, doubts, and computer screens to use our skills and resources for the greater good. After graduating, we’ll all experience huge changes. They won’t come easy and we may not love them at first, but the changes we’ll face and inspire will serve as our legacy,” said Alcide.

Saloua Daouki, City Tech’s 2017 Salutatorian

Saloua Daouki is not a woman who accepts barriers or walks away from a challenge. Before enrolling at City Tech, Saloua already had a degree in civil engineering. But as a female engineer in Morocco, she couldn’t get a job in her field. That is when she decided to emigrate to the United States. Once she landed in New York City, Saloua found a job and enrolled in English classes. Waiting on customers at Dunkin Donuts allowed her to practice her English skills while supporting herself in a new country. Saloua is now fluent in Arabic, French, and English.

Credit: A. Vargas

Math is Saloua’s passion, and this spring she graduates with a BS degree in math education—to the great fortune of New York City middle and high school students. She starts graduate school at City College in the fall, where she will continue to study mathematics. In addition to her student teacher training, Saloua received a scholarship from the National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, which seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors to become K-12 teachers. She was on the Dean’s List, was honored by the National Society of Leadership and Success, and made a number of conference presentations as a member the Honor and Emerging Scholars Program.

“Everyone’s life is full of challenges, but depending on several things, one can either overcome these challenges or give up. I have been able to overcome most of mine—and the support I received from my professors at City Tech played a big role in my successes,” said Daouki.


Orientation for Incoming 9th and 10th Grade Students / Families

 

Dear Students and Families,

Congratulations on your acceptance to NEST+m for the 2017-18 School Year! We are so excited to welcome you into our school community.

At NEST+m, intellectualism, inclusivity, collaboration and exploration within and beyond our school community enable our students to lead lives filled with learning, discovery and purpose.

To best support your transition to NEST+m we will be holding our Orientation Day for incoming students / families on June 5th, 2017 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm in our school auditorium.

It is essential that both our incoming students and parents / guardians are in attendance at this important event.

We look forward to seeing you soon.

Best regards,
Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of May 15, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Happy Mothers Day to all who are celebrating; hoping this is a day of balance and connection for those who are thinking of or celebrating with other loved ones.

This Thursday May 18th, from 4:45pm to 7:45pm, is our NEST+m K-12 Curriculum Showcase. Please see the linked flier below for more details:

NEST+m K-12 Curriculum Showcase

As always, our calendar and updates below provide additional information about our week ahead.

 

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

 

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz

Principal

 

Our Week Ahead

Grades K-5 Announcements:

Monday, May 15th

  • NEST + m High School Wind Ensemble Performance for 3rd, 4th and 5th Grade
  • NEST + m High School Jazz Band Performance for Kindergarten, First Grade and Second Grade students

Tuesday, May 16th: 7:20am-8:10am Math Team Awards Ceremony, Library

 

Grades 6-8 Announcements:

Middle and High Schools: Attend STEM Career Expo at the NY Hall of Science (NYSCI)

Registration Deadline: May 19, 2017

Event: May 19, 2017

Contact: Andrea Canova

Middle school, high school, and college students, and their parents are invited to experience a night at the museum at NYSCI. Attendees will have the opportunity to explore summer academic and internship opportunities in STEM, witness interactive science demonstrations, listen to career conversations, explore the museum after dark, and enjoy a taste of Queens. More than 30 community partners and colleges will inspire, give advice, and provide opportunities for youth. Doors will open at 5:30pm. The STEM Career Expo is FREE and open to students ages 12 and older, and their families. Click here to register.

 

Grades 9-12 Announcements

MAY PSAL EVENTS     
05/15 Mon     Fencing Girls Varsity          Stuyvesant HS
05/15 Mon     Softball Girls Varsity           Randall’s Island #23

Please see http://www.psal.org/profiles/school-profile.aspx#01538 for the most updated schedule or email ccinquegrana@schools.nyc.gov

As Previously Announced, Exciting opportunities for Grades 9-12 Students below

·       Apply by May 19: 38th Annual Summer Writing Workshop

·       Apply by May 24: ARAS Pioneer Teens—A Free Two-Week Summer Art Program

·       Ongoing: Big 10 University Scholarship

 

 


Queens College to Celebrate Award-Winning Students on Campus Quad, Monday, May 15, 12:15-1:30

-- Among the Student Honorees to be Recognized Are Governor’s Excelsior Scholarship “Making College Possible Coding Challenge” Winners and Record-Setting Women’s Basketball Team --

Media interviews and photo ops with the honorees, their parents, and President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez will take place at the side of the main stage during opening ceremony introductions.

