School/Class News





CUNY WINS HECKSCHER GRANT TO ALLOW HURRICANE-DISPLACED PUERTO RICANS AND VIRGIN ISLANDERS TO STUDY TUITION-FREE

The philanthropic Heckscher Foundation for Children has committed $100,000 to cover tuition and fees at The City University of New York for students who left Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands after this year’s devastating hurricanes.

At the behest of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, the CUNY Board of Trustees voted last month to allow these students to attend at in-state tuition rates. The University then applied for the Heckscher grant to cover costs above whatever the students receive in federal Pell grants.

“The generosity of the Heckscher Foundation for Children will make a big difference for displaced students who choose to pursue their college education at CUNY,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “They are far from their homes. Their lives and their families have been disrupted. But thanks to this grant, they will be able to continue their college education tuition-free. I can’t imagine a more humane response for people who have lost so much.”

Heckscher Foundation Chairman and CEO Peter Sloane said: “We are pleased to provide this catalytic support for displaced students from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands who wish to continue their studies at CUNY. We hope that the tuition relief this grant affords will help our students from the affected territories get through this difficult period for them and their families.”

CUNY’s grant application estimated that $100,000 would cover the unmet costs of about 80 students. In addition to the grant, CUNY is also making laboratory and other space available to University of Puerto Rico faculty and is setting up a grant process for collaborative work on recovery issues. All CUNY colleges have been involved in University-wide relief efforts.

The university and New York City have close associations with the Caribbean islands. The Puerto Rican community has long been one of the most vibrant in New York, and no city in the country has more native-born citizens whose families came from the Virgin Islands. CUNY has about 16,000 current undergraduates who identify as Puerto Rican.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Report Co-Authored by Guttman Professor Released by the UCLA Civil Rights Project

Ryan Coughlan, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Ryan W. Coughlan, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Ryan W. Coughlan, Guttman Assistant Professor of Sociology, is a co-author of a report outlining the growing school segregation crisis in New Jersey. The report was released by the UCLA Civil Rights Project and picked up by news outlets.

“New Jersey’s Segregated Schools: Trends and Paths Forward,” written by Gary Orfield, UCLA, Civil Rights Project; Jongyeon Ee, UCLA, Civil Rights Project; and Ryan W. Coughlan, Guttman Community College, City University of New York, shows that New Jersey has made little, if any, progress toward reducing the segregation of Black and Hispanic students in the state’s schools.

Dr. Coughlan was interviewed by the Philadelphia Inquirer and WNYC’s All Things Considered about the report’s findings.


Facebook partners with CCNY for web security course

Chantelle Levy, CCNY Facebook Ambassador.

Students mingling at the Facebook with Cybersecurity event.

Facebook is partnering with The City College of New York to launch a web security hybrid course—the first of it’s kind on campus. The company is donating $25,000 toward scholarships and educational expenses. Spearheaded on the CCNY campus by computer science major Chantelle Levy, Facebook chose her to be CCNY’s Facebook Ambassador.

“It’s truly a pleasure to be chosen as a Security Ambassador Intern for Facebook; my interest in security stemmed from no other than the TV Show ‘Mr. Robot’,” said Levy, an undergraduate student. “Since then, I’ve been involved in anything security-related, including the web security course offered at CCNY, the BlackHat Conference and DEFCON in Vegas and a security internship with Facebook in Silicon Valley.”

Levy and other students initiated the partnership in Spring 2017 under CodePath University for those students interested in learning about cybersecurity. At that time the course offered no credits. However, Rosario Gennaro, a professor of computer science at the Grove School of Engineering and director of the Center for Algorithms and interactive Scientific Software, became involved with the student group and helped transition the course into a one-credit class.

More than 150 students and faculty attended the Cybersecurity with Facebook event on campus this month to educate students about the different perspectives of working at Facebook Cybersecurity.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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#GivingTuesday Brings the Brooklyn College Community Together to Support Student Achievement

The Nov. 28 fundraiser aims to unite faculty, staff, friends, and more than 137,000 alumni to reach the highest possible goal in attaining resources to ensure the success of Brooklyn College students.

The Brooklyn College Foundation’s Annual Fund is hoping to unite the Brooklyn College community in an effort to surpass last year’s #GivingTuesday fundraising total.

On Tuesday, Nov. 28, Brooklyn College, along with all other City University of New York (CUNY) institutions, is preparing for #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving. This global campaign takes place on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving, and was created to counterbalance the consumerism of “Black Friday” and “Cyber Monday” with a call for philanthropy and community outreach.

This is the college’s second year of participation and the goal is to surpass the $21,000 raised last year and engage and activate the #BCfamily to participate in some way during the 24-hour giving challenge. This multifaceted campaign will get the word out to faculty, staff, students, friends, and over 137,000 alumni through e-mail and social media campaigns.

Funds raised from Giving Tuesday will go to support the Annual Fund, a vital Brooklyn College Foundationprogram that is graciously sustained by thousands of donations averaging about $50. Support from the Annual Fund helps the college continue to create a complete and fulfilling college experience by providing the resources needed to immediately respond to the urgent and evolving needs of the students, faculty, and campus.

Nov. 28 is Giving Tuesday at Brooklyn College.

“Giving to the Annual Fund is an easy way to support student success,” Beth Levine, associate executive director of the Brooklyn College Foundation said. “And Giving Tuesday provides a way for us to reach an even larger audience, bringing us all together as one.”

There are many ways to support Brooklyn College beyond Giving Tuesday. Alumni and friends receive print and digital mailings from the foundation throughout the year, and may even receive a phone call from students during the annual phone-a-thon. Additionally, donors can participate by joining the Boylan Society, a monthly sustainer program; purchasing a Commemorative Brick and leave behind a lasting legacy at Brooklyn College; or making a one-time gift online.

To learn more about how to give to Brooklyn College or to learn more about the impact that giving has on our students, please visit the Brooklyn College Foundation website.

The Brooklyn College Foundation was established in 1958 to encourage and promote the academic purposes of Brooklyn College of The City University of New York and the educational welfare of students, faculty, alumni, and the community. Through a full spectrum of fundraising programs, the foundation provides resources that advance the mission of Brooklyn College.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Guttman Students Compete in National Fed Challenge

2017 Fed Challenge participantsOn November 1, 2017, six Guttman students enrolled in Professor Seth and Professor Buttet’s macroeconomics course competed in the Maiden Lane division of the Fed Challenge.

The College Fed Challenge, sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, is a competition designed to bring real world economics into the classroom. During the competition, teams play the role or policymakers by preparing and delivering a presentation on their analysis of a case study describing hypothetical economic conditions with a monetary policy recommendation based on their analysis. The case study is sent to to the teams prior to competition day, and they have four weeks to prepare their recommendations.

The Guttman team placed honorably. Students had fun and learned about central bank operations and macroeconomics in the process.


Baruch College Gets High Rankings in The Princeton Review and Entreprenuer Magazine’s “Top 25 Schools for Entreprenuership Studies” for 2018

Zicklin School of Business in the Top 10 Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Nationwide for Third Consecutive Year 

New York, NY – November 14, 2017 – Baruch College’s undergraduate and graduate programs at the College’s Zicklin School of Business were ranked in the top 10 by The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine’s survey of the “Top Schools for Entrepreneurship Studies for 2018.”

Baruch College placed #5 in “Top 25 Undergraduate Schools” – the highest ranking to date in this category – and ranked #10 among the “Top 25 Graduate Schools.”

These rankings mark the third consecutive year that Baruch College has placed in the top 10 for both undergraduate and graduate programs, and the 10th consecutive year Baruch College has been included in one or both of the undergraduate and graduate lists since the annual ranking began in 2006.

The rankings are based on surveys by The Princeton Review, in partnership with Entrepreneur magazine, of more than 300 colleges and business schools across the country offering entrepreneurship programs.

“We’re very proud to once again be nationally recognized for our entrepreneurship programs,” said H. Fenwick Huss, PhD, Willem Kooyker Dean of the Zicklin School of Business. “Zicklin embodies the entrepreneurial spirit with real-world experiential learning taught by experienced faculty and industry experts.”

“These top rankings demonstrate the Field Center’s unwavering commitment to a robust entrepreneurship education that fully equips our students with the latest tools, experiences, and support essential for success in today’s economy,” said Scott Newbert, PhD, academic director of the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship.

A Specialty in Entrepreneurship

At Baruch College, The Lawrence N. Field Center for Entrepreneurship plays a crucial role in establishing the Zicklin School of Business as a leading business school with a specialty in entrepreneurship. Zicklin’s faculty and students, Baruch’s Small Business Development Center advisors, as well as alumni, entrepreneurs, and consultants come together at the Field Center to support the entrepreneurial endeavors of start-ups, established businesses, and the College’s constituents.

Each year, the Field Center holds entrepreneurship-focused events, MakerHub workshops, co-working opportunities to exchange ideas in a supportive environment, and partnerships with such high-profile companies as AT&T and IBM to host student entrepreneurship competitions.

A model of entrepreneurship education, the Field Center is built around the collaboration of an institution of higher education, government, and the private sector.

New York City‒Based with a Global Reach

A college of The City University of New York, Baruch has a more-than-160-year history of excellence in public higher education, with its Zicklin School of Business being the largest of its schools. With a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak 129 languages, the College continually receives among the top rankings for academic quality and best value from such prominent organizations as U.S. News & World Report, Princeton Review, Forbes, and Money magazine.

With its graduates known to be New York smart and world-class ready, the Zicklin School of Business is a recognized leader in providing undergraduate and graduate business and executive education for the 21st century. Consistently rated by rankings experts among the top performers in areas relevant to today’s students—such as academic excellence, diversity, and value—Zicklin offers a wide range of part-time and full-time business degree programs that are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business and taught by faculty who are thought leaders, active researchers, and practitioners in their fields. Integrated both physically and philosophically into the fabric of New York City, the world’s financial capital, the Zicklin School is committed to delivering relevant, affordable, academically rigorous business education globally that is world-class in quality and worldwide in its impact.

For media inquiries contact:

Suzanne Bronski, (646) 660-6093, suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

 

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$500K boost for CCNY’s Zahn Center from Manhattan Borough President

Matthew Washington, deputy Manhattan Borough president, at a Zahn Demo Day at CCNY.

Hobby-sized printers in the Zahn Center’s MakerLab.

The City College of New York’s Zahn Innovation Center is the recipient of $500,000 in capital funds from the Manhattan Borough President’s Office. The award will enable the   Center, a startup incubator, to dramatically improve its manufacturing offerings by adding short run manufacturing capabilities to the equipment in its MakerLab. The MakerLab is a rapid prototyping facility designed for student entrepreneurs and the hardware startup community. The new equipment and improvements will bring lasting impact to City College and Harlem community startups, both benefitting from the upgrade.

“I am thrilled to support the Zahn Innovation Center and assist in the creation of a prototyping hub in Harlem, led by student innovators” said Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer. “I am proud to invest in a diverse group of students and local entrepreneurs as they build their startups and test their ideas in this lab of the future.”

Lindsay Siegel, executive director of the Zahn Center, hailed Brewer and Deputy Borough President Matthew Washington. “Their generosity will enable our student startups to realize their visions sooner,” she said.

The Center helps CCNY student startups:

  • Build prototypes;
  • Develop products and refine their features;
  • Improve sales pitches; and
  • Negotiate the complicated realms of financing and intellectual property law.

Since its founding, the Center has graduated 155 startups. Collectively, these startups have raised and earned more than $32 million in capital, and filed more than 75 provisional and full patents for their concepts.

The new funds will be a major boost for student entrepreneurs at an institution, where according to the latest available figures, 60% of whom are from homes with an annual family income of $30,000 or less.

In addition, the improved MakerLab is expected to expedite the entire production process for both student and Harlem community startups.

“This enables students to fulfill a Kickstarter campaign months ahead of the typical production schedule associated with most crowdfunded hardware startups,” said Devin Voorsanger, the Zahn Center’s technology program director. “This rapid fulfillment of orders and the drastically reduced costs will allow student startups to proudly manufacture in the U.S. and get their businesses off the ground.”

The new services will also be available to community startups. This will make it significantly easier for startups in Harlem to launch and iterate their own hardware startups as they have a homegrown manufacturing and prototyping facility available to help them, said Siegel.

About the Zahn Innovation Center
The Zahn Innovation Center was established by the City College Fund in 2012, with support from the Moxie Foundation and the Manhattan Borough President’s Office, as an incubator at the City College of New York (CCNY). The Zahn Center empowers students to develop entrepreneurial skills while incubating the most promising technology startups and social impact ventures. We provide co-working space, a campus-wide speaker series, and four entrepreneurship competitions with prize money.

About The City College Fund
The City College Fund is a tax-exempt 501c(3) non-profit fundraising organization, established in 1946 to support The City College of New York in its mission to provide access and excellence in higher education, particularly to students who might not otherwise be able to afford to go to college. Gifts to The City College Fund directly benefit City College’s extraordinary students, renowned faculty, innovative programs and schools.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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CUNY STUDENTS SHINE AT UNDERGRADUATE BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE FOR MINORITY STUDENTS

Twenty students from seven CUNY campuses won honors for presentations of their original research at the American Society for Microbiology’s Annual Biological Research Conference for Minority Students.? More than1,800 students presented their research and some 300 received awards for their oral or poster presentations to the 4,300 students who attended the event, which was held Nov. 1-4 in Phoenix.

“The breadth of undergraduate research at CUNY that was recognized at this national conference – from cancer biology to neuroscience to social and behavioral sciences and beyond – shows the vitality of CUNY’s efforts to engage minority students in fields where they have not traditionally been found,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “This is just one way that The City University of New York helps so many of our students follow their dreams and launch rewarding careers.”

Irene Hulede, manager of student programs at the American Society for Microbiology, said the research and presentations build students’ confidence and help propel them “from one level to the next, with the next logical step being graduate school and a Ph.D. in the STEM fields” of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. “They also attend professional development workshops, where we provide them with resources needed to be successful in graduate school. They talk with leaders in the field and receive a lot of mentoring and one-on-one coaching.”

CUNY’s winners included seven from Hunter College, six from City College, two each from Brooklyn College and Queensborough Community College, and one each from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Kingsborough Community College and Medgar Evers College. There were five winners in cancer biology; three in cell biology; three in social and behavioral sciences and public health; two in neuroscience; and one each in chemistry, developmental biology and genetics, engineering, physics and mathematics, immunology, microbiology and physiology.

For City College senior Geneva Hidalgo, the conference meant an anxiety-laced 15 minutes of lecture and Q&A. “Last year I did a poster. This year I wanted the challenge of oral presentation,” she said. “You have to know your research really well and prepare for questions from people who don’t know anything about your research.”

Working with City College assistant psychology professor Sarah O’Neill, she analyzed parent- and teacher-provided data on children who have symptoms that typically develop in youngsters who are later diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); the data were collected by professor Jeffrey Halperin’s lab at Queens College. Hidalgo wanted to see whether the apparent link between ADHD and obesity in adolescents and adults held true for children.

“Our study was the first to compare the body mass indexes of preschoolers at age 4 and at age 7,” she said. She found no significant association between body mass index and neuropsychological deficits, like processing speed and executive function (the mental skills that let you do things), but did note a significant association in preschoolers showing inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity.

Now in her third year in the National Institutes of Health-funded Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) program, Hidalgo intends to seek a post-graduation National Institute of Mental Health fellowship before applying for a Ph.D. program in clinical psychology.

Queensborough Community College spring 2017 graduate Rawlric Sumner won for a poster presentation in chemistry that demonstrated a way of optimizing a type of photovoltaic solar cell that is dye-sensitized; his method uses ionic liquids with single-walled carbon nanotubes as electrolytes. He now studies chemistry at Queens College, with his eyes set on an eventual Ph.D.

Sumner credits his Queensborough mentors – professors Tirandai Hemraj-Benny and Sharon Lall-Ramnarine – as well as senior chemist James Wishart at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he continued this research last summer. He said they guided him on “matters pertaining to academics, personal issues and even planning for my future. All of my current and future success can be attributed to the foundation established through my undergraduate research experience and the mentorship by these outstanding individuals. It has given me ambition and a strong work ethic while looking toward my future.”

At Medgar Evers College, junior Jaleel Shepherd, who immigrated from Guyana six years ago, was recognized for work in signaling pathways that enable cancer cells to survive. His poster described the three-dimensional structure of ACK (a protein kinase, or enzyme that modifies other proteins by chemically adding phosphate groups) and how he screened for specific cancer inhibitors and showed their effects on cancer cells.

Shepherd praised his two mentors at Medgar Evers – biology professors Alam Nur-E-Kamal and Ijaz Ahmed – and Raj Rajnaraynan, a pharmacology and toxicology professor at the University of Buffalo, where he conducted research last summer. He also insisted that credit is due to his lab mates, Ruth Opoku, Nadia Patterson and Vimal Arora, who contributed scholarship and support. He said Medgar Evers pushed him to think, to explore and to ask questions. “I’m interested in the underlying specifics of diseases. I’d like to find cures and not just for cancer. Ever since I was young I’ve wanted to understand how things work, for the purpose of helping others.”

Here are all the winners:

 2017 Presentation Awardees at

Annual Biological Research Conference for Minority Students

COLLEGE FIRST NAME LAST NAME YEAR CATEGORY AWARD TYPE
Brooklyn College Sierra Louis-Gene Junior Developmental Biology and Genetics Poster
Brooklyn College Janai Williams Senior Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health Poster
City College of New York Geneva Hidalgo Senior Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health Oral
City College of New York Mariya Mayer Senior Cancer Biology Poster
City College of New York Courtney Ogando Junior Cell Biology Poster
City College of New York Kailey Singh Sophomore Physiology Oral
City College of New York Fathema Uddin Senior Cell Biology Poster
City College of New York Jacqueline Weng Sophomore Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health Poster
Hunter College Camille Derderian Senior Cancer Biology Oral
Hunter College Rochel Hecht Senior Engineering, Physics and Mathematics Poster
Hunter College Marysol Finkenberg Senior Chemistry Poster
Hunter College Tiffany Merlinsky Junior Cancer Biology Oral
Hunter College Micaela Millan Sophomore Cell Biology Poster
Hunter College Stephanie Tepan Senior Cancer Biology Poster
Hunter College Olga Vafaeva Senior Neuroscience Oral
John Jay College Dee-Anne Cush Senior Immunology Poster
Kingsborough Community College Hakim Thomas Community College Student Microbiology Poster
Medgar Evers College Jaleel Shepherd Junior Cancer Biology Poster
Queensborough Community Gabriel Palencia Serna Community College Student Neuroscience Poster
Queensborough Community College Rawlric Sumner Community College Student Chemistry Poster

 

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of November 13, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Thank you for joining our November Parent-Teacher Conferences. Your presence and participation, in person and at home, are central to our students’ success.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

This week is School Photo Week!

  • LG: Mon-Tues, November 13-14
  • MG: Wed-Thur, November 15-16
  • UG: Fri- Mon, November 17, 20

Please click here for schedules and more information.

Tuesday, November 14

  • AMC 8 Math Competition in the Cafeteria at 8:30 am
  • Spelling Bee in the auditorium at 4 pm

Thursday, November 16

  • PTA meeting in cafeteria at 8:30 am
  • MG open house in auditorium at 5:30 pm

Friday, November 17

  • 9th grade Potluck Dinner in Cafeteria at 6 pm

Looking Ahead

  • Week of November 20th will have three school days, due to Thanksgiving Break on November 23rd and 24th. Also, there will be a rapid dismissal with no afterschool programs on Wednesday, November 22nd.
  • Week of November 27th will be Open School Week at NEST+m. More information will be sent out this coming week.

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.

3T Writing Workshops
3T Writing Workshops hopes to offer a place for students to write freely about what is on their minds and have their words validated by actors bringing their words to life.

Students are invited to join their upcoming workshops on Nov 30, Dec 7 and Dec 14 at The New School for Drama 151 Bank St. from 4-6pm.

Please click here for an application. More information is found on their website.

SAT / ACT Test Prep
Class of 2019
FREE Hybrid Exams (11/18 & 12/16; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! These are the last two dates this year for the Class of 2019. (Registration closes at noon the Thursday before the event). Register Here.

March 21 SAT Prep starts by 1/27 – See all SAT prep options here
April 14 ACT Prep starts by 2/24 – See all ACT Prep options here
*Group and Small Group options attached.

Class of 2020
FREE PSAT Exam & Review Seminar (3/10; 8:30am-12:30pm) – Take a practice PSAT Exam, score it, and chat through a few tips and tricks before your PSAT exam this March! Register Here.

FREE Hybrid Exams (4/28, 5/19, & 6/2; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! Register Here.

All Students
Career Planning Seminar (5/12; 10am-1pm) – Explore YOU and find a career that fits! Complete an interest assessment profile and find careers that match your interests. Register Here.

Atlas offers Group ($399+), Small Group ($599+), and Private Tutoring ($999+) prep options to suit the various needs of your students. Don’t forget, we offer unlimited scholarships to our group courses for those who qualify for free or reduced price lunch (verbal confirmation from counselor is the only proof required).

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu

NYU School of Medicine STEP Program
Is your child a 10th or 11th grader interested in science education, SAT prep, or health professions? The STEP Program at the New York University School of Medicine has begun actively accepting New York State 10th and 11th grade high school students into their program.
Deadline: November 15, 2017 — click here for more information.


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of November 6, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Please Join me in congratulating Coach Jackie O’Connor and the NEST+m Girls Varsity Soccer Team. They have made it to the B-Division Semifinals and will be playing on Tuesday November 7! For more information please see this playoff bracket here.

This week, on Monday November 6, NEST+m’ s current 5th grade students & families and 8th grade students & families will be able to attend tours of our Middle Grades (8:30 am start) and Upper Grades (10:49 am start).

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

Tuesday November 7

  • Election Day: No School for students.

Wednesday November 8

  • 10 am – Red Hawk Dancers – 3rd grade Assembly
  • 5:30 pm  – MG Open House

Thursday November 9

  • 10 am – 4th grade Author Visit, Jean Merill and Doug Bygott – The Wild Life of Limericks
  • Parent Teacher Conferences, 4:45pm to 7:45pm

Friday November 10

  • Half Day for students. School ends at 11:30am. No After School activities.
  • Parent Teacher Conferences, 12:40pm to 2:40pm

Looking Ahead

  • Week of November 13-20. School Photos, all week long!
    • LG: Mon-Tues, November 13-14
    • MG: Wed-Thur, November 15-16
    • UG: Fri- Mon, November 17, 20
  • Tuesday, November 14
    • AMC 8 Math Competition, 8:30 in the Cafeteria
    • 4 pm, Spelling Bee in the Auditorium

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

ACCELERATED LEARNING ACADEMY {ALA) 
The ALA prepares high-achieving 10th and 11th graders for professional careers in Medical Science, Biomedical Engineering & Technology, and Applied Mathematics over 3 weekends of interactive workshops at Princeton University. Students will explore new STEM content with group activities, lectures, hands-on demonstrations and real world applications taught by experienced scientists. Please click here for more information.

Pathways to An Inclusive Future
Hear a panel of professionals, youth advocates, parents and educators with different perspectives tackle the complexities of inclusion- what it is, why it is, and what it could look like in the future.
Monday, November 6, 2017 6-8pm
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
West 46th Street and 12th Avenue
New York, NY 10036
Click here for more information.

Shape Up NYC
Shape Up NYC is a free citywide fitness program operated by NYC Parks that provides more than 350 free group exercise classes each week at 200 locations across the five boroughs.  Please see our website for a class near you: https://www.nycgovparks.org/programs/recreation/shape-up-nyc

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu

Paid Intership 
The Family Art Project at Wave Hill is hiring additional 2017-2018 interns this fall for students who have an interest and enthusiasm for the arts and/or science. $9 per hour – 12 month position on weekends from 9am to 4pm. Send cover letter and resume to fapinternship@wavehill.org.

Promise Project
PROMISE at Columbia University is committed to being the most effective, all-encompassing program to help children with learning disabilities get the support they need to succeed. Children receive state-of-the-art neuropsychological assessments, clinical recommendations and the follow-up necessary to get the services they need to learn . Call Ana Garcia, at Promise Project’s main number, at 212-342-1600.

Community Service
There are community service opportunities available for 11th and 12th graders with the SONYC after-school program at NEST+m. Please email Scott Percelay at spercelay@grandsettlement.org or stop by room 257 if interested.

NYU School of Medicine STEP Program
Is your child a 10th or 11th grader interested in science education, SAT prep, or health professions? The STEP Program at the New York University School of Medicine has begun actively accepting New York State 10th and 11th grade high school students into their program.
Deadline: November 15, 2017 — click here for more information.


Moms and Dads, Put Down Your Mobile Phones! Hunter Study Shows That Parents’ Distraction by Mobile Devices May Hinder Infant Social-Emotional Development

The journal Developmental Science has just published a cautionary new study led by Hunter’s Tracy Dennis-Tiwary, professor of psychology. Moms and Dads, Put Down Your Mobile Phones! Hunter Study Shows That Parents’ Distraction by Mobile Devices May Hinder Infant Social-Emotional Development

Professor Dennis-Tiwary and her colleagues examined the impact of parents’ mobile-device use on infants aged 7 to 24 months. The researchers focused on three periods of mother-child interaction:  (1) playful contact between a mother and her baby, (2) the mother’s mobile device time, (3) the “reunion,” when the mother’s attention returned to the baby.

“We found that infants expressed more distress, and explored less, during maternal device use compared to the free play and reunion periods. Moreover, greater habitual use of mobile devices by mothers outside the lab predicted less emotional recovery in infants during the reunion period,” Professor Dennis-Tiwary said. “Results suggest that, like other forms of maternal withdrawal and unresponsiveness, mobile-device use can have a negative impact on infant social-emotional functioning and parent-child interactions.”

Hunter graduate student Sarah Myruski and research assistant Olga Gulyayeva ’14, both members of Professor Dennis-Tiwary’s lab team, were among the Developmental Science article’s five co-authors.


Hunter Professor Victor Bobetsky to Deliver Talk on “We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song”

On Tuesday, November 7 at 4:30 p.m, Victor Bobetsky, Professor of MusicHunter Professor Victor Bobetsky to Deliver Talk on "We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song" and Director of the Teacher Education Program in Music at Hunter College and six of his students from the music education program will present a book talk at NYU. Professor Bobetsky will discuss the research and academic activities that led to the creation and publication of his book, We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song (2015). The students joining him in this presentation will perform excerpts of several antecedent songs, discussed in the book, that may have influenced the music and/or text of the current version of “We Shall Overcome,” the anthem we know and sing today.

The book was inspired by a symposium on the origins and history of “We Shall Overcome” which Professor Bobetsky hosted at Hunter College in 2013. The symposium celebrated the song’s origins and history featuring guest speakers from academia and choirs from the New York City Schools who performed the antecedent songs.

The book, which contains eight essays, two of which were written by Bobetsky, has been purchased by over 196 college, university and public libraries and is a useful tool for music teachers. The collection was described by Music Educators Journal as “a valuable resource to be used not just in the music appreciation or general music classroom but in any class that seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the African-American civil rights movement.” Professor Bobetsky commented, ” I am thrilled to be able to involve Hunter music education students in this upcoming event and I want to thank Hunter President Jennifer J. Raab for her generous support which helped to make the research, the symposium, and the creation of this book a reality.”

Date: Tuesday, November 7, 2017
Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Taminent Library at New York Unviersity, 70 Washington Square South, NY, 10012
RSVP: Please email taminent.events@nyu.edu with guest name(s) and the title of the event: Book Talk: Victor Bobetsky on We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song


Stunning Exhibit of Magnum Photos by Hunter’s First Curatorial Certificate Cohort

How can a camera capture a moment of seismic political shift, and how canStunning Exhibit of Magnum Photos by Hunter's First Curatorial Certificate Cohort the person behind the camera use their perspective to effect change? These questions and more are tackled by the 17 works on display in the Leubsdorf’s Gallery’s new exhibition, Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947-Present. This exhibition is part of a city-wide celebration of the 70th anniversary of Magnum, a cooperative photo agency founded to give humanist photographers more agency, both in their careers and in the activist world.

“We are so privileged to have one of our nation’s leading historians of photography, the extraordinary Maria Antonella Pelizzari, bring this kind of exceptional work to Hunter’s galleries and into the lives of Hunter students,” said Hunter President Jennifer J. Raab.

Curated by Professor Pelizzari, this exhibition about community represents the work of a newly formed community: the graduate students enrolled in Professor Pelizzari’s Advanced Curatorial Certificate seminar. While the theme of the exhibition was selected by the professor, the students chose the featured artworks themselves, wrote all the accompanying materials, including the accompanying catalogue, and were responsible for the show’s design and execution.

The Advanced Curatorial Certificate program, open to art students who are currently pursuing or recently earned their MA or MFA from Hunter, offers a two-semester overview of all facets of the curatorial process, from theory to execution. This seminar, which has long been offered by the Department of Art and Art History, was recently approved as a Certificate-granting program, and Finding Community represents the first exhibition-culmination of the program.

This year’s cohort dove into the background of the Magnum movement, researching the development of photojournalism and the surrounding cultural phenomena. They read about curatorial history and process and embarked on a deep exploration of the legacy of the Magnum photography community. They decided to group the artworks into four sections that each dealt with the concept of community differently: Longing for Community, Shifting Community, Contested Territories, and Displaced Community. The pieces depict families, refugees, civil war, protest, and quiet moments of calm amidst political instability. Spanning Magnum’s 70-year history,  the exhibition includes pieces by some very young artists, and some long deceased.

The students found that the images — Professor Antonella referred to the pictures as “little poems” — had taken on new resonance; images of refugees in the ’70s, they realized, could just as easily be taken from last week’s newspaper. “My relationship to this work changed dramatically over the past year, which speaks to the power of a group like Magnum, which can take on renewed relevance and import in a shifting political structure,” said Ella Hall, a student and member of the cohort.

The exhibition runs Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm until November 26, 2017.


BMCC Announces 2018 Leadership Fellows

Professor Don Wei (center), one of 15 faculty selected for the 2018 Faculty Leadership Fellows Program

The 2018 cohort of the Faculty Leadership Fellows Program at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has been announced. Fifteen full-time faculty from 11 departments were nominated by department chairs, past faculty fellows or cabinet members, and selected for criteria including their demonstrated leadership, years of service at BMCC and application statement.

The goal of the Faculty Leadership Fellows Program is to recognize and develop faculty leadership through formal and informal roles across departments. The program is also designed to advance departmental and college priorities and promote the role of community colleges more broadly in society.

“Leadership rests with people, not just with a position,” said Jim Berg, Associate Dean of Faculty. “This program emphasizes the capacity in each person to make a positive difference to the college.”

The Leadership Fellows Program begins with an intensive seminar, January 8-12, 2018. Participants will engage with nationally recognized experts on major challenges facing community colleges. These exemplary leaders include current and former college presidents, as well as prominent experts in the field of higher education teaching and learning, organizational development and equity.

A series of workshops will follow throughout Spring 2018. These will focus on topics identified in the January seminars and could include topics such as mentoring and coaching, planning for student success, dealing with conflict, program planning and budget development, and effective communications.

“BMCC cannot realize our vision to become a premier community college without strong, visible and pervasive faculty leadership. Adding to our first cohort of fellows, we are building a strong coalition of faculty leaders essential to improving student success and advancing equity,” said Karrin Wilks, Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs at BMCC.

The following faculty fellows were selected from 27 applications:

Heather Finn, Academic Literacy & Linguistics; Rosario Torres-Guevara, Academic Literacy and Linguistics; Joel Barker, Accounting; Andrea Garraway, Business Management; Don Wei, Computer Information Systems; Chamutal Noiman, English; Jason Schneiderman, English; Jean Amaral, Library; Eda Henao, Modern Languages; Michael Morford, Music and Art; Edna Asknes, Nursing; Catarina Mata, Science; Christopher Jackson, Speech; Mark Janis, Speech; Kirsten Cole, Teacher Education and Janice Walters, Teacher Education.


Open Forum Presents Donald Generals, Middle States Team Chair for BMCC

 

As part of the ongoing accreditation process through the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) for Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), students, faculty and staff attended a Middle States Open Forum on November 6 at 199 Chambers Street.

The forum was hosted by BMCC President Antonio Pérez and featured Donald Generals, President of the Community College of Philadelphia and Middle States team chair for BMCC.

Dr. Generals provided information about Middle States reaffirmation and opened the floor to audience comments related to BMCC’s MSCHE Self-Study Report 2017-2018.

This report documents the college’s efforts to strengthen students’ college readiness, facilitate their timely degree completion and other priorities. It is part of BMCC’s decennial self-study process launched in February 2016, when more than 100 faculty and staff formed working groups to address the seven Middle States standards.

A focus on transparency

The culmination of the MSCHE reaffirmation process will be a peer-reviewed visit from a Middle States Evaluation Team in March 2018.

“My purpose for being here today is simply to see if the institution is ready for that visit,” said Dr. Generals. “My job is to see if the self-study process has been transparent, with widespread inclusion of students, faculty and staff. It’s not about getting high marks, it’s about the process of continual improvement.”

In other words, said President Pérez, “The Middle States visit isn’t about showcasing who we are—it’s about sharing who we are and clarifying the directions we have chosen in our institutional self-study, ensuring that the college community has had a part in its creation.”

The Self-Study Report 2017-2018 is available online.

 


Hispanic Heritage Month Highlights Paths to Empowerment

 

Hispanic Heritage Month, Paths to Empowerment opened November 1 at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), with a presentation by award-winning poet Cristina Rivera Garza, author of The Iliac Crest, “an excavation of forgotten Mexican women writers.” Other events that day included the opening of the Altar del Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead Altar as well as an exhibit in the BMCC Library that features works from the Hispanic diaspora.

“We wanted to have a more academic focus that would provide our students with the tools to raise critical awareness about our current social issues,” says Professor Rosario Torres of the Academic Literacy and Linguistics Department at BMCC. “Transformative events such as the Third Cross Cultural Approaches to Latin Studies (CCALS) Biennial Conference: School as an Immigrant and the Moth Storytelling Workshops are the highlights of this Hispanic Heritage Month.”

The events “will emphasize storytelling, experience sharing and collective wisdom in order to build paths to empowerment,” says Professor Torres, who is co-chair of the Hispanic Heritage Committee with Professor David Caicedo. “Events will range from academic workshops on narrative construction, to storytelling podcasts, to legal advisement on immigration.

Hispanic Heritage Month will run through December 7. For more information, contact Professor Rosario Torres at rtorres@bmcc.cuny.edu.


Message from the President: Terror Attack in Lower Manhattan

BMCC has a unique history of resilience when faced with tragedies, including the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and their impact on our campus. We are a strong community that knows the importance of looking out for ourselves and each other. Our resiliency underlies our response to yesterday’s senseless terror attack that killed eight innocent people who were out enjoying our city’s beautiful recreational sights along West Street.

President Perez

This horrific event is a reminder to be vigilant of our surroundings and safety. At BMCC, our response to crises is a priority. We continue to improve our strategies to protect our college community. We stand firmly in support of all our students, faculty and staff, and reinforce our commitment to provide a safe and nurturing working and learning environment. We have several services in place for any members of our community who need help dealing with the aftereffects of yesterday’s attack.

The Office of Student Affairs, located in room S-350, is available to answer questions and direct students, faculty and staff to get help through the BMCC Counseling Center, located in room S-343.

BMCC will continue to work with NYPD and other city agencies as they investigate yesterday’s attack. Our Public Safety officers are on hand to assist in providing access to our Main Campus at 199 Chambers Street. We will continue to update the BMCC community through social media and other communication platforms.

Our hearts go out to the families and loved ones of everyone affected by yesterday’s tragedy.

Sincerely,

President Perez

Antonio Pérez

BMCC President


BMCC Offers Opportunity for Students Displaced by Natural Disasters

 

Efforts are being made to help displaced students who were affected by hurricanes in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The CUNY Board of Trustees recently made a decision to allow affected full-time students to pay tuition at the in-state rate and now BMCC is providing more opportunities for displaced students to earn an education through select programs.

“At BMCC we take pride in our global community, and many of our students are from areas affected by recent natural disasters, such as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands,” says Sunil Gupta, Dean of the BMCC Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development.

To help those students out, particularly those whose incoming CUNY Assessment Test scores indicate they need support with college-level mathematics, “We are waiving all application and enrollment fees for eligible students with dislocated status due to natural disasters who are seeking to attend our BMCC Math Start program,” Dean Gupta said. “Gaining an education is a critical part of the recovery process for individuals affected by these devastating events, and we want them to know we are there for them.”

Providing services to disaster-affected students is also a priority for Diane K. Walleser, Vice President for Enrollment Management.

“BMCC has a strong relationship with the Puerto Rican and Caribbean communities and we hope to help students whose education has been disrupted, or who have been displaced from the workplace and are looking for a fresh start,” she says. “The CUNY Board of Trustees vote to allow affected full-time students to pay tuition at the in-state rate will enable affected students at BMCC to save over $10,000 intuition.”

Additionally, she says, “Our BMCC Admissions and Financial Aid teams will match students to the right programs, as well as help them access tuition assistance grants and scholarships. We stand ready to support our Puerto Rican and Caribbean friends and family, as they seek educational goals and rebuild their lives.”

BMCC students come from more than 160 countries around the world, including those devastated by recent natural disasters. To assist in relief efforts, BMCC students set up tables throughout the College and collected a total of $1,788 so far. This effort, which includes the collection of non-perishable goods, is being led by the BMCC Office of Student Affairs in collaboration with the Caribbean Student Club at BMCC. Donations are still being accepted and can be made by contacting the Office of Student Activities at (212) 220-8160 or osa@bmcc.cuny.edu.

Full-time students displaced by recent natural disasters and interested in entering the BMCC Math Start program through the BMCC Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development may call LaShallah Burgess, (212) 346-8897.

Students displaced by recent natural disasters who want more information on paying tuition at the in-state level, applying for grants or other assistance, may contact the BMCC Office of Admissions: admissions@bmcc.cuny.edu.


BMCC Veteran Students Share Challenges with Service Organizations

The Veterans Resource Center at BMCC, welcomed representatives from the New York City Department of Veterans’ Services (DVS) to meet with student veterans on Oct. 18. The session provided BMCC student veterans with an opportunity to share their stories and ask questions about acquiring assistance for services including housing and health benefits. The event was part of the ongoing DVS Veterans on Campus Listening tour.

BMCC President Antonio Pérez welcomed everyone and shared the college’s ongoing efforts to support its student veterans. DVS representatives Jamal Othman, Assistant Commissioner of Education, Employment and Entrepreneurship and Cassandra Alvarez, Senior Adviser and Director of Public Private Partnerships, attended the session to unveil a new program called, Veterans on Campus-NYC, and to learn about some of the challenges student veterans are experiencing.

The most common topic discussed was the need for housing assistance. “Homelessness and housing are the biggest issues that we are trying to help resolve,” Otham said. “This issue is even more challenging in New York City.”

Deborah Harte, Director of Single Stop at BMCC, attended the session to provide insight regarding the services offered by Single Stop and to learn how the Commissioner’s office is helping veterans with housing. “It’s an area we would love to partner with you,” said Harte to the DVS representatives. “We know how challenging it is to help our students with housing.”

BMCC student veterans

The Veterans on Campus Program is designed to provide assistance to colleges in identifying and adopting best practices for serving veterans at their campuses. Otham said, he is hopeful that colleges, like BMCC, will partner with DVS to ensure a successful transition to college, careers and purpose-driven civilian lives.

In addition, Joshua Chrisman, Senior Operations Associate with American Corporate Partners, attended the session to inform BMCC student veterans about the Veteran Mentor Program, which connects veterans with professionals from a variety of public and private corporations through yearlong mentorships. The program offers veterans with skills including resume building, interviewing, networking and leadership.

For more information about the Veterans Resource Center at BMCC, call (212) 220-8000, Ext. 5363.


Kowald Legacy Series at CCNY features poet Kimiko Hahn, Nov. 14

Poet Kimiko Hahn

Poet Kimiko Hahn, award-winning author of nine books of verse, presents two readings in The City College of New York’s Rifkind Center, NAC room 6/316, on Nov. 14. “Craft Talk,” 2 – 3 p.m.  and “Reading,” 5 – 6 p.m., to conclude this semester’s Kowald Legacy Series. Both are free and open to the public.

The readings are supported by the Kenneth Kowald Fund for Advancing American Literature and the Rifkind Center for the Humanities in City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts.

Hahn’s critically acclaimed work includes the books “The Artist’s Daughter: Poems,” “The Narrow Road to the Interior,” “Toxic Flora” and “Brain Fever.”

She’s the winner of the PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry, the American Book Award, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She has also been awarded fellowships by the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hahn is a distinguished professor at Queens College. In 2016, she was elected president of the Poetry Society of America.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Photonics interns advance

Matthew Shao Chen, Karen Wu Photonics Interns & Siemens Competition Semifinalists

2017 CCNY Photonics Interns with Dr. Robert Alfano and Dr. Kestutis Sutkus

Most high school students spend their summer hanging out at the mall or chilling at the shore. But each year a handful of students from NYC high schools spend their break peering through fancy microscopes at The Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers (IUSL) of the City University of New York at The City College of New York.

Why do these kids bypass the beach to be part of the Photonics Internship program? “They’re passionate about science and eager to learn about optics and physics,” says Dr. Robert Alfano, a scientific innovator whose work unites the divergent fields of medicine, biology and high-speed laser physics. Alfano, a Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering at The City College of New York, is the Director of the IUSL and has led the internship program since its inception.

Over the years, more than 100 high school students who were trained using the state of art methods at IUSL have gone on to some of the best colleges and universities. So it’s no wonder the competition for the intern spots is fierce. Alfano says being smart is a given. He looks for kids who understand that “The only way to make, build and do great things in science is to get your hands dirty in the lab.”

Interns learn how to be optical scientists. They work on real projects with teams of undergrad and PhD students studying photonic and laser technologies for scientific, engineering, medical, and industrial applications. Some lucky interns get their names on published papers. All interns enter the premier national science research competition for high school students, the Siemens Competition. One year a CCNY intern, David Bauer, won the prestigious competition and a $100,000 prize (part of which he used to fund his CCNY undergrad degree).

This year two interns were selected to be Siemens Semifinalists: Matthew Shao Chen of Great Neck South High School and Karen Wu of Brooklyn Technical High School.

Students participating in the 2017 Photonics Internship program came from many NYC area high schools including Riverdale Country School, Brooklyn Tech, and the Bronx School of Science.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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CCNY’s Jennifer Morton wins inaugural national Israel Scheffler Prize

CCNY philosophy professor Jennifer Morton is winner of the inaugural Israel Scheffler Prize in Philosophy of Education.

For her unique insights into student and teacher behavior, City College of New York philosophy professor Jennifer Morton is the winner of the American Philosophical Association’s inaugural Israel Scheffler Prize in Philosophy of Education.

APA cited five of Morton’s connected set of papers on topics in the philosophy of education for presenting her its new award established in memory of the late Israel Scheffler, an influential philosopher of education globally.

Morton’s insightful papers that caught APA’s attention are:

  • “The Non-Cognitive Challenge to a Liberal Egalitarian Education;”
  •  “Cultural Code-Switching: Straddling the Achievement Gap;”
  • “Molding Conscientious, Hard-Working, and Perseverant Students;”
  •  “Unequal Classrooms: Higher Education and Online Learning;” and
  •  “The Educator’s Dual Role: Expressing Ideals While Educating in Non-Ideal Conditions.”

The Scheffler Prize will be awarded every third year for either a book or a connected set of three or more papers on a topic in philosophy of education, broadly construed.

An assistant professor of philosophy in City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts, Morton’s areas of research are philosophy of action, moral philosophy, philosophy of education, and political philosophy.

She has published papers in the European Journal of Philosophy, the Journal of Political Philosophy, Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Research and Theory in Education, among others. She has been awarded a Spencer Foundation grant for her work in Philosophy of Education.

Morton is a graduate of Stanford University (PhD) and Princeton University (A.B.).

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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PRISM Students Earn Awards for Their Research at National STEM Conferences

PRISM Students Earn Awards For Their Research At National STEM Conferences

Two John Jay students have earned national awards for their undergraduate research in science at national conferences that promote diversity and inclusion in STEM.

Senior and Macaulay Honors College student Lisset Duran, who attended the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) conference with a travel grant, won an award for her outstanding presentation of her research on the genetics of breast cancer. Dee-Anne Cush, who is a senior majoring in Cellular and Molecular Biology, won an award at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) on her presentation of immunology research she completed as part of Albert Einstein College of Medicine’s Summer Undergraduate Research Program.

“It was amazing to win,” said Cush. “It made me appreciate my capabilities and it enlightened me to how far I can go and how much I can achieve if I set my mind to it.”

John Jay’s Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math (PRISM) is committed to creating opportunities for students to learn science outside of the classroom. In November, Cush was one of seven students who attended ABRCMS in Phoenix, and Duran was one of six students to fly out to Salt Lake City in October for the 2017 SACNAS National Diversity in STEM Conference. In addition to gaining direct research experience under a faculty mentor, PRISM students like Duran and Cush also receive “bootcamp” style training to help them craft effective messaging for their presentations at the conferences.

PRISM students at John Jay
      John Jay PRISM students in Salt Lake City for the 2017 SACNAS National Diversity in STEM Conference

“Being a scientist is being able to communicate well,” said Duran, who works closely with her faculty mentor Professor Lissette Delgado-Cruzata. “I used to get up to present and I literally would shake. Now I go up there and I do my presentation with a lot of confidence. Without PRISM, I wouldn’t have had that.”

“When I first started working with faculty mentor Dr. Angelique Cortals, I wasn’t familiar with scientific jargon—it was all new to me. But I’ve been in PRISM for three years and I have improved tremendously in communicating and understanding science,” said Cush.

Because SACNAS and ABRCMS have a specific emphasis on increasing diversity in science, they are or particular importance to John Jay’s students, many of whom come from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in STEM.

“SACNAS is very different from other conferences in that it’s focused on minorities, and it’s refreshing to be in a place where everyone looks like you,” said Duran, who spent her summer at Brown University conducting research as part of a paid internship with The Leadership Alliance.

“As a black student in a predominantly white-male dominated field, it shows that there are opportunities for us out there,” said Cush.

Dr. Edgardo Sanabria-Valentín, Associate Program Director of PRISM, agrees that diversity in STEM is a priority for John Jay’s community, especially since the College is a federally designated Hispanic-Serving Institution with 49% of its students identifying as Hispanic. “We at PRISM believe that science should represent the diversity that we see both in our beautiful city and across the world,” he said.

Another important feature of the conferences is that both ABRCMS and SACNAS offer its participants preparation for graduate school. The SACNAS conference featured representatives from 400 different graduate schools as well as mentoring opportunities and workshops to receive individualized resume advice. For Duran, who is pursuing a PhD in biomedical science, and Cush, who has just applied to medical school, that information is crucial.

“All of our students should know what their options are and have opportunities to pursue advanced careers and degrees in science,” said Dr. Sanabria-Valentín. “That’s one of PRISM’s goals.”


Family Palooza Brings Families to John Jay for a Day of Campus Fun

Family Palooza Brings Families to John Jay For a Day of Campus Fun

Families flocked to campus on October 21st for Family Palooza, a daylong carnival-style event hosted by the Office of Student Transition Programs. Formerly known as Family Weekend, the event allowed families to learn about the College’s myriad offerings while spending a Saturday afternoon having fun together.

“This year, families saw the program and got excited,” said Renee Toney, a Senior majoring in Law and Society who has helped organize Family Weekends over the past three years as a Peer Ambassador. “In the past, it was conference-style, but parents didn’t want to be lectured. This time, we made it inclusive for kids by having balloons, basketball, and games.”

Jazmin Letamendi, Associate Director of the Office of Student Transition Programs, agrees that in addition to being more inclusive, the programming was made more accessible this year by hosting it on-site at the campus gym. “As a result, attendance skyrocketed from 140 to 300 people.”

Jazmin Letamendi
Jazmin Letamendi

For the first time ever, the planning for the event involved a committee of students from John Jay’s Peer Ambassador Program under Letamendi’s guidance. Family Palooza, which featured 21 student clubs, a photo booth, a workshop led by Professor Jennifer Rosati on Forensic Science, a talent show, a volunteer project with the Office of Community Outreach and Service Learning, and an off-campus New York Islanders game, required a great deal of effort that paid off in the end.

“It’s the students who know what the community wants, because they’re the voice of the College,” Letamendi said. “We were really satisfied with all the work we put into planning the event.”

Mercedes Talley, who tabled at Family Palooza as the Treasurer of the All-Inclusive Club at John Jay, said that the new format allowed her to teach students and their families about her club’s mission through the use of fun games like trivia. “Family Palooza gave our club an opportunity for promotion,” she said. “It let students know that there is a club that tries to advocate for students with disabilities seen and unseen.”

Toney agrees that the event exposed families to the various opportunities the College offers: “Because of the student tabling, families saw what clubs on campus actually do. Later, when we had the talent show with students singing and dancing, families were excited to see what John Jay had to showcase.”

Letamendi says that involving families in students’ lives is a priority for the College, and especially for the Office of Student Transition Programs, which also plans Parent and Family Orientation. “John Jay sets the bar high for family programs because we know that families are instrumental to students’ lives,” she said. “A lot of our families love John Jay, and we see many sending their third or fourth student here. They have a proud devotion to the College.”

At the Office of Student Transition Programs, family is so important that its dynamics are often replicated in its programs. As part of the Peer Ambassadorship Program, students help organize and volunteer at campus events, but they also build strong bonds with one another and the larger John Jay community.

“As Peer Ambassadors, we tell each other about internship opportunities and elevate each other,” said Toney. “It’s like a big family.”

Family Palooza photobooth photos


For Veteran’s Day, John Jay College Honors its Veteran Students

For Veterans Day, John Jay College Honors its Veteran Students

For Veterans Day, John Jay College is celebrating its student veteran population. With 530 veterans currently enrolled, the College takes pride in honoring its many veteran students who have served in various military branches and have made tremendous sacrifices for the nation and the greater good.

Recognized as a Best for Vets and Veteran Friendly higher education institution, John Jay offers extensive programming, services, and career opportunities to prepare its student veterans for life after the military. Richard Pusateri, Manager of the Military and Veteran’s Services Office, says that with an 80% graduation rate and with an average GPA last year of 3.3, veteran students are characteristically successful at John Jay.

One of those exceptional students is Sade Thomas, who will sing the National Anthem at the Mayor’s Breakfast on November 11, with Mayor de Blasio, First Lady Chirlane McCray, and other prominent city leaders in attendance. Thomas served as an administrative specialist in the US Marine Corps at Camp Pendleton, CA from 2006-2010, where she achieved the rank of Corporal. A native of Brooklyn, she graduated with a Criminal Justice BS from John Jay in 2014, and is currently enrolled in the MPA Oversight and Inspection program from which she will graduate in May.

As the President of the student-led John Jay Veterans Association, a peer mentorship group for veteran students, Thomas is committed to fostering community among veterans on campus.

“I’ve been a member of the Veterans Association since 2014, so I know the people well here and I love being around them,” she said. “I make sure student veterans get the best academic experience they can.”

 

               Sade Thomas

Another veteran student John Jay is proud to recognize is Kyle Grant. When Grant retired from the military in 2014, he was more motivated than ever to complete his education. He immediately started taking classes at Kingsborough College, where he completed his Associate Degree, and then transferred to John Jay for his Bachelor’s in Security Management. Only a few months after earning his BS in the spring, he is now pursuing a dual-degree in Protection Management and Public Administration and plans to graduate this December.

During the day, Kyle works a full-time job as a Security Manager at First Data, one of the nation’s leading credit card processing companies. At night, Kyle returns to campus, where he is currently enrolled in five courses. “What I’m doing is not for everybody,” he said. “But it’s because of my dedication that I’m finding a way to get it done.”

Former Marine and Forensic Psychology major Eugene Marmontov shares a similar commitment to his education. Throughout his eight years on active duty as a Marine – in Afghanistan and Iraq, Guantanamo Bay and Europe – he envisioned coming home one day and going to college, and specifically, to John Jay.

“I always wanted to go into public service in the justice field,” he said, “and I knew that was the place I wanted to be.”

Marmontov, 35, was born in Moscow and emigrated to Brooklyn with his mother when he was 18. After enlisting in the Marines at 24, he ended his active duty career in 2015, and enrolled at John Jay. Marmontov now has a 3.95 GPA and will graduate in December with hopes to begin his career in law enforcement either with a federal agency such as the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Agency or Secret Service, or with the NYPD.

On November 9 during community hour, the Office of Military and Veterans Services and the Veterans Association will host a Veterans Day observance and Marine Birthday celebration where community members are invited to contribute hygiene items to a month-long collection drive for homeless veterans. On November 28th, a ceremony and banquet featuring keynote speaker Rear Admiral Steven D. Poulin will be held for new inductees into the John Jay chapter of the SALUTE National Veterans Honor Society, which was initiated on campus last year.

“John Jay is committed to honoring its veteran students,” said Pusateri. “For veterans, that acceptance in this community means a lot.”


John Jay Research & Evaluation Center Presents Findings on Program to Eliminate Violence at DeNormalizing Violence Conference

John Jay Research & Evaluation Center Presents Findings on Program To Eliminate Violence At Denormalizing Violence Conference

On October 26, the John Jay Research & Evaluation Center (JohnJayREC) hosted the Denormalizing Violence Conference, where they presented results from a study that evaluated the ground-breaking CURE Violence program. CURE Violence reduces violence by understanding and treating it as a public health issue, and for four years, JohnJayREC has received funds from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) of Princeton, New Jersey, the New York City Council, and the New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice to conduct evaluation of the program.

Jeffrey Butts, Director of JohnJayREC, opened the conference by pointing out favorable findings that show that CURE Violence has contributed to reducing violence, increasing the adoption of non-violent norms in place of violent ones, and fostering community trust and cooperation with law enforcement.

Additionally, CURE Violence staff who are trained to anticipate and deter violent conflicts as well as provide counseling, spoke at length about the experience of implementing the CURE Violence model. One of the primary reasons they say its works is because the model is community-centered and is facilitated by trusted community members.

“The program works because it’s an inside job,” said David Caba, Program Director with Bronx Rises Against Gun Violence, a CURE Violence site. “The Violence Interrupter needs to live in the catchment where they work. You can’t bring someone from the suburbs to the South Bronx to do this work.”

Shanduke McPhatter, Executive Director of Gangstas Makin’ Astronomical Community Changes, which uses the CURE Violence model in Brooklyn, said that as someone who was formerly incarcerated and affiliated with a gang, he’s uniquely positioned as a credible messenger to change the way individuals think about violence. “Instead of telling somebody what to do, I show them what to do,” he said.

The benefits tend to be beneficial for everyone involved. “Once you start changing other people’s lives, you have the shot to change your own life,” said Marcus McAllister, from the National CURE Violence team. “This work transforms the workers.”

But while the evidence is strong that CURE Violence is effective, the research did not always fully convey the transformative impact that the program had on the lives of participant and staff members.

“We went out and surveyed over 5,000 young men in New York City, but you couldn’t necessarily measure everything,” said Sheyla Delgado, JohnJayREC Deputy Director for Analytics. “We can become more creative about how we measure these things,” she added, mentioning that program recognition may be another effective way to measure CURE Violence’s impact.