WHAT:
With more than 90 city, state and federal award-winning students in academia and athletics for the 2017 academic year, Queens College is taking the opportunity to celebrate their success in a campus-wide party. Complete with a DJ and refreshments—it is the first such event of its kind to be held at the college.

Notable student honorees include members of the first and second place winning teams in the first-ever statewide “Making College Possible Coding Challenge,” in which 70 teams from SUNY and CUNY schools competed to build a mobile app to share information about Governor Cuomo’s Excelsior Scholarship program; members of the first, second and third place winning teams in the 2017 CUNY Hack-a-Thon; the NCAA Division II and Queens College record-setting Knights Women’s Basketball Team that advanced to the “Elite Eight” for the first time in program history; U.S. Fulbright Scholars and Jeannette K. Watson Fellows. For a full list of student winners, please click here.

WHO:
Student honorees and their parents; Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez; Computer Associates International, Inc. Co-Founder and QC alumnus Russell Artzt; the Director of Community Relations for the School of Business at New Jersey City University, a 1976 Women’s Basketball Olympic Silver Medalist and QC alumna Gail Marquis; Queens College administrators, staff and students

WHEN:
Monday, May 15, 12:15 to 1:30 pm
Queens College Quad
65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, NY
Directions to QC; Campus Map

Background:
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Chris Hayes of MSNBC’s ‘All In with Chris Hayes’ Returns to His Bronx Roots to Promote New Book at Lehman College, May 21

BRONX, NY—Lehman College, in partnership with Dream Yard, the University Neighborhood Housing Program, and the Herbert H. Lehman Center for Student Leadership Development, will welcome Chris Hayes back to the Bronx to discuss his new book, A Colony in a Nation, on Sunday, May 21, at 6:45 p.m. This event, which is free and open to the community, will take place in the Lovinger Theatre. Book sales will benefit one Lehman alumna Noëlle Santos, who dreams of opening the borough’s only bookstore.

Chris Hayes

Born and raised in the Norwood section of the Bronx, Hayes is the best-selling author of Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy, an Emmy Award-winning news anchor, and serves as Editor-at-Large of The Nation. In his new book, A Colony in a Nation, Hayes posits that there are two Americas: a Colony and a Nation. In the Nation, we venerate the law. In the Colony, we obsess over order, fear trumps civil rights, and aggressive policing resembles occupation.

Santos, who has generated a great deal of attention recently for her Lit Bar bookstore idea, will facilitate book sales at the event. A portion of the sales will go to fund her bookstore. Santos hopes to open her storefront by the fall.

The Lit Bar is to be a hybrid bookstore and wine bar. Santos has spent the past two years working hard to make it a reality. This included submitting a business proposal that won $7,500 in the New York Public Library and Citi Foundation’s NYStartUP! Business Plan Competition. Training with bookstore owners around the city to learn how to properly run one. And launching a crowd funding campaign, which had a goal of $80,000 that it surpassed while helping to garner national press for her initiative.

The evening’s program includes a book discussion, followed by a brief Q&A, and book signing.

###

Media Contact: Yeara Milton/ 718-960-7963/ yeara.milton@lehman.cuny.edu


Rights Groups Document Harms of Bigoted Muslim Ban

May 12, 2017 – New York – A briefing paper released today by the CLEAR project (Creating Law Enforcement Accountability & Responsibility) at CUNY School of Law in partnership with Amnesty International documents the devastating effects of the Trump administration’s Muslim ban on individuals and families hailing from the seven Muslim-majority countries targeted by the executive order. The ban, temporarily halted by multiple US courts, is slated for judicial review before two federal courts of appeals.

“Trump has proven that his bigoted threat to ban Muslims from the US was not mere campaign rhetoric,” said Ramzi Kassem, Director of CLEAR. “Whatever happens in the courts, people of conscience everywhere must continue to denounce this shocking expression of official prejudice. Anyone who might think this policy reasonable should read these firsthand accounts.”

My Family Was in Shock: The Harms Caused by President Trump’s Executive Orders on Travel to the US is a joint initiative of CLEAR and Amnesty International. When the first executive order was in effect, law students and attorneys at CLEAR provided legal advice to hundreds of immigrants and refugees who were stranded abroad, on their way to the US, or detained at US airports. Its staff referred some of these people for interviews by Amnesty International, and contributed additional information and analysis about the impact of the executive order.

The resulting paper amplifies the experiences of those directly affected by the Muslim ban, using 12 case studies based on over 30 interviews. It describes how the ban violated international human rights law and treaties binding upon the United States. Importantly, these accounts illustrate the chaos wreaked upon refugees, immigrants and US citizens alike in the wake of the Muslim ban’s implementation. The revised version of the executive order does not allay concerns, as a federal court in Hawaii has already held.

“We witnessed firsthand the confusion, heartache, and trauma that the executive order caused people of every stripe traveling into and out of the country,” said Tarek Z. Ismail, Senior Staff Attorney at CLEAR, who worked with dozens of families affected by the ban. “Individuals and their families were forced to make impossible decisions at the drop of a hat.”

Amina F. (not her real name), a Sudanese green card holder, discontinued her dissertation research when she heard the ban was likely to be issued, and rushed home to the US. “I didn’t want to risk being stuck outside the country, and then potentially losing my opportunity to get citizenship,” she told researchers. When she arrived at JFK, Amina was held for five hours, questioned intensively, and handcuffed. “[W]hen I was handcuffed I started crying, not because of the handcuffs, but because I thought at that moment that I probably was going to get deported or detained or something like that.”
Baraa H. (not his real name) and his wife felt forced to leave their baby daughter in the care of friends and hurry back to the United States, fearing that they may later be barred because of their Yemeni citizenship. “It was a very cruel choice, but what could I have done? I had no other choice.”

Others were forcibly separated without any choice. Suleiman (not his real name) a doctor from Sudan, was separated from his wife, and their four-month old daughter. The family had gone to Qatar to show off their new-born and Suleiman came back early for work. When the travel ban was issued, his Sudanese wife and daughter were stuck. “It was a big ordeal for both of us,” Suleiman said. “We didn’t know what the end result would be.”

While the immediate effects of the executive order were quickly interrupted by the courts, the Muslim ban’s impact reverberated throughout communities across the US and abroad.

Yasmin F. (not her real name), a US citizen of Iranian origin, recounted the ordeal her family went through in attempting to travel to the US from Iran during the period of the first executive order. “The executive order impacts all of us. Even as a citizen, I’m wary of traveling; I’m afraid of having problems at the airport.”

Another US citizen of Iranian descent expressed a similar sentiment. “It was heartbreaking,” she told our researchers, as her voice choked up. “Overnight I went from feeling American to feeling like an invader in my own country.”

###

CLEAR (Creating Law Enforcement Accountability & Responsibility) is a project of Main Street Legal Services, Inc., the clinical arm of CUNY School of Law. CLEAR serves Arab, Muslim, South Asian and any other communities that are disparately affected by post-9/11 law enforcement policies and practices deployed in the name of security.

CONTACT:
Kevi Brannelly – CUNY School of Law
Kevi.Brannelly@law.cuny.edu – 347.280.7745


LaGuardia Community College Celebrates Opening Of Expanded Library

60 Percent Increase of Previous Space; Includes Modern Upgrades for LaGuardia’s 50,000 Students, 3,000 Faculty & Staff, and LIC Community

LaGuardia Community College Celebrates Opening Of Expanded Library

Long Island City, NY (May 12, 2017)—LaGuardia Community College yesterday celebrated the completion of a major expansion of the college’s library to nearly 60,000 sq. ft.—a 60 percent increase of the previous space. Highlights include open areas where students can study and collaborate, new state-of-the-art computing capabilities, and large windows to draw in natural light and welcome the Queens community to the college—in a modern, comfortable space designed with input from LaGuardia students, faculty, and staff.

With an annual attendance of more than 650,000 people, the library is the most heavily utilized space on campus. It serves the college’s 20,000 degree-seeking and 30,000 non-credit students, and 3,000 faculty and staff. As well, visitors from Queens and beyond regularly access the library.

CUNY Vice Chancellor for Facilities Planning, Construction and Management Judith Bergtraum, CUNY Director of Design, Construction & Management Robert Lemieux, LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow, Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, New York State Senator Michael Gianaris, and City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer, attended a ribbon-cutting to mark the opening of the newly expanded library. Staff representing Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan attended on her behalf. Click here for photos of the event, which also included LaGuardia faculty, staff, alumni, and students.