Charlie Ransford, Director of Science and Policy at CURE Violence, says that despite these challenges, the research that JohnJayREC has done is invaluable to making sure that the program continues to improve. “Our approach is within the community and to get rid of violence, 100 percent,” he said. “Research helps us figure out that if we have the right perspective and ask, how can we make the model better? How can we make it work to the 100 percent level?”

New York City Council Member Jumaane Williams echoed that CURE Violence’s community-centered approach is exactly what’s needed to counter mass incarceration, which has been discredited as ineffective in reducing both violence and crime. “Crime prevention right now is to lock up as many black and brown people as possible, but we know that doesn’t work,” he said. “We’re using an acute solution for a chronic problem.”

As “a chronic problem” that has the potential to be stopped by looking at long-term policy solutions is exactly how Robin L. Holmes Myers, Operations Director of CURE Violence at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), thinks violence should be approached. “There is structural violence happening in these neighborhoods,” she said. “How do we change policies that are causing this violence? How do people receive services that are needed like housing or mental health services?”

Aletha Maybank, Deputy Commissioner of DOHMH, said that framing violence as a public health issue will help us see the real cost violence has on our communities.

“The larger goal is not just to stop violence,” she said. “It’s about stopping premature death.”

View all the photos from the conference.


John Jay is Among the Most Diverse Colleges in the Northeast According to Wall Street Journal Ranking

John Jay is Among the Most Diverse Colleges in the Northeast According to Wall Street Journal Ranking

John Jay College has been ranked among the top five multicultural and inclusive colleges in New York City in the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education (THE) College Rankings. The  list is based on an environment metric which includes the racial and financial backgrounds of student populations. John Jay is #10 for diversity among colleges in the entire Northeast.

According to the publication, the WSJ/THE rankings measure school environment factors such as the number of students that are the first in their families to attend college and the share of the student body that comes from abroad. This metric also accounts for the percentage of Pell Grant recipients and the racial and ethnic diversity of the faculty. Four other City University of New York colleges also made the top 10 list.

With a student body that represents more than 130 nationalities, John Jay’s diverse community is evident beyond the rankings. The College’s inclusive campus fosters a rich environment for learning about important topics, engaging in hands-on research and working towards solutions to major national and global issues.

As a Hispanic-Serving Institution, with membership in the Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities (HACU) and the Hispanic Education Technology Services consortium (HETS), John Jay supports student success with programs such as Adelante!, the Pre-Law Institute, the Ronald H. Brown Law School Prep Program, and the Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math (PRISM), which is contributing to increased diversity in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. This year, a report by the Education Trust also ranked John Jay College #3 for the graduation rates of Black students among top-performing colleges and universities.

 

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations.  In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.


The National Society of Leadership and Success at John Jay Brings Sir Richard Branson to Campus

The National Society of Leadership and Success at John Jay Brings Sir Richard Branson to Campus

On October 17, Sir Richard Branson visited John Jay College to speak about the role of social good in business as part of a live national broadcast organized by the National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS).

“Your idea must make a positive impact in people’s lives,” Branson said in front of an audience that included students, staff, faculty, and President Karol V. Mason. “Otherwise what’s the point?”

As part of their goal to develop the leadership potential of students, NSLS, which has over 500 chapters on campuses nationwide, offers students the opportunity to hear from influential leaders from a variety of fields. In addition to Branson, NSLS has hosted talks with Trevor Noah, Anderson Cooper, Arianna Huffington, and many more. Because they are broadcast nationally as well as recorded for later viewing, each talk is accessible to students regardless of where they are based.

Richard Branson with the National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS)Allison O’Hagan, a Forensic Psychology major who is graduating next May, is the President of John Jay’s NSLS chapter and says that becoming involved with the Society is something all students can benefit from, regardless of their area of study. “There’s something for everyone to take from the program,” she said. “For example, I’m currently trying to be a police officer and leadership is something they stress.”

At John Jay, the NSLS chapter is relatively new at only three years old, but the chapter’s future has been promising since its inception in 2015 when former student and Forensic Psychology major Angelica Puente-Soto approached Danielle Officer, Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, with the idea to start the chapter on campus. Once approved, the program quickly grew.

“Our goal was to have 50 students, but in that first year, we had nearly 600. We ended up having induction in the school gymnasium, and the President of the Society attended,” said Officer.

After that first massive success, the John Jay College chapter has grown and has continued to gain attention from NSLS executive leadership. After hosting a regional leadership retreat hosted over the summer, John Jay was selected to host a speaker broadcast with Sir Richard Branson, which is an opportunity that is only extended to strong NSLS chapters. The College is the first CUNY campus to host a live broadcast.

Students in the audience watching the National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS) interview with Sir Richard BransonAt the heart of NSLS is the development of leadership skills so that students can reach their dreams in college and beyond. To that aim, students must complete three components to be inducted into the Society. In addition to viewing at least three speaker broadcasts, students also must attend a Leadership Training Day as well as join a Success Networking Team (SNT). Within their SNT, which is comprised of a small group of peers, students set action plans using the SMART model—a model used to set and achieve attainable goals.

“It’s one thing to set a goal on your own but when you share a goal, you feel responsibility to complete it,” said Officer. “In their SNTs, students can set any goal they want, but the peers in the group hold them accountable and help guide them through it.”

After completing their goals, some students become even more involved with the Society by joining the Executive Board. O’Hagan thinks that the students that gain the most are those who take advantage of these various opportunities. “When you’re first invited, you might look at the requirements and think it doesn’t work,” she said. “But we find that students who put in time and effort are more successful, and they end up doing successful things in all aspects of their involvement in campus.”

Richard Branson with President Karol Mason

Ultimately, the goal of NSLS is aligned with the goal of all of John Jay’s programs housed out of CSIL’s office: to develop professional leaders who will become fierce advocates for justice.

“Like Branson said, when you fall, you get back up,” said Officer. “Our goal is that students learn to overcome obstacles and develop perseverance so that they can pay it forward in society.”

 

View all the photos from the event.


Alumni Achieving Graduate School Dreams: Celebrating 25 Years of the McNair Scholars Program at John Jay

Alumni Achieving Graduate School Dreams: Celebrating 25 Years of the McNair Scholars Program at John Jay

This year, the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program is celebrating its 25th year at John Jay College. Allura Casanova, who graduated from John Jay in 2016 with a major in Forensic Psychology and Global History, and is now completing a joint PhD in Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, may not have ever considered pursuing her doctorate without the help of McNair.

“I’m a first generation college student,” said Casanova. “Before the McNair program, I didn’t know what graduate school could mean for me.”

Tannuja Rozario, who graduated from John Jay in 2016 with a major in Law and Society, and is currently pursuing her PhD in Sociology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, agrees that the program opened her eyes to what was possible.

“The McNair program pushed me beyond what I thought my limits were,” said Rozario.

The objective of the McNair Scholars Program is to encourage low-income and first generation students to pursue graduate study. As part of the program, students have the opportunity to work with a faculty mentor on a two year research project, receive graduate school admission guidance including GRE preparation, and attend several workshops and activities to learn the personal and professional skills needed to succeed in graduate school.

“McNair gave us tools we wouldn’t have access to otherwise,” said Casanova.

One of the most important tools that McNair equips students with is the ability to conduct research—a skill that can seem daunting to undergraduate students.

“I knew I wanted to conduct research projects when I came to John Jay, but I felt so overwhelmed at first,” said Rozario. “I applied to the McNair program, and my mentor who guided me through my research paper also guided me through my two years in the program and beyond.”

“I began working in Professor Daryl Wout’s lab, and he encouraged me to apply for McNair,” said Casanova. “Under his mentorship, I learned what my own research interests were.”

The program is also committed to eliminating financial barriers to applying for graduate school, which is important for McNair Scholars, many of whom chose John Jay specifically because of its affordability.

“John Jay is low cost, but I had to pay out of pocket for my education,” said Casanova. “The application fees and costs related to the GRE wouldn’t have been possible without McNair’s help.”

But the program offers more than academic and financial support—it also prepares students for unexpected social challenges they may face in their graduate programs, many of which require students to travel out-of-state and out of their comfort zones.

“Transitioning from New York to Massachusetts was not easy,” said Rozario. “But it is such a great experience.”

Casanova agrees. “Michigan is not as diverse as John Jay,” she said. “But the McNair program helped me adjust to a place where faculty and mentors have a different racial and socioeconomic background than mine.”

Both Rozario and Casanova feel uniquely positioned for success in graduate school because of their experience at John Jay.

“John Jay was an unforgettable experience, and I am so grateful for the opportunities that I was provided with,” Rozario said.

“At John Jay, I knew that faculty members really cared about me,” said Casanova. “Dr. Ernest Lee still reaches out to see how I’m doing.”

It is partly because of her positive experience at John Jay that Casanova is so enthusiastically pursuing her PhD.

“This may sound cheesy,” she said, “but my goal is to become a professor because I want to be the same mentor for young scholars that my mentor was for me.”


Doctoral Student Mawia Khogali Wins Fellowship From National Institute of Justice to Complete Her Dissertation in Justice

Doctoral Student Mawia Khogali Wins Fellowship from National Institute of Justice to Complete her Dissertation in Justice

Mawia Khogali is two years away from graduating with her PhD in Psychology and Law from John Jay College, a highly competitive program that only admits five people per year, and enables her to look at justice from the lens of psychology.

Now, three years into her program, Mawia has been awarded a fellowship from the National Institute of Justice for the completion of her dissertation, which will look at the perception of force between police and civilians. Mawia says the fellowship will open up new possibilities for her career.

“Getting this award from the NIJ is the best thing that could have happened,” she said. “My ability to move forward as a researcher has shifted because the fellowship recognizes that what I’m doing is worthy in the field.”

Mawia was a strong applicant for the award, especially given her extensive research experience. As part of her doctoral program, she’s worked on a variety of research projects, including a study in which she reached out to 1,500 attorneys in order to analyze how racial stereotypes influence the way plea bargains are negotiated.  “It’s a learning experience,” she said. “It’s been a lot of research but it helps me see where I want to go in my career trajectory.”

That trajectory is already starting to take form as Mawia has also accepted a fellowship at the Vera Institute’s policing program, where she looks at community policing, a method of policing that focuses on how communities can collaborate with law enforcement for innovative justice solutions. Mawia loves her work at Vera because she can see how it makes a difference on the ground. “We’re using applied research to work hand in hand with police officers to see how we can address issues without the use of enforcement,” she said.

Having these research experiences – both with the faculty at John Jay and her mentors at Vera – has enriched Mawia’s doctoral journey. “I’m still learning a lot, but I can’t imagine having the knowledge I have if it weren’t for both the academic research I’ve done at John Jay and the applied research I’m doing at Vera.”

As a graduate of Medgar Evers, and now as a doctoral student at John Jay, Mawia considers herself a lifelong CUNY supporter. She already gives back to the CUNY family by working as a Teaching Assistant  in Psychology and Law at John Jay. “One of my passions is teaching,” she said. “I love my students here. They have a personal relationship with you, and they rely on you both for knowledge and life skills.”

It’s because of Mawia’s commitment to justice, both in the criminal justice system and elsewhere, that she is considering becoming a full-time professor at CUNY one day. At CUNY, where there are high rates of students of color, Mawia feels she can make the most impact. “I’ve noticed how white the academy is, and I’ve been able to see the lack of resources for students of color. I’m the only black person in my program and I want to share the knowledge I’ve gained with those who look like me.”

“I promote justice, especially racial justice, in all the classes I teach,” she said. “CUNY students want that.”


John Jay and CUNY Push for DACA Renewal

John Jay and CUNY Push For DACA Renewal

There has been an outpouring of criticism in academic circles across the U.S., and especially at CUNY and John Jay, in reaction to efforts to rescind DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The Obama administration put DACA in place to protect young immigrants from deportation if they were brought to the U.S. illegally as children and have remained here ever since.

John Jay president Karol Mason has been vocal in her support of undocumented students, often called “Dreamers.” In a statement on the subject, she said, “we are committed at John Jay to doing everything we can to support and protect our students, regardless of immigration status.” It is estimated that there are between 500 and 1,000 undocumented students at John Jay College.

The College is adhering to guidelines in place whereby the institution will not disclose any immigration information about students unless legally required. These protections are consistent with the policy outlined by CUNY and Chancellor James Milliken.  In a statement of his own, Milliken said, “We are fully committed to the thousands of CUNY DACA students and will do all we can to support them. They represent some of the most talented and creative voices in the CUNY community and our city. We will do everything we can to help persuade Congress to shore up support for the DACA community, not undermine it, and CUNY will provide counseling and guidance to help our DACA students with their needs and questions.”

On September 6, Milliken made an appearance at John Jay College alongside Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who announced that he was filing a lawsuit on behalf of New York State (along with 14 additional states and the District of Columbia) challenging the Trump administration’s decision to rescind DACA. In a statement issued the following day, President Mason said, “Yesterday, we all witnessed what it means to be a Fierce Advocate for Justice… We will join with the overwhelming chorus of voices speaking out against the decision to rescind DACA, and leverage our resources to persuade Congress to right this obvious wrong.”

Faculty, staff, and students around campus have been organizing to provide additional resources and support for undocumented students.  These include: advertising free renewals of DACA applications; the creation of community safe spaces such as “Pizza Mondays,” an event put together by the Latino/a Studies department that takes place each Monday where undocumented students can get together to talk and discuss immigration issues; confidential counseling support offered by the Wellness Center; and other legal and financial resources.

Isabel Martinez and Nancy Yang are two of the many John Jay faculty and staff members deeply involved in the movement to protect Dreamers on campus. They help run the DREAMers Club and organized Pizza Mondays. According to Martinez, “My classrooms have been very upfront about teaching about undocumented students.” She meets with her students individually so she can offer support.

Martinez has also been raising awareness about different scholarship opportunities (most undocumented students aren’t eligible for financial aid) and additional legal protections that might be available such as Special Juvenile Immigrant Status.

To learn more about the resources available to undocumented students at John Jay, click here: http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/undocumentedstudents


John Jay Mobilizes To Support Disaster Relief and Recovery Efforts

John Jay Mobilizes to Support Disaster Relief and Recovery Efforts

In the wake of four natural disasters, which tragically struck within weeks of each other, the John Jay community has mobilized to support those affected by these tragic events.

“We are all reeling from so many tragedies over the past few weeks. We witnessed three hurricanes in a row devastate Texas, Florida, the Caribbean and Puerto Rico, and a major earthquake severely impact Mexico City. On Monday morning, we woke to the news of the mass shootings in Las Vegas. I struggled to find the words to address the pain that so many of us are feeling in the wake of these events,” said President Karol Mason.

Mason said that community members can help in a wide variety of ways including donating household items, volunteering, joining an event, or contributing funds.

To maximize the impact of those who want to help, John Jay set up a webpage – Unmet Needs – to serve as a resource for the community members who wish to donate or support the affected populations.  John Jay is following the Unmet needs Roundtable Model, a model that has proven to be effective in coordinating long-term recovery efforts. The model utilizes a “coordinating agency” to bring together different partner organizations, provide training, help distribute funds, and provide reports on the progress of recovery efforts.

Those who want to volunteer can sign up with the Unmet Needs Roundtable. Donations are being collected and sent to international and domestic areas impacted by the hurricanes, and several events have also been organized including Arts for Healing, which took place in Hound Square from October 16 – 20, and a bake sale scheduled for October 25 in the Atrium.

In a letter to the John Jay community, Jose Luis Morin, chair of the Latino/a studies department, said, “Many in our community – including students, faculty and staff – with roots in Mexico and Puerto Rico have been deeply shaken, are concerned with the wellbeing of loved ones, and are looking for ways to assist in relief efforts.” He identified several specific organizations that people can donate to including Fundacion Loyola to support Mexico and The Hurricane Maria Relief and Recovery Fund to support Puerto Rico, among several other reputable organizations.

Chancellor James Milliken acknowledged that many in the CUNY community are directly affected by the hurricane that struck Puerto Rico. “This disaster has special meaning in New York and at The City University of New York,” he said. “So many in our communities trace their heritage to Puerto Rico, and thousands of CUNY students, faculty and staff have family and friends directly impacted by this disaster. Our thoughts and prayers are with our friends, families and colleagues in Puerto Rico, and we want to do all we can to assist them at this time.”

One John Jay graduate student, Layla Vasquez, started a Go Fund Me campaign that has already raised $1,445 to support recovery efforts in Guayama, Puerto Rico, an area that was hit especially hard.  In an article in Yonkers Daily Voice about her campaign, she is quoted as saying, “This is a human necessity, this is human survival… it’s necessary that the government steps in to help people.”

Check in with the Unmet Needs webpage to stay up to date on how you can aid in the recovery efforts.


At Otisville, Prison-to-College Pipeline is Expanding Educational Opportunity for Students Inside and Out

At Otisville, the Prison-To-College Pipeline Is Expanding Educational Opportunity for Students Both Inside And Out

At the Otisville Correctional Facility, students enrolled in the Prison-To-College-Pipeline (P2CP) anxiously waited to greet a group of visitors who had traveled to the prison specifically to meet them.

“This is a special event,” said Dylan Knapp, a current P2CP student who was scheduled to speak on a panel later in the afternoon. “We’ve spent a lot of time preparing for this.”

The visit was hosted by the Prisoner Reentry Institute (PRI) at John Jay College and by the NYS Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS) as an opportunity for various stakeholders—including John Jay College President Karol Mason, city and state officials, corrections professionals, educators, students, and funders—to learn more about the impact of the ground-breaking P2CP program, which allows incarcerated people to begin their college careers while still incarcerated and finish them upon release. Since its beginning in 2011, the program has garnered the support of various foundations including the David Rockefeller Fund, the Ford Foundation, JM Kaplan Fund, the Teagle Foundation, the Pinkerton Foundation, and more.

“It has not been easy but today is a milestone, and we take pleasure in what we have achieved,” said Otisville Superintendent Kathleen Gerbing.

“It takes a community to pull this off,” added Ann Jacobs, Director of PRI.

That community effort begins with a recruitment process that extends to five prisons across the state. Applicants who pass the CUNY admissions tests in reading and writing submit an essay and are interviewed. Once accepted, students are transferred to Otisville, and begin the three-part program: credit-bearing classes taught by professors that travel to Otisville on a weekly basis, a monthly learning exchange with John Jay students who come to the prison for seminars with the incarcerated students, and a workshop series in which P2CP students receive academic advisement and practice skills for success in college and beyond.

“We want students to have a rich campus experience like all other CUNY students,” said Bianca Van Heydoorn, Director of Educational Initiatives at PRI.

As a result, P2CP students gain access to a comprehensive set of resources and myriad opportunities to learn. That learning extends not just to the students inside, but also to those who participate in the exchange program, who often have an equally life-altering experience.

“I grew up believing that people deserved to be put away,” said Nino Pereira, a John Jay student who participated in the learning exchange program in 2016. “This program showed me that I had biases against incarcerated people, and forced me to face them.”

P2CP’s impact extends well after students complete the program. After graduation, students have access to the College Initiative (CI) program, which provides outreach, academic counseling, financial aid and enrollment assistance, peer mentoring, and supportive workshops. Both P2CP and CI are committed to providing support at each step of the way.

“I’ve gotten support through this program to keep being resilient,” said Dino Solorzano, a second year student of P2CP.  “John Jay and the professors who teach us are here to say this is not just school—this is family.”

That sense of family was clear throughout the visit as returning graduates of P2CP took turns greeting friends they’d met through the program, some of whom were still incarcerated. Deivy Tauzard, who was seeing the prison for the first time since his release, turned to Knapp with advice. “Take advantage of these opportunities,” he said. “This program is hope.”

Fortunately, the program continues to grow. In 2016, an experimental pilot program called the Second Chance Pell was launched to give incarcerated people the opportunity to receive Pell grants to fund their college education. John Jay College was selected as the lead institution for CUNY, and became one of 67 universities nationwide to participate in the program.

“Under the Obama administration, we started the Second Chance Pell,” said John Jay President Karol Mason, recalling her experience as former U.S. Assistant Attorney General. “The Prison-to-College-Pipeline is confirming that what we thought was important in theory is important in practice.”

With the federal Second Chance Pell Pilot expansion, the P2CP academic program has grown to 52 students this fall, and is slated to expand to 100 students in the fall of 2018, and to 150 students in fall 2019.

Theron Smith, who was part of the program’s first cohort in 2011, is excited to see it expand. “From 15 students to 30 to 40, I’ve already seen the program grow so much,” he said.

Dr. Baz Dreisinger, the Founding Academic Director of the program, thinks there’s a good reason that the program continues to grow—it’s because the model works. At the time of this visit, she was in Taiwan to talk about replicating the innovative P2CP model in that country, but her presence was still felt.

“Six years ago, we couldn’t have imagined how powerful the program would become—not just here—but internationally,” Dreisinger stated. “We should all be vastly proud.”

View all the photos from the Otisville Spotlight on P2CP.


For Purple Day, John Jay Students Speak Out Against Domestic Violence

For Purple Day, John Jay Students Speak Out Against Domestic Violence

This October, the Women’s Center for Gender Justice is hosting a series of events for Domestic Violence Awareness Month in order to spread awareness about intimate partner violence (IPV). Included in the Center’s programming were workshops held on October 18 and 19 where students received purple t-shirts to wear the following day for Purple Day — National Domestic Violence Awareness Day.

“Our efforts to bring awareness to this issue on campus are so important,” said Christina Manuel, a senior student at John Jay majoring in Gender Studies and International Criminal Justice. “We’re letting students who have experienced violence know they have a support group.”

Students will also be tabling in the atrium throughout the month, where John Jay community members can decorate t-shirts for inclusion in The Clothesline Project – a national initiative designed to spark campus-wide conversations about violence. The t-shirts will later be displayed in an opening ceremony on November 2nd in the hopes that the exhibit will serve as a visual symbol of support for survivors.

Manuel is one of several students who have been trained by Jessica Greenfield, counselor and clinical social worker at the Women’s Center for Gender Justice, about Title IX, the national law that prohibits sex discrimination and sexual misconduct in schools and colleges. The goal of training students is that they can pass this knowledge on to their peers, who may not realize there are support mechanisms on campus.

“Many students don’t know that John Jay has a policy on sexual misconduct, or that they can speak to me confidentially,” Greenfield said. “As a counselor, I give students as much information as I can so they can make informed decisions, including whether they want to file a report.”

The center offers counseling services for those who have survived any form of gender-based violence, including short-term advocacy or ongoing counseling, as well as information and resources. Still, Greenfield recognizes that not all students may feel comfortable seeking out this support.

“There is still so much stigma around this issue,” Greenfield said. “That’s why the Clothesline Project is impactful, so that students can see that may not be alone in their experiences.”

Furthermore, the language used to describe experiences of violence can sometimes be alienating for students.

“Not everyone relates to the term ‘domestic violence’,” Greenfield said. “But when we talk about healthy relationships and healthy communication, it meets people on a different level.”

The Women’s Center for Gender Justice’s focus on healthy relationships includes all aspects of sexuality, including reproductive and sexual health.  In November, the Center hosts a birth control clinic and sexual health fair where students can meet with physicians and get information about testing as well as prescriptions for birth control for up to a year.
The Women’s Center also runs the Gender Justice Advocates Program, a professional development program that trains students on how to engage in activism and lead effective campaigns for gender justice.

Christina Manuel, whose hometown is in Virginia, said that it is this commitment to justice that makes her most proud to be a student at John Jay.

“It’s so cool to be in a community that is focused on social justice and change,” she said. “That passion for activism from both students and professors is what really drew me here.”


In the Anthropology Department, Students Are Building a Creative Community Inclusive of All

In the Anthropology Department, Students are Building a Creative Community Inclusive of All

Students looking for a creative home at John Jay College need look no further than the Anthropology Department, where the student collective and magazine known as A Home @ The End of the World will celebrate its one year anniversary this November.

“We started because students wanted to write outside of the academic setting, and without an explicit focus on justice,” said Atiba Rougier, Professor of Anthropology and head of the magazine. “Students were asking: how do I want to engage in the world through my writing?”

“The zine gives me the ability to express myself creatively,” said Connor Gilligan, a founding member of the magazine and sophomore majoring in Anthropology.

Every month, A Home @ The End of the World publishes articles from “zinesters” on topics that include everything from history and literature to health and happiness. Before publication, articles are reviewed by an Executive Editorial Board that includes several John Jay faculty, including President of the American Anthropological Association Alisse Waterston.

“A Home @ The End of the World gives students space to write, but it’s also a way for students to learn things like meeting deadlines and expressing themselves in an article,” said Rougier. “That’s important for a career.”

In addition to building professional skills, senior Joey Butts says the magazine builds community: “The zine has given me a family at John Jay.”

That emphasis on community is why A Home @ The End of the World also hosts a monthly discussion series called the Anthropology Café, where students can come together to learn how anthropology can help them find solutions to real-world problems.

“Take the topic of drug addiction,” said Kevin Garcia, a freshman studying English. “Anthropology helps us see it as more than a disease and understand its cultural aspects as well.”

The next Anthropology Café will be on Domestic Violence Awareness Day on October 19, and will be led by Dr. Edward Snajdr on gender-based violence in Asia. Like every event the magazine hosts, it is open to all students, regardless of what they’re studying.

“A cop that has taken anthropology is a different cop than one who hasn’t,” said Rougier.

Irene Agyemang, a Criminal Justice major, agrees. “Anthropology allows me to see the world from other points of view and therefore teaches me tolerance,” she said. “We need tolerance, especially in this political climate.”

Other students see anthropology’s potential to impact their careers in different ways.

“I plan to go to medical school and use what I learned in anthropology to work for Doctors Without Borders,” said Dafhnee Jimenez, a junior who majors in Anthropology and minors in Biology.

In the same way that A Home @ The End of the World welcomes students with various career goals, it also welcomes students with various creative abilities, not just writing.

Michelle Bukhari became a photographer for the zine after her sister Amerra recommended she join. “Now, I have a place to display my work,” she said.

Students can also help manage the zine’s robust Instagram presence. This month, Philosophy student Debbie Chan will be working with Sarah Morgano, Social Media Manager for the college, to plan a @AHomeAtTheEndoftheWorld week-long takeover of the College’s official Instagram account.

“The zine allows me to meet people I would’ve never had the chance to meet before,” Chan said of her work with Morgano.

The takeover, which starts October 16th, will bring greater awareness of anthropology to the John Jay community as well as the opportunities offered by the Department. For example, a group of students will be traveling to DC this December for the American Anthropological Association’s annual conference.  Next March, A Home @ The End of the World will also host its second annual conference featuring student and faculty work.

Freshman Frank Davila is grateful he was introduced to the zine. “I love this group,” he said. “The more we know about different cultures, the more we’ll be able to get along.”


Celebrating the Latinx Community With A Series of Month-Long Events

Celebrating the Latinx Community At John Jay With a Series of Month-long EventsJavier Avila’s experience moving from Puerto Rico to Pennsylvania when he was thirty-one inspired him to resist discrimination with art in the form of a one-man show that he recently performed as part of an event hosted by the SEEK Department at John Jay. “In the show, I explore what is wrong with prejudice and what’s at the root of it—fear,” said Avila in one of his videos. “But I also explore how positive it is to embrace diversity.”

Avila’s performance, which SEEK Department organized as part of their Freshman Seminar, was one of several events that also celebrated diversity during Latinx Heritage Month, and specifically the diversity of experience that makes up the Latinx community. On September 14, poet and novelist Elizabeth Acevedo kicked off the month-long series of events with a reading from her book. Acevedo, who is the daughter of Dominican immigrants and whose forthcoming novel features a teenage Afro-Latina protagonist, captivated the crowd.

“Acevedo was able to connect with students,” said Communications and Marketing Manager of Student Affairs Mark Travis Rivera, who also read at the event from his book DRAFTS, which explores the intersection of race and disability. “She was talking about being from New York City and about her hair, and it really resonated with folks.”

That all of the events in honor of Latinx Heritage Month resonate with John Jay students is important for the College. With 43% of its student population identifying as Hispanic/Latino, John Jay is federally recognized as a Hispanic-serving institution.

Included in the roster of events was also a talk that featured Ana M. Bermudez, the first Latina to be appointed Commissioner of the Department of Probation in New York City. Bermudez spoke to John Jay students about overcoming social bias as a Latina woman and member of the LGBTQ community, as well as what it means to be an effective leader for justice.

“Ana M. Bermudez is a living, breathing example of change in our society,” said student Uroosa Malik, who is completing a dual-degree program in Public Administration and Inspection and Oversight.  “Her fierce persona and diligence in committing to her vision inspired everyone in the room to stand up for what they believe in.”

Bermudez also emphasized the importance of embracing all facets of one’s identity—both ethnic and otherwise.

“Through the words of her mother, Commissioner Bermudez shared that the key to happiness and success is to praise one’s unique sense of self,” said student Gina Ortiz, who is completing a Master’s program in Inspection and Oversight.

For the culminating event on October 12, everyone in the John Jay community was invited to celebrate their unique sense of self by contributing to a collective art project at Hound Square. With assistance from The InterRelations Collaborative, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building cross-cultural understanding through art, John Jay students, faculty, and staff helped construct a community quilt.

“Everything from The Trouble with My Name to the quilting project centered Latinx communities and families,” said Rivera. “We hope to continue to center our Latinx students and their lived experiences.”

 


National Academy of Medicine Elects Historian Gerald Markowitz

National Academy Of Medicine Elects Historian Gerald Markowitz

The National Academy of Medicine – the independent branch of the National Academy of Sciences that advises the nation on critical medical and health issues – today announced that Distinguished Professor Gerald E. Markowitz of John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the CUNY Graduate Center has been elected a member of the academy. This is among the highest honors in the field, granted to people with exceptional professional achievements and a commitment to service.

“I’m thrilled,” Markowitz said. “As a historian, I feel incredibly honored to be recognized by the National Academy of Medicine. It is a recognition that the story of great doctors is not the whole story of medicine, and that the extraordinary contributions of people in the field are enhanced by the fact that workers and community activists have really pushed the medical professionals and the public health profession to recognize dangers that might have escaped their notice or not gotten the attention they deserve.”

CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken praised Markowitz’s lifetime of achievement. “His impressive body of work on critical aspects of public health – particularly occupational safety and environmental health – without question merits his election to the National Academy of Medicine. His scholarship, his activism and his passion have long enriched the education of students at John Jay and the CUNY Graduate Center,” the Chancellor said.

The National Academy of Medicine is charged with providing unbiased, evidence-based information and advice on health and science policy to policymakers, professionals and the public at large on a wide range of biomedical issues, medicine and health. “At a time when science is being denigrated and undermined in some quarters, the vital role our national academies is more important than ever,” the Chancellor added.

Markowitz began teaching at John Jay in 1970. He has received numerous federal and private grants, including from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Milbank Memorial Fund. The American Public Health Association awarded him its 2000 Arthur J. Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of the Public Health.

He is well known for books and papers on occupational safety and health, particularly for those co-written with David Rosner, a former CUNY Distinguished Professor who is now at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and previously was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. Rosner trained as a medical historian and Markowitz trained as a political economist and social historian. They write sitting side-by-side at the computer, “sentence by sentence, paragraph by paragraph,” Markowitz says.

Their books include Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children (University of California Press/ Milbank Memorial Fund, 2013); The Contested Boundaries of American Public Health (Rutgers University Press, 2008); Are We Ready?: Public Health since 9/11 (University of California Press/Milbank Books on Health and the Public, 2006); Children, Race, and Power: Kenneth and Mamie Clark’s Northside Center (University Press of Virginia, 1996); Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Disease in Twentieth Century America (Princeton University Press, 1991; paperback 1994; noted as “Outstanding Academic Book of 1991” by Choice); Dying for Work (edited essays, Indiana University Press, 1989); and Slaves of the Depression: Workers’ Letters about Life on the Job (Cornell University Press, 1987).

Reviewing Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution (University of California Press/Milbank Books on Health and the Public, 2002), the New England Journal of Medicine wrote: “Markowitz and Rosner show that the lead industry in the United States was well aware of the hazard decades before the publication of … [a 1943 journal] article by Byers and Lord but chose to respond to it primarily as a public-relations problem.”

That book led to Markowitz and Rosner spending three days on the witness stand in a 2013 in a lawsuit which resulted in a landmark $1.1 billion judgment against three major companies, which were ordered to remove lead paint from 4.7 million older homes in a number of California cities. Lead paint was banned in 1978, but still remains a threat to children, who tend to eat the sweet-tasting paint chips in countless buildings across the country.

“How is it that a problem for children that is totally preventable has not been prevented in the U.S.?” Markowitz asks. “The shorthand answer is: We don’t value some lives as much as we value others. Because lead poisoning is perceived as a problem of poverty and children of color, it does not achieve the kind of attention it should, despite the fact that childhood lead poisoning is an equal opportunity danger to all children and affects all children.”

Markowitz says that he and Rosner are now writing Building the Worlds That Kill Us, which examines how the physical, social and economic worlds we have built since the 19th-century “produce the kinds of diseases that are the predominant diseases of the era.” Take, for example, the trail of infectious diseases in the 19th century that followed the routes of an increasing number of commercial travelers, or the explosion of tuberculosis in jam-packed, urban areas in the early 20th century. “Today, with the extraordinary amount of environment pollution and the development of new chemicals and techniques, you have diseases of long latency. We have new endocrine disruptions [such as from artificial estrogens], even from the paper receipts from the cash register receipts that we handle every day.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


The Ninth Annual Johnny Pacheco Latin Music and Jazz Festival on November 14-17

Lehman College is presenting the Ninth Annual Johnny Pacheco Latin Music and Jazz Festival on Tuesday, November 14 through Friday, November 17. This year’s festival, which takes place in the Studio Theatre in the Speech and Theater Building on the Lehman campus, will include performances by New York City-area professional and student ensembles, workshops for musicians, and a jazz musical. The event, which is open to the public and free of charge, will be simulcast on BronxNet television and streamed live. Onsite festival seating is provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

The Johnny Pacheco Latin Music and Jazz Festival, named for the legendary musical superstar who led the salsa music and dance explosion in the 1960s, provides bandstand and learning opportunities for more than 250 talented young musicians studying music in New York City schools. The entire festival is being promoted as part of the Jazz Education Network Virtual Outreach Series to help foster interest in “the improviser’s art” around the world.

Additionally, the 2017 Pacheco Festival is serving as a fundraiser to provide disaster relief for the people of Puerto Rico. Online donations can be made at lehman.edu/givetojazz.

“Each year, this festival brings together more and more musical artists, students, and community members in a celebration of the Latin musical genres that are now part of a global soundtrack,” said Allan Molnar, a music lecturer at Lehman College and the festival’s producer and artistic director. “Many renowned musical icons, like Johnny Pacheco, have lived and worked in the Bronx, so presenting this gathering here at Lehman makes total sense. The impact of this event is easy to appreciate when you realize that some of our first students are now professional musicians. I’m pleased to know that we have become part of the rich cultural life here in the Bronx.”

The schedule:

On Tuesday, November 14, there will be two featured performances of Holding the Torch for Liberty, a jazz musical by Eli Yamin and Clifford Carlson, about the fight for women’s suffrage. The shows are at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. and will feature students from the Celia Cruz Bronx High School of Music.

On Thursday, November 16 at 7:30 p.m., two Latin jazz ensembles will perform—Los Mas Valientes, directed by Jessica Valientes, and the Paul Carlton Trio.

On Friday, November 17 at 7:30 p.m., there will performances by the Lehman College Jazz Ensemble, featuring saxophonist Jim Mair and percussionist Aldo Mazza as guests; the Lehman College Guitar Ensemble, directed by Robert Windbiel; and the Higher Level Band, directed by Lehman College music student Anthony Puentes.

On Wednesday through Friday, November 15-17 at 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., there will be workshops and performances by various student jazz and Latin jazz ensembles.

For more information, visit lehman.edu/jazzfest. To watch the festival “live” online, visit lehman.edu/jazzfeststream.

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


Men’s Soccer Wins Second-Straight CUNYAC Championship

For just the third time in school history—and for the second-straight season—the Lehman College men’s soccer team earned a spot in the upcoming NCAA Championship, after winning the CUNYAC Championship 3-1 against the John Jay Bloodhounds on Saturday (November 4) in Staten Island.

It was a familiar combination that put Lehman on the board in the 12th minute. CUNYAC All-Star Shevante Scott took a cross from CUNYAC Player of the Year and leading goal scorer Salh Alzubidi and blasted a shot that knuckled through the defense and went inside the far post for a goal. The marker was just the second of the year for the sophomore from Mount Vernon. The score stayed at 1-0 into halftime.

Then, barely four minutes into the second half, the Lightning went up 2-0. Lehman pressed the attack into the box and the Bloodhounds committed a penalty, which resulted in a penalty kick for the Lightning. Another CUNYAC All-Star, Nabi Ben Bangoura, calmly drilled the ball into the back of the net.

In the final ten minutes of action, John Jay started to press the attack and were rewarded for their diligence with a goal in the 85th minute that made the score 2-1. From there, Alzubidi, who was named Player of the Year in his inaugural season at Lehman, scored his conference-best 18th goal of the year after the John Jay goalie kicked the ball directly to him after making the save. The final score was 3-1.

“I’m just speechless,” said Scott. “We’ve been highly motivated all year. We had one mission and one mission only, which was to play our best and win. It was a good game. The guys [from] John jay came on really hard. The pressure was on, but we stayed composed, made sure to keep the momentum up and that’s why we won.”

With the win, the team secured its place in the upcoming NCAA Championship. They currently have a 13-4-1 overall mark, including a perfect, 8-0 conference ledger. The Lighting will learn who their opponent is and where they will travel after the NCAA selection show on Monday, November 6, at 1:30 PM. More information on the NCAA championship

Earlier that day, the Lehman College women’s soccer team lost a hard-fought game, 2-0, to the College of Staten Island in the CUNYAC Championship on the same field.

“I’m really proud of our seniors and the rest of the team,” said head coach Casey Melilli. “We played well in the first half. CSI came out in the second half very determined and we had a problem responding.”


Lehman Receives $2 Million to Double the Number of Grads with Tech Degrees

Lehman College will be one of the first City University of New York colleges to receive a $2 million grant as part of an initiative by Mayor Bill de Blasio to double the number of CUNY students graduating annually with a tech-related bachelor’s degree by 2022.

The five-year, $20 million CUNY 2x Tech Initiative will bring together CUNY colleges and major employers to expand access to quality tech careers and meet industry needs. The initiative will help build a world-class public higher education pipeline by enhancing classroom instruction, promoting tech-specific advising, and providing tech majors with valuable on-the-job experiences to prepare students for post-graduation careers.

“Lehman College is proud to participate in the CUNY 2x Tech Initiative, which will help us to increase our computer science majors, provide new educational opportunities for our students, and prepare them for careers in the growing tech sector in this great city,” said Lehman College President José Luis Cruz. “The CUNY 2x Tech effort also perfectly aligns with Lehman’s 90×30 initiative, to double the number of marketable degrees and certificates we will grant by the year 2030. I thank the Mayor and all those involved at CUNY and Small Business Services for making this happen.”

“Our students from CUNY have every bit as much to offer the tech industry as students coming out of Stanford and MIT,” said Mayor de Blasio. “We are adding classrooms and staff, building a bigger pipeline so more New Yorkers can land the jobs of the future.”

The CUNY Tech 2x Initiative will build on the success of the Talent Tech Pipeline program, launched in 2014; a program that has had impressive results at Lehman College. Alumni of the program have launched tech careers at companies such as: Spotify, Google, Thrillist, Cablevision, Litify, Soundcloud, TripleLyft, Intrepid Pursuits, Accenture, ExpressScripts, JPMC, Viacom, Infor, NBC, and IBM, among others.

About the NYC Tech Talent Pipeline

Launched by Mayor de Blasio in 2014, the NYC Tech Talent Pipeline is the City’s tech Industry Partnership, designed to support the inclusive growth of the NYC tech sector and prepare New Yorkers for 21st century jobs. The Tech Talent Pipeline works with 175 companies, 16 local colleges, and additional public and private partners to define employer needs, develop training and education models to meet these needs, and scale solutions throughout the City, delivering quality talent for the City’s businesses and quality jobs for New Yorkers.


Lehman Professor Honored by American Institute of CPAs Leadership Academy

Sean Stein Smith, a professor in Lehman College’s Business and Economics department, has been recognized by the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) for attending their 2017 Leadership Academy. He was among 38 members selected to attend the prestitigious Leadership Academy conference held last month in Durham, North Carolina.

Professor Stein Smith’s research at Lehman focuses on two main areas. “I study the utilization and implementation of stakeholder reporting, for example, how organizations report all of the information that is not covered in the financial statements, but still is important for decision-making,” he said.

Stein Smith, who also researches the intersection of technology, strategic planning, and accounting, writes a weekly column for Inc.com called “Common Sense Finance.” Prior to joining Lehman this year, he taught at Rutgers and Farleigh Dickenson universities and worked in corporate financial planning and accounting.

The AICPA recognition is just the latest in Stein Smith’s professional and academic career. Last year, he was awarded the Institute of Management Accountants Young Professional of the Year Award and in 2015 he received a New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants 30 Under 30 Award.

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


City College undergrads star at national biomed research conference

Five of CCNY’s 2017 ABRCMS winners in Phoenix, (from left) Fathema Uddin, Geneva Hidalgo, Kailey Singh, Mariya Mayer and Jacqueline Weng.

Six students from The City College of New York were winners at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students in Phoenix, Arizona. The undergraduates from the Division of Science, the CUNY Medical School at CCNY, the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership and the Grove School of Engineering excelled in both poster and oral presentations.

The students, their majors, topics and presentation categories, are:

  • Geneva Hidalgo, psychology, social/behavioral sciences and public health (oral);
  • Mariya Mayer, music, cancer biology (poster);
  • Courtney Ogando, biomedical engineering, cell biology (poster);
  • Kailey  Singh, biomedical science, physiology (oral);
  • Fathema Uddin, biology, cell biology (poster); and
  • Jacqueline Weng, biomedical science, social/behavioral sciences and public health (poster).

Hidalgo, a senior in CCNY’s RISE Program, summed up the team’s winning formula: “You have to know your research really well and prepare for questions from people from other fields who don’t know anything about your research.”

ABRCMS is one of the largest, professional conferences for underrepresented minority students, military veterans, and persons with disabilities to pursue advanced training in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. ABRCMS attracts more than 4,000 individuals, including 2,150 undergraduate and post baccalaureate students, 400 graduate students and postdoctoral scientists and 450 faculty, program directors and administrators. Students come from more than 350 U.S. colleges and universities.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Three Lehman Researchers Contribute to Kilonova Discovery

It was one of the most cosmic events ever.

On August 17, a kilonova explosion—a collision of two dead neutron stars—produced a rare intergalactic fireworks display that was detected by astrophysicists around the world. And three Lehman College scientists are among the elite group of researchers credited with documenting the phenomena.

Professor Luis Anchordoqui, a professor in the Physics and Astronomy department, research associate Tom Paul, and graduate student Jorge Fernandez Soriano are among the thousands of authors who contributed to the article “Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger,” published in the October 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. The discovery generated worldwide interest and a front-page story in The New York Times.

The August 17 event was the first time in history that such an explosion was heard. The kilonova triggered sensors around the earth and in space, producing what the Times called “a loud chirp in antennas designed to study ripples in the cosmic fabric.”

“Up until now, we were only able to see events after the explosion,” said Anchordoqui. “We’ve never seen this type of event, where you can see and hear things, as it happens. I feel lucky that I can witness something like this. Scientists will be studying this event for years to come for some further clue into the origins of the universe.”

Anchordoqui and Paul are also both researchers at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Pampa Amarilla, Argentina. It is the largest cosmic ray observatory in the world and was among the facilities to report on the kilonova phenomena that scientists believe took place 130 million years ago in the southern constellation of Hydra.

“The kilonova is a breakthrough development in astronomy and physics,” said Daniel Kabat, the chair of Lehman’s Physics and Astronomy department. “By combining all these different types of observation, gamma rays, radio waves, you get a more complete picture of what’s going on in the universe.”

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


NEW COURT-INTERPRETER INTERNSHIP HARNESSES CUNY STUDENTS’ LANGUAGE SKILLS

Facing an exponentially growing need for qualified language interpreters, New York State’s court system is teaming up with The City University of New York to prepare multilingual students for the state’s court-interpreter screening exams, the first step in qualifying for well-paid full- and part-time jobs as court interpreters.

The Unified Court System Internship Program in Court Interpreting, piloted at LaGuardia Community College last spring with 42 students, officially launches this semester with 37 students from LaGuardia, Hunter College and John Jay College for Criminal Justice – all schools with language interpretation and translation programs. The internship program will expand to more campuses in Spring 2018.

The program offers 20- and 100-hour internships. The greatest growth is expected in the 100-hour program, which this semester has four Hunter Russian-language speakers and four John Jay Spanish-language speakers; in the spring, it is expected to draw 25 to 30 students.

“Thirty-nine percent of our students speak a native language other than English,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Their ancestries trace back to more than 200 countries and regions, and they speak an astounding total of 174 languages. These internships offer an exciting way for our students to capitalize on their language skills and to benefit the city and state.”

Hunter’s Nadzeya Aryfullina, far right, stands next to staff court interpreter Yuri Orozco, who assists defendant in Hon. Rachel Freier’s courtroom

Ann Ryan, New York State coordinator for the courts’ Office of Language Access, agreed: “The students see that interpreters are really helping people. When they find someone who speaks the same language, it is almost like helping a kindred spirit,” she said.

In 2009, courts in New York provided interpreters in 95 languages. In 2013, that grew to 108 languages and in the past 12 months to 119 languages among all the courts in the state. Many CUNY students could help meet the need for interpreters because they speak a language other than English as either their first language or heritage language. At LaGuardia Community College alone, students speak languages including Spanish, Polish, Pashtu, Urdu, Thai, Bengali, Nepali, Korean, Japanese and Chinese.

New York’s court system requires the provision of interpreting services in court proceedings of all types, and to all court users, including witnesses and crime victims, not only in courtrooms, but also in clerical offices and other points of contact. Yet, as the court’s 2017 “Ensuring Language Access: A Strategic Plan for the New York State Courts” makes clear, the challenge is great. Five million New York state residents speak one or more of 150 languages other than English, 2 million of whom are not fluent in English.

The greatest strain is in suburban and rural areas, the plan says, where interpreters are far less available than in cities. The CUNY internship program could help bridge the gap.

“With the New York State court system’s ever-growing need for qualified court interpreters, this unique CUNY-court system partnership offers multilingual college students supervised, hands-on interpreting experience in a court setting, serving as a gateway to rewarding career opportunities as an interpreter in the New York State courts,” said Lawrence K. Marks, Chief Administrative Judge of New York State.

The internship is offered as a 20-hour introductory program and a more comprehensive full-semester 100-hour program. It provides students with a unique opportunity to observe actual proceedings in Family, Civil and Criminal Courts while learning about the vital role court interpreters play. Interns shadow a court interpreter-mentor to learn about each court. With supervision, they may assist with interpreting in noncourtroom settings such as Help Centers and information windows. They also help in record rooms, clerks’ offices and petition rooms. In the classroom, interns also learn legal terminology, theory, protocol and the ethical responsibilities and boundaries of a court interpreter.

Interns will be encouraged to apply for the interpreting exams, the first step in qualifying to provide language services to the New York State courts. Those who pass the rigorous state exams could qualify for up to $170 for a half day and $300 for a full day translating in the courts. Click here for the state application and examination information.

CUNY’s interns are enthusiastic.

Aziza Babaeva, one of four students from Hunter College’s Russian translation program taking part in the internship, was born in Uzbekistan and came to the United States at age 9. English is her third language after Tajik and Russian. She is studying for a bachelor’s degree in Russian translation. “Interpreting is a whole new skill,” she said. “You have to listen, think and speak at the same time.” She plans to go to medical school, but nonetheless she intends to take the Russian interpreting exam to qualify for the per diem court jobs. The internship was key to her decision. “This is an amazing program, and the mentors are amazing. They are willing to share so much of what they know.

Brandon Martinez, a John Jay College student majoring in criminal justice and Spanish, was in the 20-hour internship program and liked it so much he enrolled in the 100-hour internship. Although his goal is still to be a police officer, “I would also like to be a per diem Spanish-to-English translator in Criminal Court.” Born in the U.S. and raised in the Dominican Republic, he is fluent in both languages.

Maria Vanessa Maldonado, who came from Argentina when she was 16, is finishing a certificate program in legal translation at John Jay this semester after graduating in May as a law and society major with a minor in anthropology. “I never knew this could be a career, and I love it,” she said. In order to pay for college, she has been running a small cleaning business. “Now when I get dressed up to go to court, my 12-year-old daughter brags about it.”

Each year, the New York State courts provide interpreters in more than 100 languages. To ensure that everyone has equal access to the legal proceedings, the court system offers foreign and sign language interpreters regardless of the type of case or the economic status of the person in need of interpreting services. The courts hire interpreters to provide language services for trials, conferences and interviews in the courtroom and in other settings. Interpreters may also be called upon to translate medical and legal documents, certificates, letters and other written materials.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Co-creator of #SAYHERNAME Spotlights Police Violence Against Black Women and LGBTQ People at Brooklyn College Event

Activist, attorney, and author Andrea J. Ritchie led a talk about the daunting challenges faced in the quest to center women of color, and queer and transgender people as victims in discussions of state violence.

Activist, attorney, and author Andrea J. Ritchie discusses the salient points of her new book, Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color.

Shantel Davis. Aiyana Stanley-Jones. Renee Davis. Sandra Bland. Tanisha Anderson. Rekia Boyd. Korryn Gaines. Charleena Chavon Lyles. Mya Hall. Kiwi Herring. Duanna Johnson. These are just a few of the names of women and girls who have been the victims of police violence. The names may sound unfamiliar, but that is something that activist, attorney, and author Andrea J. Ritchie is hoping to change with her new book, Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color (Beacon Press 2017).

Ritchie captivated a standing-room-only audience in the Brooklyn College Library‘s Woody Tanger Auditorium on Nov. 1, speaking at an event organized in her honor by poet and Associate Professor of English Rosamond S. King and the Brooklyn College Women’s Center. Co-sponsors included the Ethyle R. Wolfe Institute for the Humanities, the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, the LGBTQ Resource Center, the Division of Student Affairs, the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Office of Diversity and Equity Programs, among others.

Ritchie might be best known for her role as lead counsel in Tikkun v. City of New York, described as “groundbreaking impact litigation challenging unlawful searches of transgender people in police custody, contributing to sweeping changes to the NYPD’s policies for interactions with LGBTQ New Yorkers.”

“There’s an intractable narrative in this country that state violence is only committed against cisgender, heterosexual, black men,” says Ritchie, co-founder, with Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, of the #SAYHERNAMEhashtag and phrase. “That ‘private’ violence is what happens to white women, and, as Barbara Smith says, ‘and some of us are brave,'” referencing the classic black feminist work, But Some of Us Are Brave: All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men: Black Women’s Studies, which outlines how black women and their experiences are often omitted from larger feminist and racial justice narratives. “If we confront the kinds of violence that police officers visit on black female/queer/transgender bodies, then black communities would have to confront the violence that black communities perpetrate against black female/queer/trans bodies. And that’s something that people don’t want to do.”

To drive home her point, Ritchie brought up the case of Duanna Johnson, a black transgender woman who was brutalized by police in Memphis, Tennessee. The vicious attack was caught on video, but failed to ignite the level of community outrage and response as cases where the victim was a black cisgender (or non-transgender) heterosexual male.

“The local NAACP said, essentially, as an explanation for their inaction, ‘We don’t condone what happened to her, but we don’t condone her lifestyle either,” Ritchie said.

Poet and Associate Professor of English Rosamond S. King introduces Ritchie and her work to an eager Brooklyn College audience.

“We have a lot of activists on campus—and people who want to be activists,” said King. “And I wanted to bring Andrea J. Ritchie to Brooklyn College because she’s someone who has the scholarly chops and is well-published, but who also has been in the streets, organized with different communities, and who knows how to bridge those divides.”

Rapt audience members were eager to discuss strategies to combat both the violence and the erasure, after Ritichie’s talk, and asked her what she thought might be some solutions.

“The way to fight despair is to take action,” Ritchie responded. “Take a piece [of justice-oriented action], any piece, in your immediate community. Talk to one person.  Try to figure out just one way that you can effect change. Write one letter to an editor of a magazine. Write one article for your student newspaper. Go to one meeting. Go to one rally. Look at other examples of resistance. You can unravel the giant web if you pull on the right threads.”

 

Andrea Ritchie is a Black lesbian immigrant, police misconduct attorney, and organizer who has engaged in extensive research, writing, and advocacy around criminalization of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people of color over the past two decades. She recently published Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color now available from Beacon Press.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Center for Ethnic, Racial & Religious Understanding Hosts November 15 Discussion on Immigration Policy During Trump’s First Year

— This Sixth Annual Presentation is Being Introduced as the Susheel Kirpalani Innovation Exchange, Named for Alumnus and New Sponsor Kirpalani —

Queens, NY, November 7, 2017— The challenges to immigration and immigration reform that have developed in the first year of the Trump presidency will be the focus when the Center for Ethnic, Racial and Religious Understanding (CERRU) holds its sixth annual Innovation Exchange. It will take place Wednesday, November 15, from 4:30–9 pm in the Dining Hall Patio Room at Queens College.

This marks the first year the Innovation Exchange will be presented as the Susheel Kirpalani Innovation Exchange, in honor of Queens College alumnus Susheel Kirpalani, who now provides funding for the event. It is open to the public with a suggested donation of $10 per ticket. Dinner will be served. Those who RSVP through Eventbrite by November 8 will be entered into a $25 gift card raffle (attendance at the Innovation Exchange required to win).

Among the topics in discussion for this year’s presentation, Trump’s First Year: Impressions on Immigration from Across the Political Spectrum, are the proposed U.S.–Mexico border wall; the travel ban affecting individuals from six predominantly Muslim countries; and the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which enabled children brought here as immigrants to study, pay taxes, and work legally in this country.

Participants include individuals lobbying, advocating, and engaging in bipartisan work on the issue of immigration reform, who will examine legislation pending in the House and Senate. There will also be a “walkabout” featuring displays of various immigration-related narratives from the community. Participants will have a chance to work together to develop their own innovative approaches to addressing the evening’s topics.

Each year CERRU engages in an evening of discussion, debate, and dialogue on a challenging social issue, interacting with experts working to transform and transcend the issue by examining it from different perspectives. This year’s Innovation Exchange will also serve as the kick-off event for CERRU’s “Political Leaps of Faith” project, which will bring students together from across the political spectrum to work toward collaborative legislative campaigning.

Directions: http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/directions/Pages/default.aspx
Campus Map: http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/directions/2d/Pages/default.aspx

About CERRU
CERRU is a diversity training and education center on the Queens College campus devoted to building relationships across differences and creating opportunities for respectful but honest conversations around difficult and divisive issues in the belief that cultivating the ability to understand inequality and the biases that underwrite it is crucial to creating a more inclusive society.

CERRU works with students, faculty, and staff to co-create a safe, vibrant, and inclusive space for communication. It offers fellowships, dialogues, and open trainings on the Queens College campus and other college campuses that enable participants to become leaders equipped to navigate an increasingly multicultural society. It also hosts events exploring multiple perspectives on controversial issues, providing context and opportunity for dialogue.

About Queens College

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Contact:
Yael Rosenstock
Associate Director
CERRU
yrosenstock@cerru.org
718-570-0482


Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez named Board Chair of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities

Queens, NY, November 6 2017 – Queens College of the City University of New York president Félix V. Matos Rodríguez was elected as board chair of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), the HACU Governing Board announced on November 2. Matos Rodríguez replaced William V. Flores, former president of the University of Houston, Downtown, in the position.

“The work HACU does each and every day has had beneficial impact on Hispanic students both in the United States and abroad,” said Matos Rodríguez. “From the internships and scholarships they provide for career development programs that help ensure students are prepared to enter the workforce, HACU’s vital support for Hispanic students has never been more necessary. I am truly humbled to have the opportunity to serve as board chair as we continue to advocate for students around the world.”

Matos Rodríguez has served as president of Queens College since 2014 and has been a member of HACU’s Governing Board since 2012. His distinguished career spans both academia and the public sector. Previously the president of Eugenio María de Hostos Community College/CUNY prior to Queens College, Matos Rodríguez is one of the few educators in the country who has served as president of both baccalaureate and community college institutions. He also served as Puerto Rico’s cabinet secretary of the Department of Family Services where he formulated public policy and administered service delivery in programs such as Child Support Enforcement, Adoption and Foster Care, and Child and Elderly Protection.

Matos Rodríguez is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is an Aspen Institute Ascend Fellow. He serves on the boards of Phipps Houses, the United Way of New York City, the TIAA Hispanic Advisory Council, and the Research Alliance for New York City Schools. He is a graduate of Yale University and he received his PhD from Columbia University.

“We are honored to have Félix Matos Rodríguez serve as chair of HACU’s Governing Board,” said HACU President and CEO Antonio R. Flores. “We are also very grateful for the extraordinary leadership and contributions made by our outgoing board members.”

Established in 1986 and currently representing more than 470 colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and Spain, HACU seeks to promote the development of member colleges and universities, improve access to and the quality of postsecondary education opportunities for Hispanic students, and meet the needs of the business, industry, and government communities through the development and sharing of resources, information, and expertise.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.​
The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth in the nation by the Chronicle of Higher Education among public U.S. colleges for upward social and economic mobility and globally, by the Center for World University Rankings, in the top 3.5% of schools on such factors as quality of education and faculty, and alumni employment. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.​​

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY’s “Sulfurious” bags international Chem-E-Car award

CCNY’s Chem-E-Car team with “Sulfurious” [center] at the 2017 AIChE finals.

Team CCNY, comprising undergraduates from The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, is the 2017 AIChE Chem-E-Car finals’ Spirit of Competition Award winner for the third year running. In addition, “Sulfurious,” the CCNY entry, placed 11th out of 41 domestic and international qualifiers in the competition in Minneapolis.

Sulfurious won the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Mid-Atlantic competition last spring to advance to the AIChE finals.  The objective of the Chem-E-Car competition is for students to build a car, the size of a shoebox, which runs and stops at a precise distance via one or more chemical reactions.

Sulfurious runs on a manganese-zinc battery, developed in partnership with the CCNY-based CUNY Energy Institute. The car’s name is derived from the “Too Fast, Too Furious” movie franchise and the main element in the stopping mechanism, sulfur.

In Minneapolis, Sulfurious performed well, coming within 90 cm [35.43 inches] from the target of 23.5 m [77.08 feet] while carrying a load of 157 ml water. “The competition was stiff with the top team being 2 cm [0.787 inches] from the target,” said Elizabeth Biddinger, assistant professor of chemical engineering and the CCNY team faculty advisor.

Indonesia’s ITS University won the Chem-E-Car Trophy.

Sulfurious’ trip to Minneapolis was the fifth straight by a CCNY team to the AIChE finals. Their honors include a second place finish in 2013 with “REAKTER,” and Spirit of Competition awards in 2015 with “RuSTi” and 2016 with “Iodonator.”

This year’s team comprised (all chemical engineering unless indicated):

  • Captain Oswald Shakir Julien, senior;
  • Co-captain Nannette Hernandez, senior;
  • Co-Captain Karlas Christoper, sophomore;
  • Hamad Haider, senior;
  • Yash Patel, senior;
  • Sujana Shifon, sophomore;
  • Adebambo Shomoye, senior;
  • Stephan Smith, senior;
  • Leo Strauss, senior, electrical engineering; and
  • Keith Williams, senior, mechanical engineering.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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CUNY School of Professional Studies Partners with the Central Park Conservancy to Create Professional Education Programs

New York, NY — November 8, 2017 — After a rigorous selection process, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is pleased to announce a partnership with the Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks.  CUNY SPS and the Institute will collaborate to develop an Urban Park Leadership Program, geared toward executives and leaders of public-private park partnerships, and a non-credit Urban Park Professional Certificate Program for current and aspiring urban park management personnel. This program is made possible by the generous support of The JPB Foundation.

The partnership will draw on the Conservancy’s 37-year management of Central Park and the expertise of the larger CUNY system to create the two programs over the next two years. The New York City Labor Market Information Service (LMIS) at the CUNY Graduate Center will play an integral role in market research and assessment prior to program development. CUNY faculty and practitioners will join Institute staff to contribute subject matter expertise to develop the programs, which will be evaluated by the Office of Research, Evaluation & Program Support (REPS) in the Office of the Senior University Dean for Academic Affairs.

The new professional education programs will facilitate hands-on guidance and capacity building to urban park leaders and executives and standardize, professionalize, and assess skills for current or aspiring urban park professionals. The program will also explore the feasibility of a degree program for those wishing to enter the field, while also promoting occupations in urban parks as a viable career path for youth.

“The Central Park Conservancy and CUNY share many of the same goals, and are both embedded in and committed to our City,” said CUNY SPS Dean John Mogulescu. “The competition for this grant opportunity was formidable: proposals were submitted by several distinguished academic institutions from across the country. As you can imagine, I am delighted that we were selected as the Institute’s partner from among such a renowned field of competitors. I am happy that we will be working together to support the field of Urban Park Management and I look forward to the implementation of this new project at CUNY SPS.”

The Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks was created in 2013 to more effectively share what we’ve learned since 1980 with other parks,” adds Douglas Blonsky, President & CEO of the Central Park Conservancy and Central Park Administrator. “It took us 37 years of learning to get to where we are. We hope that by sharing our knowledge through case studies, peer exchange, and CUNY’s academic strength and faculty, other parks can experience the same success more efficiently.”

“Partnering with the City University of New York is the most logical choice to me,” said Ira M. Millstein, Chair of the Institute Advisory Board and Life Trustee of the Central Park Conservancy. “This is the first executive program dedicated to urban parks. What could provide a more urban experience than a partnership between two leading New York organizations?”

“I’ve personally witnessed the benefits that a well-managed urban park provides, socially, economically, and environmentally. Central Park is a prime example of that. This program will help other urban parks, here in New York City and elsewhere, thrive in the same way as Central Park,” said NYC Parks Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver, FAICP.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Large crowd expected at next CCNY Mini-Medical School session

Mini-Medical School Diet Health Activity
Community members working together for a healthier Harlem
Dr. Gilbert Brovar
Dr. Gilbert Brovar

The Harlem community spoke and the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York listened. Community members were asked if they’d like free health information sessions on topics of their choosing and the answer was a resounding YES! Thus the Mini-Medical school was born.

60 people showed up to the first Mini-Medical School event on Oct 18th to talk about diet, physical activity and health. The presentations were engaging as was the Q & A. Afterward, many attendees said they’d be back for more. In fact, they promised to bring a friend or family member the next time. Which is why an even larger crowd is expected at the second Mini-Medical School on Nov 15th when the topic will be Diabetes and Health: Management and Prevention.

Hazeezat Shittu, who leads the team of medical students behind the program, will MC the evening. The speaker will be Dr. Gilbert Brovar, the Medical Director of the St. Barnabas Hospital Diabetes Clinic and an Affiliate Associate Medical Professor in the Department of Clinical Medicine at the CUNY School of Medicine.

Don’t miss this free event where you can learn how to actively take part in your and your family’s healthcare on Wednesday Nov 15th from 5:30-7PM in the North Academic Center, Room 1/201 of CCNY. Mini-Medical School is open to all members of the Harlem Community. Light refreshments will be served.

Click here to RSVP.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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Flagship Technology Lab at Baruch College Opens with Fanfare

Baruch College President, and City Government and CUNY Officials Preside Over Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony Marking First Renovation of Center Since Opening in 1994

PresidentWallersteinGuestsCutRibbonforNewTechLab

 L to R: Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, CUNY Vice Chancellor Judith Bergtraum, Lawrence Kaplan, Laurie Kaplan, Borough President Gale Brewer, Douglas Kaplan, Council Members Rosie Mendez and James Vacca

 

NEW YORK, NY- October 20, 2017– To celebrate the grand opening of a flagship technology lab that will serve thousands of students, Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, City Council Member Rosie Mendez, and City Council Member James Vacca presided over a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Oct. 13, 2017.

The renovated lab, named the Martin E (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center, is equipped to keep pace with ever-shifting and emerging technologies, giving students the vital tools to compete globally in their chosen fields. Occupying more than 11,000 square-feet with views of the Empire State Building, the lab is named in honor of Laura Kaplan and her late husband, alumnus Martin Kaplan, generous benefactors to the College. Mrs. Kaplan participated in the ceremony along with members of their family.

Also part of the ribbon-cutting were Judith Bergtraum, vice chancellor for facilities planning, construction and management at The City University of New York (CUNY), and Isabel Arias, president of Baruch College’s Undergraduate Student Government.

City, State, and Donor Support Made Lab Possible

In his opening remarks, College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD., expressed appreciation for the generous financial support of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito (MPA ’95), Borough President Gale Brewer, and Council Members Rosie Mendez and James Vacca, which made upgrades to the lab possible.

Dr. Wallerstein added, “I want to thank and acknowledge a number of special guests, starting with Laurie Kaplan and her family. She and her late husband, Martin Kaplan, who was a member of the class of 1959, have been generous benefactors of the Baruch College.” President Wallerstein then voiced appreciation to the Office of Vice Chancellor Judith Bergtraum, which handles CUNY’s Facilities Planning, Construction and Management, for managing the renovation of the space.

The ribbon-cutting ceremony marks the first renovation of the space since it opened to students in 1994. More than $2.5 million in state and city capital funds supported the lab’s major upgrades, and the student technology fee financed the purchase of all the new equipment.

Designed as a one-stop, state-of-the-art technology resource for Baruch College’s existing and growing student population, the approximate 400-seat lab features a wide range of upgrades from 4k monitors to a help desk modeled after the Apple Genius Bar to collaborative, flexible work spaces. It was designed with full attention to accessibility for users with disabilities

Congratulations from Public Officials

During the ceremony, Borough President Gale Brewer said “The public’s money couldn’t go for a better cause. Congratulation to Baruch College on this amazing lab.”

Council Member Rosie Mendez added, “It has been an incredible 12 years representing Council District 2, but also representing Baruch College, an incredible institution that reaches beyond my district, throughout the entire city. With the support of my colleagues Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Councilmember Jimmy Vacca, I am excited to be a part of the opening of the Martin E. (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center.”

“I’m elated to celebrate the completion of six multimedia rooms at Baruch College,” said Council Member James Vacca. “These rooms are equipped with state-of-the-art technology. I allocated $150,000 towards renovating the space, with the goal of creating a dynamic learning environment, where students can come together to collaborate on projects and coursework.”

Although unable to attend the event, New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito sent along her best wishes.  “Baruch College is an integral component of our city’s education system, having shaped the lives of millions of New Yorkers. As a proud Baruch alum, it has been remarkable to witness Baruch’s growth over the years and I am excited to see Baruch College grow with the Martin E. (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center. As Council Speaker, it is with great pride that funds allocated by the New York City Council were able to make this center a reality.”

 Renovated Lab Center: Latest Addition to Major Campus Improvements

 The Martin E (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center is the latest in campus improvements that have been underway at Baruch College during the last few years.

In September 2016, an upgraded Subotnick Financial Services Center/Wasserman Trading Floor opened, providing experiential learning opportunities for students studying economics, finance, journalism, and technology.

In 2012, the College’s campus gained a transformative outdoor space by opening the 25th Street Interim Pedestrian Plaza. Now known as the Clivner Field Plaza, the car-free block is under construction for a redesign that will create a permanent public space,

Additionally, Baruch College is moving ahead with the Allen G. and Mary E. Aaronson Student Center, which will be located in a currently unused portion of the Madison Square Station Post Office.

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Media Contact:  Suzanne Bronski:  646-660-6095 / Suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu


Baruch College Earns Two National #1 Rankings for Social Mobility

Third Consecutive Year in Top Spot on CollegeNET’s Social Mobility Index

NEW YORK, NY – October 24, 2017 – CollegeNET and The Chronicle of Higher Education both named Baruch College top in the nation on their respective social mobility analyses.

In College NET’s 2017 Social Mobility Index (SMI), released today, Baruch was listed #1 for the third consecutive year among more than 1,300 colleges nationwide. Last week, The Chronicle released its ranking of colleges with the highest student-mobility rates, placing Baruch College #1 among four-year public institutions in the U.S.

CollegeNET: Economic Opportunity a Top Priority

CollegeNET’s SMI is a data-driven analysis that ranks four-year colleges and universities “according to how effective they enroll students from low-income backgrounds and graduate them into good-paying jobs.” The annual index was designed to help redirect the attribution of “prestige” in the nation’s higher education system toward colleges that are solving the major problems of our time.

“Unlike other college rankings that are aimed primarily at helping students select a college, the SMI helps policymakers determine which colleges are addressing the national problem of economic mobility,” said Jim Wolfston, CEO of CollegeNET, who added that advancing economic opportunity is more pressing than any other social, political, or economic problem in the nation.

Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein said “Institutions of higher education need to consider the whole student and offer personalized training in soft skills, workplace dynamics, internship and job hunting, follow-up protocols, and professional correspondence. Baruch has had such career services and mentorship opportunities in place for decades, and they truly do help propel students into their first jobs and beyond.”

For more information about CollegeNET, the purpose of the SMI, and its methodology, go here.

WATCH: Video clip of Baruch’s third consecutive #1 ranking.

In March 2017, CollegeNET named Baruch College a Social Mobility Innovator for 2017. In its widely publicized announcement, CollegeNET noted that “Baruch offers low-income students a supportive start-to-finish program that makes college affordable, advances economic opportunity and helps restoring the promise of the American Dream.”

Read more about CollegeNET’s recognition for Baruch College here.

The Chronicle’s List: Data from the Equality of Opportunity Program

To name Baruch #1 among four-year public institutions in the United States, The Chronicle analyzed data from the Equality of Opportunity Project’s comprehensive study on college graduate outcomes. The most in-depth research of its kind to date, the project amassed data from numerous sources to produce the data warehouse called Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility. The Chronicle used this extensive material—which included anonymous tax filings and financial aid records—to derive its current rankings.

Learn about The Chronicle’s list here.

National Recognition Continues to Expand

Baruch College’s #1 rankings in social mobility by CollegeNET and The Chronicle of Higher Education add to the College’s expanding roster of national rankings and recognitions that focus on value, student debt, and return on investment.

See below for coverage of Baruch College’s most recent recognitions:

U.S. News & World Report Ranks Baruch College among the Best in the North

Princeton Review Names Baruch College as One of the Country’s Best

Forbes Ranks Baruch College among “Best Value Colleges 2017: 300 Schools Worth the Investment

Money Magazine Ranks Baruch College #1 among “Best Public Colleges” and #2 for “Best Colleges for Your Money”

Excelling in Access to Affordable Education and Student Success (U.S. Department of Education)

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Healthcare Industry Leaders and Advocates to Discuss the State of the Industry and What Comes After the Affordable Care Act

Business Forum Breakfast
Friday, November 17, 8–10 am

WHAT:
Panel discussion with President & CEO of Public Health Solutions Lisa David, President & CEO of Emblem Health Karen Ignagni, New York State Senator Gustavo Rivera, and VP of New York-Presbyterian Hospital System Kate Spaziani on what comes next for healthcare after the Affordable Care Act. Moderated by Distinguished Lecturer of Journalism at Queens College Sheryl McCarthy, with opening remarks by Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. Breakfast will be served.

Free and open to the public, but seating is limited.
Public RSVP deadline is November 14:
Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5252, or register online here.

Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background:
Lisa David is the President and CEO of Public Health Solutions, an organization working to improve health outcomes in New York City’s most vulnerable communities. She leads the organization in successfully providing public health services to underserved families and children, offering grants and management assistance to over 200 community-based organizations, and guiding public health research and program evaluation. She also provides leadership in executing long-term strategies to address the public health needs of low-income communities throughout New York City.

Lisa has over 30 years of experience in the public health and healthcare sectors. Prior to joining Public Health Solutions, Lisa held positions as the Interim CEO of Medicines360, the EVP and COO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and the Vice Chair for Administration of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Columbia School
of Physicians and Surgeons. Lisa currently serves on the Health and Mental Health Advisory Committee for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and is a member of the United Hospital Fund Policy Forum. She also serves on the Board of Directors of Medicines360, and on two committees of the Human Services Council: the Value Based Payment Commission and the Priority and Strategy Council.

Senator Gustavo Rivera represents the 33rd Senate District in the Bronx, which includes the neighborhoods of Kingsbridge Heights, Belmont, Fordham, University Heights, Van Nest, East Tremont, Crotona and Mount Hope.

Since his election in 2010, Senator Gustavo has dedicated his efforts to changing the way business is done in the legislature and ensuring that the families of the 33rd Senate District have a voice in Albany.

In January 2013, Senator Rivera became the ranking member of the New York Senate’s Health Committee. Since then, Senator Rivera has championed legislation that addresses issues of health inequity, such banning smoking within 100 feet from schools and afterschool programs. Since March 2017, he became the main sponsor of the “New York Health Act,” a bill that will create an innovative single payer health care system in New York State.

In 2011, Senator Rivera launched the Bronx CAN (Changing Attitudes Now) Health Initiative. The goal of this community oriented health initiative is not only to encourage Bronx residents to develop healthy behaviors, but to shape policies that will help tear down some of the institutional barriers that stand in the way of Bronxites having a healthier lifestyle.

Senator Rivera also worked as a community organizer on New York State campaigns, as well as on President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign. He was also employed as a professor and a staff member for U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand.

Karen Ignagni serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of EmblemHealth, a New York City-based not-for-profit health insurance company. EmblemHealth was formed through the merger of two New York legacy insurance plans, Group Health Incorporated (GHI) and Health Plan of New York (HIP), and today provides quality, affordable health care coverage and administrative services to approximately 3.1 million people.

Prior to joining EmblemHealth in September 2015, Ignagni was President and CEO of America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), the insurance industry association that represents providers of health and supplemental benefits to more than 200 million Americans. At AHIP, Ms. Ignagni was active in working with the White House and congressional leadership on the development of health reform legislation, including the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). She also led two mergers with other organizations to form AHIP, and made it the leading voice for the health plan community in America. During her tenure, AHIP was ranked by Washington Insiders as the second most effective trade association in Washington.

Ms. Ignagni also directed the AFL-CIO’s Department of Employee Benefits. She was a Professional Staff Member on the U.S. Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee and worked at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Ms. Ignagni has won many accolades for her leadership in the health care industry, earning recognition by leading publications including the New York Times, National Journal, The Hill, Time Magazine, The Washingtonian, Fortune Magazine, and Modern Healthcare, for her extensive health policy background and intrinsic feel for politics.
In 2017, Ms. Ignagni received the Heritage Healthcare Leadership Award and was named one of Crain’s 50 Most Powerful Women in New York.

Kate Spaziani is Vice President of External Affairs for the NewYork-Presbyterian Regional Hospital Network. In this role, she oversees and coordinates communications, marketing, and community affairs for NYP’s four regional hospitals and physician services division. Ms. Spaziani previously served as Vice President of Grants and Federal Relations for NYP, managing the Hospital’s federal government affairs strategy and overseeing its grant applications for programs such as the New York State Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Program.

Ms. Spaziani joined NewYork-Presbyterian in 2012 with over thirteen years of legislative, legal, and government affairs experience. As Senior Policy Advisor to U.S. Senator Kent Conrad (D-ND), former Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee and senior member of the Senate Finance Committee, she worked on the drafting and passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act, the development of annual budget resolutions, and federal deficit reduction policy. Ms. Spaziani also has held positions in the U.S. House of Representatives, serving as Legislative Director to Representative Ron Kind (D-WI) and Legislative Assistant to Representative Marion Berry and has practiced law at Powell Goldstein LLP on health law and election law matters.

Ms. Spaziani received an A.B. magna cum laude from Duke University in Public Policy Studies and her J.D. cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Baruch College Fund Raises a Record-Setting $21 Million for Its First Dedicated Scholarship Campaign

              

More than 300 Additional Students to Receive Assistance

https://photos.smugmug.com/Events/2017/BaruchLex102617-All/n-GCmCQM/i-HVhPQxw/0/a5a3a29b/X3/i-HVhPQxw-X3.jpg

(R to L) Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein offers thanks to Pamela and Kim Baptiste, Brenner Family Foundation’s executive director and president respectively, for their generous contribution to the scholarship campaign and their ongoing support.

 

New York, NY- November 1, 2017- The Baruch College Fund (BCF) celebrated the successful completion of its first dedicated scholarship campaign—named “Be in the Life-Changing Business”—at the 11th annual 17 Lex Society reception held at the New York Historical Society on Oct. 26.

The campaign raised a record-setting $21 million—more than $6 million over the fundraising goal—that will provide financial assistance to at least 300 additional students. A total of 1,297 people made donations, with 120 donors contributing leadership gifts of $25,000 or more.

At the reception, Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, acknowledged the generosity of all the donors whose gifts made the campaign a tremendous success as well as all leadership donors.

“Every member of the 17 Lex Society has made Baruch the engine of social mobility that we are,” President Wallerstein said. “As a publicly funded institution, we truly couldn’t do it without your ongoing support. I thank you personally, and on behalf of the College, for helping to make Baruch as great as it is.”

Special Recognition

Campaign chairman Jay Berman ’59 announced that a large gift from the Brenner Family Foundation (established by the late Max Brenner ’21) propelled the total fundraising amount to over $21 million. Since 1986, the Brenner Family Foundation has aided more than 48 students who major in accounting.

“On behalf of Baruch College, I am thrilled to thank the Brenner Family Foundation for their generous contribution to our scholarship campaign,” Berman said. “This recent gift joins the Foundation’s legacy of support to Baruch.”

To recognize their generosity, President Wallerstein presented a bronze maquette, a replica of the College’s iconic Bernard Baruch statue located in the lobby of the Newman Vertical Campus. Additionally, President Wallerstein awarded Berman with a Tiffany clock for working tirelessly over the past few years organizing this scholarship campaign.

The 17 Lex Society

The College’s leadership giving society is comprised of donors, trustees, recent graduates, and current students who provide an annual contribution to the Baruch College Fund.  Society members are invited to signature Baruch events, VIP alumni events, and have the opportunity to network with prestigious alumni and friends.

For more information about the 17 Lex Society, please go here.

 

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Stanford selects CCNY quartet for global fellowship program

The second cohort of Stanford Innovation Fellows from CCNY. From left: Raneem Elsayed, Ariel Obando, Nathaly Camila Ardiles and Khandker Ahamed.

There’s no question that generations of university students want to change the world, starting with where they are. But how? Four undergraduates from The City College of New York are among 229 students from 10 countries named 2017 University Innovation Fellows by Stanford University’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design. The program empowers students to become agents of change at their schools. Fellows work to ensure that their peers gain the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to compete in the economy of the future and make a positive impact on the world.

Selected from City College (the only CUNY school represented) are:

  • Khandker Ahamed, economics (Brooklyn);
  • Nathaly Camila Ardiles, electrical engineering (New Rochelle);
  • Raneem Elsayed, history/political science (Brooklyn); and
  • Ariel Obando, electrical engineering (Queens).

In addition to six-weeks of online training designed by Stanford, they will attend a “Silicon Valley Meetup,” Nov. 16 – 20, with the other 225 Fellows. They will take part in immersive experiences at Stanford’s d.school and Google, and work with leaders in education and industry.

“We’ll also participate in experiential workshops and exercises focused on such topics as   building a movement, creating spaces for innovation, designing of learning experiences, and creating new models for change in higher education,” said Ahamed.

The team will embark on their CCNY mission in the spring semester, titled, according to   Elsayed, “Fostering and Implementing Innovation, Inspiring and Bringing Students Together.” Ardiles summed it up as an effort, led by students for students, to promote entrepreneurship and innovation.

“Our goal is to help students that may have the knowledge and skills but don’t know to implement their ideas,” added Obando.

This is the second cohort of UI Fellows. Like their predecessors last year, the four were mentored and sponsored by CCNY’s Zahn Innovation Center.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.


Brooklyn District Attorney Organizes Campus Sexual Assault Prevention Symposium at Brooklyn College

Acting District Attorney Eric Gonzalez organized this series of workshops hosted by the college, designed to raise awareness, support survivors, and share solutions.

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson (right) and Acting District Attorney for Brooklyn Eric Gonzalez share a commitment to creating safer campus spaces.

 

In the wake of the headlines detailing survivor accounts of rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment, Brooklyn College hosted “A Symposium on Campus Sexual Assault,” organized by Acting Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and his office. Over 100 students, educators, government staffers, and law enforcement officials attended the daylong event held on Friday, October 27 in the Brooklyn College Student Center.

“Brooklyn College is a leading voice in the fight against sexual assault on campuses,” said District Attorney Gonzalez, the first Latinx to serve the borough in this capacity. “And one of the things we have to ensure is that when we get our students into college, they are treated fairly and given opportunities to be successful. The traumas caused by sexual assault can take students off their successful track. So, I’m committed to this work and to making sure that we provide the resources and the information to ensure that anyone who steps foot on a college campus is not deprived of their education because of sexual harassment or sexual assault.”

“There’s really no better time to have a conversation about these topics than now,” said Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson. Anderson, a lawyer and leading scholar on rape law who has been a vocal critic of attempts to roll back advances and protections in these areas, announced the convening of a new task force, a coalition of Brooklyn College faculty and students working together to address these matters on campus. “As you know, the statistics are deeply troubling. The National Sexual Violence Resource Centerreports that one in five females and one in 16 males are sexually assaulted while in college. More than 90 percent of these victims do not report to the police; most of them do not report their victimization to any authority figure. And there’s tremendous silence around this issue because, too often, the victims are blamed.”

The symposium’s keynote speaker Bea Hanson—former principal deputy director of the United States Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) and current executive director of the NYC Domestic Violence Task Force—discussed the ways in which policy continues to affect outcomes, and how education is key to intervention, prevention, and supporting survivors.

“One of the areas that we can look forward to and continue to work on—and I’m glad that Brooklyn College is really talking about this, too—is prevention and how we can really, really support victims, regardless of what happens to the offender,” Hanson said. “Some of the groundbreaking work we were able to do in the Obama administration to address a whole number of issues cannot be easily changed. One of the more prominent aspects of the work we accomplished is broadening how rape is defined and how the FBI counts incidences of the crime.”

The previous definition of rape did not account for victims who were unconscious, incapacitated, under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or those otherwise coerced into non-consensual sexual situations; nor did it consider or count male victims.

“Brooklyn has very strong leadership in this arena through Michelle Kaminsky’s Domestic Violence Bureauand the Brooklyn Family Justice Center—making sure we’re addressing people that are most marginalized because of their sexual orientation, gender identity, immigration status , race, ethnicity, or disability status. So, I’m hopeful and excited that the city is taking the lead in this ongoing commitment to doing as much as we can to reduce sexual violence.”

Brooklyn College takes a strong stance against sexual assault and sexual harassment. To learn more about these issues, to report incidences, or to find support resources, please visit the college’s Sexual Harassment, Assault, and Rape site.

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Dr. Patricia Broderick aka “the dynamite stick” on CUTV News Radio

Dr. Patricia Broderick, CUNY Medical Professor and Founder of Eazysense

They call Dr. Patricia Broderick the “dynamite stick” because nothing stops her. She is the first person to marry the brain with sensors and has invented, patented and trademarked a revolutionary technology, THE BRODERICK PROBE® that some medical doctors say will change the face of science and medicine.

Broderick is so dynamic that CUTV News Radio has asked her to talk about her work on air twice – on Monday November 6th at 1pm EDT and again Monday November 13th at 1pm EDT.

Dr. Broderick is a Medical Professor in Molecular Cellular and Biomedical science at the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York and Professor in Neurology at NYU-Langone Medical Center. She is also Founder of Eazysense Nanotechnologies Inc.

Broderick believes the brain is a living miracle, but we’re getting closer to understanding it biologically and chemically. She has spent her career working on neurodegenerative diseases like epilepsy, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, as well as biopsychiatric conditions like anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorders.

Click here to find out how to call in on Nov 6th and 13th at 1PM EDT to speak with Dr. Broderick and the CUTV News Radio hosts Jim Masters and Doug Llewellyn.

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VETERANS DAY AT CUNY: A TRIBUTE TO 3,000 STRONG

University Recognizes Veterans Excelling in Classroom

More than 3,000 military veterans are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs on CUNY’s 24 campuses, a 50 percent increase since 2010 due in part to the University’s reputation for welcoming veterans and providing them with services that help them succeed.

Every year since 2009, CUNY campuses have earned recognition for being among the country’s most “military friendly” colleges, according to Victory Media, a respected veterans’ advocacy organization that uses strong data-based measures to assess resources, services and outreach that colleges provide student veterans.

In advance of Veterans Day, CUNY’s Office of Veterans Affairs this week is honoring student veterans who have maintained grade point averages of 3.5 or above. For the fifth year, the Veterans Affairs office presented the awards at a breakfast on Monday at The Graduate Center, prior to a networking-and-resource fair to which all 3,000 CUNY student veterans were invited.

“CUNY is proud to be a university that welcomes veterans and reservists not only in words but in actions – with programs, services and resources that help ease their transitions and support their pursuit of success,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “And we’re proud of our veterans – proud of the academic excellence, diversity and life experience they bring to all our campuses.”

CUNY student vets have served in every branch of the military and in every part of the world. Many fought in Afghanistan and Iraq and in other areas of post-9/11 conflict, while some served prior to the years of large-school deployments to the Middle East. Like CUNY students in general, they are diverse in every way and come from a range of backgrounds and personal histories. They are a distinct group of CUNY’s “nontraditional” students.

Here’s a look at a few of the CUNY veterans being honored for their academic achievement:

Throughout his eight years on active duty as a Marine – in Afghanistan and Iraq, Guantanamo Bay and Europe – Eugene Marmontov envisioned coming home one day and going to college. Specifically, to John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “I always wanted to go into public service in the justice field,” he said, “and I knew that was the place I wanted to be.”

Marmontov, 35, was born in Moscow and emigrated to Brooklyn with his mother when he was 18. “I spent the first few years trying to assimilate, learn the language, learn the culture, working random jobs,” he says. “I became a citizen.” At 24, and alone after his mother was killed in a car accident, he decided to enlist in the Marine Corps. He served tours in Afghanistan and Iraq as part of a scout sniper team, followed by a deployment with security forces at Guantanamo Bay and then assignments in Europe, Israel and Libya training with forces from those countries.

Marmontov ended his active duty career in 2015, when he decided it was time to “explore myself and go to college.” He headed straight to John Jay as he’d long planned and found it as welcoming a place for veterans as he’d heard. “People there are phenomenal in helping with GI benefits, picking classes, employment, mentorship with other veterans. I got an internship with the U.S. Marshals.”

A forensic psychology major with a 3.95 GPA, Marmontov will graduate in December and hopes to begin his career in law enforcement either with a federal agency such as the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Agency or Secret Service, or with the NYPD. He also plans to continue his education, studying part time in John Jay’s graduate program in public administration. Meanwhile, he hasn’t completely separated from the service: He remains a Marine reservist.

Samantha Ruiz grew up in East Harlem and enlisted in the Navy in the spring of 2001. “I was in basic training when 9/11 happened,” she says. She was 18 and planned to spend four years in the service, taking advantage of the Navy College Fund to pursue her education. But two years in, plans changed. She became a parent while stationed in Virginia and school had to wait. She wound up staying in the service for 14 years, the last few stationed in Japan.

“I trained first as a mechanical engineer, but eventually I segued into career counseling and drug and alcohol counseling,” Ruiz, now 35, said. “I worked one-on-one helping sailors with career goals and transitioning out of the Navy.” It was a skill that came in handy when the time came for her own transition in 2015: “My oldest was 14 and going into high school and I felt it was more important to be with him so I decided to come home to East Harlem and go back to school at CUNY.”

Ruiz completed an associate degree at Borough of Manhattan Community College, then transferred to Hunter College as a sociology major. She’s maintained a 3.8 GPA and will graduate next spring. “Going back to school was definitely a culture shock,” she says. “I was a lot older and had a lot of life experiences. I’ve been in 21 countries and have a more global perspective about how things work than typical college students. But it was really beneficial being a sociology major.”

Ruiz works part time on Hunter’s student veteran services team, helping fellow veterans make their own transitions to school and life after the service. Not the least of it is helping them navigate the paperwork for VA education benefits – things she herself got help with when she returned. After graduation, Ruiz hopes to continue on to a master’s at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter. She knows exactly who her clients will be: “I want to work with vets.”

Though most student vets served in the post-2001 era and arrived on CUNY campuses soon after their discharges, some are veterans of earlier wars and took different routes to college. “You know, I’m an old man,” joked Edgardo Cedeno, a 69-year-old Vietnam veteran who graduated from Lehman College this summer and is now working on a master’s.

His story begins long before most of his fellow student vets were even born. Raised in the Bronx, Cedeno was drafted into the Army in 1968 and served a year in Vietnam. Like many returning vets in those years, he struggled for a few years after his discharge. “Veterans weren’t welcomed home as they are now,” he says ¬– but he eventually straightened his life out and got a job with Con Edison through the federal CETA program. It turned into a 34-year career.

Retiring in 2013, Cedeno decided to go to college, at Lehman, where his wife, Cordia, had earned an undergraduate and a master’s degree. “We used to tell our kids about the value of education,” Cedeno said, adding with a laugh, “I was the only dummy in the family.”

He majored in political science, a longtime interest. “Going back to school was a little intimidating at first. I was older than everyone, even the professors. But I took to the work and I graduated cum laude.” He wasn’t finished: A few weeks later he began Lehman’s master’s program in organizational leadership. His studies are aligned with his passion for service: A deacon at Mount Carmel Baptist Church, Cedeno leads the church’s social service ministry at Taconic Correctional Facility, a women’s prison. He’s also thinking about becoming a member of his local community board. “I went back to school for the education itself, but also for my community work,” he said. “If you don’t have credentials you’re not taken seriously, even at my age.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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2017 School Photos

School photos will be taken the week of November 13-November 20. Individual portraits as well as class photos will be taken. Senior portraits will be in December.

Please click here for the LG Schedule.

Please click here for the MG and UG Schedule.


WABC-TV anchors, seven distinguished alumni, receive CCNY honors

Bill Ritter

Sade Baderinwa

 

 

Eyewitness News co-anchors Bill Ritter and Sade Baderinwa are this year’s John H. Finley Award recipients. The award is given out by the Alumni Association of The City College of New York for exemplary and dedicated service to the City of New York.

In addition, the association has honored seven City College alumni for outstanding post-graduate achievement. They received the Townsend Harris Medal at CCNY’s 137th annual alumni dinner in Manhattan.

The seven are:

  • Bernard S. Cohen, Esq. ’56B, the renowned lawyer who successfully argued the landmark civil rights case Loving vs. Virginia before the U.S. Supreme Court;
  • Jacob (Jack) Feinstein ’65EE, a retired VP for Consolidated Edison and prominent energy consultant;
  • Judge Stuart S. Levy ’72, a retired administrative patent judge and expert in patent law, practice and procedure;
  • Dr. Naomi Conn Liebler ’66, a distinguished scholar, author and one of America’s pre-eminent experts on Shakespeare;
  • Dolores Allen Littles ’59, a trailblazing photography editor for Life Magazine and Time Life Books;
  • Dr. Augustine L. Moscatello ’69, the award-winning Chair of the Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery at Westchester Medical Center; and
  • Dr. Stanley I. Sandler ’62ChE, a world renowned chemical engineer and researcher in applied thermodynamics.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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A Soldier’s Story

Senior Isiah James, a decorated veteran, finds community and support on the Brooklyn College campus thanks to the college’s Veteran and Military Program.

Senior and political science major Isiah James during his 12-month, third deployment in Maiwand, Afghanistan, as a member of the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment.

Out of the corner of his eye, senior Isiah James saw the grenade coming toward him.

It was 2009, the day before Valentine’s Day, 10:30 in the morning, and he and his unit were on patrol, their first mission for the U.S. Army in Kirkuk, Iraq. This was second of James’s three deployments—the first in Baghdad, Iraq, and the third in Maiwand, Afghanistan.

The mission began three hours late and the streets of Kirkuk were already bustling. This worried James because a dangerous situation was made even more so as Iraqi civilians could get caught in crossfire between U.S. soldiers and insurgents. James was positioned in the last of a convoy of four armored trucks, each outfitted with machine gun turrets. As a gunner and trained sniper, James was charged with protecting the convoy from any danger that might come from behind. His weapon allowed him to spot and respond to potential attacks from a 180-degree radius.

“I’m standing there behind my 50-caliber machine gun. One hundred armor-piercing incendiary rounds,” James recalls. “The turret is electric, so you move a little joystick and it turns. I’m scanning high. I’m looking at windows and building rooftops because they like to shoot at you from there. My turret is off to the right-hand side. The turret doesn’t move as fast as my head. And to my left, I see movement.”

That is when he saw two men running, one of whom had a Russian RKG-3 anti-tank grenade in his hand. As James tried to turn his turret around to address the imminent threat, the man threw the grenade directly toward James.

“I’ll never forget it. Just like in movies, everything proceeded in slow motion. I thought, ‘#^$%! He got me. I’m dead.'”

The grenade hit James’ turret, bounced into the air, and exploded. The concussive force of the explosion knocked him unconscious and pushed him deeper into the belly of the vehicle. He isn’t certain how long he was out, but he awoke to an Army medic standing over him, asking if he was okay. Instinctively, James removed his gloves and stuck his finger into his left ear. When he removed his finger, there was blood.

As a result of the blast, James experienced a mild traumatic brain injury. He had to relearn how to speak; he has permanent hearing loss in his left ear; he experiences chronic migraines and pains in his joints; and he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)—leaving him, among other things, unable to enter his home without first checking behind doors, inside closets, and under beds to ensure no one is lurking, waiting to do him further harm.

“I’m 31 years old and I’m 90 percent disabled,” he says.

For his service during three tours of duty, James was the recipient of 25 medals, ribbons, and badges, including the Presidential Unit Citation for “gallantry, determination  . . .  in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions” and the Valorous Unit Award for “extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States.”

It took some time for James to manage these obstacles, some of which he continues to deal with, but his healing journey led him into academia to study the very causes of human conflict, and to learn ways to resolve these differences nonviolently. The Florida native came to Brooklyn College after his spouse, Damaris Rosado-James ’10, who studied art history at the college, and whom he married on September 30 of this year, recommended it to him. He enrolled and decided to devote the entirety of his intellectual energy to the study of political science in an attempt to understand how to solve some of the problems in the world he saw firsthand.

The highly decorated James, in full regalia, and his wife Damaris Rosado-James ’10, use his saber to cut their wedding cake at a ceremony that took place on September 30.

“I’ve definitely noticed the influence of Isiah’s service in the classroom,” said Sara Hassani, adjunct lecturer of political science, who teaches James in her “Politics of Incarceration” course. “Not only does he have a wealth of experience to draw from in relation to the topics we discuss, but he also demonstrates a passionate commitment to social justice. His dedication to service shines through his vocal concerns over abuses of power, as well as the problem-solving approach that inspires many of his interventions. He’s not usually satisfied with simply identifying the underlying causes of social issues. Rather, he often emphasizes the ways in which we can strive to overcome them. It’s refreshing to see.”

These success stories are par for the course thanks to the support the college offers vets. The Brooklyn College Veteran and Military Program—whose motto is “Thank you for your service; now let us serve you!”—aids veterans in their transition from military to civilian to academic life.

“The primary goal of the program is to actively engage all veterans, active duty members, their dependents, and survivors in campus-wide programs and activities that will enhance their college experience,” said Claudette Guinn, the program coordinator. “Our services include assisting veterans in applying for the G.I. Bill; certifying and validating their benefits in compliance with current Veterans Administration regulations; mentoring incoming veterans; and providing updated information regarding changes in educational benefits, federal laws, support services, additional entitlements, special scholarships for dependents of deceased and disabled veterans, and the special book cost program for veterans. The program also provides referrals for on- and off-campus services when necessary, such as the Center for Disability Services, immigration, pro bono legal services, internships, and career opportunities.”

In addition to the program, the Veteran Students’ Organization (VSO), founded in 1974 by Vietnam War-era soldiers, is also a place where Brooklyn College students who served in the military find community. And the college has a sizable population of veterans. Each year, it tracks the enrollment of students with military service. In fall 2017, 200 students identified as veterans, the largest cohort in the last five years.

“You know there are other people who are like you, who have similar combat experiences to your own.” James said of the Veteran and Military Program, for which he sometimes serves as mentor and tutor. “It’s what we in the military call ‘espirit de corps,’ that sense of a shared value system shaped by our service.”

He recommends that other student veterans utilize the program’s services as well.

“Find someone you can trust and talk to them,” he advises. “It will help tremendously.”

James will be graduating at the end of the fall semester. He is planning to take the LSAT in December, and says he will pursue a career in public policy after he finishes law school.


All Ears: NYC Department of Veterans Services brings listening tour to Kingsborough Exploring ways to provide more resources for NYC active military and veterans at CUNY

Commissioner Loree Sutton and Senior Advisor and Director of Public Private Partnerships Cassandra Alvarez of the NYC Department of Veterans Services visited Kingsborough as part of a city-wide listening tour being conducted by the newly created Veterans on Campus NYC coalition.  The coalition of NYC colleges, universities, and private entities is dedicated to better supporting and understanding the student veteran and family member experience.

The initiative was launched by Mayor Bill de Blasio as a means of providing pathways to opportunity for tens of thousands of the city’s diverse student veterans. Over 12,000 students are currently using their GI Bill to pursue higher education in New York City.

The two guests met with Interim President Peter M. Cohen, Dean Brian Mitra, KCC’s Veteran Program Specialist/Certifying Official Tara Yarczower, and student veterans and active military personnel; toured our Veterans Lounge in room T7-220; and learned how KCC’s Military and Veteran Affairs Office (MAVA) works closely with many campus departments to serve the needs of prospective and enrolled active military personnel, veterans, their dependents and survivors.

MAVA has identified liaisons in Access-Ability Services, Admissions Services, the Bursar’s Office, Career Development, Counseling and Health Services, Financial Aid, Freshman Services, the Men’s Resource Center, the Registrar’s Office, Student Affairs, the Transfer Success Office, and the Women’s Center, whom veterans can contact directly.

The City is exploring ways to partner with CUNY in order to provide more resources for the active military/veteran population.

Students wishing to explore what benefits they may qualify for at Kingsborough can visit room C-106 or call 718-368-5472.

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BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE HONORED FOR INCREASING LATINO GRADUATION RATES “Accelerated Study in Associate Programs” is Named a “2017 Example of Excelencia”

October 10, 2017 – The Latino student advocacy group Excelencia in Education has announced its 2017 “Examples of Excelencia.” Bronx Community College’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) was cited for its outstanding, evidence-based results of improved Latino student success. The announcement was made October 5 at the annual Celebración de Excelencia held at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C.  Leaders from across the country attended the event — including BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe and Dean Francisco Legasa, who has been with the ASAP program since it was launched in 2007.

“BCC is thrilled by this recognition of our commitment to a learning community of diversity and excellence,” observed President Isekenegbe.

Over 1,200 Latino students at BCC have participated in ASAP, which has increased its students’ semester-to-semesterCelebración de Excelencia to 93%, while maintaining a 54% three-year completion rate among enrolled students. This is compared to a three-year graduation rate of 18% among the rest of the student body.

“While angry voices attempt to minimize Latinos’ contributions to our nation, Excelencia in Education brings national recognition and celebrates our contributions,” said Sarita Brown, President of Excelencia in Education.

This year, the Examples of Excelencia were selected from among more than 160 nominations from 25 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.


York College English Professor Publishes New Book on Georgia O’Keeffe

Dr. Linda M. Grasso has published her second book, Equal Under The Sky: Georgia O’Keeffe and Twentieth-Century Feminism (University of New Mexico Press, 2017), the first historical study of Georgia O’Keeffe’s complex relationship to US feminism from the 1910s to the 1970s. Utilizing understudies sources such as fan letters and archives of women’s organizations and colleges, Grasso shows how and why feminism and O’Keeffe are inextricably connected to popular culture and scholarship. The women’s movements that impacted the creation and reception of O’Keeffe’s art, Grasso argues, explain why she is a national icon who is valued for more than her artistic practice. Information about the book and the author’s related activities can be found at www.okeeffefeminism.com. 

Dr. Linda Grasso is a professor of English at York College, CUNY.

  • U.S. Literature
  • U.S. Women’s Literature and Culture
  • African American Literature
  • U.S. Women’s History
  • Asian American Studies
  • Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum
Linda M. Grasso holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Studies from Brown University and specializes in U.S. Literature and Culture, Women’s Literature, and Women’s and Gender Studies. She teaches courses in American Literature, African American Literature, Women’s and Gender Studies, American Studies, and Writing. Professor Grasso’s most recent book Equal under the Sky: Georgia O’Keeffe and Twentieth-Century Feminism (University of New Mexico Press, Fall 2017) situates the artist in U.S. feminist history and explores what feminism meant to O’Keeffe and her audiences over several generations. She is also the author of The Artistry of Anger: Black and White Women’s Literature in America, 1820-1860 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002)—which was a finalist for the 2003 MLA First Book Prize–and numerous essays on nineteenth and twentieth-century U.S. women’s literature and culture.
Education: PhD, Brown University
            MA, Brown University
             BA City University of New York

 


Grove School’s Jeffrey Morris, Rosemarie Wesson earn AIChE honors

 

CCNY Grove School’s Jeff Morris and Rosemarie Wesson.

Jeffrey Morris, Professor of Chemical Engineering in The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering is the AIChE 2017 Shell Thomas Baron Award recipient. He received the award today at the organization’s annual meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he delivered the award’s eponymous lecture. His talk was entitled: “Exploring Complex Colloidal Dispersions by Simulation.”

Also at the annual gathering, Rosemarie D. Wesson, associate dean for research and Professor of Chemical Engineering in the Grove School, was elected to a three-year term as AIChE treasurer. Her tenure begins in 2018.

Morris was cited by AIChE, the acronym for the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, for being “an acknowledged leader worldwide on fluid-particle systems, widely recognized for his theoretical contributions as well as using numerical simulations to address challenging problems in suspension mechanics.”

The organization further noted that Morris has produced results on phenomena in suspension flows and new experimental approaches for these problems.

He has published widely and participated in major leadership roles in the field, including programs in fluid mechanics for AIChE and chairing the Bingham Award Committee for Society of Rheology.  His major contributions to the rheology of suspensions include theory-simulations based on single-particle insights as well as modeling with effective medium approaches.

Morris’ new ideas, including accounting for finite volume fractions and inertial effects, have been tested using numerical simulations and experiments. He reviews the progress in the field and applies the results to more practical situations: suspension flow in thin films and suspension jet flow.

Morris is a graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology (BS, MS) and the California Institute of Technology (PhD).

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Zero Textbook Cost Courses Increase at CUNY SPS

New York, NY — October 31, 2017 — The CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is at the forefront of a CUNY-wide initiative to save students money on textbooks by offering Zero Textbook Cost online courses (Z sections) using Open Education Resources (OER) rather than traditional textbooks.

Rising textbook costs pose a significant barrier to college access and completion.  According to the American Enterprise Institute, the cost of college textbooks has escalated by 181% since 1998 while the cost of recreational books has decreased by 4.2% during the same time period.  The College Board recommends that college students budget at least $1,200 per year for textbooks and course supplies, a number that dramatically increases the cost of attending college at CUNY, where undergraduate tuition at a 4-year college is $6,530.

To increase college access and completion rates by reducing prohibitive textbook costs, New York State has invested $8 million to promote use of OER in the CUNY and SUNY systems. Faculty, librarians, and instructional designers are collaborating to convert courses that currently use expensive publisher textbooks to Z (Zero Textbook Cost) sections. At CUNY SPS, the number of fully online undergraduate Z sections offered by the School has grown from 35 sections in Spring 2017 to 65 sections scheduled for Spring 2018.

“Online courses are a natural fit with OER,” says Dr. Jennifer Sparrow, Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs and Director of General Education. “For the past five years, the General Education program has been working to make all its courses low-cost (under $40) or no-cost textbooks.  We’re almost there.”

In lieu of using proprietary textbooks, Zero-Textbook Cost courses employ a mix of OER textbooks, links to scholarly and professional websites, resources from CUNY library databases, and multimedia lectures created by CUNY SPS professors. Faculty say that the OER initiative has produced a truly student-centered approach to online learning.

“Students no longer need to delay their ability to kick-start a successful semester because they are waiting for financial aid in order to purchase books,” says Professor Joan Mosely, the lead mathematics professor for General Education at CUNY SPS. “Instead, students receive easy to navigate platforms within Blackboard that are on par with the rigorous academic environment found in traditional brick and mortar classrooms.”

In January 2018 more than 75% of General Education sections at CUNY SPS will be Z sections, with additional course conversions planned for Fall 2018 and the prospect of a 4-year “Z Degree,” which would be the first of its kind at CUNY, on the horizon.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Major Healthcare Providers Team up with LaGuardia Community College, Weill Cornell Medicine, & Harvard B-School Alumni to Train New Yorkers for In-Demand Medical Jobs

Program grads hired at Weill Cornell Medicine, CityMD, Columbia University Medical Center, Elmhurst Hospital, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Mount Sinai, Northwell Health, and other NYC health institutions

Latest Class of Graduates Complete Intense 5-Month Program

Long Island City, NY (October 25, 2017)—A unique program run by LaGuardia Community College and Weill Cornell Medicine, designed to expand the number of well-qualified candidates for open medical billing positions, has graduated its fourth cohort of 23 students.

Training NYers for Medical Billing Jobs, with Weill Cornell Medicine & Harvard B-School Alumni - Medical Billing Group photo

23 students graduated from the fourth cohort of the Medical Billing Training Program

Funded by the New York Alliance for Careers in Healthcare (within the New York City Department of Small Business Services), the Medical Billing Training Program is offered tuition-free and attracts more than 1,000 applicants for limited class spots. At last week’s graduation ceremony, CityMD, which operates urgent care walk-in clinics throughout NYC, was welcomed as one of the program’s newest employer-partner.
Brian Graybow, vice president of revenue cycle for CityMD, said, “LaGuardia’s medical billing curriculum is comprehensive and their students come with an appreciation and excitement for the role they are pursuing.”

Nearly 80% of program grads from previous classes are now working in New York as medical billers, customer service reps, and other non-clinical entry level positions with starting salaries of $35,000-$45,000.

Kim Kendall & Carolina Santana

Kim Kendall with 4th cohort graduate Carolina Santana, now working at Weill Cornell Medicine

As awareness of the medical billing program has grown throughout NYC, the number of employers engaged in the program and recruiting graduates for hire as medical billers has grown. More than 50% of graduates have started at Weill Cornell Medicine, the program’s lead employer-partner. Additional graduates have been hired by CityMD, Columbia University Medical CenterElmhurst HospitalMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterMount SinaiNorthwell Health, and additional NY metro health care facilities.

“The eagerness of NYC’s leading health institutions to join our partnership reflects their seeing that turnover is near zero, that some grads have already been promoted, and that all hires are detail-oriented, astute professionals eager to work every single day. By working together with business and academia, our team has created an intense, demanding training course whose graduates are much better equipped for immediate employment than the typical entry level job seeker who has worked in the field or had some post-secondary education. Plus, thru our course, taught by industry pros and regularly updated, they’ve obtained a deep understanding of the intricacies of the US health insurance system and have a genuine compassion for the patients whose treatment coverage they help facilitate,” said Barry Puritz, co-chair of the Harvard Business School Club of New York Skills Gap Project, which helped initiate the program in 2015 [ click here to read more].

“Patients are always top of mind; as healthcare expands, we must innovate and adapt our billing practices. Posting payments and adjusting claims in a timely manner is important to our physician practices in providing quality services to our patients.” said Mohammed Kabir, 30, who has been working at Weill Cornell Medicine since graduating from LaGuardia last year. “This program has changed my life in every way. Before, I made ends meet driving taxis and doing odd jobs. Now I have a career that I’m proud of and that fascinates me every day. The US medical billing system is so complex. It’s also ignited my interest in education; I’m planning to pursue a degree in computer science at LaGuardia this spring.”

“Programs like this one that enable our college to utilize our pedagogical skills for the benefit of the medical institutions that take care of us and our neighbors, while getting highly-motivated New Yorkers on the path to an economically and professionally rewarding career, is the pinnacle of what we do in continuing education,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “And it’s especially gratifying when the program inspires graduates to take their higher education further.”

Kim Kendall & Larry Amaya

Kim Kendall with 4th cohort graduate Larry Amaya, now working at Weill Cornell Medicine

“It’s clear that there is a high demand for our Medical Billing Training Program—from both employers and New Yorkers eager for a challenging career with growth opportunities, and where they can make a real difference to fellow New Yorkers; ensuring that their bills from doctors’ appointments and hospitalizations are processed smoothly and accurately,” said Kim Kendall, Director of the Medical Billing Training Program at LaGuardia. “As well, because our college attracts many non-traditional students, program graduates bring a wide diversity of age, experience, language, and country of origin, to the healthcare institutions that employ them.”

Of students in the fourth cohort, the average age was 34 (range: 21-51); 82% (19 out of 23) were born outside the United States, from Bangladesh, Brazil, Ecuador, Jamaica, Mexico, Myanmar, and Nepal.

According to New York Health Careers, the medical billing occupation is expected to see continued growth as state and federal reforms have made health care available to many more people. Additionally, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that between 2014 and 2024, the number of jobs for Billing and Posting Clerks will increase by 13% nationwide. The New York State Department of Labor projects that the number of jobs will increase by 20% in New York during the same period.

Based on word of mouth and media coverage of the first three graduations, more than 1,100 people applied for the 24 openings in the fourth cohort, which had a 96% retention rate; 23 of the 24 students who started the program in May 2017 completed the program and graduated.

“The concept has the potential to be replicated for larger impact,” said Mr. Puritz.

To read more about the Medical Billing Training Program at LaGuardia Community College, click on links below:

1. First cohort 
2. Second cohort
3. Third cohort

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit http://www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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CITY COUNCIL LIKELY TO HAVE FEWER WOMEN MEMBERS AFTER ELECTION DAY, ACCORDING TO CUNY INSTITUTE FOR STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE

The gender gap on the City Council is likely to continue to widen, with female representation dropping to as low as 23.5 percent after the election next week, according to an analysis by the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG).

While women account for 52 percent of New York City’s population, only 47 women are among the 170 candidates seeking election or re-election in the city’s 51 Council districts this year. ISLG a year ago found that 27.5 percent of New York City Council members were women, compared with 33.6 percent nationally.

“This isn’t just an issue in New York City. Gender disparity in elected positions is a problem across the country,” said Michael P. Jacobson, executive director of the Institute. “And this problem goes beyond representation. Research has shown that among elected officials, women are more effective – they introduce more legislation, they’re more transparent and they’re more likely to work across party lines. With fewer women in elected positions, good governance and democracy suffer.”