Chancellor James B. Milliken said the upgraded LaGuardia library was a critical investment reflecting the University’s goals of increasing access, improving preparation, retention and graduation rates, and expanding online programs. “In the 21st century,” he said, “modern libraries—with welcoming study spaces, state-of-the-art technology, and well-stocked with books and e-books—are essential for study and research, and transformative for students.”

“This library expansion is long-overdue for our exceptionally hard-working students, who are striving to make better lives for them and their families,” said LaGuardia President Gail O. Mellow. “Our student population is largely low-income, new immigrant, or otherwise disadvantaged—many face numerous challenges on their way to a college degree, from financial burdens, juggling work (often more than one job), raising children, and other responsibilities—and they deserve and need a convenient, comfortable, modern space where they can grab time to study and reflect.”

“As well, with new floor-to-ceiling windows facing the intersection of Thomson Ave., Queens Boulevard, and Van Dam Street, the design of the library expansion symbolizes the openness of our college as a place where people of any background can pursue their higher education goals. We welcome all of Queens to the college, and want them to know that the LaGuardia Library is here for them as well,” said Dr. Mellow.

Western Queens Elected Officials Celebrate the Library Expansion

“The transformation of LaGuardia Community College’s library will enhance its reputation for high-quality and affordable college education that produces job-ready graduates with respected academic credentials,” said Queens Borough President Katz. “This modern and expanded library will serve as a top-notch education resource for LaGuardia students for decades to come.”

“I was thrilled to join President Gail O. Mellow, LaGuardia students, faculty, and staff to cut the ribbon on the beautifully renovated and expanded library at LaGuardia Community College,” said City Council Majority Leader Van Bramer. “This library will bring new group study rooms, more seating, improved natural lighting, and resources that over 650,000 students will take advantage of each year. I’m proud to have allocated funding to transform this library into a modern space for research and collaboration that will prepare the next generation of leaders.”

“Expanding LaGuardia Community College library helps our students commit to excellence and contributes to their success,” said Senator Gianaris. “It is more important than ever to invest in education and bring additional resources and opportunities to our colleges. I am proud to celebrate this library expansion with LaGuardia Community College.”

“The library is the focal point for the entire college, with over 650,000 annual visits by students, making it the most heavily used part of the LaGuardia Community College campus,” said Congresswoman Maloney. “By expanding and modernizing the library, LaGuardia is offering students the hi-tech library they need. Under the far-sighted leadership of LaGuardia President Gail Mellow, this new and improved library will help LaGuardia’s diverse student body get a great start in building successful futures.”

“The expansion of the library at LaGuardia Community College will be a great asset and investment to the many students, teachers and faculty who work and attend this wonderful institution” said Assemblywoman Nolan. “I would like to thank President Gail O. Mellow and everyone at LaGuardia for making this project possible.”

More about the Library Expansion

“At last, our world-class students have a world-class library,” said Scott White, LaGuardia Chief Librarian. “We’re thrilled that we’re now able to provide patrons with more efficient access to research materials, and improved collaborative study spaces.”

Additional features include a 75 percent increase in library seating (from 420 to 732 seats) with new high-tech group study rooms, modern reading rooms, individual study spaces, and public computers—all with IT and audio-visual capabilities. It provides a new home for the college’s Media Services, where students may borrow laptop computers and access other services, and adds much-needed office space for library faculty and staff.

The expansion is centered on a reorganization and enlargement of the library’s second floor—with upgraded furniture, painting, and new flooring, and a new staircase and expanded elevator service connecting it to the library’s first floor.

The second phase of the library renovation will upgrade the first floor to match improvements made to the second floor. Planning for this phase is underway, and is expected to take two years. Click here for more information about the library renovation.

Community visitors with a valid ID may enter the library during college hours and access reference materials on-site. Faculty, staff, and students with a valid LaGuardia ID may borrow materials from the library.

Click here for more information about the LaGuardia Community College Library.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare to Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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City Tech and Infor Celebrate Launch of Center of Excellence

City Tech and Infor will celebrate the launch of the new Center of Excellence (CoE) with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Friday, May 19. The CoE is an exciting technology partnership that offers Infor’s industry-specific software solutions and training to CUNY students, faculty, and professional staff—and is the first center of its kind at The City University of New York (CUNY). A reception to commemorate the opening will take place at 11 a.m. at the Center of Excellence, room 216, Voorhees Building, 186 Jay Street, in Downtown Brooklyn, followed by a program from 11:30-1 p.m.