Representation of women on the New York City Council declined from the 27.5 percent level the ISLG found a year ago to 26 percent today, as a result of a special election that replaced a woman with a man, and a vacated seat, according to Victoria Lawson, senior research associate at the Institute and director of its Equality Indicators Project.

“It is likely that we are on track to have fewer women” on the Council after this election, Lawson said. “There are 10 open seats in the 2017 election: Nine City Council members are not running for re-election, and one seat is vacant. Of the 41 members running for re-election, 20 are uncontested and the remaining 21 are likely to win due to their incumbency.” Of the 10 open seats, she said, two are uncontested in the general election, four have only male candidates, and four include Democrats running in historically Democratic districts.

“If the remaining incumbents and Democratic candidates win in the general election, 12 out of 51 Council members (or 23.5 percent) will be women in January 2018,” Lawson said.  Additionally, women — Melissa Mark-Viverito and, before her, Christine Quinn — have led the Council for nearly 12 years, but this year none of the candidates for Speaker is a woman, “which will be a significant loss of power.”

Last year’s Equality Indicators study by ISLG, “Who Runs Our Cities? The Political Gender Gap in the Top 100 U.S. Cities,” examined representation of women in elected positions at the local level http://equalityindicators.org/women-in-politics/. The report included the genders of the 100 largest cities’ mayors, the number of women mayors of color, the percentage of elected officials and city councilors who are women, and other data. Cities including Washington, D.C. (50 percent), Austin, Texas (70 percent), Seattle (55 percent), Richmond, Va., (55.6 percent) and Honolulu (33.3 percent) were among the many municipalities surpassing New York City in the percentage of women elected to city councils.

“What’s interesting, though, is that when you look at the gender of people in appointed positions, in New York City, we don’t see this same gap,” Jacobson said. “So we know there are many women who have great experience and would be very strong candidates for office.”

The report said studies had identified several factors contributing to keeping women out of office, among them: gendered household responsibilities and social roles; the highly competitive nature of political campaigns; limited exposure to politics; and negative self-perceptions. Women, the report said, are also less likely than men to consider themselves ready to run for office.

Women and men are about equally as successful at getting elected to office, but “part of what we found is women aren’t running,” Lawson said. “Research suggests that women don’t think of it as a possibility the same way that men do. Women are more likely to wonder, ‘Do I have the right qualifications for this?’ ”

As for how to fix the gender gap in politics, the Institute’s report recommends increased research to confront biases and misconceptions by the public and by women considering running for office; research on the role of media, and on aspects of modern campaigns that discourage women from running; education for girls and young women to include political awareness and participations; recruitment of women candidates including fundraising and education; encouragement from families and spouses; and the work of organizations that encourage and train women to seek elective office, such as Emerge America and Emily’s List.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Music Reference Collection, Conference Room at Queens College Named for Music Faculty Member and Alumna

— Distinguished Music Historian Raymond Erickson, Lifelong Queens Resident and Alumna Mary E. O’Connor Honored with Campus Namings in Gratitude for Their Service to the College —

FLUSHING, NY, October 30, 2017—The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York has approved the naming of a music reference collection in the Queens College Aaron Copland School of Music in honor of distinguished music historian and faculty member Raymond Erickson. A conference room at the college has been named for lifelong Queens resident and dedicated alumna Mary E. O’Connor.

In recognition of Music Professor Raymond Erickson’s commitment to maintaining the music library reference collection in the Copland School, the collection has been named the “Raymond Erickson Music Reference Collection.” Erickson, an internationally recognized Bach scholar, noted music historian and keyboardist, joined the Queens College faculty in 1971. He has served as Chair of the Music Department, founding Director of the Copland School, and Dean of Arts and Humanities. Erickson laid the groundwork for the college’s Center for Preparatory Studies in Music and organized the first scholarship endowments for Queens College music majors.

Alumna Mary E. O’Connor, who passed away a year ago, graduated cum laude in June 1950 with a bachelor’s degree in economics. A lifelong resident of Queens, she often expressed appreciation for the excellent education she had received—at no cost to her—and felt it was an obligation to help others enjoy the same benefits. In honor of Ms. O’Connor, Room 347 in Powdermaker Hall—near the Economics Department—has been named the “Mary E. O’Connor Conference Room” to celebrate her years of service to her alma mater.

Ms. O’Connor’s commitment to the college will also endure through a $3.6 million gift for the creation of scholarships for juniors and seniors majoring in economics and/or business administration. A regular attendee at homecoming and alumni events, Ms. O’Connor spent her entire 41-year career with the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States (now known as AXA Equitable), a major life, disability and health insurer in New York City.

“Professor Raymond Erickson and Ms. Mary E. O’Connor embody the spirit of our motto, We Learn so That We May Serve,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Professor Erickson’s contributions have helped to enrich the academic experience for countless students. Ms. O’Connor’s long association with the college has been invaluable to us; now as a generous donor, she will help ensure that future generations of Queens College students will benefit from the same high quality, affordable education that she so valued. These namings will serve as a reminder of their legacies for future scholars.”

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth in the nation by the Chronicle of Higher Education among public U.S. colleges for upward social and economic mobility and globally, by the Center for World University Rankings, in the top 3.5% of schools on such factors as quality of education and faculty, and alumni employment. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


The Murphy Institute Director Gregory Mantsios Receives Distinction from City & State New York

New York, NY – October 30, 2017 –Gregory Mantsios, founder and director of the Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies at the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS), was recognized by City & State New York with the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Award for Labor and Law in ceremonies held earlier this month.

“City & State New York concentrates on our region’s government and politics, and outstanding leaders like Greg Mantsios come to our attention,” explains Tom Allon, president of City & State.   “We are honored to present him with the CSR Award for Labor & Law in recognition of his dedication and commitment to the well-being of New Yorkers, to education, and his demonstrated regard for human rights, labor, and community.”

In 1984, through a collaboration with NYC labor unions to meet the higher education needs of working adults, Mantsios founded the Murphy Institute, named for the former CUNY Chancellor, a forceful advocate for working people and the labor movement.  In 2005, the Murphy Institute moved from Queens College to midtown Manhattan under the aegis of CUNY SPS to better accommodate students across the university system.  Today, the Murphy Institute offers undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as certificate programs, and academic internships in Labor Studies and Urban Studies, to over 1,500 students.

Mantsios has served as a higher education officer – first in SUNY and then in CUNY – for over three decades.  His tireless work to advance access to higher education for non-traditional students, particularly those from poor and working class backgrounds, has provided thousands of students with new opportunities and, often, subsequent careers in areas of public service. His own educational path – he holds a BA and PhD in sociology and an MA in urban studies – solidified his scholarly interests and activism in the areas of poverty, inequality, labor relations, and education.

Under his direction, the Murphy Institute’s Center for Labor, Community, and Policy Studies has become a leading voice for scholarly analysis of the current challenges confronting workers and working-class communities through its journal, New Labor Forum, and through its monthly forums and conferences.

City & State New York is the only media company devoted solely to covering government and politics in New York. Formed from the merger of City Hall and The Capitol newspapers in 2012, City & State provides insightful and detailed coverage of the politics, the policies and the influential individuals and organizations all over New York.  The City & State CSR program showcases New York business leaders for their outstanding work and contributions.

About the Murphy Institute

The Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, part of the CUNY system, located at 25 West 43rd Street in Manhattan, New York, offers higher education programs for working adults and union members, and serves as a resource center to labor, academic, and community leaders seeking a deeper understanding of labor and urban issues.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


NSF RAPID grant boosts CCNY’s Caribbean storm study

Puerto Rico after the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria this fall.

Even before Hurricanes Irma and Maria ravaged the Caribbean recently, experts at The City College of New York were gaining insight into how storms develop and intensify in the region. A $174,895 grant from the National Science Foundation promises to boost this research.

The one-year funding to a team of NOAA CREST researchers in the Grove School of Engineering is entitled “RAPID: Impacts of Post-Hurricane Land-Atmosphere Interactions on Convective and Precipitation Processes in the Caribbean Region.”

“The primary goal of this study is to improve our understanding of the role played by modified land-atmosphere interactions in storm development and intensification in the Caribbean region,” said Prathap Ramamurthy, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, and the project’s director.

Ramamurthy and his co-PIs, Jorge E. Gonzalez​, Fred Moshary and post-doctoral fellow Nathan Hossanah, who are all affiliated with City College’s NOAA-CREST, have been conducting summer field studies in Puerto Rico for the past three years, which have vastly improved their knowledge of convection in the Caribbean.

“The recent hurricane provides us a rare opportunity to study how convection and precipitation will be impacted in a landscape that is impacted by hurricane,” noted Ramamurthy. “As part of this study we will be visiting PR frequently in the next year to make key observations of land cover change and its impact on convective processes.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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CCNY study reveals power supply might not be as vulnerable to climate change as we thought

Ariel Miara, a PhD candidate and research associate at the Environmental Sciences Initiative helped do a deeper assessment of U.S. power supply vulnerabilities.

Charles Vörösmarty, PhD, the Founding Director of the Environmental Sciences Initiative.

Here’s a bit of surprising news. A closer look at how climate change could impact our power supply shows that America’s infrastructure might be more adaptable than scientists anticipated.

The results appear in a paper published in Nature Climate Change by Ariel Miara, a PhD Candidate in The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering and Charles J. Vörösmarty, Presidential Professor of civil engineering in the Grove School. One of the study’s key findings: climate change will negatively affect U.S. power supply reliability. But maintenance and a commitment to cleaner, more efficient energy technology and infrastructure may in fact result in a more resilient power grid.

Miara and other Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC), GC/CUNY scientists worked with researchers from National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories to do a deeper assessment of U.S. power supply vulnerabilities. The team analyzed 1,080 thermoelectric plants across the contiguous United States under future climate conditions and evaluated both their individual and collective performance across 19 North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) sub-regions. Previous studies projecting power supply capacity only considered individual plant capabilities without placing them in a more realistic, regional systems-wide context.

Although the study’s findings are encouraging, the paper’s authors say further understanding of the collective strengths and vulnerabilities of the U.S. power grid in the face of climate change is essential.

Click here to learn more about the study and the ASRC.

 

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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Laurie F. Dorf Appointed Vice President for Institutional Advancement/Alumni Relations at Queens College

FLUSHING, NY, October 30, 2017 — After a national search and the approval of the Board of Trustees of the City University of New York, Laurie F. Dorf has been appointed Vice President for Institutional Advancement/Alumni Relations at Queens College.

“Ms. Dorf’s appointment will enable the college to continue to increase its resources in order to strengthen our operational capacity and infrastructure in service to our students, faculty, and staff. She brings to this vital position a unique and impressive combination of senior-level experience in fundraising programs within public and private higher education as well as the non-profit sector. I look forward to continuing to work with her to advance Queens College’s strategic plan objectives,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

Dorf had served as Interim Vice President since January 2016. In this role she has led fundraising efforts for the college while overseeing funding for the strategic plan and establishing the necessary operational support to raise $162 million, exceeding our $150 million goal. She worked with the Queens College Foundation Board to develop and implement a fundraising plan that includes endowment, annual fund, planned giving, and major gifts.

Prior to joining Queens College, Dorf served as Executive Director for Development at Columbia University, Teachers College; Director of Alumni Affairs and Special Events at New York Law School; and as the Director of Citywide Annual Fund Campaigns at the YMCA of Greater New York.

She earned her Master’s Degree in Public Administration from New York University and her Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Long Island University. A Brooklyn native, Dorf grew up in Flatbush and graduated from Midwood High School.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage at www.qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Laurie F. Dorf Appointed Vice President for Institutional Advancement/Alumni Relations at Queens College

FLUSHING, NY, October 30, 2017 — After a national search and the approval of the Board of Trustees of the City University of New York, Laurie F. Dorf has been appointed Vice President for Institutional Advancement/Alumni Relations at Queens College.

“Ms. Dorf’s appointment will enable the college to continue to increase its resources in order to strengthen our operational capacity and infrastructure in service to our students, faculty, and staff. She brings to this vital position a unique and impressive combination of senior-level experience in fundraising programs within public and private higher education as well as the non-profit sector. I look forward to continuing to work with her to advance Queens College’s strategic plan objectives,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

Dorf had served as Interim Vice President since January 2016. In this role she has led fundraising efforts for the college while overseeing funding for the strategic plan and establishing the necessary operational support to raise $162 million, exceeding our $150 million goal. She worked with the Queens College Foundation Board to develop and implement a fundraising plan that includes endowment, annual fund, planned giving, and major gifts.

Prior to joining Queens College, Dorf served as Executive Director for Development at Columbia University, Teachers College; Director of Alumni Affairs and Special Events at New York Law School; and as the Director of Citywide Annual Fund Campaigns at the YMCA of Greater New York.

She earned her Master’s Degree in Public Administration from New York University and her Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Long Island University. A Brooklyn native, Dorf grew up in Flatbush and graduated from Midwood High School.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage at www.qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


YOUNGER GAY AND BISEXUAL MEN COME OUT EARLIER, CUNY RESEARCHERS FIND

Younger gay and bisexual men are recognizing their sexual orientation and coming out a year earlier, on average, than comparable young adults reported a decade ago, according to researchers at The City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and Hunter College’s Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training.

“What we’re seeing in these data is emblematic of increasing social acceptance of LGBT people in the U.S. in general,” lead author Christian Grov, professor at the Graduate School of Public Health, said in an interview. “In 2005, we were talking about Ellen DeGeneres and ‘Will and Grace’ on TV. Now we have Lady Gaga; openly gay characters in ‘Star Trek Discovery,’ ‘Orphan Black’ and the Oscar-winning best picture ‘Moonlight’; the legalization of same-sex marriage; and Barack Obama being the first sitting president to come out in favor of LGBT rights. It’s a whole new world.”

The study, “Birth Cohort Differences in Sexual Identity Development Milestones among HIV-Negative Gay and Bisexual Men in the United States,” appears in The Journal of Sex Research. Grov’s co-authors are Hunter College faculty members H. Jonathon Rendina, assistant professor of psychology, and Jeffrey T. Parsons, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, both of whom conduct their research at the Hunter College center.

This paper, based on 2015 data collected in an online survey, replicates and expands upon research that Grov, Parsons and others published in 2006. That study has been cited 300 times, making it a Google “classic paper” that is among the top 10 referenced in the field of sex and sexuality.

The new study of more than 1,000 gay and bisexual men from across the country includes questions on their coming-out process, which involves four sexual identity development milestones that generally occur in this order: awareness of sexual attraction to the same sex, self-identification as gay or bisexual, disclosure of this sexual identity to others, and having consensual sex with someone of the same gender.

The researchers found that when looked at as a whole, the age when men first felt sexually attracted to someone of the same gender was independent of birth cohort (age group); the median age was 11 to 12, about the same as initial heterosexual attraction. However, the authors also used advanced statistical techniques to identify subgroups of men who differed based on the patterns in their ages of achieving the four sexual identity development milestones.

The authors identified three distinct groups. The majority (84 percent) noticed same-sex attraction around the onset of puberty (i.e., around age 10) and progressed to self-identification, same-sex sexual activity, and coming out—all in that order and all during adolescence. The rest felt same-sex attraction during their teens (ages 12.5 to 18.0), but achieved the remaining milestones later in life; for 13 percent, this was during early adulthood and for 3 percent it was in middle adulthood. There were more men from the older cohorts within the latter two groups who passed the milestones at later ages than men from the younger cohorts, which Grov suggests reflects the tighter social strictures under which older men grew up.

The pattern of reaching the sexual identity development milestones has been stable over time within temporally matched age cohorts. However, the study says, the youngest group of gay and bisexual men (age 19 to 25 in 2015) reported passing milestones roughly one year earlier, on average, than men whom they sampled from that age group in 2003–2004.

Grov said in the interview: “If you look at guys in their 50s vs. their 20s, they’ll say the same age when you ask ‘When did you first realize you were gay,’ but the older cohorts often were living in the closet until they were financially independent or out of college, because being out as gay had very negative implications decades ago.”

The study has caveats: “Admittedly, we recognize that the cohort groupings between the 2006 study and the present study do not match up identically and there are some key sampling differences between the present study and the 2006 study (i.e., that study included HIV-positive participants and was geographically limited to men in urban areas).” As a result, the researchers call for ongoing monitoring of generational differences in passing sexual identity milestones.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 

 


YOUNGER GAY AND BISEXUAL MEN COME OUT EARLIER, CUNY RESEARCHERS FIND

Younger gay and bisexual men are recognizing their sexual orientation and coming out a year earlier, on average, than comparable young adults reported a decade ago, according to researchers at The City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and Hunter College’s Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training.

“What we’re seeing in these data is emblematic of increasing social acceptance of LGBT people in the U.S. in general,” lead author Christian Grov, professor at the Graduate School of Public Health, said in an interview. “In 2005, we were talking about Ellen DeGeneres and ‘Will and Grace’ on TV. Now we have Lady Gaga; openly gay characters in ‘Star Trek Discovery,’ ‘Orphan Black’ and the Oscar-winning best picture ‘Moonlight’; the legalization of same-sex marriage; and Barack Obama being the first sitting president to come out in favor of LGBT rights. It’s a whole new world.”

The study, “Birth Cohort Differences in Sexual Identity Development Milestones among HIV-Negative Gay and Bisexual Men in the United States,” appears in The Journal of Sex Research. Grov’s co-authors are Hunter College faculty members H. Jonathon Rendina, assistant professor of psychology, and Jeffrey T. Parsons, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, both of whom conduct their research at the Hunter College center.

This paper, based on 2015 data collected in an online survey, replicates and expands upon research that Grov, Parsons and others published in 2006. That study has been cited 300 times, making it a Google “classic paper” that is among the top 10 referenced in the field of sex and sexuality.

The new study of more than 1,000 gay and bisexual men from across the country includes questions on their coming-out process, which involves four sexual identity development milestones that generally occur in this order: awareness of sexual attraction to the same sex, self-identification as gay or bisexual, disclosure of this sexual identity to others, and having consensual sex with someone of the same gender.

The researchers found that when looked at as a whole, the age when men first felt sexually attracted to someone of the same gender was independent of birth cohort (age group); the median age was 11 to 12, about the same as initial heterosexual attraction. However, the authors also used advanced statistical techniques to identify subgroups of men who differed based on the patterns in their ages of achieving the four sexual identity development milestones.

The authors identified three distinct groups. The majority (84 percent) noticed same-sex attraction around the onset of puberty (i.e., around age 10) and progressed to self-identification, same-sex sexual activity, and coming out—all in that order and all during adolescence. The rest felt same-sex attraction during their teens (ages 12.5 to 18.0), but achieved the remaining milestones later in life; for 13 percent, this was during early adulthood and for 3 percent it was in middle adulthood. There were more men from the older cohorts within the latter two groups who passed the milestones at later ages than men from the younger cohorts, which Grov suggests reflects the tighter social strictures under which older men grew up.

The pattern of reaching the sexual identity development milestones has been stable over time within temporally matched age cohorts. However, the study says, the youngest group of gay and bisexual men (age 19 to 25 in 2015) reported passing milestones roughly one year earlier, on average, than men whom they sampled from that age group in 2003–2004.

Grov said in the interview: “If you look at guys in their 50s vs. their 20s, they’ll say the same age when you ask ‘When did you first realize you were gay,’ but the older cohorts often were living in the closet until they were financially independent or out of college, because being out as gay had very negative implications decades ago.”

The study has caveats: “Admittedly, we recognize that the cohort groupings between the 2006 study and the present study do not match up identically and there are some key sampling differences between the present study and the 2006 study (i.e., that study included HIV-positive participants and was geographically limited to men in urban areas).” As a result, the researchers call for ongoing monitoring of generational differences in passing sexual identity milestones.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 

 


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of October 30, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you to all who created or joined this weekend’s annual PTA-coordinated celebration, Fright Night 2017. This NEST+m tradition demonstrates the NEST+m community’s collaborative spirit, creative energy and can-do work ethic.

  • Special thanks to this year’s Fright Night Co-Chairpersons: Lower Grades Event Chairs Deb Kreisman-Title, Eiko Sakai, and Amelia Murphy; MG Dance Chair Michelle Barber-Perry; and Haunted House Creator Julie Longmuir.
  • Special shout out to Willi Yusah and the NEST+m Upper Grades Theater students for bringing to life a truly frightening Haunted House!
  • Special thank you to our School Safety Team and the NEST+m Custodial Team for supporting this enormous event.

This past week we had the pleasure of inducting almost 50 new members into the NEST+m chapter of The National Honor Society. Our Induction Ceremony featured a candle lighting ceremony, musical performances by members of our Upper Grades Jazz Ensemble, and a reception for students and families afterward.

Thank you to NHS Advisor Ruby Mercure, the NHS Faculty Council, Music Teacher Craig McGorry, our generous PTA, and all Upper Grades teachers that have supported and challenged our students over the past years.

Please Join me in congratulating NEST+m’s Upper Grades AP Physics Teacher Hyungmin Park. He has been selected to receive a 2017 Sloan Award for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics in New York City Public High Schools. This honor from the Fund for the City of New York and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation will be formally presented at the Great Hall of the Cooper Union in early December. Congratulations Mr. Park!

Congratulations to Coach Jackie O’Connor and NEST+m’s PSAL Girls Varsity Soccer team on finishing their regular PSAL season undefeated!  They won their first playoff game on Saturday and have their next game Monday at 3:30. Go Eagles!

Congratulations to NEST+m Upper Grades student, Emma Shapiro, on being named a semifinalist in the Foundation for Letters 2017 NYC Writing Competition!

It is a true honor to celebrate the many ways in which our students, faculty and families embody intellectualism, inclusivity, collaboration and exploration within and beyond our school community.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

It’s Spirit Week, all week long!
Please click here for Spirit Week’s schedule of activities. 

Tuesday October 31, 2017

  • Halloween—This is a regular instructional day. Students are expected to behave with an academic seriousness and kindness toward others. As always: No masks, “fake” weapons, sunglasses or objects/attire that would otherwise be prohibited by the DOE Bill of Student Rights & Discipline Code.

Looking Ahead

November 6

  • Tour of NEST+m Middle Grades (6-8) for current NEST+m 5th grade Students and Families – Begins at 8:30 am.
  • Tour of NEST+m Upper Grades (9-12) for current NEST+m 8th grade Students and Families – Open House will begin at 10:49 am. Classroom tours will begin at 11:32 am.

November 7

  • Election Day – Day of Learning – no school for students

November 9th and 10th

  • Save the Date for Parent Teacher Conferences, November 9th (evening) and November 10th (afternoon). Signup links will be sent this week

Please see below for interesting opportunities for NEST+m students

ACCELERATED LEARNING ACADEMY {ALA) 
The ALA prepares high-achieving 10th and 11th graders for professional careers in Medical Science, Biomedical Engineering & Technology, and Applied Mathematics over 3 weekends of interactive workshops at Princeton University. Students will explore new STEM content with group activities, lectures, hands-on demonstrations and real world applications taught by experienced scientists. Please click here for more information.

College is Possible
An Evening of Answers for High School Students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPS) and their Families.
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6-8pm
CUNY- Borough of Manhattan Community College
199 Chambers Street
New York, NY 10007
Click here for more information.

Pathways to An Inclusive Future
Hear a panel of professionals, youth advocates, parents and educators with different perspectives tackle the complexities of inclusion- what it is, why it is, and what it could look like in the future.
Monday, November 6, 2017 6-8pm
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
West 46th Street and 12th Avenue
New York, NY 10036
Click here for more information.

Shape Up NYC
Shape Up NYC is a free citywide fitness program operated by NYC Parks that provides more than 350 free group exercise classes each week at 200 locations across the five boroughs.  Please see our website for a class near you: https://www.nycgovparks.org/programs/recreation/shape-up-nyc

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.


Previously announced opportunities

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu

Paid Intership 
The Family Art Project at Wave Hill is hiring additional 2017-2018 interns this fall for students who have an interest and enthusiasm for the arts and/or science. $9 per hour – 12 month position on weekends from 9am to 4pm. Send cover letter and resume to fapinternship@wavehill.org.

Promise Project
PROMISE at Columbia University is committed to being the most effective, all-encompassing program to help children with learning disabilities get the support they need to succeed. Children receive state-of-the-art neuropsychological assessments, clinical recommendations and the follow-up necessary to get the services they need to learn . Call Ana Garcia, at Promise Project’s main number, at 212-342-1600.

Community Service
There are community service opportunities available for 11th and 12th graders with the SONYC after-school program at NEST+m. Please email Scott Percelay at spercelay@grandsettlement.org or stop by room 257 if interested.

NYU School of Medicine STEP Program
Is your child a 10th or 11th grader interested in science education, SAT prep, or health professions? The STEP Program at the New York University School of Medicine has begun actively accepting New York State 10th and 11th grade high school students into their program.
Deadline: November 15, 2017 — click here for more information.


CCNY’s Documentary Forum screens film about Ferguson uprising

The Documentary Forum, at The City College of New York Center for Film, Journalism and Interactive Media, presents a screening of “Whose Streets?“, a documentary about the Ferguson uprising, on Nov. 1 from 6:30-9:30 p.m. in Shepard Hall, Room 291. Filmmaker Sabaah Folayan, activist and storyteller, will be present for a Q&A.

The film focuses on the residents of St. Louis, Missouri who come together to hold vigil and protest the shocking killing of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by police and then left lying in the street for hours. In the days that follow the killing, parents, artists, and teachers also stand on the frontlines to demand justice; as the National Guard descends on Ferguson with military grade weaponry, these young community members become the torchbearers of a new resistance.

This screening is part of the Seventh Art Stand’s second installment, “Uplifting Black Voices”, taking place this fall. The national film screening and discussion series focuses on films that empower African-Americans, celebrate successful leaders, and offer historical context that leads to the continued unjust treatment of communities of color.

The event is co-presented by Third World Newsreel with Firelight Media, the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, the CCNY President’s Office, the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education and Seventh Art Stand. To register for the free event, click here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.‪

 

 

« BACK TO NEWS


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of October 23, 2017 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Please note that this is a posting of an email that originally was sent on October 22nd, 2017.

________________________________________________________________________________

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you to all NEST+m SLT members, PTA officials, families and Upper Grades Students who have engaged in a letter writing campaign to ensure that our building’s rear courtyard remains the vital component of our K-12 learning environment that it has been since 2001.

Please know that I have been actively advocating within Department of Education channels to ensure that this physical space is maintained for its direct connection to students’ health and well being.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz

Please join me in celebrating the many ways in which NEST+m’s Teachers & Faculty embody the core values of Intellectualism, Inclusivity, Collaboration and Exploration within and beyond our school community:

Math for America Fellows
Did you know that seven NEST+m teachers within our Math and Science Departments (Grades 6-12) are participating in a 4-year Math for America Fellowship? Kudos to those who are continuing this learning experience and to those who have been newly admitted:

  • Master Teacher Fellowships: Johanna Cinquegrana, Richard Sullivan, Margaret Tanzosh
  • MfA Fellowship: Tala Councilman
  • Early Career Fellowship: Scott Justus, Bao Nguyen, Caroline Phillips

LGBTQ Writers in Schools Program
Congratulations to Upper Grades Social Studies Teacher Halle Bauer and our Upper Grades LGBTQ+ Club students.  On behalf of NEST+m, Ms. Bauer applied to the DOE’s “LGBTQ+ Writers in Schools” Program. This past week we were accepted! This program will support us with a classroom library of LGBTQ+ literature as well as an on-site author visit.

PINK Club
A shout-out to Ms. O’Connor and the PINK Club who represented NEST+m in the Making Strides for Breast Cancer walk in Central Park last Sunday.

Teacher-Coaches
Thank you to these Fall Sport Teacher-Coaches!

  • Lower Grades: April Barabash and Theresa Anderson
  • Middle Grades Athletics (Champs) Jackie O’Connor, Richard Sullivan, Theresa Anderson, Charles Hohl and Darnel James
  • Upper Grades Athletics (PSAL)
    • Girls Soccer: Jackie O’Connor
    • Boys Soccer: April Barabash
    • Girls Volleyball: Scott Justus
    • Fencing: Carolina Barreiro Ojeda

Our Week Ahead

Monday, October 23

  • Upper Grades Town Hall Meetings
  • TCRWP: This week, Monday to Wednesday, NEST+m will be hosting a Teachers College Reading and Writing Project Reading Institute. 40 educators from across will be based in our library and in select Lower Grades classrooms as we collectively deepen our practices regarding the teaching of Reading.

Wednesday, October 25

  • 7th Grade Field Trip to Old Bethpage (Wednesday and Thursday)

Thursday, October 26

  •  Jazz at Lincoln Center, Jazz for Young People, Grades 5 & 6 Assemblies.

Friday, October 27

  • NEST+m K-12 Spirit Wear Day – show your purple!
  • Upper Grades National Honor Society Induction Ceremony

Saturday, October 28

  • Fright Night PTA Fundraiser: LG 3-6 pm, MG Dance 7-9 pm

Looking Ahead:

SPIRIT WEEK starts this Friday Oct. 27th and runs through Nov. 3rd!

  • Friday 10/27- NEST+m Spirit Wear Day
  • Monday 10/30 – Denim Day
  • Tuesday 10/31 – Halloween (Absolutely no mask, no weapons allowed)
  • Wednesday 11/01 – PJ DAy
  • Thursday 11/02 – Jersey/Sports Day
  • Friday 11/03 – Multiple Inclusive Day
    • K-8 Each class/grade picks a theme, color or pattern.
    • 9-12 Groups of multiple will be posted. Please join one of our teams! Confirmed so far… Tropical/Floral, White shirt & blue jeans, Flannel & jeans, Pink hoodie & dark jeans… more to come.

November 6

  • Morning Tour of NEST+m Middle Grades (6-8) for current NEST+m 5th grade Students and Families
  • Afternoon Tour of NEST+m Upper Grades (9-12) for current NEST+m 8th grade Students and Families

November 7

  • Election Day – Day of Learning – no school for students

November 9th and 10th

  • Save the Date for Parent Teacher Conferences, November 9th (evening) and November 10th (afternoon). More details forthcoming.

Please see below for interesting opportunities for NEST+m students

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu

Paid Intership 
The Family Art Project at Wave Hill is hiring additional 2017-2018 interns this fall for students who have an interest and enthusiasm for the arts and/or science. $9 per hour – 12 month position on weekends from 9am to 4pm. Send cover letter and resume to fapinternship@wavehill.org.

Promise Project
PROMISE at Columbia University is committed to being the most effective, all-encompassing program to help children with learning disabilities get the support they need to succeed. Children receive state-of-the-art neuropsychological assessments, clinical recommendations and the follow-up necessary to get the services they need to learn . Call Ana Garcia, at Promise Project’s main number, at 212-342-1600.

Community Service
There are community service opportunities available for 11th and 12th graders with the SONYC after-school program at NEST+m. Please email Scott Percelay at spercelay@grandsettlement.org or stop by room 257 if interested.

NYU School of Medicine STEP Program
Is your child a 10th or 11th grader interested in science education, SAT prep, or health professions? The STEP Program at the New York University School of Medicine has begun actively accepting New York State 10th and 11th grade high school students into their program.
Deadline: November 15, 2017 — click here for more information.

Halloween Teen Night at the Whitney Museum
Save the date! On Friday, October 27th from 5-7:30 pm, New York City teens are invited to Halloween Teen Night at the Whitney. Join Youth Insights Leaders and artist Ephraim Asili for a night of spooky jams, dancing, costume making, tarot card readings, snacks, and more. Refreshments and art materials are provided.
Free for teens. No RSVP required—bring a friend!
Questions? Contact Teen Programs at youthinsights@whitney.org. Learn more about teen programs at whitney.org.


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of October 16, 2017 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Please note that this is a posting of an email that originally was sent on October 15th, 2017.

________________________________________________________________________________

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

NEST+m teachers and faculty are committed to creating the learning experiences, within and beyond our classrooms, that enable our students to feel valued, recognized, intellectually engaged and empowered.

In one small snapshot of our shared commitment to nurturing students’ intellectual and social-emotional development —

  • Author Shana Covey was on site to read to NEST+m students in Grades 2, 3 and 4 from her book Malala: A Hero for All. She returns on October 27th to read for Grades K, 1 and 5.
  • The K-12 Hispanic Heritage Celebration in our Courtyard this past Thursday was a true whole-school celebration. Thank you to all who created and attended. Special thanks to musicians Maria Alsonso and Benjamin Willis, parents of one of our Kindergarten students; the NEST+m PTA; and our COSA Nancy Alba.
  • The 4th grade team was recently selected by the NYC Department of Education to participate in the city’s “Scientist in Residence” program. This program will match the 4th grade team with a scientist or STEM professional from October 2017-May 2018 to co-lead a research-based STEM project with our students.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz


Our Week Ahead

Tuesday October 17, 2017

  • 4:10pm: School Leadership Team (SLT) meeting in the Library

Wednesday October 18:

  • Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee in the NEST+m Cafeteria at 8:30am. — All NEST+m families welcome — Sign-in through School Safety Desk at Courtyard entrance
  • Lice Angels will be visiting for grades K-5

Thursday October 19:

  • Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee in the NEST+m Cafeteria at 8:30am. — All NEST+m families welcome — Sign-in through School Safety Desk at Courtyard entrance
  • Assembly for K-5: Anti-Bullying Laser Light Show by Prismatic Magic

Friday October 20

  • Upper Grades Principal’s Coffee in the NEST+m Cafeteria at 8:30am. — All NEST+m families welcome — Sign-in through School Safety Desk at Courtyard entrance
  • Family Friday for Grades K-2, 8:30 am – Family Fridays give you an opportunity to visit your child’s classroom during a lesson. Please wait in the lobby.

Looking Ahead:

November 7

  • Election Day – Day of Learning – no school for students

November 9th and 10th

  • Save the Date for Parent Teacher Conferences, November 9th (evening) and November 10th (afternoon). More details forthcoming.

Please see below for interesting opportunities for NEST+m students

Kaplan Test Prep
NEST+m has a partnership with Kaplan Test Prep. Kaplan is offering a SAT and ACT Combo Test at NEST+m on Tuesday, October 24th from 3:00 – 7:35pm. This is a great opportunity for students to be exposed to both exams. Please click here to register. Kaplan is also offering a SAT Prep Course in preparation for the March SAT and a Prep Course for the April ACT. Please click here for additional information regarding dates and times and to register. Please note students must register at least 10 days prior to the start date of the course.

Community Service
There are community service opportunities available for 11th and 12th graders with the SONYC after-school program at NEST+m. Please email Scott Percelay at spercelay@grandsettlement.org or stop by room 257 if interested.

NYU School of Medicine STEP Program
Is your child a 10th or 11th grader interested in science education, SAT prep, or health professions? The STEP Program at the New York University School of Medicine has begun actively accepting New York State 10th and 11th grade high school students into their program.
Deadline: November 15, 2017 — click here for more information.

Halloween Teen Night at the Whitney Museum
Save the date! On Friday, October 27th from 5-7:30 pm, New York City teens are invited to Halloween Teen Night at the Whitney. Join Youth Insights Leaders and artist Ephraim Asili for a night of spooky jams, dancing, costume making, tarot card readings, snacks, and more. Refreshments and art materials are provided.
Free for teens. No RSVP required—bring a friend!
Questions? Contact Teen Programs at youthinsights@whitney.org. Learn more about teen programs at whitney.org.

Born and Raised Scholarship
The Law Offices of Ivan M. Diamond just announced the winner of their annual Born and Raised Scholarship: none other than recent NEST+m graduate, Kiana Jackson! Congratulations to Kiana! The firm is currently accepting applications for the 2018 Born and Raised Scholarship, which is open to NYC seniors in high school who plan to continue their education in the city.

 


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of October 10, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

The first week of October was full of activity. Upper Grades Clubs began to meet this week; some altruistic Middle Grades students held a bake sale and raised $684 for Puerto Rico hurricane relief – proceeds will be sent via the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City – and our 4th grade classes and the Upper Grades Red Cross Club walked together to Engine 28 in the neighborhood to drop off all the donated items that will also go to help relief efforts on the ground in Puerto Rico.

Please see these important announcements:

504 Accommodations
Please remember that 504 Accommodations must be renewed each school year. We are currently processing 504 Accommodation requests. To request 504 Accommodations, please complete both the family/HIPPA form as well as the Medical form and email them to TDerfner@schools.nyc.gov or fax them to Tessa Derfner, Assistant Principal at (212) 260-8124.

Click here to download the Family Form.

Click here to download the Medical Form.

Our Week Ahead:

Tuesday, October 10th
Author Shana Corey will be visiting to discuss her book, Malala: A hero for all with grades 2-4.

Wednesday, October 11th
11th graders will be taking the PSAT on October 11th. Please ensure that your children, our students, get a good night’s sleep, eat breakfast, and come equipped with sharpened #2 pencils and their graphing calculator.  Lunch will be served 8th period.

Thursday, October 12th
From 3:00-5:00 pm in the courtyard, NEST+m will be celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month with food, dance and live Caribbean and Mariachi music! Vengan a bailar, todos!

PSAL Schedule
Please click below to visit the PSAL website for our school teams’ schedules:
http://www.psal.org/events-and-standings/school-calendar.aspx?schid=01538

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of October 2, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Thank you families for making our K-12 curriculum night ‎a great success.
During curriculum night we were asked to share a resource related to the skills of studying. The following online series was crafted to support students’ post-secondary transition but may be valuable for students from a variety of grades.How to Get the Most Out of Studying: Professor Stephen Chew, Samford University

https://www.samford.edu/departments/academic-success-center/how-to-study


Please see the important announcements below regarding events in our week ahead.

Tuesday, October 3rd, from 3-4:30 pm

HIGH SCHOOL ARTICULATION WORKSHOP
8th grade families are invited to join us for a 90 minute workshop designed to help them navigate the high school application process.

Monday, October 9th
COLUMBUS DAY
Schools are closed on October 9th, so enjoy the upcoming long weekend.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Sonic Hedgehog at the center of experimental Parkinson’s research at CCNY

Dr. Andreas H. Kottmann, Ph.D., principle investigator on an APDA funded research project and Lauren Malave, graduate student and lead scientist for dyskinesia in his laboratory.

You may know Sonic Hedgehog as a Sega videogame character who saves us all from world domination. But within the realm of science, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is also helping to solve the mysteries of Parkinson’s Disease.

Just ask Andreas Kottmann of The CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York. Kottmann and his team were recently awarded a research grant by the American Parkinson Disease Association (APDA) to validate their findings around SHH’s potential role in Parkinson’s.

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is caused by the degeneration of a certain type of neuron in the brain, so called dopamine neurons. Kottmann and his team have found that dopamine neurons do not only communicate with other neurons with the chemical dopamine as their name wrongly suggests, but also by secreting Sonic Hedgehog (SHH).

Using genetic engineering, the scientists produced a line of mice with dopamine neurons that cannot express SHH. These mice grow up healthy but then develop deficits that are reminiscent of Parkinson’s disease. Interestingly, at first, the deficits of these mice can be reduced by the drug L-Dopa, which is the most effective anti PD drug, But, like in humans, when chronically dosed with L-Dopa, the mice exhibit dyskinesia (involuntary movement).

Recently, Lauren Malave, a grad student in Kottmann’s laboratory, found that agonists (binding agents) of the SHH co- receptor Smoothened can ameliorate the formation and display of L-Dopa induced dyskinesia (LID). The new grant will allow the team to determine whether agonists of the SHH co-receptor Smoothened can ameliorate established L-Dopa Induced Dyskinesia (LID) not just in mice but in Parkinsonian Macaques. What they learn might open the door for testing Smoothened agonists as anti-dyskinetic agents in clinical trials…

Learn more here about Kottmann and team’s research, officially titled Validation of the G-protein coupled receptor Smoothened as a target for ameliorating L- Dopa induced dyskinesia.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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“Mojados” immigrant photo exhibit opens at CWE

Immigrant inclusion is one of the biggest human rights challenges facing countries across the globe. The City College Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education tackles this issue with the photo exhibit “Mojados: Portrait of Immigrants.” It opens Oct. 27 and runs through Dec. 20.

The opening day includes a reception at 6 p.m. at 25 Broadway on the 7th floor. A conversation between photographer and exhibit creator Francisco Uceda, CWE human rights expert and Patai Postdoctoral Fellow Danielle A. Zach, and Susanna Rosenbaum, director of CWE’s MA Program in the Study of the Americas, follows.

“This is an extraordinary exhibition, not only from an artistic point of view but also because immigration has become a human tragedy that requires urgent response,” said CWE Dean Juan Carlos Mercado.

The exhibit’s name, “Mojados,”stems from the derogatory slur “wetback.” Uceda uses photography as a powerful medium to raise consciousness and protest injustice. With his “Mojados” exhibit, Uceda does just that by vividly capturing the humanity of immigrants that racist and xenophobic assaults aim to deny them.

Uceda’s portraits fit into a tradition of portraiture that may date back to Robert Frank’s work in the slums of Detroit, where he exposed the rest of America to an obscure part of the heartland.

“On both sides of the Atlantic, immigrants and refugees have been the target of attack by publics fueled by racism and xenophobia,” said Zach. “In the United States, there has been a discernable upswing in anti-immigrant discourse, which dehumanizes and misrepresents these vulnerable communities. Such attitudes are manifest not only at the grassroots level but also among public officials who have reinforced negative sentiment with nativist policies.”

“Mojados” is open to the public Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. For more information, please visit: franciscouceda.com.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Student-designed CCNY chatbot places second in national Intuit contest

CCNY’s “Team AutoRiza.” From left: Danny Tsoi, Khandker Ahamed, Mahmoud Khedr and Nashid Chowdhury.

Using entrepreneurial skills nurtured at the school’s Zahn Innovation Center, a team of City College of New York undergraduates placed second nationally in Intuit QuickBooks’2017 Product Management Case Competition. The four-member “Team AutoRiza” conceptualized a machine learning chatbot to help service small business owners.

Out of several hundred submissions, the City College concept was second to an app conceived by a Harvard University team.

Team AutoRiza comprised:

The challenge was to develop a concept for an app that will connect to QuickBooks and help small businesses in some aspect of their work. The CCNY team, with experience garnered from the Zahn Center which trains students how to transform their ideas into sustainable ventures, brainstormed.

They interviewed 20 small businesses in Harlem – ranging from start-ups, retail and financial to technology and fast food. To determine their pain points, business owners were asked several questions about their day-to-day operations. They were also asked why they chose QuickBooks and what QuickBooks could do better to improve their experience.

“Among our top findings were that these small businesses find calling QuickBooks inconvenient and time consuming, and that they typically have to go through an answering machine,” said Khedr, the team leader.

“They also mentioned the lack of 24-hour service, which was frustrating,” said Ahamed, the team marketing hacker.

These findings inspired the team to design a chatbot, which essentially is a computer program that conducts a conversation via auditory or textual methods. Chatbots are typically used in dialog systems for various practical purposes including customer service or information acquisition.

“While picking the top teams was difficult, those that came out on top had an innovative solution,” summed up Garrett Allen, Intuit, Inc., product manager.

Computer science majors Chowdhury and Tsoi said the next stage is to build the chatbot.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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The Chronical of Higher Ed Ranks Queens College Among Top Ten Public U.S. Colleges for Upward Social and Economic Mobility

​– A Global Ranking of Almost 28,000 Colleges Places QC in the Top 5% on Quality of Education and Faculty, Alumni Employment —

FLUSHING, NY, October 24, 2017—The results of a recent Stanford University study, as reported on in the Chronicle of Higher Education, provide insight into how well Queens College is propelling students up the economic ladder. The Chronicle’s list is drawn from Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility, the widely reported study in which a team led by Stanford economics professor Raj Chetty assessed colleges’ impact on social mobility. In a global assessment of 27,770 degree-granting institutions, the Center for World Universal Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5 percent for the quality of its education and faculty, alumni employment, and other factors.

The 2017 Stanford study tracked students from nearly every U.S. college, including nongraduates, and measured their subsequent earnings against millions of anonymous tax filings and financial-aid records. It looked at how well colleges helped students whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent of income levels reach the top 20 percent for individual earnings. Queens College was ranked number 10 out of 35 four-year public colleges.

“The Stanford University study powerfully demonstrates that when it comes to economic mobility, Queens College—now in its eightieth year of serving the people of New York—is making a larger impact than virtually every other college in the country,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “When our students—rich in ambition, talent, and creativity—are given the advantage of a high-quality, world-class faculty, they become the backbone of our city and state workforce.”

Queens College’s social mobility track record also helped it earn a place in the top quarter of Money magazine’s July ranking of the “Best Colleges for Your Money.” The magazine measured colleges by 27 criteria.

In the global rankings, the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) says it “publishes the only global university rankings that measure the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions,” similar to the process employed by U.S. News & World Report.

CWUR does not consider the Stanford data or similar measures. Rather, it “uses eight objective and robust indicators to rank the world’s top 1000 universities.” These include Quality of Education, measured by the number of a university’s alumni who have won major international awards, prizes, and medals relative to the university’s size; Alumni Employment, measured by the number of a university’s alumni who have held CEO positions at the world’s top companies relative to the university’s size; Quality of Faculty, measured by the number of academics who have won major international awards, prizes, and medals; Publications, measured by the number of research papers appearing in reputable journals; Influence, measured by the number of research papers appearing in highly influential journals; Citations, measured by the number of highly cited research papers; Broad Impact, measured by the university’s h-index*; Patents, measured by the number of international patent filings.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

*An h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure the impact of the productivity and citation of the publications of a scientist or scholar. The index is based on the set of the scientist’s most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications.


New World War I Exhibit at Roosevelt House: Ambassador William vanden Heuvel Speaks on Opening Night, Oct. 19

To mark the 100th anniversary of U.S. participation in World War I (April 1917 to November 2018), the Roosevelt House Public Policy InstituteNew World War I Exhibit at Roosevelt House: Ambassador William vanden Heuvel Speaks on Opening Night, Oct. 19 at Hunter College will mount a new exhibit, World War I and the Roosevelts: Franklin and Eleanor, Family and Friends.

The exhibit features 17 rare, nearly mint condition American and European military recruitment and fundraising posters prepared by leading artists of the day who donated their services to the New York-based Committee on Public Information.  On view is the work of Howard Chandler Christy, James Montgomery Flagg, Francis and Joseph Leyendecker, and Joseph Pennell, among others. They were among the 300 illustrators who contributed to the war effort with enlistment posters for the Army, Navy, and Marines, for Liberty Bond posters to pay for the war, and for Red Cross appeals for money and clothing. (The dark and violent imagery of two fierce Italian posters reflects the suffering of that nation at the hands of the Germans and Austrians before the Americans entered the war.)

These original posters are supplemented with images of the Roosevelts, including Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s visit to the battlegrounds and damaged towns of France in the summer of 1918, and of Eleanor Roosevelt’s Red Cross work.  In addition, exhibit cases display original magazines with cover art by Flagg and Norman Rockwell along with Liberty Bond drive buttons, books about the war, and other wartime memorabilia. The story of one doughboy from the Bronx, Private David Moran, is told through original photographs, letters, and military insignia. He is representative of the men who served in the American forces and saved Europe from German domination. The show concludes with a sample of New York memorials to the 116,000 Americans who lost their lives in the conflict.

The exhibition and its programs are made possible by generous grants from the Stepanski Family Charitable Trust and the Susan and Elihu Rose Foundation.

Commented Jennifer J. Raab, President of Hunter College: “Less than a decade after Franklin and Eleanor moved into what we now call Roosevelt House, they relocated to Washington to help fight the war meant to end all wars.  Their tireless work has remained something of a historical footnote, so we are proud to be recalling their service—along with that of other members of their extended family—on the 100th anniversary of U. S. entry into that global conflict. Our gratitude goes to the generous funders who made this show possible, and to the institutions who have lent amazing artworks. We are delighted that the public and our students will be able to learn valuable lessons from America’s onetime determination to ‘make the world safe for democracy,’ and to take inspiration from the commitment of one of its most public-spirited families: the Roosevelts.”

Added Harold Holzer, the historian who serves as Jonathan F. Fanton Director of the Roosevelt House: “Although most Americans think of President Franklin D. Roosevelt as the crusading Allied leader of World War II, he was in fact a major figure in the first world war as Assistant Secretary of the Navy.  In that role, he became an energetic force behind the modernization of the American Navy and a remarkably active presence on the European front, dressed in a special ‘uniform’ of his own design.  What FDR learned in those years gave him the knowledge and experience to deal with aggression when it erupted again 20 years later.  Moreover, his Roosevelt cousins—the children of Theodore Roosevelt and his siblings—served as uniformed fighting men in the Great War, often heroically, and Eleanor Roosevelt volunteered for the Red Cross.  Fighting for freedom became a family enterprise for the Roosevelts, as this exhibit demonstrated, met their obligations with spirit, patriotism, and courage.”

OPENING PROGRAMS

Roosevelt House announced that at the opening program inaugurating the exhibit (October 19, 6 PM), it will host a talk by former Ambassador William vanden Heuvel, whose leadership over the last two decades has benefitted Roosevelt House as well as the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library at Hyde Park, and the FDR. Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island.  Ambassador vanden Heuvel will speak on World War I: The Hero and the Conscience—“Wild Bill” Donovan and Roger Baldwin—chronicling and contrasting the lives of a military hero and a conscientious objector, both of whom young vanden Heuvel knew personally.

A second program will follow on November 8: His Dark Land—a World War I Tragedy, a dramatic reading written by and starring award-winning stage and film actor Stephen Lang, co-starring Tony winner James Naughton. Re-imagining a suspended and surreal moment in history, His Dark Land unearths the mystery, confronts the controversy, and dramatizes the story of the fabled World War I “Lost Battalion”—and its tragic, commander, Colonel Charles Whittlesey.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

World War I and the Roosevelts draws from the rich collections of the Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, NY and the Museum of the City of New York, with additional material provided by The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library at Hyde Park, Liberty Hall Museum in Union, NJ, the archives of Roosevelt House, and private collections.

One century has passed since the United States entered World War I on April 6, 1917.  In Europe, the war had started in August 1914, millions had already died, and a stalemate prevailed.  Germany’s resumption of unrestricted submarine attacks taking American lives, and its nefarious attempt to engage Mexico in a war with the U.S., finally compelled President Woodrow Wilson to ask Congress for a declaration of war to help the Allies, chiefly England and France, defeat the Germans. Wilson declared: “The world must be made safe for democracy.” This vision of moral leadership on the world stage would inform American foreign policy for another 100 years.

Of the many commemorative events and exhibits taking place in 2017-2018 about America’s engagement in this terrible conflict, Roosevelt House has a unique perspective on the history of the era. In 1913, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt moved from their home on 65th Street to Washington DC to serve the nation. As Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Franklin was on the front lines of policy and operations during the war. The lessons he learned about prosecuting and financing a war, and the terrible toll it took in lives, would remain with him the rest of his life and influence his decisions during World War II.

Eleanor Roosevelt became a Red Cross volunteer in Washington, inspiring others and acquiring the extraordinary emotional skills she would deploy during World War II and in later human rights work. She visited injured soldiers at the local military hospitals, and sought additional funding to improve their care and assist their families.  In January 1919, she accompanied FDR to Europe and saw the wreckage of the French countryside.  Her experiences there and in Washington led her to support President Wilson’s League of Nations, as did Franklin, and seek new ideas for peace.

In addition, at least 18 other members of the extended Roosevelt family were deeply involved with the war, perhaps more than any other American family. Among them were Teddy Roosevelt’s four sons and daughter and son-in-law, Eleanor’s brother, and numerous cousins, aunts and uncles, nieces and nephews.  The war also drew upon the talents of five past and future presidents, and a number of men who would later serve in the cabinet of future President Roosevelt and advise him during a second world conflagration.  The Great War of 1914-18 reshaped Europe and shaped the man, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who would later rescue it again from German aggression


Winners of the Annual Joan H. Tisch Community Health Prize for Excellence in Urban Public Health Announced by Hunter College

Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab has announced this year’s recipients of the seventh annual Joan H. Tisch Community Health Prize.  These prestigious awards are given to individuals and nonprofit organizations in the New York metropolitan area for distinguished accomplishment in urban public health.  The 2017 recipients are the Mary Mitchell Family and Youth Center in the Bronx, which champions food assistance and access to nutritious meals in the Crotona neighborhood  through a robust health initiative with its Teen Council; and Diane Arneth, Executive Director of Community Health Action of Staten Island and Chief Community Services Officer of Brightpoint Health, who has demonstrated a unique ability to tackle the most demanding public health challenges, including the HIV/AIDS and opioid epidemics.

Both recipients were honored at a ceremony and reception on Thursday, October 12, at The Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College.

“We are enormously pleased to announce this year’s Tisch Prize recipients who do an incredible job of addressing the needs of New Yorkers,” said President Raab. “And we are particularly proud that the 2017 awards honor practitioners from the outer boroughs of Staten Island and the Bronx, whose populations deeply need attention but where great work too often goes unrecognized. The Hunter community is greatly appreciative of the Tisch family and these annual awards that continue to shine a light on persistent urban public health problems and the innovative ways in which they are being addressed by both creative individuals and community-based organizations.”

“The Mary Mitchell Family and Youth Center and Diane Arneth of the Community Health Action of Staten Island and Brightpoint Health have each exhibited their unwavering dedication to providing vital services to New Yorkers in need,” said Laurie Tisch, President of the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund. “They share the mission of the Illumination Fund and my mother Joan’s Legacy Project and we are proud to present them with this honor.”

The Joan H. Tisch Community Health Prize honors not-for-profit organizations and individuals for distinguished accomplishment in the field of urban public health. Made possible by support from the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Prize is part of the Joan H. Tisch Legacy Project, which is based at Hunter College, and is a tribute to Joan H. Tisch in recognition of her humanitarian activism in health care and social services in New York City. The winners each received a prize of $10,000.

The nominee’s work should be focused upon improving urban public health in areas such as: reducing health disparities; obesity/diabetes/nutrition; chronic disease prevention and management; environmental health; HIV/AIDS; health problems associated with poverty; healthy aging; mental health; substance abuse and addiction; public health policy and advocacy; and access, financing, and quality of care.

About the Honorees:

Mary Mitchell Family and Youth Center (MMFYC) serves the primarily nonwhite Crotona neighborhood of the Bronx. When its Teen Council researched the diets of children in the area in recent years, it found that fully half would likely develop diabetes in their lifetimes. Inspired to action by the results, the MMFYS empowered the Teen Council and community at large to create a health initiative to support health choices for individuals and collaboration among community leaders to ensure an environment where healthy options were available. The initiative includes a highly successful food buying club, support of a local farmers market, plus other efforts to increase access to healthy food and make systemic change. By expanding opportunities, developing leadership, and building community, it is the goal of the board, staff, and youth of the Center to change the environment of Crotona without gentrification so its residents can achieve “complete physical, mental and social wellbeing” as defined by the World Health Organization.

Tisch-17-2

Harold Holzer, Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, Laurie Tisch (center), Maria Teresa Ocasio, Board President of MMFYC, and Jennifer J. Raab, with MMFYC Teen Council members


Diane Arneth, is the Executive Director of the Community Health Action of Staten Island (CHASI) and Chief Community Services Officer of Brightpoint Health. Arneth has consistently demonstrated her ability to address public health challenges as they emerge. As executive director for CHASI for the past twenty-six years, Arneth has overseen the growth of the organization from its earliest days, when it operated with a budget of only $150,000, to the multi-site, multi-service agency it is today, with a budget of $11.2 million. She has been a passionate and committed advocate for the residents of State Island, 20,000 of whom are served annually by the comprehensive range of services her organization provides, including case management, comprehensive substance use disorder services, emergency food and benefits assistance, HIV, HCV, and diabetes testing and prevention services for 20,000 Staten Islanders annually.