City Tech’s partnership with Infor, through its Education Alliance Program (EAP), led to the development of the Center of Excellence, an innovative lab and learning environment where participants enjoy access to cutting-edge software, such as Infor’s Mongoose, as well as guidance from faculty who collaborate with students on projects. The hands-on experience gained through the CoE will prepare participants to enter a number of career paths, including system analyst, developer, integration consultant, and application developer.

“We are excited to partner with Infor to provide relevant and quality tech training to the CUNY community,” said Russell Hotzler, President of City Tech. “The Center of Excellence offers training on high-tech software as well as a collaborative environment that will enable students, faculty, and professional staff to innovate as well as to prepare for careers in the burgeoning tech sector in New York and beyond.”

Infor, a leading provider of beautiful business applications specialized by industry and built for the cloud, has developed a curriculum that empowers students and professionals at every level to gain critical skills that will set them apart in the job market by developing proficiency using these industry-specific business tools. Through the EAP program, participants gain exposure to Infor Mongoose, Infor Enterprise Asset Management, Infor Cloudsuite Industrial, Infor ION, and Infor Supply Chain Management.

“We are thrilled to build upon our existing partnership with City Tech and launch this new Center of Excellence focused on deeper skills training using new, cutting-edge software, as well as development and programming methodology,” said Marine Cadet, Vice President of Global Talent Enablement at Infor. “Over the past two years our Infor EAP has touched more than 2,000 students and placed approximately 200 in employment at Infor, its partners, and its customers and centers. Partnerships like this one at City Tech allow us to continue this growth.”

Join us in celebrating the new Center of Excellence at City Tech!

RSVP to partnerships@citytech.cuny.edu or call 718-260-5564 by Monday, May 15, 2017.


Bikesharing affecting bus ridership in NYC, says CCNY-Columbia study

CCNY transportation expert Candace Brakewood at a bikesharing dock in Manhattan.

Bus riders in New York City may now be opting to use bikeshare, according to a new study co-written by City College of New York Assistant Professor Candace Brakewood. This is the key finding of her peer-reviewed research study with Columbia University’s Kayleigh Campbell that was recently featured on the Atlantic’s CityLab website.

Brakewood and Campbell studied trips made in New York City between May 2012 and July 2014 to assess how bus ridership changed after the introduction of the city’s bikesharing system, called Citi Bike.  Bus routes were divided into control and treatment groups based on whether or not they were located in areas that received bikesharing infrastructure. They found that a significant decrease in bus ridership on treated routes, compared to control routes, coincided with the implementation of the bikesharing system in New York City.

“The results from our preferred model indicate that every thousand bikesharing docks along a bus route is associated with a 2.42% fall in daily unlinked bus trips on routes in Manhattan and Brooklyn,” wrote Brakewood and Campbell.   Although the magnitude of the reduction is a small proportion of total bus trips in New York City, the findings suggest two things: either a large proportion of overall bikeshare members are substituting bikesharing for bus trips or bikesharing may have impacted the travel behavior of non-members, such as private bicyclists.

“Understanding how bikesharing and public transit systems are interrelated is vital for planning a mutually reinforcing sustainable transport network,” wrote Brakewood and Campbell.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. More than 15,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions. View CCNY Media Kit.

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BMCC Hosts CUE Conference to Share Strategies for Student Success

One of more than 35 breakout sessions at the CUE Conference

The CUNY Coordinated Undergraduate Education (CUE) Conference 2017 was held May 5 at BMCC’s main campus, 199 Chambers Street, and at BMCC’s Fiterman Hall, 245 Greenwich Street.

The Conference theme, Accelerating Progress, Accelerating Equity: Improving Student Success in Developmental and Gateway Courses was reflected in breakout sessions, a keynote address by Katie Hern, Director of the California Acceleration Project, and Plenary by Steven Hinds, Director of Chicago’s Active Learning in Adult Numeracy and Mathematics.