Tisch-17-1

Harold Holzer, Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, Laurie Tisch, Diane Arneth, Jennifer J. Raab


Selection Committee for the Joan H. Tisch Community Health Prize:

Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, (Co-Chair) Senior Advisor to President of Hunter College and the Former NYC Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services; Harold Holzer, (Co-Chair) Jonathan F. Fanton Director, Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute, Hunter College; Judith Aponte, Associate Professor, Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing; Pam Brier, Senior Adviser to the President of Hunter College; Joan Grabe, Chair, Hunter College Foundation Board of Trustees and Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing Advisory Board; David Himmelstein, Professor, Hunter College School of Urban Health; ; Sue A. Kaplan, Research Associate Professor, Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine; Ram Raju, MD, Senior Vice President, Community Health Investment Officer, Northwell Health; Dennis Rivera, Public Health Advisor, Hunter College; and Gregory Shufro, Senior Managing Director, Shufro, Rose & Co., LLC.

About Hunter College:

Hunter College, located in the heart of Manhattan, is the largest college in the City University of New York (CUNY) system. Founded in 1870, it is also one of the oldest public colleges in the country and famous for the diversity of its student body, which is as diverse as New York City itself. Most Hunter students are the first in their families to attend college and many go on to top professional and graduate programs, winning Fulbright scholarships, Mellon fellowships, National Institutes of Health grants, and other competitive honors. More than 23,000 students currently attend Hunter, pursuing undergraduate and graduate degrees in more than 170 areas of study.  The 1,700 full- and part-time members of Hunter’s faculty are unparalleled. They receive prestigious national grants, contribute to the world’s leading academic journals, and play major roles in cutting-edge research. They are fighting cancer, formulating public policy, expanding our culture, enhancing technology, and more.

About the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund:

The Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund (LMTIF) is a New York City-based foundation that strives to improve access and opportunity for all New Yorkers. Founded in 2007 by philanthropist Laurie M. Tisch, the Illumination Fund plays an active role in supporting innovative approaches to the arts, healthy food, civic service and education in order to illuminate strategies that transform our urban landscape. For more information about the Illumination Fund, visit lmtilluminationfund.org.


Hunter College and Centro Launch Rebuild Puerto Rico

Hunter College and the Center for Puerto Rican Studies (Centro) today announced the launch of Rebuild Puerto Rico, a virtual hubHunter College and Centro Launch Rebuild Puerto Rico that provides helpful information about the hurricane recovery efforts on the island in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. In collaboration with the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration, elected officials, community organizations and other influencers, this crowd-sourced website acts as a clearinghouse for the stateside Puerto Rican community and other allies during this humanitarian crisis.

The outpouring of help from the mainland United States and many more initiatives are under way, but until now, there has been no one place to turn for all information related to the island and its recovery efforts. The website works through crowdsourcing, allowing members of the Puerto Rican diaspora across the United States and others interested in supporting Puerto Rico to share recent updates, solidarity events, political calls to action, and support and volunteer opportunities.

Rebuild Puerto Rico is an extension of the work that Centro has been conducting for more than 40 years, especially since the unfolding of the fiscal and economic crisis in Puerto Rico in 2015. Centro has served as a national convener and source of information to stateside communities. Centro’s conferences and events provide a safe space to discuss difficult policy and political issues where participants acknowledge differences in perspectives yet seek to find common ground moving forward.

“The devastation that the people of Puerto Rico have endured is unimaginable and the Hunter College community is eager to do anything we can to support the recovery efforts on the island,” said Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab.  “Rebuild Puerto Rico will help to streamline all information that is critical for that support to be provided.”

Volunteers with skills in collecting and managing information, writing policy briefs, and helping with outreach and partnership are needed. For more information on how to get involved in Rebuild Puerto Rico, please visit https://centropr.hunter.cuny.edu/events-news/rebuild-puerto-rico.

About Centro:
The Center for Puerto Rican Studies (Centro) is the nation’s leading university-based institution devoted to the interdisciplinary study of the Puerto Rican experience in the United States. Centro is dedicated to understanding, preserving and sharing the Puerto Rican experience in the United States. Centro also collects, preserves and provides access to library resources documenting Puerto Rican history and culture. We seek to link scholarship to social action and policy debates and to contribute to the betterment of our community and the enrichment of Puerto Rican studies.


There’s Another Genius on the Upper East Side: Hunter’s Annie Baker Named a 2017 MacArthur Fellow

Annie Baker, the co-associate director of the Rita and Burton Goldberg MFA in Playwriting Program at Hunter College, has been named a 2017 MacArthur Fellow. There's Another Genius on the Upper East Side: Hunter's Annie Baker Named a 2017 MacArthur FellowAs a recipient of the “Genius Grant,” Baker joins an impressive list of MacArthur Fellows including her co-associate director, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, who received the award last year, and Hunter College High School alum Lin-Manuel Miranda, who was given the honor in 2015.

Baker and 23 other Fellows will receive a no-strings-attached $625,000 grant recogizing their exceptional creativity and potential for future contributions to their fields. The MacArthur grants are awarded annually to writers, visual artists, scientists, and other innovators and artists. Professor Baker won a 2014 Pulitzer Prize for her play The Flick.  The New York Times called her most recent play, The Antipodes, “in-all-ways fabulous.”

“This is another recognition of the fact that we have an extraordinary playwriting program at Hunter College,” said Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab.  “Our students already know that they are truly fortunate to be able to learn from Annie Baker. Annie and her co-associate director Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, also a MacArthur Fellow recipient, who are very devoted to their students and are now joined by our new theatre department chair, Gregory Mosher, a renowned director and producer.”

Professors Baker and Jacobs-Jenkins are both Distinguised Artists-in-Residence and teach classes in the Rita and Burton Goldberg MFA in Playwriting Program at Hunter College.  According to Professor Baker, “The award means I can now focus on what matters to me: my playwriting, mentoring young writers, and continually educating myself about the world around me.I want to take bigger artistic risks and audit lots of Hunter classes!”

Professor Baker has a BFA from the Department of Dramatic Writing at New York University’s Tisch School and an MFA from Brooklyn College.  In addition to her Pulitzer Prize, she also received a Hull-Warriner Award, a Susan Smith Blackburn Award, and an Obie Award for Playwriting for The Flick; an Obie Award for best New American Play and a Drama Desk nomination for Best Play for Circle Mirror Transformation; and an Obie Award for best New American Play for The Aliens.  Her plays have been produced at over 200 theatres throughout the U.S. and in over a dozen countries, including productions at the National Theatre and Royal Court in London and the Moscow Art Theatre in Moscow. Other recent honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, Steinberg Playwriting Award, American Academy of Arts and Letters Award, New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award, and the Cullman Fellowship at the New York Public Library.

The Rita and Burton Goldberg MFA in Playwriting Program at Hunter College is a selective 2-year program that combines rigorous academic theatre classes and intensive, hands-on writing workshops led by our artists-in-residence. The program is supplemented by the city itself as students partake in a wide range of cultural activities and professional development opportunities that can only be found in New York. Almost all of the Goldberg MFAs have had their works performed at theatres or festivals around the USA, and many have won or been finalists for a wide variety of prizes in major competitions, including Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center Awards, the Princess Grace Awards, and others.  Recent alumni include Lindsey Ferrentino, whose play Ugly Lies the Bone  was produced at the Roundabout Theatre in 2015, and whose new play, Amy and the Orphans, will be produced by the Roundabout Theatre as part of its 2017/2018 season; Johnna Adams MFA ’12, whose play Gidion’s Knot has had more than 20 productions across the US since 2012; Callie Kimball, whose play Sofonisba made the 2016 Kilroys List, which recognized it as one of the year’s best unproduced plays by female writers; Nicole Pandolfo, who was recently selected for a 2017 commission with the NJPAC Stage Exchange with Premiere Stages at Kean University; and Charly Simpson, MFA ’17, whose play Jump was developed at the MFA Playwrights’ Workshop at the Kennedy Center in July 2017.


Professor Jonathon Rendina Awarded $3.6M NIH Grant to Study Stigma and HIV-Related Health Outcomes

Hunter College’s Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training  has been awarded a five-year researchProfessor Jonathon Rendina Awarded $3.6M NIH Grant to Study Stigma and HIV-Related Health Outcomes grant for more than $3.65 million from the National Institute on Mental Health (NIMH) to better understand how stigma is associated with mental and physical health outcomes for HIV-positive gay and bisexual men. The Principal Investigator (PI) on the award is Dr. Jonathon Rendina,  Assistant Professor of Psychology at Hunter College and Director of Quantitative Methods at CHEST.

Sexual minority stigma has been well-examined as a contributor to mental and physical health outcomes for gay and bisexual men, but much less is known about the impacts of HIV stigma for men who are both gay/bisexual and HIV-positive. This study represents the culmination of training that Dr. Rendina received at Hunter College/CHEST over the past three years and pilot research he conducted with the support of a career development award  from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). This is the second large, NIH-funded research grant awarded to Dr. Rendina as PI since joining Hunter College as a full-time faculty member in 2016.

“There are well-documented mental and physical health disparities faced by gay and bisexual men, and these are further exacerbated among those who are living with HIV,” said Dr. Rendina. He went on to note that, “The hypotheses we will test as part of this longitudinal study will help us plan appropriately for subsequent interventions aimed at reducing health disparities by targeting the mechanisms linking stigma to health.”

Co-Investigators on this award are Dr. Jeffrey Parsons, Distinguished Professor at Hunter College and Director of CHEST, and Dr. Sarah Feldstein Ewing, Professor at Oregon Health and Sciences University. Additional collaborators include Dr. Brian Mustanski of Northwestern University, Dr. Steven Safren of University of Miami, Dr. Adam Carrico of University of Miami, and Dr. Christina Meade of Duke University.

The study will involve many Hunter College undergraduate and master’s students who intern or volunteer their time at CHEST, doctoral students from CUNY’s Health Psychology and Clinical Science PhD program, and postdoctoral fellows from Hunter College/CHEST.

CHEST’s mission is to conduct research to identify and promote strategies that prevent the spread of HIV and improve the lives of people living with HIV. We have been advocating for and working with the LGBT community since 1996.


Roosevelt House Director Harold Holzer Receives Empire State Archives and History Award

Harold Holzer, the Jonathan F. Fanton Director of the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, received the 2017 Empire State Archives and History Award from the New York State Archives.

At the September 6th ceremony, held at The Great Hall of The Cooper Union, actor and Tony Award nominee Stephen Lang treated the attendees to an intimate conversation with Holzer about his decorated career as an educator and one of the country’s leading authorities on Abraham Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War era.

“Harold Holzer is the quintessential New Yorker,” said Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab.  “He is a preeminent presidential scholar who has had an extraordinary career in government, public policy and communications. No one embodies the mission of Roosevelt House—to educate students, support research, and foster creative dialogue—better than Harold Holzer.”

“As a member of the Archives Partnership Trust Board, Harold has inspired us with his enthusiasm for history, extraordinary knowledge of President Lincoln and the Civil War era, and his staunch commitment to making history accessible to all. We’re proud to recognize Harold’s successful career and his unwavering dedication to promoting our nation’s rich history with this award,” said Tom Ruller, State Archivist and Executive Officer of the Archives Partnership Trust.

Before coming to Roosevelt House, Holzer served as Senior Vice President for Public Affairs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. His latest body of work, Lincoln and the Power of the Press: The War for Public Opinion, won the Lincoln Prize. For ten years, Holzer co-chaired the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, appointed by President Clinton, and was awarded The National Humanities Medal by President Bush in 2008.

The Empire State Archives and History Award commemorates the invaluable contributions by a national figure to propel the understanding and utilization of history in society. Previous honorees include historians Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., James McPherson, Robert Caro, David McCullough, and Ron Chernow; documentarian Ken burns; and actors Sam Waterson and Richard Dreyfuss.


Langston Hughes Festival celebrates Zadie Smith’s literature

The Langston Hughes Festival symposium at CCNY discusses the work of award-winning writer Zadie Smith.

On the day that Zadie Smith receives City College of New York’s venerated Langston Hughes Medal, scholars and writers hold a symposium at CCNY on Nov. 16 to deconstruct the noted novelist’s work. Entitled “I am the sole author of the dictionary that defines me,” the event runs 12:30 – 3 p.m. in City College’s Aaron Davis Hall, Theater B, located at 135th St. and Convent Ave. It is free and open to the public. Click here to register.

Participants in the Langston Hughes Festival symposium include:

Vanessa K. Valdés, associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese in CCNY’s Division of Humanities and the Arts, author of  “Diasporic Blackness: The Life and Times of Arturo Alfonso Schomburg,” will be the moderator.

“We’re excited about presenting what I know will be a compelling discussion of Zadie Smith’s writing and her impact on the literary landscape,” said Retha Powers, director of the Langston Hughes Festival.

The symposium preludes the evening’s Festival highlight at which Smith

will receive the 2017 Langston Hughes Medal. She joins a list of literary luminaries, including James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou and Walter Mosley, who have received the honor.

A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, Smith will give a reading. She will also engage in a conversation with Emily Raboteau, the award-winning writer and CCNY English professor.

The medal presentation will be made by Jacqueline Woodson, the renowned author and 2015 Langston Hughes Medalist. Click here to attend.

Smith’s award-winning books include: “White Teeth”(Random House, 2000), “The Autograph Man” (Vintage Books / Random House, 2002),  “On Beauty” (Penguin Books, 2005),  “NW” (Penguin Press, 2012) and “Swing Time” (Penguin Books, 2016).

In addition to her novels, she writes regularly for the New Yorker magazine and the New York Review of Books. She is a tenured professor of creative writing at New York University.

For more information on the Langston Hughes Festival email: lhf@ccny.cuny.edu.

About the Langston Hughes Medal
The Langston Hughes Medal is awarded to highly distinguished writers from throughout the African American diaspora for their impressive works of poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography and critical essays that help to celebrate the memory and tradition of Langston Hughes. Past award winners include James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Morrison, August Wilson, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Octavia Butler, and Edwidge Danticat.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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NATIONAL GRID SERVES AS ANCHOR PARTNER FOR KINGSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MANAGEMENT ACADEMY IN EXPANDING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP

Brooklyn, NY: An inspiring video highlighting National Grid as the anchor partner for Kingsborough Community College’s (KCC) new Customer Experience Management (CXM) Academy  focuses on a recently-developed, industry-driven innovative model of education and workforce development. This unique partnership—geared toward ensuring professional and academic equity for students transitioning from community to senior colleges—provides real-world business training to help sustain competitive wages for program participants entering the job market.

The CXM Academy model draws upon Kingsborough’s best resources to prepare eligible students for entry into customer relations positions in New York City. Academy students learn communication skills, business etiquette, and financial literacy. There is also a focus on cultural competency, social networking, customer management technology, labor relations management, and government and policy regulations. Academy cohorts take part in mandatory workshops throughout the semester to help them develop as professionals and prepare for the world of work.

Students completing the Academy gain access to paid employment in one of the ten committed industry/business partnership sites that Kingsborough has developed.

Managed through KCC’s Office of Continuing Education, Workforce Development and Strategic Community Partnerships, CXM Academy prepares students for career pathways in customer service and call centers with opportunities for advancement as they demonstrate quality performance and advance in their education.

“National Grid’s continued investment in Kingsborough’s students speaks to their commitment to creating a solid workforce,” said KCC’s Vice President for Continuing Education, Workforce Development and Strategic Community Partnerships Dr. Reza Fakhari. “We are grateful to National Grid for recognizing the importance of developing quality customer service training for our students that can lead to opportunities within National Grid and beyond.”

National Grid has hired nine graduates from the first cohort; another 10 hires are scheduled for this fall to work in the Brooklyn Call Center. There are over 100 students currently enrolled in the CXM program.

“We are very proud to partner with Kingsborough Community College (KCC) on our innovative Customer Experience Management program,” said Ken Daly, president of National Grid, New York and past chairman of KCC Foundation. We have hired numerous graduates from the program and they are now part of our team of 250 dedicated employees serving customers in our Brooklyn Call Center. Excellent customer service is a vital skill for National Grid as we prepare to meet the clean energy needs of our customers and local communities in the future.”

About National Grid
National Grid (LSE: NG; NYSE: NGG) is an electricity, natural gas, and clean energy delivery company that supplies the energy for more than 20 million people through its networks in New York, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. It is the largest distributor of natural gas in the Northeast. National Grid also operates systems that deliver gas and electricity across Great Britain.

National Grid is transforming its electricity and natural gas networks to support the 21st century digital economy with smarter, cleaner, and more resilient energy solutions. Read more about the innovative projects happening across our footprint in The Democratization of Energy, an eBook written by National Grid’s US president, Dean Seavers.

For more information, visit www.nationalgridus.com.

About the Kingsborough Office of Continuing Education, Workforce Development & Strategic Community Partnerships
The Office of Continuing Education, Workforce Development and Strategic Community Partnerships engages with and serves the borough’s 2.6 million residents. By fostering alliances with strategic community and industry/business partners, the Office seeks to develop the workforce of a changing borough, reduce disparities across its communities, and improve the economic and social standing of its highly diverse neighborhoods. It enrolls about 25,000 students in its various courses and programs each year.

About the Customer Experience Management (CXM) Academy
www.kbcc.cuny.edu/continuinged/Documents/CXM_Academy/CXM_Info_Card.pdf

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CUNY BOARD APPROVES TUITION BREAK FOR STUDENTS FROM PUERTO RICO, VIRGIN ISLANDS  

Students from hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands will pay in-state tuition for the 2017-18 academic year, the CUNY Board of Trustees voted unanimously on Monday.  Affected full-time students will pay $6,350 in tuition for the year, rather than the $17,400 that students from outside the state pay.

The aid follows a call by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo for both CUNY and SUNY to extend in-state tuition to students from the U.S. territories displaced by the September hurricanes Maria and Irma. The Board’s resolution also authorizes CUNY’s 24 college presidents to provide additional financial assistance to affected students on a case-by-case basis.

“Hurricanes Irma and Maria had a devastating impact on Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands,” said Board Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr.  “While families are trying to rebuild homes and lives, CUNY will make every effort to support college students who were displaced by these disasters. Today’s vote represents an important step in enabling students affected by the devastating hurricanes to continue their college education.”

Chancellor James B. Milliken said, “I applaud the Board and the Governor for supporting tuition relief that will help our students from the affected territories get through this difficult period for them and their families.”

In a report to the Board of Trustees during Monday’s meeting, Chancellor Milliken said an effort has been launched to raise private funds to help displaced students defray the cost of attending CUNY and that all CUNY colleges are actively involved in University-wide relief efforts.  In addition, CUNY is making laboratory and other space available to University of Puerto Rico faculty and setting up a grant process for collaborative work on recovery issues.

CUNY and New York City have close associations with the Caribbean islands, the Board noted. The Puerto Rican community has long been one of the most vibrant in New York, and no city in the country has more native-born citizens whose families came from the Virgin Islands. CUNY has about 16,000 current undergraduates who identify as Puerto Rican.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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CWE panel discusses Puerto Rico hurricane aftermath, Oct. 24

Participants in the CWE panel discussion on the aftermath of the hurricane devastation in Puerto Rico [from top]: Harry Franqui-Rivera, Emmanuel Gonzalez, Jr., Ed Morales and Armando Pintado. Elena Romero is the moderator.

Attendees encouraged to bring disaster relief donations The aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria in Puerto Rico is the focus of a panel discussion at the City College Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education on October 24. Entitled “State of Disaster: Puerto Rico and U.S. Relations in the Aftermath of Hurricanes,” the discussion highlights the historical relationship between P.R. and the United States and examines the social, economic and political conditions the Island faces as it struggles to recover from the hurricane devastation.

The event, 6 – 8 p.m., is hosted by the CWE Divisional Committee on Inclusive Excellence and the CWE Office of Student Affairs. It is free and open to the public and attendees are encouraged to bring disaster relief donations. CWE is located at 25 Broadway, 7th floor, in Manhattan.

Panelists include:

Harry Franqui-Rivera, associate professor of History, Bloomfield College, N.J. and a New Jersey Council of the Humanities’ Public Scholar;

Emmanuel Gonzalez, Jr., NYPD Deputy Inspector Commanding Officer, 72nd Precinct, Brooklyn, and participant in the NYPD’s P.R. recovery effort;

Ed Morales, journalist, author and adjunct professor, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University;

Armando Pintado, national coordinator, VAMOS4PR campaign, a network of stateside labor, community, cultural, and human rights groups committed to fighting for a better future for Puerto Rico and empowering the Puerto Rican diaspora.

Elena Romero, journalist and educator who has covered fashion, music and Latino culture is the organizer and moderator of the panel. Her work has appeared in numerous publications including Women’s Wear Daily, Vibe, Urban Latino, Latina, Savoy, Sportswear International, the New York Post and on WBAI-FM. She also contributes to  remezcla.com.

“President Trump has faced tremendous criticism for poorly handling Puerto Rico’s recovery efforts –from his delayed visit, to threats to pull emergency responders to his temporary lift of The Jones Act,” said Romero, an adjunct assistant professor at CWE.  “The federal government’s non swift course of action has been very different than what we saw with aid to those affected by Hurricanes Harvey in Texas or Irma in Florida. The discussion is to try to address the question why and how the island can rebuild.”

The event is occurring at the mid-point of CWE’s disaster relief efforts that will conclude at the end of October. CWE has been collecting batteries, flashlights, portable lanterns, feminine hygiene products, diapers, baby wipes, and cases of water. Donations are accepted six days a week at the CWE front lobby.

“CCNY plays a vital role in the recovery stage because we have the School of Medicine, Architecture and Engineering, said Juan Carlos Mercado, dean of the CWE and a member of the Puerto Rico task force appointed by City College Interim President Vincent Boudreau to advise him on this matter. “At this moment, through our contacts in Puerto Rico we are evaluating the specific needs there as well as providing response to concrete requests by P.R. higher education Institutions there.”

For more information on the panel discussion, contact Elena Romero at (212)925-6625, ext. 258 or email eromero@ccny.cuny.edu.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Queens College Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration on November 12 Will Focus on the Movie “Casablanca,” the Refugees in its Cast, and the Holocaust’s Impact on Film Professionals in Europe

— In the Sinai Chapel-sponsored Presentation, Holocaust Survivors and Their Family Members Will Light Remembrance Candles in a Commitment to Combat Anti-Semitism —

WHAT: The college’s annual Kristallnacht commemoration, presented by the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College and Sinai Chapels of Fresh Meadows, to recommit to combating anti-Semitism and hatred. The keynote address, “Casablanca, the Refugee Question, and the Fateful Summer of 1938,” by Noah Isenberg, will include clips from the popular film starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman.

The program, which is free and open to the public, will include a candle-lighting ceremony with Holocaust survivors and family members of the subsequent generations. There will also be a multicultural invocation and audiovisual and musical interludes, including performances by Townsend Harris HS students, and Ms. Sara Kahan, who will perform the national anthems of the US and Israel.

WHO: Noah Isenberg is professor of culture and media and director of the Screen Studies program at the New School’s Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts in New York City. His latest book is We’ll Always Have ‘Casablanca’: The Life, Legend, and Afterlife of Hollywood’s Most Beloved Movie. Isenberg is also the author of the critically acclaimed biography Edgar G. Ulmer: A Filmmaker at the Margins, and a recipient of grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fulbright Commission, the International Research Center for Cultural Studies in Vienna, and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

WHEN:
Sunday, November 12, 2017, 2-4 pm
Goldstein Theatre, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, NY
Directions to QC: http://bit.ly/mX79LH
Campus map: http://bit.ly/1toCpb7

Background: In aiming to be the premier community resource for Jewish intellectual endeavor in the Queens-Long Island area, the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College has become one of the best-known in the country. Through its outreach and research exploring the more than three millennia of Jewish civilization, the center bridges QC’s
academic Jewish studies program and the community. Its attractive educational and spirited cultural programs on campus—lectures, symposia, conferences, film festivals, and artistic performances—are all open to the public, most at no cost.

Sinai Chapels of Fresh Meadows, Queens, is a funeral home serving New York’s Jewish community for four generations. It is owned and operated by Michael Resnick and his family. The Resnick family and Sinai Chapels are proud to support the Jewish studies program at Queens College and this special Kristallnacht commemoration.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:

Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY DOMINATES CHRONICLE’S PUBLIC COLLEGE SOCIAL-MOBILITY RANKINGS, PLACES HIGH IN WORLD RANKING

Seven senior colleges and five community colleges at The City University of New York dominated the Chronicle of Higher Education’s top 10 lists of public U.S. campuses with the greatest success in moving low-income students into the middle class. In a separate global assessment of college quality using totally different criteria, three CUNY colleges placed among the top 1,000 colleges among the 27,770 analyzed worldwide.

The Chronicle’s list was drawn from a widely reported study of colleges’ impact on social mobility by a team led by Stanford University economics professor Raj Chetty. Their 2017 paper, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility” tracked students from nearly every U.S. college, including nongraduates, and measured their subsequent earnings against millions of anonymous tax filings and financial-aid records. They looked to see how well colleges helped students whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent of income levels reach the top 20 percent for individual earnings.

CUNY’s social-mobility track record also factored in Money magazine’s July ranking of five CUNY senior campuses in the top quarter of its “Best Colleges for Your Money”: Baruch College, Brooklyn College, Queens College, Hunter College and John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Money measured colleges by 27 criteria.

“The Chronicle’s and Money’s emphasis on how colleges help propel students up the economic ladder speaks to CUNY’s strength and mission since 1847,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “It is also increasingly viewed as one of the most important contributions higher education can make if it is truly to serve as a means of achieving equity. All of us at CUNY take great pride in the University’s role in helping generations of low-income, underrepresented and immigrant students succeed.”

In Fall 2016, 42.2 percent of CUNY students overall came from households earning less than $20,000; at the senior colleges, 37.1 percent came from such households, while at community colleges, it was 52.9 percent.

The seven CUNY baccalaureate-level colleges in the top 10 were Baruch College, No.1; City College, No. 2; John Jay College of Criminal Justice, No. 4; City Tech, No. 6; Brooklyn College, No. 7; Hunter College, No. 9; and Queens College, No. 10.

The five CUNY associate-level colleges were Borough of Manhattan Community College, No. 3; LaGuardia Community College, No. 5; Bronx Community College, No. 6; Queensborough Community College, No. 8; and Kingsborough Community College, No. 9.

In the global rankings, the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) says it “publishes the only global university rankings that measure the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions,” as prominent ranking services like U.S. News & World Report do.

CWUR does not consider the Chetty data or similar measures at all. Rather, it gives 25 percent weight each to alumni who are CEOs at top world companies, alumni who won major international awards, and the number of faculty who won international awards, all relative to the university’s size. It gives 5 percent weight each to the number of faculty research papers; their influence as measured by publication in “highly influential” journals; citations measured by the number of highly cited research papers; broad impact as measured by the “h-index,” an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of an author’s publications; and patents, as measured by the number of international patent applications.

Assessing 27,770 degree-granting institutions, CWUR placed three CUNY colleges in the top 1,000: City College, No. 323, in the top 1.2 percent in the world; Hunter College, No. 929, in the top 3.4 percent in the world; and Queens College, No. 955, in the top 3.5 percent in the world.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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CCNY psychologists develop new model that links emotions and mental health

The novel MAS model linked emotion regulation to personality and wellbeing in surprising and unexpected ways.

For decades psychologists have studied how people regulate emotions using a multitude of ways to conceptualize and assess emotion regulation. Now a recent study published this week in the journal PLOS ONE by Elliot Jurist and David M. Greenberg of The City College of New York, shows how a new assessment model can give clinicians an exciting new way to think about clinical diagnoses including anxiety, mood, and developmental disorders.

The authors developed the Mentalized Affectivity Scale (MAS) – a novel assessment model which breaks emotion regulation into three elements:

·      Identifying: the ability to identify emotions and to reflect on the factors that influence them (e.g. childhood events)

·      Processing: the ability to modulate and distinguish complex emotions

·      Expressing: the tendency to express emotions outwardly or inwardly

Jurist and Greenberg administered the MAS to nearly 3,000 adults online. Statistical modeling of the results showed: processing emotions delineates from identifying them and expressing emotions delineates from processing them.

The team of psychologists also found that emotion regulation was linked to personality and wellbeing in surprising and unexpected ways and that the ability to process and modulate emotions was a positive predictor of wellbeing beyond personality and demographic information. As the accompanying chart shows, one of the most important findings was how the three elements linked to the participants’ prior clinical diagnoses across anxiety, mood, eating, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

“We have introduced a way for psychologists and psychiatrists to use emotion regulation to supplement diagnoses,” said Greenberg, the lead author who is a postdoc student at Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership.

Jurist, the senior author and director of the Mentalized Affectivity Lab at CCNY and Professor at the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership said: “For the first time we have empirical evidence for the validity and usefulness of the theory that can be carried out into the mainstream by neuroscientists, emotion researchers and psychiatrists.”

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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College Welcomes New Faculty for 2017-2018 Academic Year

Group photo of 2017 new faculty

Front Row Sitting ( Grace Pai, Shadisadat Ghaderi, and Vivian Lim)
Back Row Standing ( Rodrigo Lobo, James Mellis, Jihyun Kim, Meghan Jennifer Gilbert-Hickey, and Laura Wallace)

Guttman is proud to welcome 12 new faculty members for the 2017-2018 academic year:

Shaisadat Ghaderi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, earned her Ph.D. in mathematics from West Virginia University (WVU), and her M.Sc. in mathematics from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran. Her research interests include combinatorics, graph theory, matroid theory, and their applications. Her Ph.D. dissertation is on infinite matroid theory and solving open problems in that domain. She has developed and taught various courses in mathematics at undergraduate level at WVU. She had the opportunity to teach in the Emerging Scholars Program (ESP), i.e. the honors-level calculus program with a very strong student support component, which mostly serves underrepresented minority students. She received fellowships to implement active learning methods in instruction to foster in students critical thinking and to improve their effective communications with peers as well as their technical speaking and writing skills. She also pursued a Certificate in Applied Statistics at WVU. At Guttman, she teaches statistics.

Meaghan Gilbert-Hickey is an Assistant Professor of English. Her recent and forthcoming essay-length publications focus on intersectionality in contemporary young adult dystopias. Along with a colleague, she is editing a collection of essays — Raced Bodies, Erased Lives — solicited by the University Press of Mississippi via the Children’s Literature Association Publication Advisory Board, that interrogates the impulse to prioritize conversations about gender and class, while deflecting attention away from rich work on race geared toward a young adult readership. She is also at work on a single-author manuscript, tentatively titled The Hetero-Nuclear Imperative, that examines intersectional maternity in YA dystopian fiction.

Dalvin Hill, Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor of information technology, holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in computer science from the University of Tulsa. He holds an M.S. in internet business systems from Mercy College, and a B.B.A in computer information systems from Monroe College. During his collegiate experience, he conducted various research projects, several of which have been recognized as top-tier by his colleagues. His current research areas include health information exchanges, electronic health record, and mobile payment systems. Dr. Hill has had the opportunity of teaching at various institutions in the United States and also in Kabul, Afghanistan where he served as a Department Chair and Assistant Professor of information technology and computer science. His overseas teaching experience has severely broadened his horizon, and he is delighted to have contributed to a war-torn country. He is an avid traveler and is delighted to share his experience as a global trotter.

Jihyun Kim, Assistant Professor of Science, received a Ph.D. in organometallic chemistry (under the direction of Dr. Robert Kulawiec) from Georgetown University, Washington, DC. Dr. Kim was a Susan Komen Breast Cancer Foundation Fellowship recipient and completed a postdoctoral fellowship (under the direction of Robert Clarke) at Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center. Dr. Kim taught all areas of chemistry at Rockland Community College-SUNY and served as a substitute assistant professor at Medgar Evers College-CUNY.

Vivian Lim, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in teaching, learning, and teacher education; an M.A. from CUNY Brooklyn College in secondary mathematics education; and a B.A. from Columbia University in psychology and mathematics. Before Guttman, she taught courses for mathematics teacher preparation programs at both the University of Pennsylvania and Brooklyn College. Vivian was formerly a mathematics teacher in a Brooklyn public high school. The focus of Vivian’s dissertation work was on the role of mathematics education, specifically mathematics for social justice, in fostering the development of youth as citizens. At Guttman, Vivian will be teaching mathematics and statistics courses, including the quantitative reasoning component of City Seminar.

Rodrigo Lobo, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, was born and raised in Brazil, is married, and has two daughters. His academic background includes a Ph.D. in business administration from Positivo University, Brazil, Ph.D. research work as Visiting Scholar in innovation management at University of California, Berkeley, and a Master’s degree in international business from Baldwin Wallace University, Ohio. He has 30 years of corporate experience. He’s held executive positions at Accenture, BPO division, and served as managing director for Brazil and Latin America at Coastal Training Technologies, which was acquired by Dupont, Sustainable Solutions division. He has entrepreneurial experience with his own publishing business in Brazil. His teaching experience began nearly 20 years ago as management lecturer. He has traveled extensively in South America, North America, Europe and Asia and is fluent in Portuguese, Spanish and English.

James Mellis, Assistant Professor of English, holds a Ph.D. in literature from Tulane University, and a M.Phil in Anglo-Irish literature from Trinity College, Dublin.  Before coming to Guttman, he taught at William Paterson University in New Jersey and Temple University in Philadelphia. At both schools, he taught a number of writing and literature courses, including an immersive civic-engagement class that brought students from William Paterson to New Orleans to perform volunteer work in neighborhoods still recovering from Hurricane Katrina and visited with scholars, activists, musicians, filmmakers and others to learn about the recovery.  He is currently editing a volume of essays about Voodoo, Hoodoo and Conjure in African-American Literature and is looking forward to joining the Guttman community.

Grace Pai, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, was a former high school math teacher through the NYC Teaching Fellows program. Prior to joining Guttman, she worked as Senior Research Associate at the New York City Department of Education using quantitative analysis and mixed methods for program and impact evaluation, and also has experience doing international development work in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa (Bangladesh, South Africa and Sierra Leone). She holds a Ph.D. in international education with a concentration in applied statistics from New York University, an M.Ed. in secondary school mathematics from Brooklyn College, an Ed. M. in prevention science and practice from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a B.S. in management and international business from the Stern School of Business at New York University. Her research interests include education policy, college access, social stratification and international development. At Guttman, she teaches math and statistics.

Dara Pir, Assistant Professor of Information Technology, holds a Ph.D. and a Master of Philosophy in computer science from The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Dara’s professional background includes design and development of software in small, mid-size, and large companies. He has taught information technology courses at Guttman since 2014. Dara’s current research interests include signal processing applications in computer science.

James Rodriguez, Assistant Professor of History, is a lifelong New Yorker and CUNY alumnus who graduated from Brooklyn College with B.A. in English and psychology. James began his formal research in public housing and gentrification at New York University’s Ph.D. program in American studies. Alongside academic research, James has worked as a land use/public housing organizer on the Lower East Side.

Anya Y. Spector, Assistant Professor of Human Services, earned a Ph.D. in social work from the Columbia University School of Social Work, an MSW from Fordham Graduate School of Social Service, and a B.A. in psychology from Barnard College at Columbia University. Dr. Spector also completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies at Columbia University. Dr. Spector’s career has included direct clinical practice in outpatient substance use treatment, as well as public health research and program evaluation at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Her mixed methods research has been focused on understanding human services providers’ professional practices vis-à-vis HIV prevention and substance use treatment, attitudes toward behavioral research, evidence-based practice, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Dr. Spector will teach in the human services field of practice.

Laura Wallace, Assistant Professor of English, holds a Ph.D. from the Graduate Center, CUNY. Laura taught at City College for eight years before joining the Guttman community as an adjunct instructor in 2016, where she has taught composition and literature courses as well as a Capstone Seminar in children’s literature. As Assistant Professor of English, Laura is teaching Reading and Writing in the First-Year Experience. Her research interests include nineteenth-century poetry, drama and, most recently, Victorian photography.


Keeping People Out of Poverty: Do Health Insurance Benefits Make a Difference?

Baruch College Professors Develop First U.S. Poverty Measure to Count Health Insurance Benefits as a Resource to Meet Health Needs

 

New York, NY – October 12, 2017 – Do Medicaid and other health insurance programs help keep families out of poverty?

Researchers have been unable to answer that question, because they struggled, without success, for decades to find a valid method for including health needs and benefits in poverty measures.

Now, two professors from Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs have developed the first U.S. poverty measure to count health insurance benefits as a resource to meet health needs. For those who believe that health insurance is a need, the findings demonstrate that these benefits are a powerful poverty fighting tool.

The study, Estimating The Effects Of Health Insurance And Other Social Programs On Poverty Under The Affordable Care Act,” was published in the October 2017 issue of Health Affairs.  The measure was developed by Dahlia K. Remler and Sanders D. Korenman, both professors at Baruch College’s Marxe School, faculty affiliates of the City University of New York Institute for Demographic Research (CIDR) and faculty research fellows at the National Bureau of Economic Research. The team also included Rosemary T. Hyson, a research scientist at the Marxe School and CIDR.

“U.S. poverty measures have never incorporated both health needs and benefits,” said Professor Remler. “While the Affordable Care Act (ACA)—the largest expansion of U.S. social insurance programs since President Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty initiatives—increased health insurance coverage for millions of lower-income Americans, it has been difficult to determine the effect of this insurance expansion, or of any health insurance benefits, on poverty.“

Study’s Findings:  Medicaid and premium subsidies are among the most important antipoverty programs

According to Remler, the study has shown the significant impact that health insurance benefits have in efforts to reduce poverty among people under the age of 65. Highlights of the study include:

  • Public health insurance benefits (from Medicare, Medicaid, Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and Affordable Care Act premium subsidies) accounted for nearly one-third of the overall poverty reduction from public benefits.
  • Medicaid and CHIP had a larger effect on child poverty than all non-health means-tested benefits combined.
  • For people in households with at least one disability recipient, public nonhealth benefits reduced poverty by 35.4 percentage points, and public health insurance benefits reduced it by another 9.9 percentage points.
  • Poor adults with neither children nor a disability experienced little poverty relief from public programs, and what relief they did receive came largely from premium subsidies and Medicaid.
  • Medicaid and CHIP reduced poverty among  recipients by a remarkable 17.1 percentage points.
  • Employer-sponsored insurance reduced the poverty rate of those it covered by 5.0 percentage point.
  • Premium subsidies reduced the poverty of the individually insured by 6.6 percentage points

 Looking at Poverty:  Health Insurance Coverage Must be Counted

 “Given today’s debate about the ACA and health insurance, it’s important not to have only separate measures of health insurance coverage and non-health poverty,” said Remler. “That misses how people do without health care or insurance to keep up paying for food and housing. And the official poverty measure misses how paying for health care or insurance can hurt people’s ability to meet food and housing needs.”

Remler added, “We can now show how those big cuts to Medicaid that just barely keep not passing would thrust many Americans into poverty.”

For more information about the study, go here.

Media Contact:  Suzanne Bronski:  646-660-6095 / Suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

 

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Baruch College’s Accounting Programs Receive High Rankings in Public Accounting Report’s Annual Professors Survey

Makes Top 10 in the Northeast and Top 50 in the U.S. for Best Undergraduate and Master’s Accounting Programs

 

New York, NY – October 04, 2017- Baruch College’s undergraduate and graduate accounting programs at the Zicklin School of Business are ranked among the top 10 in the Northeast region, and the Top 50 in the United States, according to the Public Accounting Report (PAR) 36th Annual Professors Survey 2017.

PAR’s Annual Professors Survey is the nation’s only survey that allows professors to rank the best accounting programs in the U.S. Nearly 1,000 accounting professors from approximately 200 U.S. colleges and universities that offer accounting degrees participated in the 2017 survey, which was conducted last April and May.

The Zicklin School’s Stan Ross Department of Accountancy offers accounting and taxation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels, including PhD in accounting.

PAR ranked Baruch College in the following top categories:

Undergraduate Programs:

  • #8 – “Top Undergraduate Accounting Programs by Region” Northeast
  • #18 – “Top 25 Undergraduate Rankings of Schools with 24+ Full-time Accounting Faculty”
  • #31– “Top 50 Undergraduate Programs”

Master’s Program

  • #7 – “Top Master’s Accounting Programs by Region” Northeast
  • #16 – “Top 25 Masters Rankings of Schools with 24+ Full-time Accounting Faculty”
  • #32 – “Top 50 Masters Programs”

For more information about the Stan Ross Department of Accountancy, go here.

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Baruch College MFE Students Capture Third Place in Datathon

“A rigorous competition geared toward students with data science and

machine learning backgrounds, many at doctoral levels”

 

NEW YORK, NY – October 4 2017— Four students in Baruch College’s Master of Science in Financial Engineering (MFE) program kicked off the 2017-18 competition season by capturing third place out of 32 teams in the September 30th Datathon, a series of rigorous events for top quant and tech talent presented by Citadel and Citadel Securities in partnership with CorrelationOne.  At each Datathon, student teams must tackle a large, complex dataset and present their conclusions to a panel of judges.

Wenhao Hu (team captain), Deyun Li, Weihao Vincent Li, and Matthew Lin, all who will graduate this December, competed against PhD, MS, and undergraduate students from such top-tier universities as Cornell, Columbia, and Yale, among others. The Baruch team implemented an XGB classifier for forecasting on the given data set.

“This win represents a truly spectacular result for our Baruch MFE students,” said Dan Stefanica, PhD, professor of mathematics and co-director of the Financial Engineering MS Program at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. “This competition is geared toward high-performing students with strong data science and machine learning backgrounds. Many of them are studying at doctoral levels.”

Sham Mustafa, co-founder and CEO of Correlation One, added, “Through the Datathons, what we try to do is look at an impactful, meaningful social problem and bring the best minds together so they can take a look at the data and come up with their own analysis.”

Poise Under Pressure

According to Dr. Stefanica, the Datathon not only tests analytical and technical abilities but also how teams can work through complicated information under tight deadlines. “At this Datathon, our students showed incredible poise under pressure,” he said, “and also the ability to deliver actionable work at the highest level.”

For more information about the MFE program, go here.

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Upcoming Aaron Copland School of Music Events Showcase Faculty Talents

— Professor Emeritus Joel Mandelbaum to conduct excerpts from his opera, The Dybbuk on October 24 and 26; faculty to present concert in celebration of Queens College’s 80th anniversary on November 11 —

Queens, NY, October 18, 2017—Faculty from the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College will be featured in not-to-be missed performances this month and next.

Professor Emeritus Joel Mandelbaum will conduct singers and a full orchestra in excerpts from his opera, The Dybbuk, on Tuesday, October 24, at 7:30 pm in LeFrak Concert Hall. Based on the enduring play of the same name by writer and folklorist Sholom Ansky, Dybbuk tells the story of a couple whose love persists after one partner’s death. Mandelbaum will lead a second performance with the same cast and ensemble on Thursday, October 26, at 8 pm at Merkin Hall in Manhattan.

On Saturday, November 11, at 8 pm, an all-star lineup of Copland School faculty—William Anderson, Cathy Callis, Paul Cohen, Younju Namkoong, Sidney Outlaw, Morey Ritt, Marcy Rosen, and H. Roz Woll—will join a group of outstanding guest performers including sopranos Tony Arnold and Jin-Xiang “JX” Yu; flutist Tara Helen O’Connor; pianist Roy Jennings; and harpist June Han on stage at LeFrak Concert Hall in the Music Building as part of the ongoing celebrations of the 80th anniversary of Queens College. The program will include works by faculty members Sunny Knable, Joel Mandelbaum, Jeff Nichols, and Edward Smaldone, as well as works by Johannes Brahms, Claude Debussy, and other composers.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review
as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY scores highly on global & Chronicle of Higher ed. rankings

Two new rankings reflect The City College of New York’s impressive academic standing internationally and its ability to boost remarkably the social mobility of its students.

In its 2017 appraisal of the top schools globally, the Center for World University Rankings places City College, whose student population represents 89.6% of the world’s 193 sovereign states, in the top 1.2%.

CCNY ranked # 323 among the more than 27,000 degree-granting institutions of higher education worldwide according to the CWUR, which conducts the largest academic ranking of global universities.

At home, The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 nationally among four-year public institutions with the highest student mobility rates. CCNY’s mobility rate was pegged at 11.72%

The mobility rates reflect a measure of the percentage of all students in a birth cohort at a particular college whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent for household income, and who reached the top 20 percent for individual earnings. Six other City University of New York institutions were in the top 10 for mobility rates among four-year public colleges.

In other favorable rankings this fall, CCNY earned recognition nationally for its diversity. The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education 2018 College Rankings placed City College at joint #8 for environment with three other schools.

In addition, the U.S. News & World Report 2018 rankings named CCNY as one of the top 100 Best Regional Universities in the North and a Top Public School in the North.

About the Center for World University Rankings
The CWUR publishes the only global university rankings that measure the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.The rankings started out as a project in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2012 with the aim of rating the top 100 world universities. They were quickly reported worldwide by universities and the media and many requests were received to expand them. In 2014, the rankings expanded to list the top 1000 out of 27,000+ degree-granting institutions of higher education worldwide, making them the largest academic rankings of global universities.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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For Fourth Consecutive Year, Baruch College Hosted International Conference of Undergraduate Research

Only U.S. College Participating with Nine Universities from Around the World

StudentsPresentatIntlConfUndergraduateResearch

(L to R) Tanzila Mahmood, a political science and history double major, and Hanxiao (Helen) Yue, an economics major, presented their projects at the 2017 International Conference of Undergraduate Research at Baruch.

 

New York, NY− September 28, 2017 – For the fourth consecutive year, Baruch College hosted the International Conference of Undergraduate Research (ICUR), which was held on September 26 and 27. The conference linked more than 300 students from nine universities, located in eight countries on five continents.

More than 20 Baruch College undergraduate students presented at the fourth annual two-day conference, where HD video-conferencing technology made it possible for them to discuss their research from the Baruch campus linked in real time to an international audience. On linked panels of students from participating global universities, Baruch undergraduates spoke about their own research, heard presentations from foreign peers, and engaged in dialogue about their work.

“This global, academic conference gives Baruch College a special way to celebrate undergraduate research that is unique in the United States,” said Katherine Pence, PhD, chair of the Department of History at the Weisman School of Arts and Sciences, and Baruch’s ICUR coordinator. “It also provides students with a platform to showcase their high-level research to an international network of student scholars.”

This year, Baruch student research covered a wide range of topics from U.S. policy toward refugees to volatility in U.S. equity markets to genes and hormones in fruit flies to the history of feminist nationalism in Ireland.

“It’s exciting to see more and more Baruch College students eager to participate,” said Pence. “In 2014, we began with two presenters and the number of participants has jumped to nearly 25 in fewer than three years. The increasing number of participants speaks to the ambition and intellectual curiosity of our student body.”

 

An Exceptional Student Experience

According to Professor Pence, the ICUR experience helps prepare students in multiple ways as they look to embark on a career path or enroll in graduate school after obtaining an undergraduate degree.

“The conference provides an opportunity for students to sharpen their communications skills, speak with confidence to a diverse global audience, and it also encourages them to consider perspectives that may be very dissimilar from their own,” added Pence.

 

Thinking Global

In addition to Baruch College, the 2017 conference brought together students from Monash University-Australia, Monash University-South Africa, Monash University-Malaysia, Nanyang Technological University (NTU)-Singapore, University of Brawijaya, Indonesia, Kyushu University-Japan, University of Warwick-UK, University of Sussex -UK, and University of Leeds-UK.

Led and sponsored by the University of Warwick in the UK and Monash University in Australia, the goal of the conference is to challenge “undergraduate students to rethink their work in an international context” and it “requires the presenters to consider the perspective of students from different backgrounds.” Since its inception in 2013, more than a 1,000 students from 11 institutions have presented their research at the annual conference.

This year, the conference at Baruch College was made possible through support by the Office of the Provost, the Weissman Dean of Arts and Sciences, and the Marxe Dean of the School of Public and International Affairs.

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North Korea is Topic of Public Policy Issues Breakfast at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs

Ambassador and Deputy Permanent Representative of

the Republic of Korea to the UN Featured Guest

 PresWallersteinSKoreaAMBMarxeDeanProvostViceProvost

(L to R) Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, welcomes Ambassador Hahn Choonghee of the Republic of Korea, along with Marxe Dean David Birdsell, PhD; Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs David Christy, PhD; and Vice Provost for Global Initiatives Myung-Soo Lee, PhD

 

New York, NY− September 21, 2017 – The Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs welcomed Hahn Choonghee, ambassador and deputy permanent representative of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations, on September 19 to its first Fall 2017 Marxe Issues Public Policy Breakfast.

The program, “How to Solve the North Korea Conundrum,” coincided with the 72nd Regular Session of the UN General Assembly at UN Headquarters in New York, which brought together more than 100 heads of state and governments from around the world.

Baruch President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, who arranged for Ambassador Hahn to speak, opened the event. Marxe Dean David Birdsell, PhD, moderated a conversation with Ambassador Hahn, who expressed his views on a wide range of topics relating to North Korea.

A career diplomat, Hahn Choonghee is currently ambassador and deputy permanent representative of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations in New York (2014‒17). His areas of expertise include North Korean nuclear affairs; nuclear nonproliferation; regional architecture surrounding the Korean Peninsula and Northeast Asia; and North American, European and African affairs; as well as public diplomacy.

 

VIDEO:  Watch President Wallerstein open the event and introduce Ambassador Hahn.

 

About the Marxe Issues Public Policy Breakfast Series

In March 2017, the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs launched a new program, the Marxe Issues Public Policy Breakfast series, which hosts experts and thought leaders to discuss vital public policy concerns of the day. The events are free and open to the public. In addition to Ambassador Choonghee, the series has welcomed Nisha Agarwal, commissioner, Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, and Guillermo Linares, president, State of New York Higher Education Service Corporation.

 

 

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Baruch College Ranks Among Best Schools in the North in Latest U.S. News & World Report Rankings

#5 among “Top Public Schools” in the North for Second Consecutive Year

Jumps 13 Points for Nation’s “Best Undergraduate Business Programs”

New York, NY- September 12, 2017- Baruch College placed #5 among top public schools and #20 overall, both for the “Regional Universities in the North category,” in the newly released U.S. News & World Report rankings of the nation’s best colleges and universities.

The annual survey assesses more than 1,800 colleges and universities throughout the United States. Among those institutions, 1,388 receive rankings.

These 2018 rankings mark the second consecutive year that Baruch College received its highest rankings to date in the regional category, maintaining its 12 point increase from the 2016 list.

13 Point Jump in National Ranking for “Best Undergraduate Business Programs”

The U.S. News & World Report also ranks Baruch College #64 among the nation’s “Best Undergraduate Business Programs,” and #42 among the nation’s public schools.

The national ranking represents a 13 point jump from the #77 spot on the 2017 list for Baruch College’s undergraduate business programs at the Zicklin School of Business.

 At a Glance:

U.S. News & World Report also gave high rankings to Baruch College in several additional categories, which are included in the below summary of the College’s rankings:

Among Regional Universities in the North, Baruch ranks:

  • #1 “Most Selective School” among public schools; #2 among all institutions
  • #1 “Freshmen in Top 25% of High School Class”
  • #2 “Economic Diversity among the Top 25”
  • #2 “Average First-Year Student Retention Rate” among public schools; #5 among all institutions
  • #3 “Most International Students” among public schools; #7 among all institutions
  • #5 “Top Public Schools”
  • #5 Campus Ethnic Diversity
  • #20 among all institutions for “Best Regional Universities”

Among all colleges and universities nationally, Baruch ranks:

  • #64 “Best Business Programs”

 Excellence in Urban Education

According to U.S. News & World Report, “…Baruch’s vision is excellence in urban public education. The student body reflects the strength and diversity of New York City, a world-class metropolis, and the College embraces the city through its curriculum, programs and student life.”

Methodology:

U.S. News & World Report focuses its rankings methodology on “academic excellence, with schools evaluated on hundreds of data points and up to 15 measures of academic quality. Overall, the rankings emphasize student outcomes – such as graduation and freshman retention rates – which carry the most weight at 30 percent.”

For more information on methodology go here.


Baruch College Ranks #7 among Nation’s “Best Business Colleges for Business Majors” by MONEY Magazine

 Zicklin School of Business among the Top-Ten in

Analysis of 700 Schools

 

New York, NY- September 6, 2017 – Baruch College ranked #7 among the “Best Colleges for Business Majors” in its annual nationwide analysis of more than 700 schools by MONEY Magazine.  This top ranking puts Baruch College’s undergraduate business program at the Zicklin School of Business ahead of such prestigious universities as Cornell, Columbia, Georgetown, Harvard, New York University, Yale, among others.

Money magazine, in its formulation of its “Best Colleges for Business Majors” ranking, noted: “Business is the most popular major, but there’s a wide variation in the payoff of the programs. These colleges beat the competition on educational quality, affordability, and the career payoff for undergraduate business majors.”

In its description of Baruch College, Money magazine noted the school’s desirable New York City location: “…almost three-quarters of students plan to study in the college’s well-known Zicklin School of Business, which benefits from being just a few miles from Wall Street and close to the headquarters of many major corporations.”

“This high independent ranking serves as yet another example how our program innovations are gaining national attention.’” said Dr. H. Fenwick Huss, the Willem Kooyker Dean of the Zicklin School of Business.  “The school stands as a recognized front-runner in providing undergraduate, graduate and executive education for the 21st century.”

With its graduates known to be New York smart and world-class ready, the Zicklin School of Business is consistently rated by rankings experts among the top performers in areas relevant to today’s students, such as academic excellence, diversity, and value.  Zicklin offers a wide range of business degree programs, accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), and taught by faculty who are thought leaders and active researchers and practitioners in their fields.

Baruch College: #1 among “Nation’s Best Public Colleges”

Money magazine also ranked Baruch College #1 among the nation’s best public colleges and #2 for “Best Colleges for Your Money.” In its announcement, Money pointed to Baruch College’s value, its strong job outcomes for alumni, and its nationally recognized track record in advancing social mobility among its students.

Read more about Money magazine’s top rankings of Baruch College here.

Watch a video of Money Magazine’s ranking of the top 10 schools, which features Baruch College, here.

METHODOLOGY:

To determine the “Best Schools for Business Majors,” Money first looked at how many business degrees are granted at the schools, and also at the early- and mid-career salaries of those business majors. It then combined that information with the methodology used for its overall ranking. As a basis for those rankings, Money focused on three factors that “surveys show are the most important to parents and students:” Quality of education, affordability, and outcomes. Money looked at 2,4000 schools and compiled an initial cut of 711 colleges that met such requirements as having sufficient, reliable data to be analyzed, were not in financial distress, and having at least 500 students. For more detailed information about the methodolgy, go here.

 

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The City University of New York’s Baruch College Launches Innovative, Flexible Executive Master’s Degree in Finance in Mumbai, India

First-of-Its-Kind Degree Program from College’s Acclaimed Zicklin School of Business Launches in Collaboration with the Bombay Chamber of Commerce and Industry and Think Education

New York, NY – September 1, 2017 The flagship business school within The City University of New York (CUNY), the largest and most renowned urban university system in the United States, Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business, is launching a first-of-its-kind, convenient, affordable, and accelerated Executive Master’s Degree in Finance (EMSF) in Mumbai, India, in September 2017.

This groundbreaking, fully accredited U.S. degree program delivered in Mumbai for only $15,000 USD will be hosted by the Bombay Chamber of Commerce and Industry in its state-of-the-art facility at The Ruby in Dadar (West), Mumbai, in collaboration with Think Education Advisory Services.

Designed specifically for busy professionals who seek to fast-track their career success, the EMSF uses a highly convenient, weekends-only modular format that allows students to earn their Master of Science  degree (MS) in as few as 10 or 11 months, or longer, if needed. As in New York City, the program in Mumbai is entirely taught by the world-class New York City‒based faculty of Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business, the largest accredited collegiate school of business in the United States.

After completing the identical program that is offered in New York City and future program locations around the world, students in Mumbai will earn the same MS in Finance awarded by Baruch College, which is based in the heart of New York City within easy reach of Wall Street, Times Square, Midtown, and the global headquarters of major companies. Indian students are required to complete one course module in New York City and have the option for more.

“Baruch College is excited to make Zicklin’s graduate education accessible to executives in Mumbai, in India, and around the world, who do not live in New York City and whose full lives do not align with traditional program schedules,” said Dr. H. Fenwick Huss, the Willem Kooyker Dean of the Zicklin School of Business. “These talented executives fully understand that advancing their learning greatly enhances the opportunities to further advance their careers. Given the rigorous work responsibilities managed by today’s professionals, we understand that a master’s degree program must fit into demanding schedules and, at the same time, deliver an exceptional education.”

Dr. Huss has long been recognized for his leadership in business education. Before coming to the Zicklin School of Business as dean, he launched a global MBA program, in which students studied on four continents. He has also assisted universities in Russia, Ukraine, and Sub-Saharan Africa in restructuring their business programs and has lectured extensively on the topic of business information needs in the People’s Republic of China.

“In every way, this new program exemplifies how executive degree programs will evolve in the future,” said Dr. Huss. “Right now, professionals in India, and anyone within reach of Mumbai or New York City, won’t have to wait for that future; the Zicklin School of Business is delivering just such a forward-thinking program now.”

 Modular Makes the Difference

 The EMSF breaks the mold of the typical classroom-centric, rigid program structure. Instead, this new Zicklin School of Business degree program is specifically student-centered and will consist of 10 course modules, each of which is a single course completed over only two consecutive weekends in the classroom. All additional coursework takes place before and after the classroom sessions, supported by an online platform that allows faculty-supervised individual and group work.

Students complete three initial required modules in Mumbai and travel to Zicklin’s New York City campus to take one course of their choosing, with at least three options available to students who want the fastest path to completion. The remaining modules can be completed, based on availability, in Mumbai or New York City, at the student’s pace.  Tuition and fees for one New York City course are included in the total program cost.

“This flexible format allows a student to complete the EMSF in as few as 11 months—or up to 36 months if needed, depending on individual preferences and also to fit seamlessly into busy work schedules,” said Dr. Huss.

Global Perspective, Opportunity, and Networking

 According to Dr. Huss, the EMSF program will give students a global perspective and an opportunity for global learning experiences, locally and at other program locations. The Zicklin School of Business faculty teach from a global perspective that is threaded throughout the carefully constructed curriculum.

In addition to completing the classroom study for one or more modules in New York City, students in Mumbai can collaborate virtually with their peers in New York City to expand professional networks and broaden business insights. Upon graduation, all Executive MS degree recipients, wherever they studied, are full CUNY alumni.  Additionally, graduates become members of Baruch College’s roster of more than 135,000 alumni—a truly global network of professionals residing in the New York State metropolitan areas and across the world.

 India-Based Collaborations

Classes will be held at the Bombay Chamber of Commerce and Industry in its fully equipped facility at The Ruby, Dadar (West), Mumbai’s centrally located area. Established in 1836, the Bombay Chamber of Commerce and Industry is one of the oldest chambers in the country with several thousand members from Services, Manufacturing, and Agriculture. Throughout its 181-year history, the Chamber has played a significant role in the development of business from its base in Mumbai.

“Since its founding, the Chamber has provided continuous service (which include new constructs) to trade and industry,” said Director General Vijay Srirangan. “This legacy, along with our ongoing commitment to encouraging business education for corporate executives in India, positions the Chamber as an ideal collaborator with Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business for its new EMSF degree program.”

In addition to the Bombay Chamber of Commerce, Zicklin is also collaborating with Think Education (TE) Advisory Services, one of India’s leading strategic education solutions enterprises supporting the development of unique partnerships in the education sector. The firm works with leading universities and governments worldwide. For Zicklin, TE has been instrumental in positioning the EMSF for the business market in India. TE is bringing its extensive network of corporate relationships to help generate awareness of the EMSF and will lead the local delivery of student services and coordination with the Zicklin team in New York City.

“Think Education is delighted to help The City University of New York launch its first program in India,” said Aditya Malkani, managing partner at TE.” We are pleased to be creating access in Mumbai to a high-quality U.S. master’s degree at an extremely attractive price. Zicklin is offering a truly special program that includes a robust classroom component taught by NYC-based faculty who travel to Mumbai for this program in a format that is convenient for working managers and professionals.”

New York City‒Based, Global Reach

The City University of New York (CUNY) is the nation’s leading urban public university, located throughout the five boroughs of New York City, and serving more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. Founded in 1847, CUNY comprises numerous institutions, schools, and colleges, including Baruch College, which is one of the university’s 11 senior colleges.

Baruch College has a more-than-150-year history of excellence in public higher education, with its Zicklin School of Business being the largest school. With a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak more than 129 languages, the College continually receives among the top rankings for high academic quality and best value from such prominent organizations as U.S. News & World Report, Princeton Review, Forbes, and Money magazine. The College’s success in providing upward income mobility for students has been recently noted in the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal featured the unprecedented success of Baruch’s financial trading club at international competitions, beating such premier schools as Harvard and Yale Universities. The College’s faculty are among the most distinguished and widely recognized in their fields, combining outstanding academic credentials with significant real-world and industry experience.

Baruch College has an alumni network of more than 135,000 people, with a significant number of graduates living overseas.

With its graduates known to be New York smart and world-class ready, the Zicklin School of Business is a recognized leader in providing undergraduate and graduate business and executive education for the 21st century. Consistently rated by rankings experts among the top performers in areas relevant to today’s students, such as academic excellence, diversity, and value, Zicklin offers a wide range of part-time and full-time business degree programs that are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), taught by faculty who are thought leaders and active researchers and practitioners in their fields. Integrated both physically and philosophically into the fabric of New York City, the world’s financial capital, the Zicklin School is committed to delivering relevant, affordable, academically rigorous business education globally that is world-class in quality and worldwide in its impact.

For more information about Zicklin’s EMSF program in Mumbai, go here.


CIA Launches Signature School Program at Baruch College

New York, NY – August 31, 2017 – Today, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) launched its Signature School Program at Baruch College, a senior college in The City University of New York system. The program will deepen cooperation between the CIA and Baruch College by creating more opportunities for students and faculty to engage Agency officers and learn about employment opportunities. The program at Baruch College is the CIA’s third Signature School.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo has noted the importance of building a talented and diverse workforce.  “Diversity carries special importance here at CIA. Because of our global charter, we need talent from all cultures and backgrounds to accomplish our mission,” Pompeo said “CIA must be an employer of choice for all Americans who want to serve our country, a place where officers of every description can rise as far as their talent and ambition can take them.”

President of Baruch College, Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, said, “Baruch College has one of the nation’s most diverse student bodies, with individuals representing more than 160 countries, who speak 129 different languages in their homes in addition to English, studying on our campus.” He continued, “We have strong programs in virtually every area of relevance to a large, governmental organization with international scope and responsibilities, including all of the business professions, public policy, and international affairs. I am certain that in the years to come, the CIA-Baruch Signature School Program will provide our students with numerous, exciting career options both in the US and abroad.”

Signature Schools Program

As part of CIA’s recruitment strategy, select universities are chosen to serve as Signature Schools. These schools will host a broad range of recruitment activities to build sustainable relationships with university staff and personnel and to maintain contact with qualified and diverse applicant pools.

Baruch College

Baruch College is ranked among the nation’s top colleges by US News & World Report, Forbes, The Princeton Review, among others. The campus is within easy reach of Wall Street, Midtown, and the global headquarters of major companies and non-profit and cultural organizations, giving students unparalleled internship, career, and networking opportunities.

The College’s more than 18,000 students have been repeatedly named one of the most ethnically diverse student bodies in the United States. Through its three schools—the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs; the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences; and the Zicklin School of Business, the largest collegiate school of business in the United States—Baruch College offers a variety of undergraduate and graduate degrees to students from every corner of New York City and around the world.

Central Intelligence Agency

CIA is an independent agency responsible for providing national security intelligence to senior US policymakers. CIA’s mission is to preempt threats and further US national security objectives by collecting intelligence that matters, producing objective all-source analysis, conducting effective covert action as directed by the President, and safeguarding the secrets that help keep our Nation safe.

 

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BMCC Ranks #3 in the United States for Economic Mobility

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) had the third highest mobility rate among two-year colleges in the United States according to data from “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility,” a report analyzed by The Chronicle of Higher Education this month.

The report, released by the Equality of Opportunity Project in early 2017, shows that 41 percent of BMCC students moved up two or more out of five income quintiles—or categories used to assess household income.

The College’s mobility ranking is based on a comparison between the BMCC students’ parents’ income in the 1990s— when the students were between 15 and 19 years old—and the students’ individual income in 2014, when they were around age 34.

BMCC Supports Student Upward Mobility

The Chronicle of Higher Education analysis shows that BMCC students—whose parents’ household incomes were in the lowest 20 percent in the late 1990s—represented a 6.14-percent share of students in this age cohort who ended up among the top 20 percent of individual earners in 2014.

BMCC was one of 12 CUNY colleges to rank among the top ten nationally on the Chronicle of Higher Education list. BMCC was number one among the five two-year CUNY colleges listed.

To do well on this measure, colleges had to be both accessible to low-income students and to foster success among them.

BMCC Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Karrin E. Wilks says the College’s economic mobility ranking is a point of pride.

“The data reflect our historic access mission as well as our unwavering commitment to student success and to advancing equity and social justice. All faculty and staff are to be commended for their contributions to transforming the lives of our students, and for helping to realize our strategic vision that BMCC will be a premier community college nationwide,” said Wilks.


Queens College Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration on November 12 Will Focus on the Movie “Casablanca,” The Refugees in Its Cast, and the Holocaust’s Impact on Film Professionals in Europe

— In the Sinai Chapel-sponsored Presentation, Holocaust Survivors and Their Family Members Will Light Remembrance Candles in a Commitment to Combat Anti-Semitism —

WHAT: The college’s annual Kristallnacht commemoration, presented by the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College and Sinai Chapels of Fresh Meadows, to recommit to combating anti-Semitism and hatred. The keynote address, “Casablanca, the Refugee Question, and the Fateful Summer of 1938,” by Noah Isenberg, will include clips from the popular film starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman.

The program, which is free and open to the public, will include a candle-lighting ceremony with Holocaust survivors and family members of the subsequent generations. There will also be a multicultural invocation and audiovisual and musical interludes, including performances by Townsend Harris HS students, and Ms. Sara Kahan, who will perform the national anthems of the US and Israel.

WHO: Noah Isenberg is professor of culture and media and director of the Screen Studies program at the New School’s Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts in New York City. His latest book is We’ll Always Have ‘Casablanca’: The Life, Legend, and Afterlife of Hollywood’s Most Beloved Movie. Isenberg is also the author of the critically acclaimed biography Edgar G. Ulmer: A Filmmaker at the Margins, and a recipient of grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fulbright Commission, the International Research Center for Cultural Studies in Vienna, and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

WHEN:
Sunday, November 12, 2017, 2-4 pm
Goldenstein Theatre, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, NY
Directions to QC: http://bit.ly/mX79LH
Campus map: http://bit.ly/1toCpb7

Background: In aiming to be the premier community resource for Jewish intellectual endeavor in the Queens-Long Island area, the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College has become one of the best-known in the country. Through its outreach and research exploring the more than three millennia of Jewish civilization, the center bridges QC’s
academic Jewish studies program and the community. Its attractive educational and spirited cultural programs on campus—lectures, symposia, conferences, film festivals, and artistic performances—are all open to the public, most at no cost.

Sinai Chapels of Fresh Meadows, Queens, is a funeral home serving New York’s Jewish community for four generations. It is owned and operated by Michael Resnick and his family. The Resnick family and Sinai Chapels are proud to support the Jewish studies program at Queens College and this special Kristallnacht commemoration.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Jazz standout Mike Holober is inaugural Stuart Katz Professor at CCNY

Internationally renowned jazz pianist, composer and arranger Mike Holober is CCNY’s inaugural Stuart Z. Katz Professor in the Humanities & the Arts.

Internationally renowned jazz pianist, composer and arranger Mike Holober is The City College of New York’s inaugural Stuart Z. Katz Professor in the Humanities & the Arts. The endowed professorship is supported by a $1 million gift to City College by distinguished alumnus Stuart Z. Katz, Esq., a 1964 graduate. Holober’s appointment is for one year.


BRONX STUDENTS GET A CHANCE TO “ASK AN ASTRONAUT”

Spacewalker Lee Morin to Appear at Bronx Community College
and Discuss Careers in the Sciences

October 16 — Astronaut Lee M. Morin served on the International Space Station, spending three months in orbit, including 14 hours of spacewalking. Now Dr. Morin is coming to Bronx Community College for some down-to-Earth talk with middle and high school students and current BCC science majors about the futures that could await them in the “STEM” fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

Dr. Morin will discuss his experiences as a highly honored scientist-astronaut and his unique perspective on STEM careers and then take questions from his audience.“BCC is proud to host this visit by such a supremely accomplished scientist and explorer,” observes BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “The world of tomorrow will need the talent and experience of the STEM students we are educating today and Dr. Morin is leading them by example.”

Dr. Morin will be accompanied by U.S. Congressman Jose E. Serrano, who arranged the visit. As the ranking member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee that oversees NASA, Congressman Serrano has a long interest in education for the science and technology of the future. “Astronauts travel to places out of this world, literally, and risk it all for the opportunity to better our society through research,” says Congressman Serrano. “I am proud to host Astronaut Lee Morin in the Bronx to share his experiences and attest to the fact that the sky is not the limit. Bronx students will gain inspiration from an ‘action hero’ and learn more about the educational opportunities available at NASA for those who decide to pursue higher education in the STEM fields.”

This chance for students to “Ask an Astronaut” will take place in the Schwendler auditorium of Meister Hall, home of BCC’s science departments, on Tuesday, October 17, from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. For further information, contact david.levers@bcc.cuny.edu or 718.289.5157.


NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE ELECTS HISTORIAN GERALD MARKOWITZ, DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The National Academy of Medicine – the independent branch of the National Academy of Sciences that advises the nation on critical medical and health issues – today announced that Distinguished Professor Gerald E. Markowitz of John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the CUNY Graduate Center has been elected a member of the academy. This is among the highest honors in the field, granted to people with exceptional professional achievements and a commitment to service.

“I’m thrilled,” Markowitz said. “As a historian, I feel incredibly honored to be recognized by the National Academy of Medicine. It is a recognition that the story of great doctors is not the whole story of medicine, and that the extraordinary contributions of people in the field are enhanced by the fact that workers and community activists have really pushed the medical professionals and the public health profession to recognize dangers that might have escaped their notice or not gotten the attention they deserve.”

CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken praised Markowitz’s lifetime of achievement. “His impressive body of work on critical aspects of public health – particularly occupational safety and environmental health – without question merits his election to the National Academy of Medicine. His scholarship, his activism and his passion have long enriched the education of students at John Jay and the CUNY Graduate Center,” the Chancellor said.

The National Academy of Medicine is charged with providing unbiased, evidence-based information and advice on health and science policy to policymakers, professionals and the public at large on a wide range of biomedical issues, medicine and health. “At a time when science is being denigrated and undermined in some quarters, the vital role our national academies is more important than ever,” the Chancellor added.

Markowitz began teaching at John Jay in 1970. He has received numerous federal and private grants, including from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Milbank Memorial Fund. The American Public Health Association awarded him its 2000 Arthur J. Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of the Public Health.

He is well known for books and papers on occupational safety and health, particularly for those co-written with David Rosner, a former CUNY Distinguished Professor who is now at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and previously was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. Rosner trained as a medical historian and Markowitz trained as a political economist and social historian. They write sitting side-by-side at the computer, “sentence by sentence, paragraph by paragraph,” Markowitz says.

Their books include Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children (University of California Press/ Milbank Memorial Fund, 2013); The Contested Boundaries of American Public Health (Rutgers University Press, 2008); Are We Ready?: Public Health since 9/11 (University of California Press/Milbank Books on Health and the Public, 2006); Children, Race, and Power: Kenneth and Mamie Clark’s Northside Center (University Press of Virginia, 1996); Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Disease in Twentieth Century America (Princeton University Press, 1991; paperback 1994; noted as “Outstanding Academic Book of 1991” by Choice); Dying for Work (edited essays, Indiana University Press, 1989); and Slaves of the Depression: Workers’ Letters about Life on the Job (Cornell University Press, 1987).

Reviewing Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution (University of California Press/Milbank Books on Health and the Public, 2002), the New England Journal of Medicine wrote: “Markowitz and Rosner show that the lead industry in the United States was well aware of the hazard decades before the publication of … [a 1943 journal] article by Byers and Lord but chose to respond to it primarily as a public-relations problem.”

That book led to Markowitz and Rosner spending three days on the witness stand in a 2013 in a lawsuit which resulted in a landmark $1.1 billion judgment against three major companies, which were ordered to remove lead paint from 4.7 million older homes in a number of California cities. Lead paint was banned in 1978, but still remains a threat to children, who tend to eat the sweet-tasting paint chips in countless buildings across the country.

“How is it that a problem for children that is totally preventable has not been prevented in the U.S.?” Markowitz asks. “The shorthand answer is: We don’t value some lives as much as we value others. Because lead poisoning is perceived as a problem of poverty and children of color, it does not achieve the kind of attention it should, despite the fact that childhood lead poisoning is an equal opportunity danger to all children and affects all children.”

Markowitz says that he and Rosner are now writing Building the Worlds That Kill Us, which examines how the physical, social and economic worlds we have built since the 19th-century “produce the kinds of diseases that are the predominant diseases of the era.” Take, for example, the trail of infectious diseases in the 19th century that followed the routes of an increasing number of commercial travelers, or the explosion of tuberculosis in jam-packed, urban areas in the early 20th century. “Today, with the extraordinary amount of environment pollution and the development of new chemicals and techniques, you have diseases of long latency. We have new endocrine disruptions [such as from artificial estrogens], even from the paper receipts from the cash register receipts that we handle every day.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.
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Lehman College Signs Historic Agreement with Two Cuban Universities

Lehman College has reached an agreement with two of Cuba’s most prestigious universities, creating an academic alliance that will make classes accessible to both Lehman and Cuban students. It also paves the way for Lehman students to travel to the island as soon as next semester.

The agreements were signed on October 11 at the Sancti Spiritus University (UNISS) and on October 12 at the University of Camagüey (UC), the two participating Cuban universities. The alliance is part of Lehman’s strategy to strengthen its status as a global postsecondary institution. It also promotes New York State’s emphasis on student participation in experiential learning experiences.

The Lehman delegation in Cuba included President José Luis Cruz; Interim Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Harriet Fayne; and Professor Teresita Levy, director of international programs and global partnerships, and a faculty member in the Latin American, Latino, and Puerto Rican Studies department.

“Lehman College believes these historic agreements will usher in a new era of mutual understanding and scholarship between our students and faculty, our colleges and our nations,” said President Cruz. “They also create remarkable opportunities for our young people to gain a global perspective that will serve them well throughout their lives.”

As part of the agreement, four classes will begin in the Spring 2018 semester, and students enrolled in those classes will have the opportunity to travel to Cuba to study and conduct research during next year’s spring break.

Lehman faculty participating in the new program, include: Professors Gustavo Lopez, Deborah Sanders, Bertrade Ngo-Ngijol-Banoum, and Teresita Levy. All will collaborate with their Cuban colleagues on the development of Lehman global engagement courses. Lopez, a professor of chemistry, will teach a course on nanoparticles; Sanders, a lecturer on economics and business, will teach a course about global perspectives on strategic planning; Ngo-Ngijol-Banoum, an assistant professor of Africana Studies, is planning a class on race and gender and Levy is planning to teach a course entitled “United States and Latin America after 1823.”

The groundwork for the agreements began in February 2016, when Lehman representatives attended Universidad 2016, a five-day international conference in Havana, and signed a letter of intent with Sancti Spiritus University acknowledging mutual interest in working together.


Hostos Jumps Into Action to Help Those in Need

Because of the devastation caused by the recent natural disasters in Mexico, the Caribbean, and southern United States, the College has been busy offering information about international and local relief efforts and resources. Hostos also has been home to an ongoing collection drive in collaboration with other initiatives throughout New York City and abroad.

On October 4, Hostos held a “Day of Action and Solidarity” (Día de acción y solidaridad) that empowered faculty, staff and students. The Bridge was a hub of activity throughout the day, as everything from canned goods to batteries were collected. Monetary donations were also accepted to help the University of Puerto Rico. Later in the day, the donations were transported to the former Hostos bookstore, where they were packaged in preparation for delivery by Hostos’ Public Safety Department to the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in Manhattan. President David Gómez was on hand to support the effort, as the Hostos family worked as one for their brothers and sisters in need.

The effort was organized by the United for Puerto Rico Committee and the following Hostos clubs: AMLA (Assisting Latinos to Maximize Achievement), Common Ground, and Teachers of the Future.

Matilda Outlaw was one of the students busy helping the packing effort. The Early Childhood Education major and President of Hostos’ Teachers of the Future Club said with so many friends dealing with the aftermath of the hurricanes in the Caribbean and the earthquake in Mexico, she felt the need to help.

“It is just devastating to see so many people you know going through this,” Outlaw said. “I really want to offer my support any way I can. We all know what it is like to struggle; this is just the right thing to do.”

Juan Ramón from Hostos’ Conference Center and Kaira Pelaez from Hostos’ CUNY EDGE talked about how as people of Dominican descent, they felt a sense of responsibility to help their fellow Latinos who are suffering so badly. They, along with faculty including Lizette Colón, Lauren Wolf, Hector Soto and others, also felt they just needed to do something.

“I am proud to be here today,” Pelaez said. “The people of Puerto Rico are our neighbors. They really need our help.”

For information on how you can help, visit the Hostos Helping webpage here.

See how Hostos is helping through this Facebook photo album.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Hostos Cuts the Ribbon on Huge Renovation Project

Hostos’ transformation from a diamond in the rough to the “Jewel of the South Bronx” continued on September 20, when the incredible renovations to the B-Building were celebrated. The building is now home to Hostos’ Mathematics Department, Office of Academic Affairs and Office on Information Technology.

Hostos President David Gómez was on hand, along with many distinguished elected officials, community leaders and CUNY administrators to recognize all the work that went into the building located at 500 Grand Concourse.

“This building, a symbol of abandonment in the 1960’s, became a symbol of hope and renewal because of a young group of elected officials, community activists and educational idealists,” President Gómez said. “Now, four decades after acquiring a space that an insurance company lay fallow, we are restoring that same building floor by floor.  Over the past year, this floor has experienced a dramatic transformation to a bright, clean, modern space for work and learning.”

Judith Bergtraum, CUNY Vice Chancellor for Facilities Planning, Construction and Management, was also in attendance to salute everyone who was a part of the project. The renovations include a link between the B and C buildings, two large, state-of-the-art conference rooms, and upgraded stairwells.

See our Facebook photo album from the ribbon cutting here.

Those who attended or who had a hand in the incredible project were:

  • Carmen E. Arroyo/ 84th Assembly District
  • Michael Arvanites, CUNY Trustee
  • Judith Bergtraum, CUNY Vice Chancellor for Facilities Planning, Construction and Management.
  • Ralph Carmisino and Robert Lev from CUNY Office of Facilities Planning & Construction Management
  • Hostos Division of Administration and Finance, Senior Vice President Esther Rodríguez-Chardavoyne, as well as Elizabeth Friedman, Frank Virone, Julio Centeno, Varun Sehgal.
  • Katherine M. Conway, CUNY Trustee and Chair, University Faculty Senate
  • Nathalia Fernández/ Bronx Regional Representative, representing the Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo
  • Vanessa L. Gibson, NYC Council Member
  • Mario Hanna of TDX Construction Corporation,
    • Monica Major/ Director of Education & Youth/ Office of Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.
  • Victor M. Pichardo, NYS Assembly Member
  • Samir Rimawi and Daniel Burgos from DASNY
  • Sandra Wilkin, CUNY Trustee
  • Kiyomi Tremor and Mei Yan Zhang of Goshow Architects Trevor Prince, Gabriel Mirkov and Kevin O’Sullivan of Constructomics.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Nydia Edgecombe Retires After 40 years

The week of September 25 was bittersweet at Hostos as Nydia Edgecombe, the longtime Director of Hostos’ Alumni Relations Office, bid her farewell after four decades of service to the College and the community.

The goodbye began on September 28, as the Bronx Chamber of Commerce recognized her incredible career at the Hispanic Heritage Celebration Luncheon at Tosca’s Marquee in the Bronx. There, she was celebrated alongside many of the same people she has worked with during her time at the College, including Luis Eladio Torres; Principal, Community School 55 and Hostos alum; Carmelo Alvarado, Vice President, Relationship Manager, TD Bank; Officer Norkiss Andino, 49th Precinct, NYPD; Joe Ithier, Consultant, Red Apple Group; and Dulce Maria Nuñez, Licensed Mortgage Originator, A.S.A.P. Mortgage Corp.

Surrounded by colleagues, friends and her husband Wallace Edgecombe, she thanked the former co-workers and students who she said impacted her life for the better and dedicated her award to the people suffering in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria.

Later that week on Sept. 29, the Division for Institutional Advancement threw Edgecombe a surprise luncheon as the college community stopped by her office throughout the day to say farewell on what was her final day at Hostos.

Her final grand sendoff is scheduled for Oct. 21, when a tribute concert for to Pete “El Conde” Rodríguez will be held in her honor. The evening will feature his daughter, acclaimed singer Cita Rodríguez, and his son, the multitalented jazz trumpeter Dr. Pete Rodríguez as musical director, with cameo appearances by artists who performed with “El Conde” over the course of his career.

To purchase tickets and join the celebration, click here.

More about Nydia Edgecombe
Nydia Edgecombe has worked at Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of The City University of New York (CUNY) since August 2, 1977.

When she first came to work at Hostos she was hired as a college assistant in the Admissions Office, assisting the Director of Admissions at that time, Virginia Paris, with the Spanish correspondence for new immigrants from Latin America. Nydia immediately fell in love with the College, making a career out of servicing students.  Throughout the years, she was promoted to a variety of positions, becoming the Director of Admissions and Recruitment in1986.

Her new recruitment and admission strategies for the College included developing the first On-The-Spot Admission program in CUNY to simplify the application process for new students. Nydia also assisted in the development of the first direct admission process within the CUNY system, securing the enrollment of hundreds of students from the community into Hostos. While directing the Admissions and Recruitment Office, she also served as the International Students Advisor, preparing visas for students from all over the world eager to attend classes at Hostos.

During her tenure as Director of Admissions and Recruitment, she chaired the CUNY Council of Admissions Directors from 2000 to 2002.  In 2003, she was named the first chair for the newly formed CUNY Community College Enrollment Committee.

After 18 years at the helm at the Admissions and Recruitment Office, Nydia became the first Director of Alumni Relations at Hostos, developing this office from the ground up. The Office currently holds an alumni database of more than 20,000 graduates. She established the first alumni photo ID in the CUNY system, providing graduates with in-house access to the gym, library and the computer and fitness centers. Under Nydia’s leadership, the Hostos alumni enjoy significant discounts to attend enhancement courses through the Hostos Workforce and Continuing Education Department, as well as discount tickets to attend concerts sponsored by the Hostos Center for the Arts and Culture. A partnership with the Career Services Office allows alumni to attend the college career fairs and free interview skills and resume workshops.

Nydia is also a founding member of the Hostos Circle of 100 Scholarship and Emergency Fund. From 2006 to the present, as the principal development coordinator and administrator of this fund, she has secured funds from alumni, faculty, staff, and friends of the College to support the needs of students near graduation facing financial adversities. Throughout the years, more than $250,000 have been awarded to this cohort of students, securing their transition from candidates of graduation to alumni. The Circle of 100 continues to be active, with an established base of loyal donors supporting this fund.

In addition to the Circle of 100, she has coordinated other fundraising campaigns to support the education of all Hostos students. These have included the CUNY Charitable Campaigns from 2003 to 2009, the Invest in CUNY Bronx Scholarship Committee from 2009 to 2013 and the Hostos CUNY Giving Tuesday Campaign in 2016.

Nydia was instrumental in establishing Hostos’ Josephine Aguado Scholarship for Single Parents (2010), the Virginia Paris Scholarship for Social Justice (2012), the Gerald J. Meyer Transfer Scholarship (2014), and the Ramón J. Jiménez Memorial Scholarship (2016). From 2004 to 2014, Nydia also secured more than $50,000 in scholarship funding from the Diversity Foundation, Inc., which included funds from The New York Yankees and the Puerto Rican Parade, Inc.

Nydia is quick to point out that, from 2007 to 2014, she established the Hostos Dominican and Martin Luther King Scholarships, with the generous support of Healthfirst, awarding over $10,000 to students to support their Hostos graduation.

Nydia holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Lehman College, class of 1982, and a Master in Science in Education from Baruch College, with a concentration in Higher Education Administration, class of 1992. She also completed two training certificates (2008 and 2010) with the Invest-in-CUNY Fundraising Academy, at the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

She is currently a candidate for a doctoral degree in history of Puerto Rico from El Centro de Estudios Avanzados de Puerto Rico y El Caribe in old San Juan, Puerto Rico.  Nydia is scheduled to defend her thesis, “The Hell Lady from the Bronx” Evelina López Antonetty, el activismo comunitario de una puertorriqueña en la diáspora del Sur del Bronx”, in the spring of 2018.

Since 1982 she has been happily married to Wallace Ingraham Edgecombe, “el amor de su vida.” She has a daughter, Jenny, and three grandchildren: handsome and wonderful Max, beautiful and smart Olivia and funny and adorable Riley.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Hostos Edtech Online Course Wins Technology Award

Hostos is all about increasing student retention and graduation rates, and the College remains committed to offering the best tools to help students get where they are going.

The Hostos Office of Educational Technology (EdTech) has helped to lead the digital charge in this effort, and the College is thrilled to announce that the EdTech team has been named the winner of the Blackboard Catalyst Award for Optimizing Student Experience for its online student readiness course “Are You Ready.” The award honors institutions whose educational and administrative innovations have markedly improved the total learner experience. This includes their addressing of new and changing dynamics in fields such as student recruitment, financial aid, enrollment, retention and assessment, graduation, and beyond.

“Are You Ready” is an on­line course that evaluates student preparedness for on­line coursework, and covers topics such as working in an online environment, Blackboard, Netiquette, where to get support and on-campus services. Al­though intended for students who plan to take an online course, the course is actually open to anyone in the Hostos community who is registered.

“Blackboard is proud to recognize this year’s Catalyst Award winners for their commitment to leveraging technology to improve the education experience,” said Bill Ballhaus, Chairman, CEO and President of Blackboard. “We look forward to continuing to work with these educators and institutions to support learner success, and to share best practices widely for the benefit of the education community.”

Carlos Guevara, Director, Office of Educational Technology and Co-Director, Center of Teaching and Learning, George Rosa, Senior Instructional Design Specialist, and David dos Santos, Instructional Design Specialist, and authors of the online course received the award at this year’s Blackboard World conference in New Orleans.

“It is always gratifying to receive an international recognition in our field for the work we do at EdTech.  This award is confirmation that my team is on the right track, and that it is making a great impact on our students and Hostos as a whole. It also fills us with motivation and energy to keep innovating and elevating the name of Hostos Community College!” said Guevara.

The course has been running for four semesters now, and is taken by approximately 300 students every semester. This initiative has also been awarded by CUNY at the 2016 CUNY IT Conference for Excellence in Technology. It is also being piloted at three other CUNY colleges: Bronx Community College, Lehman College, and John Jay College.

Founded in 2005, the annual Catalyst Awards recognize and honor innovation and excellence in the Blackboard global community of practice and recognizes those who push the boundaries of their education­al programs and technology in order to deliver innovative and effective learning experiences.

For more information on the Blackboard Catalyst Awards, please visit: https://community.blackboard.com/groups/catalystawards

About the Blackboard Catalyst Awards
For over a decade, the Blackboard Catalyst Awards have annually recognized and honored innovation and excellence in the Blackboard global community of practice, where millions of teachers and learners work every day to redefine what is possible when leveraging technology.

Blackboard is focused on highlighting client successes and raising awareness throughout the educational industry by celebrating client achievements and milestones. Our community centers on educators and administrators who are passionate about using technology in education and collaborating on best practices. The Blackboard Catalyst Awards are an opportunity to celebrate these accomplishments and help raise standard for the entire community.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Hostos Pays Tribute to Distinguished Latino Community Leaders

Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to reflect and celebrate the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. With so many of those populations represented here at Hostos, what better place to recognize the achievements of Hispanic community leaders than right here on campus?

On September 18, Hostos officially kicked off its Hispanic Heritage Month series of events by recognizing key Latino leaders and celebrating some special students. The 3rd Annual event was presented by Hostos’ Division of Institutional Advancement and Office of Community Relations. Attending the event were the Hon. Marcos Crespo, New York State Assembly Member;  Mayra Linares-Garcia, CUNY Board of Trustees Member; Jaime Lucero, Business Entrepreneur; Rafael Álvarez, President and Chief Executive Officer of ATAX; and Isaac Goldemberg, and Hostos Distinguished Professor and celebrated author.

Guillermo Linares, the President of Higher Education Services Corporation and Melissa R. Quesada, Esq; Director of Latino Affairs Office both from Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Office also attended and presented David President Gómez with a proclamation, congratulating the College on all the great work it does within the Hispanic community.

Five students also received scholarships, thanks to Local 1199SEIU and Victor Rivera, Vice President. The awards were presented by Hostos Foundation Board Member Cira Angeles and Associate Dean Ana García Reyes. On hand to celebrate with the students were Charles I. Drago, Chair Allied Health Sciences -Program Coordinator Radiologic Technology and Jason Libfeld, Student Leadership Coordinator.

Hostos Students selected for the 1199 SEIU Scholarship-Fall 2017:
Jessica Anchundia (Nursing), Shaquira Stewart (Radiologic Technology), Nichole Johnson (Dental Hygiene), Nancy G. Romero (Radiologic Technology) and Terraine Brooks (Nursing).

The presenters for the event were BronxNet’s Yeila Lluberes and Hostos Foundation Board Member Cira Angeles. The event was organized by Dean García Reyes.

Watch the BronxNet’s coverage here.
Watch News 12’s coverage here.
To view our Facebook Album from this event, click here.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Mexican author Mónica Lavín leads 2017 CCNY Cátedra Vargas Llosa

Mexican writer Mónica Lavín co-presents CCNY’s fifth Cátedra Vargas Llosa, an international academic project honoring Spanish-language literary giant and Nobel Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa.

Acclaimed Mexican writer Mónica Lavín co-presents The City College of New York’s fifth Cátedra Vargas Llosa, Oct. 24 -27, an international academic project honoring Spanish-language literary giant and Nobel Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa.

Lavín and Raquel Chang-Rodríguez, Distinguished Professor in City College’s Division of  Humanities and the Arts, lead a one-credit seminar for both graduate and undergraduate students entitled “Mario Vargas Llosa’s  “La fiesta del Chivo” : History, Reality and Literature.”  The discourse focuses on Vargas Llosa’s historical novel “La fiesta del Chivo” (2000), about Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo.

Lavín will lead an examination of the novelistic form —point of view and counterpoint—as keys to the fictionalization of history, narrative persuasive power, and an understanding of the human condition.

Launched at CCNY in 2013 as the first of its kind in the United States, the Cátedra Vargas Llosa is offered through CCNY’s Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures, chaired by Carlos Riobó, with the cooperation of the Instituto Cervantes of New York. Click here for dates and registration information.

Lavín features in two other Cátedra events, both free and open to the public. On Oct. 24, she engages in a conversation in Spanish with author J.J. Armas Marcelo, winner of the International Prize Ciudad de Torrevieja for “Casi todas las mujeres;” and Ángel Estévez, director of CCNY’s Spanish MA Program.  They will discuss “La fiesta del Chivo and beyond,” from 6:30 p.m. in The Rifkind Room (6/316) located in CCNY’s NAC building. For more information, please call 212.650.6731.

On Oct. 27, Lavín presents the lecture “Vargas Llosa y la lección de Flaubert,” 7 p.m. at Instituto Cervantes, 211 East 49th St., Manhattan. Reception will follow. Send an email to bec3cultny@cervantes.es for more information.

About Mónica Lavín
Born in Mexico City, Mónica Lavín is the award-winning author of numerous books, short stories and essays. Notable among her books are “Ruby Tuesday no ha muerto,” recipient of the Gilberto Owen National Literary Prize; “Uno no sabe,” a 2003, finalist for the Antonin Artaud award; “Café cortado,” a 2001 Premio Narrativa de Colima winner, and “Yo, la peor,” for which she received the Elena Poniatowska Ibero-american Novel Prize. She is also the author of “La corredora de Cuemanco y el aficionado a Schubert.” Lavín’s short stories have been translated into many languages, including English, French, Italian and Persian. They are also included in national and international anthologies. Lavín has also worked as a journalist, TV presenter and as a professor of   creative writing at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de la Ciudad de México.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Directors Support Learning Through Innovative Strategies

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) welcomes Sara E. Crosby as Director of the BMCC Learning Academy (BLA) and Christopher Oscar Medellin as BMCC’s Director of E-Learning.

Sara E. Crosby, Directory of the BMCC Learning Academy

Sara E. Crosby served most recently as Director of First College Year, out of the Office of the Associate Provost for Academic Programs at Brooklyn College, CUNY. Before that, she was Assistant Director of Academic Affairs at Kingsborough Community College. She also held the position of Program Coordinator for the Self-Regulated Learning Program at New York City College of Technology, CUNY, where she started as an Adjunct Lecturer, teaching developmental writing in the Percy Ellis Sutton SEEK Program.

Sara Crosby

“I’ve spent fifteen years helping students transition to college and become more successful learners,” says Crosby. “I’m very excited to join the BMCC community, and I’m honored to be a part of the Learning Academy’s efforts to support students all the way to graduation and transfer.”

Crosby has published widely on issues affecting student success. Recent articles—on the impact of formative assessment and self-regulated learning on developmental mathematics students—have appeared in the Journal of Excellence in College Teaching and Journal of Developmental Education. She has also written articles examining the connection between self-regulated learning and academic success for community college students.

After earning a Bachelor of Arts in English at the University of Iowa, Crosby completed a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) at The New School in New York. She has published creative nonfiction in venues including The Believer and Fourth Genre. She also serves as a volunteer for New York City Audubon.

Christopher Oscar Medellin, Director of E-Learning

Christopher Oscar Medellin joins BMCC as Director of E-Learning, bringing more than 15 years experience leading online learning and educational technology projects in companies such as Amplify, Barnes and Noble, the University of Texas System, LeapFrog and Random House. He has guided digital product development on platforms including Blackboard, Canvas and EdX, as well as having developed educational apps, interactive games, language-learning textbooks, interactive sites and multimedia programs.

“I plan on applying my professional experience to design and implement future models of online education and to work with instructors in creating dynamic and engaging student-centered learning,” Medellin says. “We will do this through research and evidence-based methodologies that are scalable, affordable and effective.”

Christopher Oscar Medellin

For the past year, he has served as Director of Online Learning Design and Production at the Institute for Transformational Learning within the University of Texas System. “In this role, I led a department of instructional designers, learning architects, producers, technologists and curriculum experts,” Medellin says. “Together, we created educational models that inspire students, increase engagement, and support post-program success.”

Earlier roles include having served as Director of Online Learning and Digital Product Development in the Assessment and Consulting Division at Amplify, Inc. and Editorial Director at Random House. He was also Program Manager for Digital Publishing in the NOOK Program at Barnes & Nobel, Inc.

Medellin started his career teaching Spanish as a graduate student at the University of New Mexico, then teaching Kindergarten through grade three in the Los Angeles Unified School District. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in History and Education at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Master of Arts in Spanish Philology at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.


Pride Month Offers an Array of Events

A month of workshops, film, panels and more are being offered in celebration of Pride Month at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY).

The month’s events opened on October 4 with a workshop presenting scholarship opportunities of particular interest to LGBTQ students. Then on October 10 in Richard Harris Terrace at 199 Chambers Street, an LGBTQ Resource Fair and Kickoff Luncheon were held.

Michael Hutmaker, BMCC Dean for Student Affairs, opened the luncheon event. “The LGBTQ Pride Month events are only one way in which BMCC celebrates and supports the diversity of our entire campus community,” he said. “This is our fifth year celebrating Pride Month, which started as an awareness week in 2010, and grew from there.”

Guest speaker Hida Viloria: Putting the “I” in “LGBTQI”

Jason Schneiderman, BMCC Professor of English and faculty advisor for Pride Month, recognized LGBTQ Club President Stephen Tenezaca and Vice President Yevgeny Pasturkhova, “who are resources for students interested in getting involved LGBTIAQ life on campus.” He also introduced guest speaker Hida Viloria, author of “Born Both: An Intersex Life.”

Intersex visibility has been a presence on the queer ID spectrum since the nineties,” Schneiderman said. “It was often treated as an illness, rather than a way people express their gender and their body.”

During he/r talk, Viloria addressed the question, “Why hasn’t the ‘I’ [for ‘intersex’] in ‘LGBTQI’ been embraced more? When I was growing up, it was an insult to say to someone, ‘You’re not a real man’; ‘You’re not a real woman’. As intersex individuals, we are the specter of prejudice that the LGBTQ community has experienced.”

One of three people nationwide to hold a birth certificate describing he/r as intersex, Viloria explained that there are “30 to 40 different variations of intersex identities and chromosome variations, and 1.7 percent of the population is intersex. We are all living amongst you.”

S/he also discussed the term “Latinx,” a substitute for the female “Latina” and male “Latino,” the latter of which is also used for mixed plural usage. “Using ‘Latinex’ rejects power structures that have impacted my life,” Viloria said.

Support and resources available year round

The next Pride Month event is an exhibition opening October 17 in the main lobby at BMCC. Other events include a Safe is Sexy Workshop; a panel, “Queer Intersectionality, A Conversation With Activists,” workshops on coming out at work, and more.

Pride Month concludes on November 2, but LGBTQ programs and services at BMCC are provided throughout the year.

These include Safe Zone trainings for faculty and staff who volunteer to provide support and information to individuals at the College, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

For details and a full listing of Pride Month events, visit the BMCC website. For more information, contact Dean Michael Hutmaker at mhutmaker@bmcc.cuny.edu.


The Aspen Institute Names Kingsborough Community College One of the Top 150 U.S. Community Colleges Eligible for 2019 Aspen Prize CUNY College

Only NYC Community College to be Selected

Brooklyn, NY – The Aspen Institute College Excellence Program today named CUNY’s Kingsborough Community College one of the nation’s top 150 community colleges eligible to compete for the $1 million Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the nation’s signature recognition of high achievement and performance among America’s community colleges.

“The Aspen Institute’s focus on student success aligns perfectly with Kingsborough’s mission,” noted Interim President Peter M. Cohen. “We’ve continued to make great strides since finishing in the top 4 in 2013, developing programs to ensure equity among our students.” The prize recognizes institutions with outstanding achievements in 4 areas: learning; certificate and degree completion; employment and earnings; and high levels of access and success for minority and low-income students.

Higher education attainment has never been more important. Estimates from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce suggest that out of the 11.6 million jobs created in the post-recession economy, 11.5 million require at least some college education.

“Especially in the current social and economic climate, it is exceptionally important that our nation’s community colleges develop the diverse talent needed to fuel democratic engagement, social mobility, and economic opportunity and growth,” said Josh Wyner, executive director of the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program. “Through this competition we’re working to inspire other institutions across our country to ensure more students succeed in college and their lives beyond those campuses.”

The 150 community colleges named today as eligible to compete for the 2019 Prize were selected from a pool of nearly 1,000 public two-year colleges nationwide using publicly available data on student outcomes. Located in 39 states in urban, rural, and suburban areas, serving as few as 300 students and as many as 95,000 students, these colleges represent the diversity and depth of the community college sector. Kingsborough was the only community college in New York City to qualify. For a full list of the top 150 eligible institutions, visit: www.highered.aspeninstitute.org/aspen-prize.

The top ten finalists for the 2019 Aspen Prize will be named in May 2018. The Aspen Institute will then conduct site visits to each of the finalists and collect additional quantitative data, including employment and earnings data. A distinguished Prize Jury will select a grand prize winner, finalist(s) with distinction, and rising star(s) in spring 2019. To read more on the selection process, visit: www.highered.aspeninstitute.org/aspen-prize.

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CONTACT:  Anthony Andews | anthony.andrews@kbcc.cuny.edu | 718-368-4785 | 917-588-6305


CCNY Mini-Medical School partners with community for a healthier Harlem

Pictured left to right: Barbara Badio, Nneka Ogbutor, Tracey Akanbi, Dean Maurizio Trevisan, Nwando Ekezie, Ndeye Gningue, and Hazeezat Shittu of the School of Medicine at CCNY.

Coffee is bad for you. No, it’s good for you. You need 30 minutes of daily activity – or is it 10? Come hear the latest on how to stay healthy on Wednesday Oct 18 at the first Mini-Medical School hosted by the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York. The latest health information will be shared and refreshments will be served at the event, which is free and open to the public from 5:30 – 7:00 pm at CCNY’s North Academic Center (Room 1/201). Click here to RSVP.

The idea for the Mini-Medical School started with medical student Hazeezat Shittu. As part of an Independent Study course, Ms. Shittu wanted to find out what the Harlem community’s main health concerns are. So she and her team placed surveys in multiple locations – including the Harlem YMCA, Café One, and 2 NYPD precincts. The community responded with the topics they’d like information on – as well as when and where they’d like the events to be held.

CCNY Interim President Vincent G. Boudreau will kick off the inaugural Mini-Medical School event. Then information about Diet, Physical Activity and Health will be shared by Maurizio Trevisan, Dean of The CUNY School of Medicine, and Joan Dorn, Chair of the Department of Community Health and Social Medicine.

If you’d like to help make Harlem healthier, don’t miss this event. And keep your eye out for future Mini-Medical School events which will address diabetes and other health-related topics suggested by members of the Harlem community.

“As a medical school based in Harlem, it’s important to have a direct impact on the health of the community by providing people with the knowledge and tools to make better health decisions for themselves and their loved ones,” said Shittu, the student team leader.

About Vincent Boudreau

Dr. Vincent Boudreau has served as City College Interim President since November 2016. He was previously Dean of the college’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. He is a professor of political science at CCNY and a member of the City University of New York graduate faculty. A specialist in the politics of social movements, particularly in Southeast Asia, his latest book is “Resisting Dictatorship: Repression and Protest in Southeast Asia” (Cambridge University Press). Boudreau is a graduate of Cornell University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1991.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.

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Lehman Alumnus André Aciman to Star at Friends of Lief Library Fundraiser

To commemorate its first fundraising event, the Friends of Lief Library will be presenting an intimate evening with renowned author and Lehman alumnus André Aciman (B.A. ‘73) on October 19 at 6 p.m. in the Treehouse Conference Room on the Library’s third floor.

Aciman, a distinguished professor in the Comparative Literature program at the CUNY Graduate Center, as well as the director of the Center’s Writers’ Institute, is the author of four novels, including the recently published Enigma Variations—hailed by The New York Times as “a magnificent, living thing.” His 2007’s Lambda Literary Award-winning novel, Call Me by Your Name, has been adapted into a film by Italian director Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash) and will be released next month. In addition, Aciman has published two collections of essays; edited another volume of essays on Marcel Proust; and written a memoir, Out of Egypt, which won a Whiting Award in 1996.

At the event, Aciman will discuss his writing career and undergraduate experiences at Lehman. He has said that his years at Lehman were important in his development as a writer, particularly when he studied with Joseph Tusiani, a professor emeritus of the College’s Languages and Literatures department. “I went to the Bronx every day on the 4 train. I was working three jobs,” he said. “It was so pedestrian and plodding; everything about me was so plebian. Yet I’d get to the Bronx and here we were—Tusiani and I—two minds totally committed to what was timeless, to what was great.”

Born in Alexandria, Egypt, Aciman spent much of his teens in Italy and France before moving with his family to New York City. After graduating with a B.A. in comparative literature from Lehman in 1973, he earned his master’s and doctoral degrees at Harvard University. He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a fellowship from The New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. Aciman’s work has appeared in publications including The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, and The Paris Review, as well as in several volumes of The Best American Essays.

“André Aciman has become one of my favorite contemporary writers,” said Kenneth Schlesinger, chief librarian at the Leonard Lief Library. “Not only is he a stylist, but he is also an entertaining and amusing storyteller with a penchant for exploring the intricacies of human interaction and relationships, particularly the nature of desire. And like many current Lehman students, André is a multilingual immigrant who relates to their struggles and challenges, along with their sense of dislocation when straddling different cultures. I’m truly honored that he has agreed to return to his alma mater for our gala.”

The Friends of the Lief Library raises funds to underwrite special events, facilitate professional development, and aid purchases of books, software, and database licensing.

The event will take place at 6 p.m. in the Treehouse Conference Room on the third floor of the Leonard Lief Library. A contribution of $50 is suggested for those attending. Tickets for the event can be purchased by clicking here. For more information, please call 718-960-8577.


TWO CUNY GRADS, A HUNTER FACULTY ARTIST AND PULITZER WINNER, AND AN IMMIGRANT RIGHTS ADVOCATE WIN 2017 MACARTHUR AWARDS

Two CUNY alumnae – one also a Hunter playwriting master artist in residence – won coveted “genius” fellowships from the James D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The $625,000 unrestricted fellowships are payable quarterly over five years.

The 22nd and 23rd MacArthur grants won by CUNY alumni go to Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Annie Baker (Brooklyn College MFA), who is co-associate director of Hunter College’s Rita and Burton Goldberg MFA Playwriting Program, and Cristina Jiménez Moreta (Queens College B.A., Baruch College MPA), co-founder and executive director of United We Dream, the country’s largest youth-led immigrant organization.

“These two MacArthur Fellowships highlight our extraordinary students and faculty,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Cristina Jiménez Moreta has been a dynamic advocate for the rights of Dreamers since her undergraduate days and now helps shape the national conversation about immigrants. Playwright Annie Baker not only writes riveting theater, but also helps train the next generation of playwrights. CUNY is proud of them both.”

CUNY has more “genius” alumni than any other public university in the country except the University of California, Berkeley. In 2015, the MacArthur Foundation released data showing that between 1981 and 2014, CUNY ranked eighth in the nation’s top public and private universities and colleges in the number of undergraduate alumni who have gone on to win genius grants. CUNY was tied with Brown University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Michigan, which also had 14 undergraduate winners each. At the time, CUNY also had six alumni who had received graduate degrees.

Hunter College President Jennifer Raab noted that now both college’s playwrights in residence have genius awards. Last year, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins won the honor.

The MacArthur Foundation awarded 24 MacArthur fellowships this year. Its website explains that the grants go to individuals “who show exceptional creativity in their work and the prospect for still more in the future. The fellowship is designed to provide recipients with the flexibility to pursue their creative activities in the absence of specific obligations or reporting requirements.” People cannot apply for fellowships, which are awarded by an anonymous committee from names from any field that are suggested by hundreds of nominators around the country.

The foundation calls immigration reform and social justice activist Cristina Jiménez Moreta, who earned her B.A. at Queens College in 2007 and her MPA at Baruch College in 2011, “a powerful force in the immigrant rights movement.”

Jiménez came to the United States from Ecuador as an undocumented immigrant at age 13. As a co-founder and executive director of United We Dream (UWD), a Washington-based advocacy organization, the foundation said her “leadership acumen and strategic vision” have “shifted public perceptions of undocumented youth and focused attention on policy issues that affect them.” The Washington Post says she “helped put the cause of young undocumented immigrants on the national radar.”

The foundation cited her strategic work to advance DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) after the failure of the Dream Act in 2010. She also co-founded the New York State Youth Leadership Council and the Dream Mentorship Program at Queens College, was an immigration policy analyst for the Drum Major Institute for Public Policy and worked as an immigrant rights organizer at Make the Road New York. ​

“I felt like it just took me a few minutes to believe – is this really happening?” Jiménez, 33, told the Washington Post. “For me, this recognition is a recognition of the lives of undocumented people, of the work that we have been doing to advocate and create change.”

“The award means I can now focus on what matters to me: my playwriting, mentoring young writers, and continually educating myself about the world around me,” said Baker. “I want to take bigger artistic risks and audit lots of Hunter classes!”

She co-directs the Rita and Burton Goldberg MFA in Playwriting, an affordable, selective two-year program that fuses rigorous academic theater classes with intensive, hands-on writing workshops. A team of master artists in residence work with a small cohort of students who develop their voice, vision and craft under the personal mentorship of these accomplished writers.

Baker, 36, received the Pulitzer Prize in 2014 for “The Flick” just a week after she won a Guggenheim Fellowship in Creative Arts Drama & Performance Art. “The Flick” (Playwrights Horizons/Barrow Street Theatre), which draws from the disorientation Baker experienced from watching a digital projection of an Ingmar Bergman movie, that year also garnered the Susan Smith Blackburn Award, an Obie for Excellence in Playwriting and Drama Desk and Lucille Lortel nominations for Best Play.

Annie Baker’s plays also include “John” (Signature Theatre, Obie Award, Drama Desk and Lucille Lortel nominations for Best Play), “Circle Mirror Transformation” (Playwrights Horizons, Obie Award for Best New American Play, Drama Desk nomination for Best Play), “The Aliens” (Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, Obie Award for Best New American Play), “Body Awareness” (Atlantic Theater Company, Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle nominations for Best Play/Emerging Playwright), and an adaptation of Chekhov’s “Uncle Vanya” (Soho Rep, Drama Desk nomination for Best Revival), for which she also designed the costumes.

Baker is part of the Signature Theatre’s “Residency Five” program, which “guarantees each playwright three world-premiere productions of new plays over the course of a five-year residency.” Her first play under the program was “John” (2015); her second was “The Antipodes” (2017). “The Antipodes” was billed as “a play about people telling stories about telling stories.” Critic Ben Brantley wrote in The New York Times: “Ms. Baker hears the roar of eternity in the babble of our existence, and the futile heroism in our unending attempts to tell tales that might make sense of it all.”

During a New York Public Library 2015-2016 Cullman Center Fellowship, she continued to develop “The Last of the Little Hours,” which the Sundance Institute’s 2014 Theatre Lab in Utah chose for development, leading to a performance that she directed. It follows the daily life of a group of Benedictine monks.

Baker also received a 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship in creative arts drama and performance art. She was a MacDowell Colony Fellow in both 2009 and 2014. In 2013, she received the Steinberg Playwright Award, which included a $50,000 prize. In 2011, she was named a Fellow of United States Artists.

Her plays have been produced at more than 200 theaters throughout the United States and in over a dozen countries, including productions at the National Theatre and Royal Court in London and the Moscow Art Theatre in Moscow.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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CCNY’s Michelle Valladares receives Poet of the Year award

CCNY’s Michelle Valladares is the Americas Poetry Festival of New York’s Poet of the Year.