"One of the University’s highest priorities and certainly BMCC’s highest priority is improving student success,” said BMCC Provost Karrin E. Wilks, as the conference opened with a breakfast in Richard Harris Terrace. “We’ll never be able to do that unless we improve developmental outcomes and outcomes in Gateway courses. This is essential to realizing our mission of advancing opportunity, equity and student success. This conference is a great opportunity to learn from what other colleges are doing, proven practices that address those priorities."

Katie Hern’s Keynote Address, “Improving Completion and Equity in Developmental and Gateway English and Math,” presented findings from her work supporting California’s 113 community colleges as they implement reforms to increase student completion of college-level coursework and close the racial equity gap.

Closing the mathematics gap for adult students and college students who struggle with math was the focus of the conference plenary by Steven Hinds, “Active Learning Pedagogy for Developmental and Gateway Algebra.”

Breakout sessions highlight effective strategies

More than 35 breakout sessions highlighted the efforts of faculty throughout CUNY to improve student success, addressing many facets of student experience.

“Bridging the Gap: Addressing College Expectations,” was led by BMCC Speech, Communications and Theatre Professors Bertha Ferdman and Daphne Sicre. “Our presentation looked at freshmen coming into a Gateway course, and asked the question, ‘How do we make sure that our students are staying not just in our class, but are also staying in the college?’,” said Sicre. “We’ve realized that many students enter BMCC having a different expectation than we do, of what college is, so we start by having them read articles and do free writes on their expectations and on the differences between high school and college.”

A group of Mathematics Professors including Jean Richard, Luci Prado, Daniela Bardac-VLada, Bernard Beecher and Director of Institutional Effectiveness and Analytics Bettina Hansel presented highlights from a pilot class they developed that combines statistics and algebra. “It’s now an official course, thanks to some of the results we found,” said Hansel. “For example, about 72 percent of the students taking the combined course of algebra and statistics were able to pass, and when you look at the algebra pass rate for similar students it’s much lower, 30 percent.”

Speech Professor Sandra Poster and her colleague Chris Vinsonhaler led the breakout session, “Modeling Professionalism in Gateway Courses." One of the things the CUE Conference addresses, Poster said, "is techniques that effective classroom instructors can use to help students succeed. We want to enable  faculty members to have more tools in their tool box for reaching students, helping them be the success they want to be, and we want them to be.”

A breakout session that addressed the gap in math proficiency many incoming students experience was led by two College Discovery staff members: Director Pedro Pérez and Academic Support Coordinator John M. Burdick. “One of the things we share with our colleagues across the CUNY system is the need to help our students bridge the gap from some of the developmental courses and testing challenges they experience as they enter CUNY,” said Pérez.

“It’s great to bring faculty and staff together from across CUNY to talk about issues we share, especially regarding Gateway courses, because these are areas that our students often struggle with,” said Burdick. “It’s inspiring to for colleagues from divergent campuses to share resources and knowledge. It’s important that we’re here.”


BMCC Community Gathers for Middle States Town Hall

A Middle States Town Hall meeting for the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) community was held May 9 in Theatre 2 at the College’s main campus, 199 Chambers Street.

The purpose of the meeting was to update students, faculty and staff on the status of the College’s Middles States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) institutional self-study.

This transparent self-appraisal process examines how BMCC meets or exceeds the MSCHE Standards for Accreditation. It focuses on the College’s mission and goals, and makes recommendations for improvement.

“This Middle States Self Study process reflect a tremendous amount of work by over 100 faculty and staff,” said BMCC President Antonio Pérez. “The committees, organized around the seven standards that are key to student success, evaluate what’s working well and what we need to improve upon as an institution."

Presentations by the Working Groups

At the May 9 Town Hall, a faculty or staff representative from each of the Seven Standards Working Groups presented an update.

The presenters included:

Maria Enrico, Chairperson, Modern Languages: Standard I Group, Mission and Goals

Sangeeta Bishop, Chairperson, Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice: Standard II Group, Ethics and Integrity

Ruru Rusmin, Interim Director of E-Learning, Standard III Group, Design and Delivery of the Student Learning Experience

Tiffany James, Student Persistence and Retention Outreach Specialist, Standard IV Group, Support of the Student Experience

Anna Salvati, Professor, Computer Information Systems, Standard V Group, Educational Effectiveness Assessment

Joseph Spadaro, Vice President, Information Technology: Standard VI Group, Planning, Resources and Institutional Improvement

Janice Walters, Chairperson, Teacher Education: Standard VII Group, Governance, Leadership and Administration