City College of New York poet and filmmaker, Michelle Yasmine Valladares is the  Americas Poetry Festival of New York’s Poet of the Year. The award is for her “lifelong literary achievements and for her poetry that reflects the rich multicultural spirit of The Americas.”

Valladares, who is director of City College’s MFA Program in Creative Writing, was among 60 poets from around the world that participated in the Americas Poetry Festival in New York. The multilingual event featured readings in five languages.

Born in India and raised in Kuwait, Valladares is the author of “Nortada, The North Wind.”  Her poems have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and appeared in numerous publications including the Aster(ix) Journal, Clockhouse, and The Literary Review.

Her work is included in the anthologies “Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia & Beyond,” “The HarperCollins Book of English Poetry by Indians,” and the forthcoming “The New Poetry, Modern English Poems by Indians” (Sahitya Akademi).  She received a writer’s residency from Hedgebrook.

Valladares co-produced the award winning films “O Sertão das Memórias,” directed by José Araújo, (Brazil, Best Latin American Film, 1997 Sundance Festival,) and “El Diablo Nunca Duerme,” directed by Lourdes Portillo. (Mexico/US, Distinguished Documentary Achievement, Independent Documentary Association).

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Artists, Designers, Students & The Community Reflect on the Art of Making, Craftsmanship & Technology in the Fabric of Cultures: Systems in the Making

— Exhibit Highlights the Made in Italy Aspect in which Designers Link Their Collections to the Places in Which They Were Made, Emphasizing Tradition and Local Culture —

What:
The Fabric of Cultures: Systems in the Making
A Multimedia Exhibition curated by Eugenia Paulicelli

When:
October 5–December 15
Opening Reception: Thursday, October 12 at 5:30 pm

Where:
Queens College Art Center Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library, 6th Floor 65-30 Kissena Blvd. Queens, NY 11367

FLUSHING, NY, October xx, 2017 − The Fabric of Cultures: Systems in the Making brings together artists, designers, CUNY students and local communities to reflect on the art of making, craftsmanship and technology in today’s globalized world. The exhibition calls attention to larger systems at play that influence the state of fashion, craft and aesthetics constantly under development and in flux. It considers the new Made in Italy in a transnational context and in conversation with other cultures, traditions and technologies.

For non-Italians especially, Made in Italy signifies the acquisition of an intangible set of experiences. The objects consumed become part of an emotional map that gives access to a lived or imaginary experience made possible by the narrative of the new media. This is why the experience of authenticity is so important. Many of today’s Italian designers dedicate special attention to linking their collections to the place in which they are made, emphasizing local traditions and culture. The designers and companies included in the exhibition—Cesare Attolini, Antonio Marras, Orange Fiber and Salvatore Ferragamo, “Arte e Ricamo,” a women-run company that works for prestigious Italian and international brands from Emilio Pucci (shown in the exhibit) to Dolce & Gabbana, Tom Ford, Versace, Vivienne Westwood, and Fendi, to name but a few—are exemplars of this dialogue and dynamic. Made in Italy today demands to be examined in the context of both a multilayered identity and a plurality of centers of excellence that preserve a relationship with local origins often beyond the confines of large cities. The exhibition features, in fact, a mix of regional experiences, accents and know-how from the north: Arte e Ricamo, Emilio Pucci, Ferragamo, Silvia Giovanardi; from the south: Calabria—FraccyG, Emanuela Errico, Maria Francesca Nigro, Cangiari/Goel; Sicily—Giulietta Salmeri, Marzia Donzelli, (Arca Textile Lab) Orange Fiber; Sardinia—Antonio Marras; or from a city, Naples in the case of Attolini.

The Fabric of Cultures offers a special opportunity to view the new Made in Italy from New York, a global fashion city and a design hub, through the Tek-Tile project by the Pratt/Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator, and NY-based companies such as Tabii Just and HVRMINN. The exhibition will also debut the work of CUNY student Christina Trupiano, who has re-created the Tanagra Dress originally made by activist and dress designer Rosa Genoni in 1908. A film by Massimo Mascolo and Claudio Napoli about Trupiano’s work will also be screened.

The research behind these different companies and independent designers shares common ground: care and attention to detail and aesthetic, ethics, know-how, links to local identity and history, together with an eye to innovative techniques and designs.

The Fabric of Cultures is part of a larger, partly digital, pedagogic and research project directed by Eugenia Paulicelli, professor of Italian at Queens College: https://tinyurl.com/y7q2cn5k and director of Fashion Studies at the Graduate Center: https://tinyurl.com/ya5bwam5

For more information on the Fabric of Cultures, please contact: eugenia.paulicelli@qc.cuny.edu

For more information about the Queens College Art Center, please contact:
amanda.nocera@qc.cuny.edu.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Puerto Rican and Latino Studies Cultivates Leaders for a Changing World

Brooklyn College Associate Professor of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies Alan A. Aja leads a discussion on DACA and the rights of immigrants at a town hall meeting held in the Brooklyn College Library’s Woody Tanger Auditorium on Thursday, September 14.

As Puerto Rican and Latino Studies (PRLS) nears its 50th anniversary, the department’s innovative, interdisciplinary approach illuminates the issues facing Latinx communities and helps students develop solutions.

Six days after Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico, Julio Peña ’08 and his family had still not heard from his 86-year-old grandmother, and they were frantic.

“Puerto Ricans were unable to make phone calls. They had no running water. They had no electricity. People living in the remote areas were essentially cut off from receiving any sort of assistance,” says Peña, a native Brooklynite of Puerto Rican descent. “Puerto Rico didn’t get its due help. People tend to forget that nearly three and a half million U.S. citizens live on that island. My grandmother was able to board a flight to come to New York. Thank God she’s here, but there are so many others who have no means.”

 A desire to help the community drives Peña, who came to Brooklyn College with the intention of becoming a history teacher. His plan was to major in American studies, however, after less than a week of attending an elective course he took in Puerto Rican and Latino Studies (PRLS), Peña changed his mind.

Director of the Young Adult Borough Center at Franklin D. Roosevelt High School Julio Peña ’08.

“It was my journey of discovering my personal history through these courses, coupled with the interdisciplinary approach of the department, which utilized history, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and literature to give me a full understanding of the subject matter. PRLS was where I would receive the most well rounded academic experience. Getting a degree in this field really helped solidify my feelings about working in the nonprofit sector.”

Peña is now the director of the Young Adult Borough Center at Franklin D. Roosevelt High School in Brooklyn, a non-profit program that works with the New York City Department of Education to increase high school graduation rates by providing underserved students between the ages of 17.5 and 21, who have not yet graduated from high school, with the tools and resources necessary to finish their education. Additionally, Peña is politically active in his Sunset Park neighborhood as a member of Brooklyn Community Board 7, where he chairs several subcommittees. He is also a member of the board of a non-profit called Neighbors Helping Neighbors, which does advocacy work on behalf of tenants and tenant rights.

“PRLS is vitally important in education because we teach students critical thinking skills, the ability to contextually analyze any issue,” says PRLS Department Chair Maria Pérez y González. “The U.S. has a long and intimate history with Latin America but that is not taught in our K-12 education system. PRLS is particularly essential in the academy because we focus on Latinxs in relation to other groups and help students understand how and why they are the largest “ethnic” (and multi-racial) group in the U.S.” “Latinx” is the gender-inclusive, gender-neutral variation of “Latino/Latina.”

“What I got from PRLS was the application of theories through real-world opportunities, and experience from professionals to practice what I was learning,” said UniQue C. Starks ’16, who majored in psychology with a concentration in Africana studies and Puerto Rican and Latino studies. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree at New York University’s Silver School of Social Work. “Professor Alan A. Aja wasn’t a textbook pusher. He encouraged us to explore our identities and engage with the world outside of our bodies to understand the systems at play and the way we are impacted by marginalization. He encouraged us to question, and challenge everything while also working actively to find answers to these questions.”

Executive President of the Black Woman’s Social Work Coalition UniQue C. Starks ’16.

Starks was so inspired by her coursework with Aja that she, at his recommendation, made a trip to Havana, Cuba, to immerse herself in the culture and get a better sense of alternative political structures. She has since co-founded, and is the executive president of, the Black Woman’s Social Work Coalition, to raise awareness about the educational, social, and humanitarian obstacles faced by black and brown women, and offer solutions.

“PRLS is where we can engage this active, diligent, increasingly diverse generation to become the thought leaders that help steer the country in a direction that is just and fair,” says Alan Aja, associate professor of PRLS. “Our courses help our students understand that they are part of a larger global community. My feeling is that this generation is primed to tackle the perpetual and persistent inequalities that will come with, for example, the impact catastrophic climate change in terms migration and displacement. And part of being able to do that is the necessity of not only understanding one’s roots, but also understanding how one’s roots are intertwined with others. In PRLS, we’re in the business of creating change agents.”

Aja’s most recent book, Miami’s Forgotten Cubans: Race, Racialization, and the Miami Afro-Cuban Experience, examines the experiences of post-1958 Afro-Cubans in South Florida in relation to their similarly situated “white” Cuban compatriots. “In Miami, Cuban communities have reproduced hierarchies of white supremacy that existed in Cuba pre-Castro, during the Cuban Revolution, and still exist post-revolution,” says Aja, adding that one of the devastating effects of an institutionalized anti-Latinx sentiment, reflected in the proposed gutting of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy or the administration’s slow response to Puerto Ricans devastated by Hurricane Maria, is the internalization of these sentiments by Latinx peoples as well.

Associate Professor Alan A. Aja, author of Miami’s Forgotten Cubans: Race, Racialization, and the Miami Afro-Cubano Experience.

“The faculty had very high expectations,” says Vanessa Santiago ’06, a Brooklyn-born Puerto Rican (or Nuyorican) and the first person in her family to attend college and earn a master’s degree. When she came to Brooklyn College as a full-time student working two jobs. She intended to major in film, but was unable to continue because the hours of the courses conflicted with her work schedule. She had, however, taken enough classes in Puerto Rican and Latino studies, which was, at the time, her minor, to transition from a film major to a PRLS major.

“I did my last PRLS class with Professor Pérez y González, a community development seminar, a four-credit course. I loved that course because it taught us, in a step-by-step way, how to build up your communities to reach newer heights. And I remember that because it is the basis of how I train and how I teach, and how I lead my people—whether my own children, my students, my employees, the faculty and administrators I work with, even the parents in my program.”

4. CEO of VSL (Voice, Strength, Leadership) Education Consulting, Inc. Vanessa Santiago ’06.

Santiago says that her experiences solidified her political consciousness such that she is now the CEO of her own non-profit organization, VSL (Voice, Strength, Leadership) Education Consulting, Inc., which trains New York City students, staff, and administration in schools and other institutions to provide a top-notch and culturally competent academic and social experience for youth. Santiago also served as National President of the Omega Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., which is “committed to the development of collegiate and professional women through sisterhood, diversity, leadership, service and academic excellence.” She says that the foundations for her passions and methodologies were laid in the college’s PRLS department.

“I remember Professor Pérez y González said, ‘You have to connect. And it must first be a personal connection first before it can be a successful educational one,'” says Santiago.

“We offer an interdisciplinary perspective that will enable students to apply knowledge to a real-world setting and will carry over into any profession they choose,” says Perez y Gonzalez. “We also provide expertise in bilingual education, Latina/Latino/Latinx literature, and Latina feminisms.”

In 2020, the PRLS will celebrate its 50th anniversary. Corresponding programming for “Possible Dream Encuentro: Latin@ Arts, Communities, and Leadership” is currently being developed. Additionally, in 2018, the Association for Puerto Rican Education and Empowerment (APREE), which consists of mostly Brooklyn College PRLS alumni who helped found PRLS, are planning to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Puerto Rican Alliance (PRA) student organization.

The department continues to work on ways to expand its teaching staff, broaden its curriculum, and offer students the highest quality academic experience, including access to mentors, scholarships, and internships.

The Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies can ensure students like Vanessa Santiago, Julio Peña, and UniQue C. Starks go on to become successful alumni thanks in part to the generous support received from other alumni and donors via the Brooklyn College Foundation. To make a charitable donation to the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, please visit the Foundation’s website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON THE RETIREMENT OF VICE CHANCELLOR GLORIANA WATERS

After 37 years of distinguished service to The City University of New York, Vice Chancellor Gloriana (Ginger) Waters has decided to retire effective next month.

Ginger has served CUNY in many ways over her long career.  Hired in the Budget Office of the University’s Central Office in 1980, Ginger later moved to City College as Director of Management Analysis and Improvement and then to Lehman College as Executive Assistant to the President. She returned to City College as Deputy to the President and in 1994 was recruited to join CUNY’s Office of Faculty and Staff Relations (OFSR) as Assistant Dean for Affirmative Action. She served in numerous roles in OFSR before being appointed Vice Chancellor for Human Resources Management in 2007.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Resources Management, Ginger has been responsible for developing and implementing all policies and procedures pertaining to the University’s human resources functions, which serve more than 45,000 employees. Among her many accomplishments are the establishment of the University’s Employment Code of Practice, which codified job descriptions and employment procedures across the University, the creation of a New Employee Resource Center on the CUNY website to enhance the onboarding process for new hires, and the launch of an Executive Leadership Program to develop CUNY administrators’ leadership skills.

A passionate advocate of diversity, equity and inclusion in higher education, Ginger is also responsible for multiple initiatives that encourage the exchange of ideas, foster tolerance and enrich campus life. At her recommendation, in 2012 CUNY adopted a Diversity Action Plan to increase diversity and inclusion among the University’s faculty and staff. Under her leadership, OHRM sponsored the biannual Faculty Diversity Conference, which this year drew 300 participants from across the University and more than 3,000 web viewers, launched a mentorship program funded by a Mellon grant to increase the success and professional satisfaction of CUNY’s diverse professoriate, and initiated a series of Faculty Diversity Dialogues aimed at strengthening the faculty recruitment process through education and training. Her excellent work on diversity and inclusion was recently recognized by the Board of Directors of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education with the Frank W. Hale Distinguished Service Award.

We are planning an event to celebrate Ginger’s accomplishments.  In the meantime, please join me in extending to Ginger our deepest gratitude for a job very well done and best wishes for this next chapter.

 


Free Architecture Tours at Bronx Community College on Sunday, October 15 from 1-4 p.m.

As part of a city-wide event called Open House New York – where architecturally important buildings across the city are open for tours – Bronx Community College will provide free tours, led by architects, of the Gould Memorial Library, the BCC Hall of Fame, North Hall, Meister Hall, Carl Polowczyk Hall, Begrisch Hall and Colston Hall.  Our Hall of Fame has even been selected as a site of reflection.

The BCC event will take place on campus on Sunday, October 15, 2017, from 1:00 p.m. through 4:00 p.m.

Please watch for advertisements on the “LinkNYC” digital signs along Burnside Avenue.  To learn more about Open House New York, and the significance of historical and contemporary architecture and urban design, see their website at http://www.ohny.org/weekend/overview.

Thank you for your interest, and we hope to see you here on campus on October 15.


Latinos in NYC tome, “Black Detroit” history top latest CCNY faculty books

Some of the new titles from CCNY faculty.

Latinos in New York: Communities in Transition, Second Edition,” a follow up to the  comprehensive study of the city’s Latino population published in 1996, is one of the new books by City College of New York faculty. It is co-edited by Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership professors Sherrie Baver, Gabriel Haslip-Viera (Emeritus), and Angelo Falcón, co-founder of the National Institute for Latino Policy.

This new edition captures the most significant continuities, discontinuities, and changes of the last two decades in the local Latino community as a whole and among the various national groups. Critics hail it as timely and relevant as was the first edition.

Black Detroit: A People’s History of Self-Determination,” by Herb Boyd, adjunct lecturer in the Black Studies Program, has been lauded by Publishers Weekly for breathing “new life into the history of Detroit through stories of the city’s black residents from its earliest days to its bittersweet present.”

The Behavioral Sciences and Health Care, 4th Edition,” co-edited by João Nunes, medical professor in The CUNY Medical School at CCNY, is applauded as an invaluable resource for those educating the next generation of physicians and other health care providers.

Following are other new and forthcoming titles from CCNY faculty:

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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BMCC Celebrates Italian Heritage Month

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) celebrates Italian Heritage Month this month with two days of special events.

These include a Faculty Book Club Discussion on Tuesday, October 17 from 12 noon to 1 p.m. in the Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Scholarship (CETLS), Room S-510D at 199 Chambers Street, and a full day of presentations on Tuesday, October 31 in Richard Harris Terrace.

Discussion of a linguistic memoir

The Faculty Book Club Discussion on October 17 in Room S-510D will focus on the memoir “In Other Words” by Jhumpa Lahiri. This event will be facilitated by BMCC Modern Language Professors Tom Means and Kristina Varade.

Donna Seaman describes “In Other Words” as “a richly meditative, revealing and involving ‘linguistic autobiography’ about language and the self, creativity, risk, and metamorphosis.”

All faculty are welcome to attend this discussion. For more information, email cetls@bmcc.cuny.edu.

A day of cultural celebration

The full day of presentations on October 31 will open with a continental breakfast at 9 a.m. in Richard Harris Terrace and extend through 5 p.m.

They will include the talks “Masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance: from Giotto to Michelangelo,” by Dr. Rocky Ruggiero of Cultural Programs for the Arts, and “How We Learn Languages: Examples from Italian,” by BMCC Professor Tom Means.

These will be followed by “Bilingual Performance of Italian Poetry from Dante through Leopardi,” performed by professional actor Alessio Bordoni, and “Taste the Difference between Extra Virgin Olive Oil from Tuscany v. Sicily Like a True Italian with Our Eatalian Storyteller!” by Eataly in downtown NYC.

The afternoon will continue with an Italian lunch.

Next will be “An Afternoon of Italian Music,” featuring BMCC Music majors accompanied by Professors Jee Eun Ahn and Eleonora Rotshteyn on the piano, and then a talk, “Viva Italia! BMCC’s Summer Study Abroad to Italy,” presented by BMCC Professor Kristina Varada.

BMCC Professors Patrizia and Comello Perry will present “The Three Fathers of the Italian Language: Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio” and Mario Giacalone of BMCC TPAC will present a performance, “Italian and Italian-American Music.”

The day will close with a game of Italian Jeopardy including prizes, led by Professors Means and Varade.

For more information on Italian Heritage Month, contact Professor Tom Means, jtmeans@bmcc.cuny.edu. 


BMCC Observes National Domestic Violence Month

 October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and the Women’s Resource Center at Borough of Manhattan Community College’s (BMCC/CUNY) has planned a number of activities and workshops to bring attention to this national and citywide problem.

As recently as 2013, the New York City Police Department responded to more than 284,000 domestic violence calls. Nationwide, nearly 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner, according to statistics from the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. One in three women and one in four men have been victims of physical violence by an intimate partner.

Among the planned BMCC activities is the “Walk With Me” procession on October 17 at 12 p.m., starting in Richard Harris Terrace. This annual event is a college-wide gathering followed by a silent procession throughout the campus. Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to wear purple. The session will be followed by a workshop focused on the intersection between immigration status and domestic violence.

In preparation for the procession, on October 12 at 2 p.m., there will be a poster making session where students and student club and academic department representatives will be able to create their own “stop the violence” poster board messages. In addition to the procession, there will be a number of other workshops and activities scattered throughout the month where students can not only learn available resources, but also earn Co-Curricular Transcript (CCA) credit.

BMCC Women’s Resource Director Deborah Parker says one of the goals of all the activities is to help students become agents of change.

“Change occurs one person at a time. We inform students that there is help and resources available to them here on campus,” Parker said. “They then become a vessel of knowledge for other students and those beyond the BMCC campus.”

Domestic violence impacts everyone, Parker says. “There is no magic wand to eliminate it, but we can’t sweep the problem under the rug. Knowing that there is help out there, that there is hope, is very important.”


City Tech Professor Leader in New York City Sustainability Initiatives

City Tech Professor Illya Azaroff, an award-winning architect, participated in City & State’s “On Sustainability” conference on September 28 at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan where leaders in sustainability, energy, government, advocacy and business gathered to discuss green initiatives in New York, reducing the carbon footprint, water resiliency and protection, zero food waste and more.

Rick Chandler, Commissioner, New York City Department of Buildings; Kathryn Garcia Commissioner, New York City Department of Sanitation; and Vincent Sapienza, Acting Commissioner, NYC Department of Environmental Protection were keynote speakers.

l to r: Jarmoszuk, Treyger, Glus, Tighe, Azaroff

Professor Azaroff served as the moderator of the “Improving Water Quality and Resiliency” panel. The water contamination in Hoosick Falls last year raised many questions about New York’s ability to handle a water crisis and its effects on the public’s health. This panel identified the new challenges we face, and examined the best advances for dealing with groundwater and surface water pollution to ensure that all New Yorkers have access to clean drinking water while also protecting residents and vulnerable communities from the adverse impacts of climate change.

Panelists included Senator Todd Kaminsky, Ranking Member, Environmental Conservation Committee; Julie Tighe, Chief of Staff, New York Department of Environmental Conservation; Council Member Mark Treyger, Chair of the Council’s Committee on Recovery and Resiliency; Aloysee Jarmoszuk, Chief of Staff for Deputy Chancellor Elizabeth Rose (Vice Chancellor for Operations, NYC Department of Education); and Peter Glus, Senior Vice President, City Executive, Arcadis.

Other panels at the conference explored energy-efficient initiatives to decrease New York’s carbon footprint and the future of food sustainability.

The 2017 On Sustainability conference brought together over 250 industry professionals from across the state including: policymakers, sustainability officers, energy managers, community development leaders to share successful economic growth strategies.


‘Smart on Crime’ Conference Will Highlight Innovative and Promising Criminal Justice Ideas

Smart on Crime Innovations Conference will convene community leaders, criminal justice practitioners, elected officials, businesses, foundations, the media, and researchers to showcase promising criminal justice interventions informed by evidence and data.

On Tuesday, October 10 and Wednesday, October 11, 2017, a group of leading national criminal justice organizations spanning the ideological spectrum will host the Smart on Crime Innovations Conference to reinvigorate and refocus the public on exciting reform ideas that communities across the country are pursuing. The conference is hosted by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the Center for American Progress, and the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, and will bring together community leaders, criminal justice practitioners, elected officials, businesses, foundations, the media, and researchers. By showcasing data-driven interventions and innovations that are being implemented in cities and states, the conference will serve as a public statement that people from across the country are committed to pursuing smart, fair, and effective criminal justice and public safety policies.

Featured speakers and panelists include Eric H. Holder Jr., former U.S. attorney general; Governor Nathan Deal (R-GA); Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ); Anquan Boldin, retired NFL wide receiver; Karol V. Mason, president of John Jay College of Criminal Justice; Vanita Gupta, president of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights; Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. (R), former governor of Maryland; Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress; Cyrus Vance Jr., New York County, New York, district attorney; Mark Holden, general counsel of Koch Industries; Mark Gonzalez, Nueces County, Texas, district attorney; Brittany Packnett, Build Love + Power; Daryl Atkinson, first Second Chance Fellow at the U.S. Department of Justice and co-director of Forward Justice; Robert Tracy, chief of the Wilmington, Delaware, Police Department; John Wetzel, Pennsylvania secretary of corrections; and Malika Saada Saar, Google.

Partner organizations include the Coalition for Public Safety; FWD.us; Gideon’s Promise; JustLeadershipUSA; Koch Industries; the Laura and John Arnold Foundation; the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights; and Right on Crime.

Click here to view the conference website, including the full conference agenda and RSVP information.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice
524 West 59th Street,
New York, NY 10019

For more information, contact Doreen Vinas at dvinas@jjay.cuny.edu.

 


Alumni Profile: From Women in Haiti to Juveniles in the Justice System, Soraya Denis is Committed to Service

Alumni Profile: From Women in Haiti to Juveniles in the Justice System, Soraya Denis is Committed to Service
In her professional life, Soraya Denis serves as a senior program coordinator with the NYC Department of Correction (DOC), focusing on juvenile re-entry issues in the Youthful Offender Programming Division. It’s rewarding work, she said, but like many ambitious John Jay alumni, it’s only one part of her commitment to giving back to those groups that helped put her where she is today. Denis is also the founder of Dlo Pou Viv, a non-profit that advocates for clean water and personal hygiene for school-aged children and women in Haiti, and co-founder of Women Who Inspire Women (WWIW), a collective of professional women that promotes sisterhood and mentoring.

Those commitments earned her a spot on the Star Network’s “40 Brooklyn Stars Under 40” ranking this year, an award that honors those who exemplify leadership skills not only in their chosen fields, but in their communities as well.

“During my high school graduation, Marty Markowitz, then Brooklyn Borough President, said that ‘Brooklyn was the real capital of New York City,’” Denis recalled. “It’s the county of Kings and, of course, Queens. I am a Brooklynite in every sense of the word.”

That includes having a multi-cultural background. Born in Brooklyn to Haitian parents, Denis lived in her ancestral country for several years before returning at the age of 6. She developed an interest in law early on, and attended both The High School for Legal Studies and Sheepshead Bay High School. As an undergrad at John Jay, Denis majored in legal studies and took courses in the Thematic Studies Program, but eventually found herself torn between pursuing law school or going into law enforcement, for which she had begun preparing by participating in a co-op program with the U.S. Marshall Service.

She ultimately followed a path somewhere between the two, graduating in 2006 and obtaining her master’s degree in Criminal Justice Leadership from St. John’s in 2010. John Jay, naturally, played a big role in her decision: “It was social justice hub, we had professors from law enforcement and social justice fields as well as corrections,” she said. “I realized then that I wasn’t tied to just becoming a lawyer and that I had options.”

Today, Denis works in the DOC, opening up pathways to employment for young adults between 18 and 21 as they try and return to society after being incarcerated. This involves teaching them the soft and hard skills needed to get decent jobs upon release, as well as providing individualized support services and links to community-based organizations. “What’s rewarding about this work is that I am able to follow up on the young adults who leave DOC custody through our partnerships,” she said.

Still, the 34 year old has never forgotten her roots. A visit to Haiti in 2008 convinced her to launch Dlo Pou Viv, Haitian Creole for “water to live”, which has held fundraising drives and conducted on-the-ground field work in an effort to bring international relief to the country’s water crisis. At the same time, she’s played a leading role in WWIW, which hosts an annual women’s history month event to highlight everyday women making strides in their communities.

Both of these positions resulted her inclusion on the 40 under 40 list, a distinction she’s not taking lightly. “It serves to remind me that the little girl who moved back to Brooklyn from Haiti at 6 years old lived up to her childhood dreams,” she said.


New Exhibit Honors Those Who Gave Their Lives on 9/11

New Exhibit Honors Those Who Gave Their Lives on 9/11

 

Bravery and Sacrifice: NYPD Heroes 9/11 and Beyond, a new art exhibit at John Jay that celebrates the service of the men and women who risked their lives during the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center Towers, opened on September 8 and is on display through December 2017.

The exhibit, located in Memorial Hall alongside John Jay’s own 9/11 memorial, is comprised of 18 pieces of artwork depicting the men and women who risked their lives in the line of duty. The exhibition was spearheaded by two individuals, Elizabeth Williams and Catherine Hughes, who personally observed emergency responders in action on 9/11/2001, and partnered with the NYPD to execute their vision of memorializing those men and women through works of art.

The paintings and illustrations in the exhibit were produced by the Society of Illustrators, a group of artists who have been known to support the military and law enforcement. It is the first exhibit for the public of all the original works in the collection, and it was made possible by the NYPD Foundation and other supporters.

Police Commissioner James O’Neil attended the opening of the exhibit. “This exhibit brings the stories of our heroes to life in vivid illustrations so future generations can learn about the sacrifices of that day,” he said. “We thank John Jay President Karol Mason, faculty and students for inviting this exhibit into their home. We also thank the families of those depicted in these illustrations and the first responders who participated in this project to share the stories of their loved ones or themselves so others never forget.”

The paintings are not works of imagination. Rather, each one is based off of a photograph taken at Ground Zero.  The subjects of the paintings are real individuals, some of whom lost their lives on that day, and others who are still living. As chance would have it, one painting features the father of a current John Jay student.

That painting is entitled “Police Officer Ramon Suarez,” and it depicts two officers carrying a woman to safety. The officers are Ramon Suarez and Christopher Castro, and their heroic actions were captured in an iconic photograph represented in the painting. After the woman was rescued, Suarez headed back into the North Tower, and did not return. Castro, however, made it through, and is now the father of Christopher Castro Jr., a fire and emergency services major in his junior year at John Jay College.

As if this weren’t coincidence enough, Castro Sr. is married to Officer Judith Hernandez, who is also featured in one of the paintings. Hernandez was awarded the Medal of Honor, the NYPD’s highest award for bravery.

According to Castro Jr., his father was in the car with Hernandez driving towards City Hall when the first tower was struck. They made their way to the scene where they joined the rescue operation, but at some point they both became trapped on a basement level floor. It was pitch black, and they could hear the sound of the floors collapsing above them. But as the building was falling, it knocked a hole in the wall, and they were able to escape.  A few years later, Castro Sr. and Hernandez got married and today they live in upstate New York.

Castro Jr. said he walked past the exhibit a few times before noticing his father was featured in one of the pictures. “It was a strange coincidence,” he said, “what are the odds that my school happened to have a picture of him on the wall?”

Like his father, Castro Jr. aims to go into public service. He said he plans to join the fire department.  “If my dad ever questioned whether or not he made his kids proud, that moment right there was definitely a moment where I could hold my head high and say ‘That’s my dad,’” he said.

On 9/11/2017, the exhibit was on full display when President Karol Mason, Vice President of Student Affairs Lynette Cook-Francis, FDNY Captain Michael Nigro, and numerous other John Jay faculty, students, and community members held a 9/11 tribute ceremony in Memorial Hall.

During the ceremony, the names of 67 John Jay community members who lost their lives in the 9/11 attacks were read aloud, as students placed votive candles for each them at the foot of John Jay’s permanent 9/11 memorial, a pedestal containing a twisted shard of metal recovered from the Twin Towers.

The ceremony concluded with a touching rendition of Amazing Grace by adjunct professor and general director of Opera Ebony Gregory Sheppard.


New President Jumpstarts Academic Year

New President Jumpstarts Academic Year

 

On the first of August, Karol Mason officially began her new position as president of John Jay College. Mason has made numerous appearances since, introducing herself to students and faculty at various events around campus, often joking about not being able to find her way around campus.

August 24th was a particularly busy day for the new president. At the Macaulay Honors Welcome, she greeted new Macaulay scholars, which included freshmen and sophomores, by welcoming them to John Jay and encouraging them to use the tools that will be provided to them to change the world. “You know that is your job, to change the world for the better,” she told them. “My hope is that we will finally have a world that looks like the one we intended when this country was founded. That rests with you – the best and the brightest.”

She then headed to Faculty Development Day, a John Jay tradition and a chance for faculty to share effective teaching practices, renew their commitment to the John Jay mission, and find support for handling student challenges.

Mason then welcomed international students to the college, before appearing at the 9/11 “I Pledge” event, a “call to service” where participants pledged to do a good deed on 9/11. (Later, as part of separate event on September 7, Mason joined a group of students to unfurl a large American flag on the steps of the Jay Walk to honor 67 members of the John Jay community who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks.)

Towards the end of the day, incoming freshmen gathered in the Gerald W. Lynch Theater for Convocation.  “We share something in common,” she told the students. “This year is my first year at John Jay, so I’m a freshmen like you are. We’re going to go through this journey together.”

Mason also shared a bit of personal history with the students. “40 years ago, I met a woman in a chance encounter outside of the dining hall. And we struck up a conversation and she’s been my friend for 40 years. And who knew that she would end up being the best friend of the first lady of the United States. As a result of that opportunity, when they [the Obamas] were elevated to the White House, I had the opportunity to fulfill the dream that was started when I was 14 years old, sitting up in my room in Amityville, thinking ‘I want to be part of changing the world.’ It took me 40 years to get here, but I’m here with you guys changing the world now.”

Mason was a leader in the Obama Administration on juvenile justice issues, bail reform and re-entry for individuals leaving prison. As head of the Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs, Mason oversaw an annual budget of $4 billion to support an array of state and local criminal justice agencies, juvenile justice programs and services for crime victims, oversaw the National Institute of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, among a wide range of other efforts.  She led the Department of Justice’s work to address the issue of community trust in the justice system through a variety of programs, including the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, a partnership with John Jay College and other academic institutions across the country designed to address bias in the criminal justice system.

As John Jay President, Mason appeared most recently at a town hall event on September 7, where she fielded questions on issues ranging from DACA to climate change, homelessness, and supporting the LGBT community.

“I was drawn to this fabulous institution because of its students, the wonderful work of its faculty, and the work that’s happening across the whole college,” she said. “We’re all pulling in the same direction for the same cause and I’m grateful to be part of this wonderful family.”


Wall Street Journal ranks CCNY #8 nationally for diversity

Students at CCNY’s Freshman Convocation reflect the college’s diversity.

With a student population representing 89.6% of the world’s 193 sovereign states, The City College of New York continues to rank among the most diverse academic institutions in America.  The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education 2018 College Rankings place City College at joint #8 for environment with three other schools.

The rankings’ environment score encompasses several measures to gauge a school’s inclusiveness. They range from the percentage of first-time college graduates and Pell Grant recipients to the diversity of a school’s students and staff and the percentage of international students.

The top eight school overall are:

1.  La Sierra University

2.  California State University, Northridge

3.  Johnson & Wales University, North Miami

5.  San Francisco State University

6.  Barry University

California State University, East Bay

8.  California State University, Long Beach

CUNY – Bernard M. Baruch College

CUNY – City College of New York

University of California, Los Angeles

Academics say class discussions often become richer when students from different backgrounds engage on topics like religion and politics.

Drawing students from their immediate areas and appealing to low-income and first-generation college students, state-backed institutions in major cities seem to be most successful at bringing in a racially and socioeconomically diverse student body.

Hispanics, at 31.5 percent, are the largest ethnic student group at CCNY. Asian Americans (27 percent), Whites (21.3 percent) and African-Americans (19.7 percent) are the other major ethnic groups.

For CCNY, this latest recognition follows the U.S. News & World Report 2018 rankings that named CCNY as one of the top 100 Best Regional Universities in the North and a Top Public School in the North.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. More than 15,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Science; Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture; School of Education; Grove School of Engineering; Sophie Davis Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine; and the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. U.S. News, Princeton Review and Forbes all rank City College among the best colleges and universities in the United States.

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BMCC Team Conducts User Count and Survey of Public Spaces for Battery Park City

Two Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) professors and a team of 24 BMCC students have been contracted by the Battery Park City Authority (BPCA) to conduct an extensive user count and visitor survey of all public spaces within Battery Park City in lower Manhattan. Now underway, the survey runs through November 2017.

BMCC Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice Professors Michelle Ronda and Robin Isserles will lead the BPCA Count and User Survey. The 24 BMCC students and five BPCA interns will participate in the study, working both as research assistants and supervisors.

The Battery Park City Authority maintains and operates the parks and public spaces in a 92-acre area bordered by Chambers Street to the north, the West Side Highway to the east, the Hudson River to the west and Pier A at the southern tip of lower Manhattan.

Gaining insight into the number of users of public parks, as well as their activities in the spaces, can assist BPCA as it responds to the needs of visitors and plans for future funding and projects.

BJ Jones, acting BPCA President, describes his aim in partnering with BMCC: “Battery Park City Parks are quite simply public treasures, visited by tens of thousands each year in a lower Manhattan more vibrant, sustainable, and interconnected than ever before. Anecdotally, we have a sense of when and why people visit our Parks; this study will enable us to put science behind those estimates – and there’s no better local partner for that than BMCC.”

Survey will take place in green spaces across 92-acre area

Placed primarily at entrances to green spaces within Battery Park City, students use clickers to count visitors. The survey portion of the research includes in-person interviews with approximately 1,200 park users to occur over three months, reflecting both the summer and fall seasons.

Questions the student research assistants will ask during the survey portion of the study include, ‘If you could design the next event or activity in this park what would it be?’ and ‘What are your favorite parts of the park?”

Ronda says soliciting people’s input speaks to BPCA’s commitment to support the local and greater citywide community and to the democratic principles the public spaces embrace.

Similar studies have been done at parks around the nation including New York City. William Kornblum, Professor Emeritus of Sociology, the Graduate Center, CUNY, had conducted similar studies on Central Park throughout the 1980’s and 90’s. Then, in 2008, he was commissioned by the Central Park Conservancy to conduct the extensive and widely cited Central Park User Survey and Count.

The two-year study was released in a 2011 report that showed the number of annual park visitors had increased from 25 to 45 million over a 15-year period. The Central Park Conservancy used results from the survey data to inform decisions about capital improvements and infrastructure maintenance.

“The more social scientists help park managers understand the patterns of public use in parks such as those in Battery Park City, the better equipped they will be to deploy their limited resources to manage these precious areas,” said Kornblum.

BMCC’s Ronda worked with Professor Kornblum in the mid 1980s on an earlier study while she was an undergraduate student at Queens College (CUNY). Years later while pursuing their doctorate degrees, both she and Isserles worked with Kornblum on the 2011 Central Park User Survey.

“Working with Bill Kornblum changed my entire life,” Ronda says. “I never would have considered that this sort of research was something I could do as a career.

She says the BMCC students working on the BPCA project will gain similar invaluable social science experience.

“Students will gain skills in social science research, which is not only valuable for planning a career in that area, but they will gain practice at interviewing and talking to strangers as well as precision counting skills,” said Ronda.

Student immerse themselves in BPCA community

This survey will also be an introduction for many of the students to the parks, gardens, and other free public resources located right across the street from BMCC in Battery Park City, according to Isserles

“BMCC is part of the downtown community,” Isserles said adding, “I think it’s important that students to get to know this environment.”

Isserles is incorporating the Battery Park study into her Sociology Capstone course—a research driven class that is the final Sociology course BMCC students must complete before graduating in the major. The Capstone students will also conduct systematic counting and randomized survey interviews, says Isserles. They will also learn how to take that data and enter it as code and then conduct preliminary analysis.

She says BPCA selected the BMCC team, in part, because of the educational component of incorporating students into the research process.

“We’re delighted to partner with social science experts from Borough of Manhattan Community College – and especially pleased to hire students as research assistants,” said Abby Ehrlich, BPCA Director of Community Partnerships and Engagement. “The aspiring young professionals are gaining experience using the city as a classroom and are instrumental to the project’s success. We hope that one of the project’s outcomes will be that students administering the study become part of Battery Park City’s community along with their friends and families.”

There are added benefits when students work alongside professors in a research setting such as the BPCA study, as Ronda can attest to.

“I was the first person in my family to go to college. I didn’t even know professors conducted this sort of research,” says Ronda.


York College Professor Co-Authors/Publishes Article and Appointed as Visiting Scholar at Columbia University

Dr. Michael Orlando Sharpe’s article, “Japan as an Emerging Migration State,” by Jim Hollifield and Michael Sharpe in the journal International Relations of the Asia- Pacific Volume 17, Issue 3, September 2017 (see link below link) to the journal website below.  Additionally, Dr. Sharpe has been appointed as an Adjunct Associate Research Scholar (Visiting Scholar at Columbia University’s Weatherhead Institute of East Asian Studies for this academic year while on sabbatical from York 2017-2018. http://weai.columbia.edu/michael-sharpe/

Abstract:

“International migration and mobility raise a host of economic and security concerns for states in the Global North and the South. The garrison state linked with the trading state in Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries. The 20th and 21st centuries have seen the emergence of the migration state, where managing migration is vital for national security and development. Despite a reputation for social, political, and legal closure and a reticence about admitting immigrants, Japan is making halting moves toward a national immigration policy, what could be a ‘Meiji moment’ with policy innovation and potential transformation of Japanese society. The Japanese case is instructive for the study of migration policy as the only liberal state that has resisted immigration and paid the costs in terms of sociodemographic, economic, and political challenges. This article lays out a framework for analysis of Japan as an emerging migration state and explores the extent to which Japan has made the transition to a country of immigration.”

Https://academic.oup.com/irap/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/irap/lcx013/4168775/Japan-as-an-Emerging-Migration-State

Michael Orlando Sharpe, M.I.A., Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Political Science at York College of The City University of New York School of Arts and Sciences. His areas of expertise include: politics of international migration, comparative immigration studies, globalization, immigrant political incorporation, comparative politics, international relations, and political transnationalism. He may be reached at msharpe@york.cuny.edu. 

 

 

 


Apprentices Need Expert Eye. So Does Trump’s Plan for Them

Apprentices Need Expert Eye. So Does Trump’s Plan for ThemDestina Garcia, a community health worker with Bronx-Lebanon Hospital, on her way to a home visit with a client in the Bronx. Credit Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Destina Garcia, a community health worker at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital, recently completed a new Community Health Worker Apprenticeship Program at LaGuardia Community College. The program is a partnership between LaGuardia, NYC Department of Small Business Services through the New York Alliance for Careers in Healthcare, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, the Training Fund, and the 1199SEIU UHWE Funds.

… “Using apprenticeships, the program trains people to become community health workers… Gail Mellow, president of LaGuardia Community College, says programs like Destina Garcia’s apprenticeship create a career ladder for low-income workers by bringing the college, union and employer together.

… Ms. Garcia completed her apprenticeship in June and has continued on with Bronx-Lebanon as a community health worker. She is also a member of 1199 S.E.I.U. and plans to use union-funded tuition assistance to pursue a bachelor’s in social work at the Lehman campus of CUNY…”

Read the full article: Apprentices Need Expert Eye. So Does Trump’s Plan for Them


New Central Park fly species gets CCNY professor’s moniker

CCNY entomologist and Professor of Biology David Lohman has three species named after him.

Introducing Themira lohmanus, a fly like no other, and the most recently discovered species in the popular Manhattan urban oasis of Central Park! The immature insects subsist on duck droppings, and have a strong CCNY connection: Themira lohmanus is named after City College of New York entomologist, and Professor of Biology, David Lohman.

But wait! It’s not the only species that gets its moniker from the well-traveled entomologist, who’s often to be found in tropical forests of Southeast Asia studying the ecology and evolution of insects.  There’s also Chimaeragathis lohmani, a wasp found in Thailand, and Bulbophyllum davidlohmanii, a soon-to-be-published orchid species found on the Philippine island of Mindanao.

“It’s not terribly novel to have species named after oneself,” shrugs Lohman, citing CCNY Division of Science colleague Amy Berkov, who has multiple beetles named after her. “But new species are not discovered in Central Park very often, so having a New York City-endemic species named after me is rather novel.”

Yuchen Ang, an evolutionary biologist at the National University of Singapore where the first specimens of Themira lohmanus were analyzed, describes it thus:

“A very particular fly, Themira lohmanus has been found hiding under the noses of New Yorkers all this while. First found off Harlem Meer in Central Park, [it] can only breed on duck dung.”

Ang describes the fly’s mating ritual as “kinky” with the male employing unusual methods and appendages. It concludes with the female storing sperm from many suitors and deciding whose sperm to use when she lays her eggs.

Themira lohmanus has subsequently been found in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. More than 15,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Science; Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture; School of Education; Grove School of Engineering; Sophie Davis Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine; and the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. U.S. News, Princeton Review and Forbes all rank City College among the best colleges and universities in the United States.

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City Tech Students Compete in Brooklyn Borough President’s Smart Gun Design Competition

At a ceremony held at the Brooklyn Borough Hall in Downtown Brooklyn on September 18, the contributions of two teams of City Tech engineering students were recognized for their smart gun designs, which were submitted to Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams’ Smart Gun Design Competition. City Tech’s Department of Mechanical Engineering Technology & Industrial Design undergraduate students Liza Chiu, Josue Bautista, Antonia Meza, and Runtao You participated in the competition with Professor Masato Nakamura as faculty advisor. In addition to City Tech’s teams, a team from Pratt also made the final round of the competition, while one of the two finalist teams of graduate students from NYU’s Tanden School of Engineering won the $1 million prize.

The goal of the Smart Gun Design Competition, announced by Adams in August 2016, was to help drive innovation in advancing smart gun technology through the creation of an identification method for preventing unauthorized users of guns from using them. Adams challenged colleges and universities from the five boroughs to submit a design that would address this goal. Reducing gun violence is an extremely important issue for Adams in no small part because of his many years as a captain in the New York Police Department (NYPD). The competition was preceded by a smart gun symposium Adams organized, which brought together experts from all over the country on gun violence.

“Our students understand that designing a new smart gun system could have a huge impact, and in order to solve this real-world issue, they successfully utilized hands-on skills they learned in classrooms and labs. This competition was a great opportunity for them to conduct research and development through individual work and teamwork,” said Professor Nakamura, “Because we cannot avoid the political issues associated with smart gun design, the City Tech teams’ designs may not be applicable now. Sustainability is about using technology to improve our environment and our lives. Our goal is to use design to make the world a better place for our children and grandchildren.”

l to r: Stephen Soiffer, Chiu, Meza, Nakamura, President Hotzler

Team Energy and Environmental Simulation Laboratory (EESL), with City Tech students Josue Bautista, Liza Chiu, Antonio Meza, and Runtao (Ryan) You, introduced a smart gun design using a sensor equipped system and computer programming that focuses on preventing accidental deaths and suicide by gun, since they account for the majority of deaths by gun in the United States.

Team EESL developed a system applying customizable gesture combinations for identifying users by using a 3-axis gyroscope, accelerometer, magnetometer (compass), and global positioning system (GPS). In addition, a sonar sensor, detecting an object in an extremely close range, was equipped in order to avoid self-shooting or children’s accidental use. Using this gesture-detecting system, firearm users can customize gesture combinations that unlock a gun during an authorization process. This smart gun system emits an encrypted signal including time, location, and 3-dimensional direction of the gun muzzle when the trigger is pulled. The signal with the data will be transferred through a cellular network or a Wi-Fi connection, and eventually stored to a server.

Team PewPew, with City Tech students Josue Bautista and Liza Chiu, introduced a smart gun with technology built into the grip. The three main features are: 1) safety and training support—multi-layered grips with additive manufactured time-released molding materials to encourage increased firearm handling, build situational training experience, and enforce minimum training hours for uniformed law enforcement; 2) identity authorization—unique grip biometrics to unlock electromechanical lock, and increased identity accuracy with additional pattern recognition data; and 3) theft prevention—one gun, one grip signature, as well as an integrated GPS.

This accumulated gunfire data will be analyzed using machine learning, data science, and behavioral science. The analyzed gunfire data accumulated from each smart gun could be possibly predictive of users’ behaviors, preventing unnecessary gun use and reducing potential gun violence.

“I’m inspired by circular design, which merges sustainability with design, and considers the system’s entire life cycle. As engineers, we have a responsibility to consider the consequences of our designs. None of us wanted to design just a gun, but it was an interesting opportunity to address the issues behind gun violence. In this case, we wanted to promote responsible gun ownership and address the fact that there is a lack of training and firearm handling required of those who own weapons that have the potential to harm others,” said Liza Chiu.

“Looking back over the past year, I realize how much I enjoyed working with my teammates, despite the challenges of our project. To top it off, our team made it to the finals! It was a great honor to present our smart gun idea to the NYPD and the Borough President. I’m grateful to the Brooklyn Borough President’s Office, City Tech, my professors, technicians, and each of my teammates,” said Runtao You.

“This project required us to use our skills in engineering to design a smart gun, and it was quite a challenge since smart gun technology receives a lot of resistance from some groups. But gun safety is something that should be addressed and hopefully improved upon over time. I got to work with great mentors such as Professor Nakamura, and George Kiezik from the Physics Department, as well as a great team of fellow students who have become close friends. One of the best parts of this competition was competing with graduate students from NYU and Pratt. It was a fun experience that gave us the opportunity to use our minds and skills while working on a project that can benefit others,” said Josue Bautista.

Based on this smart gun research, Professor Nakamura and his students have established a new research initiative called CUNY Smart City Observatory (SMO), for developing and applying smart technology that can be transformed into a smart city in a more sustainable way. The SMO, for instance, will acquire and analyze data from smart guns and sensors in New York City, as well as observe and documents traffic patterns on the Brooklyn Bridge from City Tech’s Voorhees Building, monitor urban air and water quality, and develop new fashion technologies that synchronize people and local events in a smart city.


Reception Celebrates Tenured and Promoted Faculty

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) community celebrated recently tenured and promoted faculty at a reception on September 28 in the Shirley Fiterman Art Center.

BMCC President Antonio Pérez and Provost and Senior Vice President Karrin E. Wilks hosted the event, which is part of the college’s ongoing efforts to recognize faculty achievement.

“We are here to celebrate not just accomplishments, but milestones such as gaining tenure and becoming a permanent part of the fabric of BMCC,” President Pérez said in his opening remarks.

“We think it is an important part of our cycle of rituals not just to congratulate you but to thank you,” Provost Wilks told the audience. “Reaching this point in your academic careers is a testament to your excellence in teaching, your commitment to our students, your pedagogical leadership, scholarship and research.”

Before the event closed, BMCC Professor of Art Thaddeus Radell gave remarks in honor of his colleague, Charles McGill, who passed away in July 2017 and would have been among those honored at the reception. “Charles McGill was colossal not only in the physical sense, but in the sense that he was a key member of our faculty, very serious about his art, and really devoted to his teaching,” Radell said. “His students loved him.”

Newly tenured and promoted faculty

Joel Barker and Achraf Seyam, Accounting;

Shoba Bandi-Rao, Heather Finn, Rosario Torres and Oksana Vorobel, Academic Literacy and Linguistics;

Yan Chen and Hao Tang, CIS;

Margaret Barrow and Kelly Secovnie, English;

Lisa Grace, Gloria McNamara and Yuliya Shneydermann, Health Education;

Howard Meltzer and Joyce Moorman, Music and Art;

David Allen and Barbara Lawrence, Mathematics;

George Stevenson, Media Arts and Technology;

Silvia Alvarez-Olarra, Sophie Marinez, John Thomas Means, Alicia Perdomo, Silvia Roig and Lisa Sarti, Modern Languages;

Edna Asknes, Nursing;

Alexander Gosslau, Adolfina Koroch, Jun Liang, Kibrewossen Tesfagiorgis, Lauren Wiskstrom, Chiaki Yanagisawa, Hasan Yumak and Shengkun Zhang, Science;

Sheldon Applewhite, Peter Bratsis, Marci Littlefield, Maria Pagan-Rivera, Kelly Rodgers and Amy Sodaro, Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice;

Bertha Ferdman, Bejamin Haas and Christopher Jackson, Speech, Communications and Theatre Arts;

Rebecca Garte and Jean Plaisir, Teacher Education.


Psychology Study Finds Liberty Goes Hand in Hand with Religion—Including Islam

Contact: Dr. Ian Hansen

Associate Professor Department of Behavioral Sciences York College,

718-262-5181 or ihansen@York.cuny.edu

Many public intellectuals and political movements in the West consider the popular embrace of religious belief—particularly Islam—to increase the risk of suffering oppression in one’s country. However, a new set of psychology studies provides convincing evidence that this view is a misleading oversimplification. According to the lead researcher, “Religion and oppression go together like ice cream sales and street violence, or like cows and Republicans.  To figure out how much one causes the other, if at all, you have to take other related things into account.  And Islam is nowhere close to being the most oppressive cultural system in the world.  When comparing Muslim-majority countries to countries with a similar degree of development, their levels of oppression are about average.”

 

The set of three studies has been published as “Religion and Oppression: Cross-National and Experimental Investigations,” in the current issue of Religion Brain and Behavior. The authors—Ian Hansen, PhD, at York College, CUNY; Valerie Jackson, PhD, at University of California-San Francisco; and Andrew Ryder, PhD, at Concordia University—examined data from two previously-conducted cross-national surveys, one of ten countries (10,068 participants) and one of 52 countries (73,303 participants). The authors also conducted an experimental study with a student sample from a diverse urban public college in New York, one with a relatively religious population.

 

Results from the two cross-national surveys at first appeared to confirm the common Western view that religion and oppression go together. Countries that the organization Freedom House ranked lower in civil liberties and political rights were somewhat likely to have a more religious population—with the average person expressing stronger belief in God, and reporting more frequent prayer and religious attendance.  Countries that more people had fled from as refugees—another measure of oppression—were also somewhat likely to be more religious in this way.  However, the religion-oppression relationship was curvilinear, not linear: countries with less religious populations were some of the least and most oppressed in the world.

 

More importantly, the authors found that being higher in a United Nations measure—“a summary measure of average achievement in key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, being knowledgeable and have a decent standard of living”—went together both with having a less religious population and with being a freer country. This raised the possibility that upward mobility in human development caused both declining religiosity and increasing freedom, rather than freedom directly causing religious decline or vice versa.  When the authors controlled for human development, they found that the relationship between religion and oppression flipped direction.  Among any group of countries that scored similarly in human development, the more religious the people in those countries were, the less oppressed the countries were.

 

In the third, experimental, study, the authors gave some participants an opportunity to affirm their adherence to religiously devoted beliefs and practices (e.g., belief in God, belief in afterlife, attending religious services). This opportunity made participants less supportive of violating the rights of their enemies and militarizing their society than participants in control and alternative experimental conditions. So, just as more religious countries seemed less likely to suffer oppression (when controlling for human development), arousing devotional religious thoughts in an individual seemed to reduce support for oppression also.

 

The Specific Case of Muslim-Majority Countries

In the 52-country sample, the authors did an additional analysis, dividing up the countries by religious plurality/majority to see how relationships differed by religious groups. They divided the full sample up into countries with a Catholic plurality, a Muslim plurality, a religiously unaffiliated plurality, and so on—six groupings total.  In each of the four groupings that were not plurality Catholic or Protestant, the authors again found that the more religious the country was, the less oppressed it was.  This finding notably included Muslim countries—meaning that the more religious a Muslim-plurality country was, the less oppressed it was.  These four “religion-goes-with-freedom” relationships held whether controlling for human development or not.

 

Development-adjusted rankings of religion-grouped countries also suggested that Muslim countries were not particularly oppressive. Muslim-plurality countries were ranked towards the middle—not the top—of the six religious groupings on the two development-adjusted oppression measures.The link to the article can be found here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/2153599X.2017.1358208.

 

*Dr. Ian Hansen is an Associate Professor of Psychology at York College/CUNY with experience in social psychology, cultural psychology, political psychology and psychology of religion. His current projects focus on (1) understanding religiosity as a correlate of psychological conservatism that is potentially quite different from political conservatism (2) more generally assessing whether 2- or N-dimensional models of ideology strike a better balance between simplicity and explanatory power than the traditional one-dimensional (liberal vs. conservative) model (3) experimental approaches to transforming ideological self-construal, and (4) investigating whether there are moral objections to certain practices (like torture) that cannot be reduced to the known differences in moral priorities between liberals and conservatives. His degrees and majors are: PhD in Social Psychology from University of British

Columbia; MA in Social Psychology from University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign; and the BA in Philosophy from Swarthmore College.


CWE Professor Seamus Scanlon collaborates with Academy Award winner

The Long Wet Grass Premiere

Paul Nugent, Anna Nugent, Marketa Irgolva and Seamus Scanlon at Irish Screen America.

The Long Wet Grass,” the film adaptation of City College of New York librarian Seamus Scanlon’s award-winning play of the same title, premieres Oct. 1 at Irish Screen America in Manhattan. It features an original music score by Academy Award winner Marketa Irglova.

“I woke up one night and thought Marketa Irglova would be best person to write the music because she wrote “Falling Slowly” [Academy Award winner] from the film “Once,” said Scalon, a native of Galway, Ireland. “As a librarian at the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education, I used my skills to track down her agent and soon Marketa was on board.”

Scanlon produced and wrote this cinematic version of a love story set in 1997 during “The Troubles,” as the Northern Ireland conflict was known.  Victor, the protagonist, has abducted his childhood sweetheart for a minor transgression, but the pull of their love and history wrestles with the push of the violence that he inhabits.

The short film features lead actors from the stage version, Anna Nugent as Woman, and Paul Nugent as Victor McGowan.  Scanlon is a graduate of CCNY’s MFA in Creative Writing program.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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BCC EXPANDS JOB OPPORTUNITIES IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH A $672,000 Grant Will Train 120 for Paraprofessional Positions in Underserved Communities

September 25, 2017 — The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded Bronx Community College $672,000 for a new Behavioral Health Opportunities Program (BHOP).  The goal of the four-year initiative is to increase the number of paraprofessionals entering jobs in community and behavioral health in the Bronx.

The grant will fund 30 students a year, preparing them for entry-level positions at behavioral health service providers in underserved areas. It will include a Community Health Worker curriculum, internships, career guidance, job-readiness training, job placement and support. Those who complete BHOP will be ready for New York State certification and can continue their studies toward a BCC Associate in Science degree in Public Health.

Led by the Bronx Community College Division of Workforce Development and Continuing Education and BCC’s Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, the BHOP project team includes Acacia Network, Alcohol and Substance Abuse Providers of NYS, Bronx Community Health Network, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, Health People, Morris Heights Health Center and 1199SEIU Training and Employment Funds.

“We are excited to launch this new health care training program,” explained Kenneth Adams, Dean of Workforce Development and Continuing Education. “Working with our partners, BCC is poised to meet the growing demand for professionals in this field.”


BRONX COMMUNIY COLLEGE HOSTS CONCLAVE ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE City Officials and Community Activists Will Gather for “Living Free from Fear”

What: Living Free from Fear: A Bronx DV Roundtable Town Hall

When: Monday, October 2, 2017, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Where: The Hall of Fame Playhouse, Roscoe Brown Student Center, Bronx Community College, 2155 University Avenue, Bronx, New York

About: This day of lectures, panels and discussions will examine domestic violence in the borough, from the people it effects to the programs and policies designed to combat it and provide refuge for its victims. Speakers will include Cecile Noel, Commissioner for the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence and city officials who work on domestic violence issues. Topics will include “Local, State, and Federal Policy Shifts and their Impact on Survivors Seeking Stable Housing,” “Housing Challenges for Transgender & Gender Non-Conforming Survivors” and “Respecting our Elders’ Housing Needs.” Registration will start at 9:30 a.m. and lunch will be served. The event is free and open to the public. To register in advance, go to https://www.eventbrite.com/e/living-free-from-fear-bronx-dv-roundtable-town-hall-tickets-37953346481?aff=es2


At Inauguration, Lehman College President José Luis Cruz Announces Bold Plan to Grant 90,000 Degrees and Certificates by 2030

Dr. José Luis Cruz became only the third president to be inaugurated in the history of Lehman College and used the momentous occasion to announce a major new initiative called ‘90×30.’ The goal of the initiative is to double to 90,000, the number of degrees and high quality credentials that the College will be expected to grant by the year 2030.

President Cruz laid out five priorities in the coming years to begin to achieve those goals, including the hiring of additional full-time faculty and staff and “expanding professional advancement opportunities for all those who do their part to advance our mission.”

He also noted that despite recent economic gains, the Bronx remains the poorest county in New York State and ranks near the bottom five percent of counties in the nation for economic mobility for children in poor families. The Bronx also lags in educational attainment in the state, with only 27.7 percent of residents ages 25 to 64 with at least an associate degree.

“While the Bronx is moving forward and trending upward, not all Bronxites are positioned to benefit,” he said. “As a nationally recognized vehicle of upward mobility, Lehman College must assume a leadership role in driving educational attainment in the Bronx.”

President Cruz noted that if each of the estimated 462,000 Bronx residents over 25 who have a high school diploma or above but no bachelor’s degree had a path to obtain one, the impact on the borough would be substantial.

According to an analysis of economic indicators, residents would earn $6 billion in income, $2.8 billion in tax revenue would be generated, and more than 57,000 would be lifted out of poverty. “90×30 is a catalyst for urgent action that has the potential for transformative change in our home borough,” he said.

The 90×30 initiative will require growth in student enrollment for both degree-granting and certificate programs. The funds generated by increased enrollment will fund strategic increases in faculty and staff as well as additional support services so students can be positioned for further study or employment. Additional funding will be secured through new grants and donations. To jumpstart the efforts, the College has earmarked $3 million in existing resources—a “down payment” the President has called it—toward strategic initiatives that will ensure the College is on the right trajectory to meet 90×30.

The 90×30 initiative allows Lehman to build on recent successes. Over the past five years, Lehman had the largest increase in graduation rates among first-time and transfer students among CUNY senior, or 4-year, colleges. And research grants have doubled over the previous three-year average, and have increased by 70 percent increase over the last 5 years.

President Cruz said that setting a 2030 deadline means increasing the likelihood that students who currently attend K-12 schools in the Bronx and surrounding region would “benefit from the value of a Lehman education—either because they will earn a degree themselves or a parent or other relative will do so.”

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr. applauded 90×30. “There is no question that educational attainment opens the doors to economic and social mobility, not just for students, but also for their families,” Diaz said. “As an alumnus, I am proud that Lehman College is determined to bring opportunity to more Bronx residents. I look forward to working with President Cruz on this important initiative.”

For his inauguration, which happened just slightly over a year after the start of his tenure, President Cruz was surrounded by family members, mentors, and CUNY dignitaries, who offered congratulations and touted his dedication, devotion and vision for Lehman’s future.

The program opened with greetings from Dr. Rima Brusi, the president’s wife and a professor of anthropology and continued with mentors, Antonio Garcia Padilla, the former president of the University Puerto Rico and Dr. Mildred Garcia, the President of California State University, Fullerton. Kati Haycock, founder and president emeritus of The Education Trust Fund, delivered the keynote address. Chancellor James B. Milliken of The City University of New York and the Honorable William C. Thompson, Jr. chairperson, Board of Trustees, The City University of New York offered greetings and Thompson formally installed Cruz as Lehman’s third president.

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


Students Benefit from BMCC-NYU Partnerships

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Academic Affairs sponsored an afternoon gathering of two student cohort groups—the Pipeline Opportunity for Inter-Collegiate STEM Education (POISE) program and the Gallatin Undergraduate Initiative for Discovery in Education (GUIDE) program on September 21.

Both pipeline programs are products of a unique BMCC and New York University (NYU) partnership that allows a select group of currently enrolled BMCC students the chance to utilize the NYU academic support system including mentors, familiarize themselves with the NYU campus and connect with like-minded students. Students in both programs receive NYU IDs and are eligible for scholarships upon graduation from BMCC and enrollment at NYU.

Now in its fifth year, the POISE collaborative between BMCC and the Academic Achievement Program (AAP) within NYU’s College of Arts and Science (CAS) links BMCC students to bachelor’s degree programs at NYU where they can continue their education in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), as well as psychology and related majors.

GUIDE is a brand new collaborative between NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study and BMCC. Gallatin faculty and advisors mentor BMCC students, preparing them for Gallatin’s rigorous liberal arts Bachelor of Arts-degree program. GUIDE is tailored to students interested in studying social justice, which is broadly understood to include social movements, law and governance, urban democracy, economics, identity, political literature and art as well as environmental studies.

During the roundtable discussion at the event, Michael Hutmaker, BMCC Dean of Student Affairs encouraged the students to support one another as a BMCC community while at the NYU campus in the Village. “Take advantage of all that NYU has to offer you,” said Hutmaker. He noted that recent graduates from the POISE program have gone on to land jobs at high profile firms such as Citigroup Inc., Google Inc. and Goldman Sachs. Karrin Wilks, Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs called the group of students “illustrious.” She encouraged them to think about their experiences at BMCC and NYU in terms of their own dreams. “NYU positions their graduates into a healthy networking community,” which can be beneficial after college, Wilks added.

Many of the students in the room said they had no idea BMCC offered the sort of opportunities that programs such as POISE and GUIDE provide.

“My original plans were to just keep my grades up, and apply to a SUNY school, but then one day, I received an email from Student Affairs inviting me to apply for POISE,” said Engineering Science major and POISE member Mayumy Cordova Lozana.

“The chance to earn an NYU scholarship changed my plans completely,” she said.

BMCC Liberal Arts major Kevin Zambrano, a member of the new GUIDE cohort, says he has already immersed himself in student life at NYU. He was headed to a leadership retreat with other NYU students the weekend after the gathering.

“At NYU’s Gallatin School, I’ve designed my major around Post Colonial Feminism and Philosophy, and my career goal is to become a human rights lawyer,” he said.

The 2017-2018 BMCC POISE and GUIDE Cohorts include:

(POISE)

Adam Rahman (Science), Alicia Nnenna Chime (Computer Science). Jihad Gadsden (Biotechnology) Amanda Mckenzie (Science), Shaiku Jalloh (Science), Michael Caridad (Computer Science), Ehab Elrawi (Engineering Science) Babatunde Ogunniyi (Computer Information Systems), Kimberly Espejo, (Psychology), Serge Dontsa (Computer Information Systems), Mayumy Cordova Lozano (Engineering Science)

(GUIDE)

Saif Al-Islam Mozeb (Criminal Justice), Ahmad Bhatti (Communication Studies), Zainab Floyd (Art History), Chaya Konig (Psychology), Jahshana Olivierre (Liberal Arts), Shaquasha Reynolds (Psychology), Remiesha Siddo (Liberal Arts), Cascia Thompson (Writing and Literature), Kevin Zambrano (Liberal Arts)


BMCC Honors 4.0 Achievers 2017 Cohort

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Office of Student Affairs recognized 289 current students who completed 12 or more credits while maintaining a perfect 4.0 GPA at the end of the 2017 spring semester, during an evening ceremony, September 26 in Richard Harris Terrace.
President Antonio Pérez, Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Karrin Wilks and Vice President for Student Affairs Marva Craig as well as Dean of Student Affairs Michael Hutmaker all offered congratulatory remarks. Several department chairs were also in attendance.

President Pérez told the students it was always exciting to celebrate student success such as a perfect grade point average. But he also advised students to not feel defeated if they ever stumble or suffer setbacks as they continue their academic journey.

“I was never a 4.0 student, but it didn’t deter my drive to be successful, “ said the president.

He also encouraged the achievers to strive and be well-rounded individuals by getting involved in student clubs and other organizations and be willing to take the time to help or encourage their fellow students.

Provost Wilks thanked the students for their commitment to academic excellence. She said achievers in the room had demonstrated that they have leadership potential which would prove beneficial to both their careers and society.

“I see people throughout this room who can make the world a better place,” said Wilks.

Vice President of Student Affairs Marva Craig told the achievers they had mapped their journey of perfection. She also encouraged the students to listen to their peers and if they see them struggling academically, to offer assistance.

“Help others achieve what you’ve achieved,” said Craig.

In addition to a buffet meal and tables decorated by ornaments and small bags of customized BMCC M&M candies, this year’s ceremony was different from those in year’s past. Prior to the ceremony, the Office of Student Affairs challenged students to conceptualize a one-word theme for the year. Each achiever was instructed to think about two to three things they would like to accomplish this year.

Before receiving their certificates, each student took the podium and shared their academic and life goals with the audience.

This year’s achievers include;

(A-C) Jennifer Abrams, Kartik Aggarwal,Safi Ahmed,Jasmine Ahmed,Kimberly Alcock-Ainsworth, Parker Allen, Michele Alle, King Allen,Juan Alvarez Lucy Alvarez,,Burim Ameti,Mehran Amini Tehrani, Nancy An, Paloma Andrade, Zhulieta Angova, Ines Anous, Daniel Antipova, Isabel Antoniani,Romulo Armas Monje Aleksandra Artyfikiewiczd,, Etty Ausch,Ifat Ayalon,Almog Badash, Janice Bailey, Daniel Baranello, Eter Bardanashvili, Rasidatou Barry, Anna Bello, Juan, Beltrez, Christopher Belyusar,,Nadav Ben Shitrit, Maher Benham, Kayla Benjamin, Hicham Benkada, Phurbu Bhote Sherpa, Anastasiya Biloblotska, Massey Blakeman, Matthew Blume, Lizeth Francy ,A Bonilla Caballero, Yaakov Brezak, Julissa Brito, Colby Brittain, Sophie Brittain, Zuzanna Bronczyk, Patrick Browne, Jeffrey Bryak, Alexandra Buesgens, Irena Butcher, Taylor Butler, Nicole Bytnerowicz, Tiffany Cales.Ticiana Camargo-Panagis, Carlos Alberto Campoy Rodriguez, Jenny Cann, Victoria Carolina, Divita Casada, Stephen Catullo, Admira Cemalovic, Shuk Han Chan, Noella Chan Hunter, Shyendra Chandrasena, Proloy Chaudhuri, Michael Checkett, Andrew Chee, Jason Chen, Kevin Chu, Donna Cicchesi, Lenny Ciotti, Sarah Cohen, Ashley Corbiere, Mayumy Cordova Lozano, Jessica Corsino, Dylan Cortes, William Cosper, Tiarah Coston, Daniel Crosby, Jessica Cummings; and

(D-L) Ben Dayan, Alexander De La Vega, Madeline Deleon, Matthew Delgado,, Carolina Dellepiane, Sophia Deverell, Bernard Devlin, Defne Dilsiz, Steven Diodonet, Patrick Diston, Maya Divack, Maggie Dong, Volodymyr Dorodkin, Zeudis Escalona, Courtney Essien, Chelsey Fasano, Noah Fleiss, Iga Flores, Nicholas Fosmire, Steve Fred, Kyle Gagen, Alena Garver, Tiffany Gentry, Lydia Georgantzi, Hope Goldstein, Maria Gonzalez, Allan Gonzalez, Tazhiana Gordon, Janis Grant, Iyana Grogan, Emilia Grycuk, Krystal Gulisano, Corie Hahn, Devin Hammond, Elizabeth Hammond, Wes Hardin, Chontel Harris, Brandi Hassouna, Felicia Haupt, Sheryl Henneberger, Anja Hernandez, Nicholas Herrera, Lina Huang, Shanshan Huang, Ricardo Hughes, Josef Jacome, Bojana Jankovic, Barbara Javoriota Jenkins, Eunju Jeon, Eunsun Jeong, Kevin Jesmain,Suilan Jon Del Rosario,Somia Kamal, Nadjanara Katehis, Christina Kavanagh, Shane Kearns, Sean Kelleher, Ulanda Kesl, Masoumeh Khadempour, Asim Khan, Sun Young Kim, Bohdan Klotska.,Daewoong Ko, Sekou Koulibaly, Evangelia Krana, Winston Kruger, Magdalena Krzyzewska, Kiwook Kwon, Zoe Kypuros, Jovany Labardy, Heather Lacapria, Michelle Lai, Sin Tung Lam, Urgen Lama, Jie Lan. Amanda Lascano, Hyojin Lee, Sang Yun Lee. Jinho Lee, Misa Lee, Cynthia Lendor. Or Levy, Dorotea Levy De Szekely, Eleonore Ley, Yujun Liang, Chao Lin, Jenny Lin Chen, Reuben Lirio, Qi Liu, Gabrielle Loneck; and

(M- Z) Mardiya Magnus Asamoah, Clarissa Martinez, Alexis Martinez, Kemily Martinez Juan Martinez, Junko Matsunami, Chrissy Mazey, Iryna Mcdonald, Natalya Medina,, Karen Medlin, Dmitry Medvedev, Maria Mella, Danica Mijovic, Cristyn Mingo De Los Santos, Tenzin Mingyur, Monalisa Moldovan Solicd, Mahin Monsoor, Daniel Moore, Kelsey Moran, David Morrin, Nellyel Munoz, Ritienne Muscat, Alexandra Napp, Rasul Nekzad, Jessica Nelson, Colette Nelson, Itoko Nemoto, Steven Novick, Joseph Oakes, Samantha O’brien, Marlon Ocampo, Edward O’hare, Yana Olshevskaya, Yana Panchenko, Emmanuel Perez, Stephanie Perez. Delilah Perez, Alicia Persaud, Azaliia Persits, Karona Pich, Lidia Piorkowska Elias Poland, Abigail Prestol, Ashley Przestrzelski, Dewi Puspita, Jian Qin, Chuyin Qiu, Victor Ramirez, Reshma Ramsarup Md. Masud Rana, Youcef Rebrab, Jazmin Rendon, Quinn Rhi, Grisel Rivera, Nathalie Rivera, Anika Rivera, Michael Rojko, Alexia Roldan, Julian Rolof, Leslie Romero Rodriguez, Katherine Rosario, Britania Rose, Jessica Rosenthal, Ineese Russell, Breanna Sabo, Nigina Safarova, Mehmet Sahin, Julian Sapala, Sheila Sarkar, Michael Seifert, Abdullah Shahed, Zhijie Shao, Valeriya Sharypova, Maya Sherpa, Sumi Sherpa, Rosalie Sherrod, Thamy Shirley, Richard Short, Efrat Shoval, Grace Silk, Charles Silverio Da Silva, Emily Simon, Andre Simon, Sara Sirag, Brittany Smith, Grace Spaulding, Margaret Spoddig, Jordan Stern, Grethel Suazo, Goumattie Sukraj, Jennifer Sung, Kazumasa Suzuki, Brian Tai, Catalina Tanase, Fnu Tenzin Choedon, Paola Terolli, Courtney Thomas, Mateja Tokic, Valentine Tonaj, Kevin Towler, Chau Ying Tse, Ian Turner, Tania Veloz, Jamel Vilfort, Javier Villegas, Angela Vuyst, Soheir Wahba, Max Waldroop, Jian Wang, Jasmine Washington, Meghan Wolfe, John Woytalewicz, Jinyu Wu, Tiantian Xia, Lina Xu, Yuanhe Ye, Jee Young Yoo, Younes Zerhouni. Fusheng Zhao, Haojun Zhao and Ya Han Zhu.


Psychology Study Finds Religion and Liberty Go Hand in Hand—and in Muslim

CONTACT:  Dr. Ian Hansen at York College, CUNY

(347) 466-3562

ihansen@york.cuny.edu

 

Many public intellectuals and political movements in the West consider the

popular embrace of religious belief—particularly Islam—to increase the risk of suffering

oppression in one’s country. However, a new set of psychology studies provides convincing

evidence that this view is a misleading oversimplification. According to the lead researcher,

“Religion and oppression go together like ice cream sales and street violence, or like cows and

Republicans. To figure out how much one causes the other, if at all, you have to take other related

things into account. And Islam is nowhere close to being the most oppressive cultural system in the

world. When comparing Muslim-majority countries to countries with a similar degree of development,

their levels of oppression are about average.”

The set of three studies, titled “Religion and Oppression: Cross-National and

Experimental Investigations,” appears in the current issue of Religion Brain and Behavior. The

authors—Ian Hansen, PhD, at York College, CUNY; Valerie Jackson, PhD, at University of

California-San Francisco; and Andrew Ryder, PhD, at Concordia University—examined data

from two previously-conducted cross-national surveys, one of ten countries (10,068 participants)

and one of 52 countries (73,303 participants). The authors also conducted an experimental

study with a student sample from a diverse urban public college in New York, one with a

relatively religious population.

Results from the two cross-national surveys at first appeared to confirm the common

Western view that religion and oppression go together. Countries that the organization Freedom

House ranked lower in civil liberties and political rights were somewhat likely to have a more

religious population—with the average person expressing stronger belief in God, and reporting

more frequent prayer and religious attendance. Countries that more people had fled from as

refugees—another measure of oppression—were also somewhat likely to be more religious in

this way. However, the religion-oppression relationship was curvy, not straight: countries with

less religious populations were some of the least and most oppressed in the world.

More importantly, the authors found that being higher in a United Nations measure—“a

summary measure of average achievement in key dimensions of human development: a long

and healthy life, being knowledgeable and have a decent standard of living”—went together both

with having a less religious population and with being a freer country. This raised the possibility

that upward mobility in human development caused both declining religiosity and increasing

freedom, rather than freedom directly causing religious decline or vice versa. When the authors

controlled for human development, they found that the relationship between religion and

oppression flipped direction. Among any group of countries that scored similarly in human

development, the more religious the people in those countries were, the less oppressed the

countries were.

In the third, experimental, study, the authors gave some participants an opportunity to

affirm their adherence to religiously devoted beliefs and practices (e.g., belief in God, belief in

afterlife, attending religious services). This opportunity made participants less supportive of

violating the rights of their enemies and militarizing their society than participants in control and

alternative experimental conditions. So, just as more religious countries seemed less likely to

suffer oppression (when controlling for human development), arousing devotional religious

thoughts in an individual seemed to reduce support for oppression also.

The Specific Case of Muslim-Majority Countries

In the 52-country sample, the authors did an additional analysis, dividing up the countries

by religious plurality/majority to see how relationships differed by religious groups. They divided

the full sample up into countries with a Catholic plurality, a Muslim plurality, a religiously

unaffiliated plurality, and so on—six groupings total. In each of the four groupings that were not

plurality Catholic or Protestant, the authors again found that the more religious the country was,

the less oppressed it was. This finding notably included Muslim countries—meaning that the

more religious a Muslim-plurality country was, the less oppressed it was. These four “religiongoes-

with-freedom” relationships held whether controlling for human development or not.

Development-adjusted rankings of religion-grouped countries also suggested that Muslim

countries were not particularly oppressive. Muslim-plurality countries were ranked towards the

middle—not the top—of the six religious groupings on the two development-adjusted oppression

measures.

Muslim-plurality countries were also, notably, the most religious of all six religion-based

groupings of countries—most endorsing of belief in God, most frequent prayers, most frequent

religious attendance. If religion goes hand in hand with liberty (when controlling for human

development) then why are Muslim countries—as the most religious countries in the world—not

also the freest? The answer appears to lie in the relationship between religiosity and

conservative psychological tendencies like exclusivity (“my beliefs are the only true beliefs”) and

authoritarianism (“we should have strong leaders”, “the army should take over when the

government is incompetent”). In all religious groups examined, religious beliefs and exclusivistauthoritarian

beliefs were somewhat likely to go hand in hand. And the popularity of exclusivistauthoritarian

exclusivistauthoritarian

beliefs were somewhat likely to go hand in hand. And the popularity of exclusivistauthoritarian

beliefs was, unsurprisingly, associated with more oppression in a country.

Muslim-plurality countries, in addition to being the most religious of all six religion-based

country groupings, were also the most conservative (exclusivist and authoritarian). Thus these

two psychological tendencies—religiosity and conservatism—may cancel each other out with

regard to national oppression, leaving Muslim countries in the development-adjusted global

middle on oppression, rather than at the bottom or top.

In fact, the least oppressed countries in the samples were the ones in which religiosity

“outran” exclusivist-authoritarian values (among religious-conservative countries), or in which

inclusive-democratic values outran irreligious values (among irreligious-liberal countries). This

“outrunning” measure was a better predictor of liberty-versus-oppression in a country than

religiosity or conservatism measured without respect to the other tendency.

Together, the studies suggest that there is no evidence that religiosity exacerbates

oppression, and the empirical evidence supports, if anything, the opposite claim. Exclusivistauthoritarianism,

on the other hand, which is associated with religiosity, does seem to have

some oppressive potential.

The link to the full article can be found here:  http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/34FMQhQiDaSEMRwNkb9H/full

*Dr. Ian Hansen is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at York College/CUNY with experience in social psychology, cultural psychology, political psychology and psychology of religion. His current projects focus on (1) understanding religiosity as a correlate of psychological conservatism that is potentially quite different from political conservatism (2) more generally assessing whether 2- or N-dimensional models of ideology strike a better balance between simplicity and explanatory power than the traditional one-dimensional (liberal vs. conservative) model (3) experimental approaches to transforming ideological self-construal, and (4) investigating whether there are moral objections to certain practices (like torture) that cannot be reduced to the known differences in moral priorities between liberals and conservatives. His degrees and majors are: PhD in Social Psychology from University of British Columbia; MA in Social Psychology from University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign; and the BA in Philosophy from Swarthmore College.


CCNY Spitzer students receive Castagna Scholarship for study abroad

Castagna Scholarship Study Abroad in Barcelona 2017

Architecture students and Professor Fabian Llonch (left) at the Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família in Barcelona during their summer 2017 study abroad.

Two architecture students, from the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at The City College of New York, are studying in Barcelona, Spain this fall. Renowned for its unique and historical architecture, these students are taking in all Barcelona has to offer on Castagna Architectural Scholarships.

Since its inception in 2016, the scholarship has provided support to nine architecture students who have achieved academic excellence and demonstrated financial need.

Architecture students, in both the bachelor and master’s programs, receive a full year’s tuition and a study abroad and book stipend as winners of the scholarship. Past recipients have studied in Berlin in spring and in Spain in summer and fall.

“The Castagna Scholarship allows immersion into other cultures – broadening ones outlook, acceptance, and integration of new cultural ideas,” said Solomon Oh, a fifth year Spitzer student who studied in Barcelona this summer. “Studying in Barcelona revealed the city’s positive permeability between public and private realms; the experience will indefinitely inform my practice of design.”

Fall study abroad participants in Spain are:

Matthew Shufelt, M. Arch; and

Rachel Ware, M. Arch.

The Spitzer School’s hope is continued support for past and eligible winners and the inclusion of seven to eight new winners for fall 2018 and spring 2019. The scholarships are made possible through the foundation’s generosity and continued commitment to public education.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION HONORS DEAN OF CUNY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH WITH PRESTIGIOUS AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE, LEADERSHIP AND INNOVATION  

The dean of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, Dr. Ayman El-Mohandes, has received the American Public Health Association’s prestigious Executive Director’s Citation for “exceptional distinguished service.”

Dean El-Mohandes was cited for his “extraordinary leadership and innovation in strengthening the Association’s membership and development efforts.” He is one of 11 educators, elected officials and health leaders named as 2017 recipients of the APHA’s national awards. The annual awards, which recognize individuals for outstanding contributions in the field, will be presented in November during APHA’s 2017 Annual Meeting and Expo in Atlanta.

Past recipients of the Executive Director’s Citation include Dr. Jonas Salk, City College alumnus and polio vaccine developer, who was honored posthumously in 2014, and Microsoft founder Bill Gates of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, who received the award in 2003.

“We congratulate Dr. El-Mohandes, a distinguished scholar and dean of CUNY’s School of Public Health, on this extraordinary recognition of his leadership and commitment to the critical field of public health,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said.

“I am deeply honored and humbled by this recognition from APHA,” Dr. El-Mohandes said. “I have always been passionate about serving public health’s professional organization and will continue to do so going forward.”

Dr. El-Mohandes, MB BCh, M.D., MPH, MSc, is an internationally recognized leader in the field of public health. A pediatrician, epidemiologist and academician, he is an established researcher in the field of infant mortality reduction in minority-group populations. He has been dean of the CUNY School of Public Health since 2013. He has served on the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association, as Chair of the Association’s Development Committee, and as a member of its Social Responsibility Committee.

The American Public Health Association is a 145-year-old, Washington, D.C.-based professional organization that advocates for public health issues and policies grounded in research; promotes best practices, and “champions the health of all people and all communities.”

Georges Benjamin, M.D., executive director of APHA, said of this year’s award winners, “Their leadership, service and dedication are exemplary. We celebrate their accomplishments in improving health and helping create the healthiest nation.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Welcome the New Director of Institutional Advancement

Please join us in welcoming our new Director of Development of Institutional Advancement, Mr. John Frank.

Prior to his appointment as the Director of Development at Hostos Community College, Mr. Frank served as a Major Gift Officer at the Brooklyn College Foundation where he managed a select portfolio of alumni. For thirteen years, John was the Director of Development and Public Relations for AABR, Inc., a nonprofit dedicated to people with disabilities. He was responsible for all aspects of development: creating strategic plans, managing events (galas, golf outings, and cocktail parties), authoring grants, soliciting and cultivating donors as well as crafting newsletters and press releases.

Since 2003, John has taught as an Adjunct Lecturer at LaGuardia Community College, courses in Criminology, Sociology, Politics, Law and Human Rights and Leadership. On occasion, he’s taught marketing and business-related courses for Baruch College’s Continuing and Professional Studies program. His past experience includes teaching in the New York City school system, most notably at Stuyvesant High School where he taught History and Spanish.

Mr. Frank is an active member of his community, having served as a Member of Community Board #7 in Flushing. He is a past President of the Thomas Jefferson Democratic Club, former President of the Northshore Anti-Graffi Volunteers and former Big Brother for Brothers Big Sisters of New York City.

John served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Paraguay. He earned a BA from Columbia University and a MPP from Harvard University’s John. F. Kennedy School of Government.


CUNY SPS Launches Online BA in Liberal Studies

New York, NY – September 22, 2017 — Employment and education program analysts continuously emphasize the advantages of Liberal Studies as preparation for successful careers. The CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) developed the University’s first fully online liberal studies degree to ensure that students are presented with an affordable and accessible option to gain the aptitude that will place them at an advantage in their careers.

Starting in Spring 2018, CUNY SPS will offer a BA in Liberal Studies, an online degree program that addresses the global workplace’s need for graduates with specific soft-skills, disciplinary awareness, and a firm grounding in general education.

“Our students will receive the broad knowledge base that comes with studying our different courses, and they will also develop competencies that employers want such as high-level research, writing, project management, communication, and statistical analysis skills,” says Dr. Carl Grindley, academic director of the liberal studies and communication and media programs at CUNY SPS.

Liberal Studies develops ethical awareness in the world of work, teaches techniques of effective collaboration, and provides practical experience gained through internships, individual projects, and credit for prior learning portfolios. The BA in Liberal Studies degree program will broaden students’ pathways to understanding different perspectives of local and global communities while preparing them to meet the current and upcoming challenges of our society.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Curriculum Night 2017 – Schedule

Dear NEST+m Families,

Curriculum Night 2017-18 is this Thursday, September 28th. Please click on the link below for the Curriculum Night Schedule.

CURRICULUM NIGHT SCHEDULE 2017-2018

Our doors will open at 4:45 on Thursday. We look forward to seeing you here.


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of September 25, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

I am hoping that you have been enjoying this weekend’s glorious, summer-like weather.

For those who celebrated Rosh Hashanah—Happy New Year.

Last Wednesday was the 10th instructional day of our 2017-18 school year.

During these first days of school, our teachers have prioritized the development of caretaking, student-centered classrooms that enable every student to feel valued, recognized and cared for as members of our K-12 school community.

We believe that a relationship-based learning environment enables every NEST+m student to develop the trust, confidence and mindsets necessary for true learning to occur.  For instance, self-advocating when one has not yet mastered a content understanding or skill; working toward the next hardest skill within a lesson or a unit of study; learning to self-assess one’s work or to assess the work of a peer using a skills-based rubric.


On Monday September 25, at 8:30am we will host our September Lower Grades (K-5) Principal’s Coffee in the NEST+m cafe. Parental entrance and sign-in takes place at the school safety desk located at the top of the ramp inside our courtyard entrance. All NEST+m parents, guardians and caretakers are welcome.

This Thursday, September 28th, our doors will open at 4:45pm for Curriculum Night, an opportunity for parents, guardians and caretakers to meet and hear from your child’s teachers. Thank you for your patience as we finalize our curriculum night schedule which will be released soon.

In advance of our evening together I am writing to share some instructional highlights from across our K-12 community.

Theory of Action: As one school, K-12, NEST+m is uniquely positioned to develop students’ content understandings and skills. One way that we connect learning experiences across our K-12 classrooms is through our deliberate focus on the teaching of reading, writing and discipline-specific literacy. As we know: analysis, synthesis, argument and applications of knowledge require both content understandings and discipline-specific skills that are best supported through evidence-based reading, writing and conversation.

This focus on discipline-specific literacy enables us to strengthen the capacity for all students to create high level demonstrations of learning that have personal meaning for each student.

Habits of Mind: Habits of mind provide an intellectual underpinning for work across disciplines and grade levels. Teachers in NEST+m’s Upper Grades (9-12) have introduced the following habits of mind as a through line to support student success.

  • Perseverance: We will work together and persevere—even when the work is very difficult
  • Courage: We will be courageous in our questioning, creativity, and academic risk taking
  • Responsibility: We will be responsible— we will work with academic integrity, be in attendance, be prepared, and on time each day
  • Engagement: We will be intellectually open and responsive to new ideas from texts as well as our peers; we will actively engage with multiple sources and each other.

Teachers College, Columbia University Reading & Writing Project:
Through the generous support of PTA fundraising, our partnership with the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project is entering its 2nd year for grades K-5 and expanding up to Grades 6-8.  TC’s work is strengthening our planning, instruction and assessment practices in all disciplines. For more information about TCRWP, please see: http://readingandwritingproject.org/

Strengthening our K-5 Sciences: For parents and families who are new to NEST+m this year, please click here to read a letter which was distributed to families in June 2017.

Thank you Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer: Over the summer ActivPanels were installed into every NEST+m classroom for Grades 6-12. Document cameras will soon be installed into every classroom for Grades K-5. Over the summer NEST+m was awarded a $100k technology grant from the office of Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. This grant will enable us to complete our technological infrastructure upgrade so that every classroom features an ActivPanel and document camera by Fall 2018.

Promethean ActivPanel:
https://www.prometheanworld.com/products/interactive-flat-panels/activpanel
Document Camera:
https://www.prometheanworld.com/products/accessories/actiview

New to NEST+m Teachers and Faculty: This week families will have the opportunity to meet our new and returning to NEST+m teachers and faculty. Our Faculty directory is live on the NEST+m K-12 website “contact us” tab. Meanwhile, please join me in welcoming the following new-to-NEST+m teachers and faculty:

Administrative Team:
Assistant Principal (IA), Grades 6-8, Mr. Steve Hernon
Assistant Principal Operations (on one year assignment with NEST+m), Ms. Devorah Zamansky

Grades K-5:
Art: Ms. Samantha Hubbell
Music (leave replacement): Mr. Jeffrey DuPont
Kindergarten: Ms. Patricia Salguero
Grade 1: (leave replacement): Ms. Michelle LaPorte
Grade 2: (leave replacement): Ms. Mirry Joo
Grade 3: Ms. Kathleen DeLeon
Grades 4 (leave replacements): Ms. Zoe Russell, Ms. Esther Lee
Grade 5: Mr. Tory Anderson

Grades 6-8:
Grade 6: Science: Dr. Nancy Ruel
World Langauages (See below).

Special Education & Related Service Providers:
Ms. Carrie Bray, Grades 9-12 ICT
Mr. Derek Gregory, Grades 9-12 ICT
Ms. Jessica Lownes, Middle Grades ICT
Ms. Hagar Sadan, IEP Teacher
Mr. Bilal Salaam, Grades 9-12 ICT
Ms. Limor Yerushalmi, Occupational Therapy

Grades 9-12
English Department: Dr. Alicia Lerman, Mr. Chandler Wells
Math Department: Ms. Ruby Mercure, Mr. Greg Weber
Music Department: Mr. Craig McGorry.
Physical Education Department: Mr. Darnell James, Mr. Scott McLaughlin
Science Department: Mr. Clifton Masdea
Social Studies Department: Ms. India Allen, Ms. Halle Bauer, Mr. Benjamin Waldman
World Languages Department: Ms. Carolina Barreiro-Ojeda, Ms. Marisel Estrada, Mr. Jonathan Richman

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


HS for Media & Communications standouts win CCNY scholarships

CCNY 2017 President’s Community Scholarship recipient Melissa Olivar

Angel Herrera

Melissa Olivar and Angel Herrera, both summer graduates from the High School for Media and Communications in Washington Heights with immigrant roots, are the latest President’s Community Scholars at The City College of New York.

They are the eighth cohort of community scholars since the awards – formally dubbed The City College of New York President’s Community Scholarship program — began in 2010. It was introduced by City College to strengthen the links between the institution and the surrounding community. Awards are based strictly on academic merit and Scholars are required to perform community service and maintain good academic standing as a condition for renewal up to five years. The President’s Community Scholars program is sponsored by the 21st Century Foundation of The City College of New York. To date, 65 students have received scholarships.

Olivar was born in Queens of Mexican immigrant parents.  She was Class of 2017 Valedictorian at the High School for Media & Communications and the recipient of a humanitarian award for her volunteerism.

“I love to help people, which is why I want to be a doctor,” said the Astoria resident, who plans to major in chemistry.

Olivar applauded CCNY for the scholarship and said without it entering college would have been a big financial burden for her immigrant family. Her older sister is an undergraduate at York College.

Herrera moved to New York from his native Dominican Republic at age 12. He was on the Principal’s Honor Roll, the swim team and was school treasurer in high school. He also volunteered for the Navy ROTC.

He said the CCNY award was a huge help. “I live by myself and need help financially because I’m working and studying,” he remarked.

Herrera is undecided on his major but is leaning toward an engineering field.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Hostos50 Anniversary Events Off and Running!

Welcome Day Salutes Students, Both New And Old

Hostos’ golden anniversary would not mean anything if it were not for the incredible students who attended the College for the past 50 years.

To ensure the latest class of Hostos students begin their academic journey on the right foot, “Welcome Day” was held on Sept. 7. The all-day series of events helped acclimate students to Hostos through workshops, networking opportunities and fun activities.

Organized by the President’s Office and the Office of Student Activities, events were open to all new and all returning students.

Jerry Rosa, the Director of Student Activities said the aim was to “have a good beginning of the school year ‘WIFI’ – that is, we wanted them to feel Welcomed, Informed, Familiar with student services and Involved in Student Life.”

The workshops, titled “Strategies for Academic Success,” “Embracing Student Life,” and “Planning for the Future,” offered everything from relaxation techniques to advice on how student life activities can make them better students and citizens. Advice about planning for life after Hostos was even offered.

The day was rounded out by a scavenger hunt, bingo, lunch and other fun social activities.

You can see some great photos from this event on our Facebook Page here.

 

Hostos Salutes Alumni

Welcome Day ended by saluting several special alumni who returned for the “Alumni Speakers Bureau Recognition Reception.” Hosted by the Division for Institutional Advancement and the Alumni Relations Office, the evening showcased some of the best graduates Hostos has to offer.

Adam Meyer, the Alumni Speakers Bureau Coordinator, served as host and Vice President of Institutional Advancement Ana Martínez also welcomed the special guests.

Longtime Hostos Business Professor Sandy Figueroa received an award for her ongoing work engaging Hostos alumni through classroom presentations. “It’s always great to have graduates return to my class to talk about how Hostos has helped them get ahead in their professional lives,” Figueroa said.

Class of 2012 alum Saddiq Terrance A. McSween, now a Registered Radiologic Technologist, returned to the College to receive the Alumni Speakers Bureau Award for Outstanding Service to the Community. “I never tried to hide my past… I came here as an ex-felon with the plan of changing my life for the better. Hostos Community College gave me the foundation necessary for me to achieve my goals.”

As an honor student at Hostos, McSween was elected Vice President of the Student Government and was President of the Black Student Union. McSween was awarded numerous grants and scholarships, including the Martin Luther King Scholarship, the Circle of 100 Scholarship, as well as the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) Scholarship Award for Excellence.

Speaking to the spirit of the event himself, McSween urged others to give back and offer support to others who have helped them down the twisting roads of life. “If you see a troubled or at-risk youth—and it doesn’t just have to be at Hostos—reach out to that individual and talk to them so that they can get back on the right path.”

McSween also spoke passionately about how everyone should “water and nurture their roots.” He spoke fondly about how Hostos helped him build a firm foundation for himself and his family.

Other Hostos alumni who were honored were: Pedro Alvarez, Bruno Beja-Umukoro, Latayvia Brown, Sharae Brown, Adelyn E. Castro, Angel Cuevas, Feliberto Feliz, Gretcher P. Hernandez Rosario, Jose Jacobo, Maria D. Jimenez, Fernando “Ponce” Laspina, Jubril Lawal, Sierra Lebron, Makea Lowe, Majory Marekera, Juan C. Martinez, Camille Mckinnon, Idelsa Mendez, Gabrielle Napolitano, Jamila Outlar, Roberto Ragone, Naomi Strother, Saudy Tejada, Luis E. Torres, Steven Walker, and Johnnie H. Williams Jr.

You can see some great photos from this event on our Facebook Page here.

If you are interested in joining the Alumni Speakers Bureau, or if you would like to book a speaker for an in-classroom presentation or panel discussion, please contact ASB Coordinator Adam Meyer at AMEYER@HOSTOS.CUNY.EDU or call the Alumni Relations Office at 718-518-4180.

 

Incredible Legacy of Las Tres Hermanas Honored

On Sept. 14, Hostos Community College opened Hispanic Heritage Month with a heartfelt multimedia exhibition chronicling the lives of three Puerto Rican women who supported their Bronx community when it needed them most.

A reception for Las Tres Hermanas: Art, Education & Activists brought the community to the A-Atrium at Hostos to open the exhibition and pay tribute to Elba Cabrera and her two late sisters, Evelina López Antonetty, Lillian López, who profoundly changed the cultural and political landscape of New York – especially the Bronx – through literature, literacy, the visual and performing arts, and political advocacy.

Hosted by Malín Falú, the heartfelt reception was attended by Elba Cabrera, a longtime supporter of the College and member of the Hostos Community College Foundation Board.

Falú, an American journalist and model and popular personality on Spanish language radio in New York City, called the sisters “an inspiration for us all” as she talked about how they changed the political and social landscape of New York City, while serving as inspiration for the next generation of change agents.

Hostos President David Gómez was also in attendance and talked about the incredible impact Las Tres Hermanas had.

“It is appropriate that we celebrate their legacy,” President Gómez said. “They truly made New York a more just city. We are all in their debt.”

The event also saw Hostos Professor Lizette Colón speak passionately about the current challenges of Puerto Rico, Las Tres Hermanas’ homeland, and why it is important to stay involved and follow their example of activism.

An emotional Elba Cabrera stole the show, as she brought up many member of her family to thunderous applause. Cabrera said she was moved beyond words, but wanted to let the audience know that her “sisters are also here in attendance.”

The event was rounded out by bandleader and percussionist Bobby Sanabria and friends.

Guests marveled at the old photos of the sisters, which told the story of their lives and their important work. The exhibition features archival pieces, ephemera and original works, and will be on view at Hostos until October 10, 2017, in the A-Atrium at 475 Grand Concourse in the Bronx.

The original exhibition was conceived by Christine Licata and Elena Martínez and was produced by the Bronx Music Heritage Center. The curators are Martínez and widely published photographer Joe Conzo, Jr. The Hostos Exhibition Researcher and Curator was Nydia R. Edgecombe and includes new artwork by two Hostos graduates, Andre Velóz and Alice Curiel, and Hostos employee, Pat Mabry, a quilt artist.

The event was presented by the Division of Institutional Advancement in collaboration with the President’s Office. The Exhibition Committee was comprised of Elba Cabrera, Nydia R. Edgecombe, Wallace I. Edgecombe, Elena Martínez, Idelsa Mendez, Morris Ores, Juanita Lanzo, and Rich Pietras.

You can watch Bronx News 12’s coverage of this event by clicking here.

You can see some great photos from this event on our Facebook Page here.

More about Las Tres Hermanas
Evelina López Antonetty, Lillian López, and Elba Cabrera were among the most prominent in a long line of women activists of the Puerto Rican Diaspora. Evelina Antonetty (1922-1984) migrated to New York City in 1933. She worked closely with progressive Congressman Vito Marcantonio and was a close lieutenant of the legendary labor organizer Jesus Colón. In the mid-60s she founded United Bronx Parents (UBP), which advocated for tenants’ rights, bilingual education, health services, childcare and legal rights. Although its focus was primarily the Puerto Rican community in the South Bronx, UBP became a model for similar inner-city institutions across the country.

Joined by her mother and younger sister, Elba, Lillian López (1925-2005) followed Evelina to New York in 1935. She was one of the first Puerto Ricans of the Great Migration to graduate from Hunter College (1952) and then the prestigious Columbia University Library Science Program (1960). During a long career with the New York Public Library, she founded the South Bronx Project, which positioned libraries to assume vital roles in community development. Its success led her to become Coordinator of Special Services of the entire library system, a position from which she spearheaded many outreach efforts throughout New York City using the South Bronx Project as a model.

The “baby” of the family, Elba Cabrera was no less driven. After raising two strapping sons, she immersed herself in the world of arts and culture, becoming a pioneering and fierce advocate. She was among the founding staff of the Association of Hispanic Arts where she became an important mentor for emerging Latino artists. She has served on the board of the Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture since its founding in 1982, helping to mold it into one of the most important voices in Latino arts in the United States.

Three sisters. Three pioneers of the Latino community. Three tireless and lifelong advocates of parents’ rights, literacy and the arts. Evelina, Lillian and Elba have left a sparkling legacy for Latinos nationwide. Although they worked in different fields, their efforts always complemented each other, and they spent their lives deeply connected, maintaining a vast extended family that was never limited to blood relations. It is telling that among the communities they so tirelessly served, they are invariably referred to as Titi (auntie) and Madrina (godmother).

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Fourth CCNY Sternberg Lecture looks at “Democratizing the Outdoors”

John D. Judge, president and CEO of the Appalachian Mountain Club

The fourth annual Sternberg Family Lecture at The City College of New York on Monday, Oct. 2, presents a conversation between John D. Judge, president and CEO of the Appalachian Mountain Club and CCNY Interim President Vincent G. Boudreau. Hosted by the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, their discussion is entitled “Democratizing the Outdoors: A Program for Wise Policy and Student Leadership” and starts at 4:30 p.m. in Shepard Hall, room 350.

The event is free and open to the public. Click here to RSVP.

An experienced nonprofit and government leader, Judge has headed the AMC since January 2012 when he was appointed its fourth chief executive. As president, he oversees the nation’s oldest outdoor recreation and conservation organization – founded in 1876 — with more than 300,000 members, advocates, constituents, and supporters in 12 chapters from Maine to Washington, D.C.

Judge has worked to make the outdoors more accessible and get more people active outdoors and in conservation stewardship.

Headquartered in Charleston, Mass., the AMC advocates for the conservation and protection of the mountains, rivers, and forests. It owns and operates 70 outdoor lodges, camps and facilities; publishes books, maps and guides; produces and leads 8,000 adult outdoor programs; maintains 1,800 miles of trails; and delivers programs for 90,000 youth.

Judge’s previous experience includes respected nonprofit and government leadership roles. He served in several senior executive, development and marketing roles, including executive director of Habitat for Humanity Greater Boston.

As a community volunteer, he co-founded the New Frontier Society of the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation, a non-partisan group that encourages young adult participation in public affairs. He was State Chair of the Massachusetts Commission on Community Service and Volunteerism AmeriCorps from 2001 to 2004.

About Vincent Boudreau
Dr. Vincent Boudreau has served as City College Interim President since November 2016. He was previously Dean of the college’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. He is a professor of political science at CCNY and a member of the City University of New York graduate faculty. A specialist in the politics of social movements, particularly in Southeast Asia, his latest book is “Resisting Dictatorship: Repression and Protest in Southeast Asia” (Cambridge University Press). Boudreau is a graduate of Cornell University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1991.

About the Sternberg Family Lecture
The Sternberg Family Lecture in Public Scholarship showcases the relationship between the scholarship of the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, and the urgent public needs and concerns of our time. The lecture is designed to foster conversations that mobilize academic expertise into immediately relevant public and policy related discussions, and to disseminate those conversations to broader communities of stakeholders.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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AS DISASTERS STRIKE, CUNY SCRAMBLES TO HELP

Campuses of The City University of New York are mobilizing to aid the millions of people devastated by hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Jose and Maria and by the two earthquakes in Mexico.

At Bronx Community College, a fundraising drive runs through Oct. 6 and a campaign to collect toiletries goes until Oct. 20. Personal counseling for those affected will last through the entire school year.

At City Tech, the Student Government Association has responded to fundraising requests for help from three Houston colleges that Hurricane Harvey left, quite literally, under water: Houston Community College, Rice University and Texas Southern University (http://tsu.thankyou4caring.org/tsucares). The City Tech campus counseling center has scheduled group sessions for students affected by either this unprecedented string of natural disasters or the stresses caused by the federal threat to students who had been protected by DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. In addition, the campus human relations office is reaching out to faculty and staff affected, to provide details about CUNY’s employee counseling service.

At Hostos Community College, where almost 60 percent of the student body comes from the Caribbean and Latin America, representatives of the president’s office had planned to meet with community leaders and longtime partners on Friday to shape a response.

At Medgar Evers College – where approximately 25 percent of students are foreign-born and many U.S.-born students have Caribbean parents and extended family in places like Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad and Puerto Rico – efforts are under way to help the millions across the Caribbean, Texas and Florida who are recovering from the recent catastrophic hurricanes. The college has established a Hurricane Relief Account that will allow donations to be made through the Bursar’s Office. The college will make donations only to reputable charities that it deems best suited to get the aid directly to affected families.

At York College, students and staff are donating to the York College Auxiliary – Disaster Relief Fund to channel money to relief agencies. Its counseling center is open to those who need support.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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The City College of New York chosen as green college

The City College of New York has been selected as one of the most environmentally responsible colleges according to The Princeton Review, which features City College in the 2017 edition of The Princeton Review Guide to 375 Green Colleges.
“We strongly recommend The City College of New York and the other fine colleges in this guide to the many environmentally-minded students who seek to study and live at green colleges,” said The Princeton Review’s Robert Franek, Senior VP-Publisher.
The Princeton Review chose the schools for this seventh annual edition of its “green guide” based on data from the company’s 2016-17 survey of hundreds of four-year colleges concerning the schools’ commitments to the environment and sustainability.
The CUNY flagship school is not only a proudly green institution, City College is also a recognized trailblazer in educating and training the next generation of innovators in urban sustainability.
The City College of New York is an established leader in sustainability, with an expert faculty conducting groundbreaking research and providing innovative, interdisciplinary opportunities for students to engage in emerging approaches in architecture, engineering, science and the social sciences.
CCNY’s response to a rapidly urbanizing global community consists of courses on climate response, resilient design, water resource management and energy, with engineering, science and architectural degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate level that address the sustainability challenges of the 21st century.
About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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AS OCT. 5 RENEWAL DEADLINE NEARS, CUNY DREAMERS GET DACA RENEWAL FEE COVERED;  OTHERS MAY QUALIFY FOR GRANT; ALL ELIGIBLE FOR INTEREST-FREE LOAN

CUNY student Dreamers facing the strict Oct. 5 deadline to apply for renewal of their DACA immigration status will have the $495 application fee covered on the spot at CUNY Citizenship Now! DACA renewal events, thanks to a partnership with a New York nonprofit that raised funds to pay the fees.  Non-CUNY students who meet income guidelines will also have the fee waived; others can secure an interest-free loan, regardless of income.

The New Economy Project contacted CUNY Citizenship Now! to attend the events and cut the $495 application checks for Dreamers – people brought into the United States as children without documentation – meeting income eligibility requirements. The checks will be made out to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and as grants do not have to be paid back.

“CUNY has provided a bridge to the middle class and beyond to generations of immigrant New Yorkers,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Given the current political climate, and the fear and uncertainty it has created in immigrant communities, we are doing all we can to support the thousands of CUNY DACA students.  CUNY, in fact, is doing more to support Dreamers than any college or university system in the country. For that, we are grateful to the New Economy Project and other organizations throughout the city that have joined CUNY in providing a strong support network for our Dreamers, who want nothing more than to continue living, learning and contributing in the United States.”

The Trump administration announced earlier this month that it was ending DACA and barring new applications, and that anyone whose Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals work authorization was to expire between Sept. 5, 2017, and March 5, 2018, will have to renew by Oct. 5 to keep their status. Since then, donors, organizations and others in New York City and around the country have stepped in to provide funds to help Dreamers with the renewal fee.

At the CUNY Citizenship Now! Renewal and Screening Clinics, the New Economy Project will provide the $495 fee grants to eligible New York City Dreamers whose household incomes range from no more than $30,150 for one person to a $71,950 cap for a five-person household. Those exceeding the income thresholds will be assisted at the clinic events in applying online for grants which can also be delivered quickly. Interest-free loans to cover the cost of the application fee are available to anyone, regardless of income.

A CUNY Citizenship Now! DACA Renewal and Screening Clinic – staffed by pro bono attorneys and others, and offering DACA renewal assistance and screening for eligibility for other immigration benefits – was held at CUNY School of Professional Studies on Sept. 20, and five more will be held at the following colleges on these dates:

  • Saturday, Sept. 23, John Jay College, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Sept. 26, City College, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Sept. 26, Hostos Community College, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Sept. 27, CUNY School of Professional Studies, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Thursday, Sept. 28, Medgar Evers College, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Students and others attending the events will be screened for DACA renewal eligibility, and for other more permanent immigration benefits. These include Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) for minors who have entered the country and not living with their parents, are wards of the state or in foster care; U visas, for people who have been victims of crimes here; asylum; and family-based petitions, for example, for those married to a U.S. citizen or green card holder.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Faculty Step Up to Help Rising Stars

Faculty Step Up to Help Rising Stars

For many faculty members, the dedication to their students is part of their social justice commitment, worth achieving by contributing in any way they can.

When President Jeremy Travis in 2013 raised the issue of getting faculty to participate in a campaign to raise much-needed funds for a new fellowship, anthropology Professor Alisse Waterston admits that she was puzzled. To say the least, asking her colleagues to donate money in addition to the time and effort they already put in—“blood, sweat, and tears,” in her words—would be a challenge. Yet Waterston also knew that they truly believed in John Jay’s students and CUNY’s pivotal role in public higher education.

“For me personally, part of that larger social justice mission is to understand the sources and consequences of inequality as it affects our students, and doing whatever it takes to address them,” said Waterston. “We teach them, we mentor and nurture them, and sometimes, if we are able, we contribute financially.”

Read full article on the new Justice Matters magazine website.


Pre-Law Institute, PRISM and Vera Fellows Reach Milestone

Happy 10th Anniversary

The 2016–17 academic year brought milestones for three important undergraduate programs, with the Pre-Law Institute, the John Jay-Vera Fellows program, and the Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math (PRISM) all celebrating 10 years of serving the College community. Each in its way has helped pave the way for students’ personal, academic, and professional success.

Read full article on the new Justice Matters magazine website.


No Bones about It: Graduate Students Learn Hands-on in Central Park

Learning by Doing…
No Bones about It: Graduate Students
Learn Hands-on in Central Park

On city streets, below ground, and on the water—these three distinct environments are linked by a common thread: Each of these locations is the setting of a John Jay class. To investigate how the College is contributing to CUNY-wide efforts to promote experiential learning opportunities, Justice Matters looked at three John Jay faculty members who are breaking down the walls of the classroom and giving students hands-on lessons in urban anthropology, forensic anthropology, and maritime security. For President Travis, co-chair of a university task force on experiential learning, these efforts are critical to bridging the gap between theory and application, providing students with an up close and personal view of how the material they learn in class translates to the real world.

Read full article on the new Justice Matters magazine website. 


E-Portfolios Help John Jay Students Improve Digital Literacy

E-Portfolios Help John Jay Students Improve Digital Literacy

 

Math and Science Resource Center Recognized for Novel Use of E-Portfolios

The John Jay Math and Science Resource Center (MSRC) and its staff have been honored by the National College Learning Center Association with an award for Innovative Use of Technology. The award recognizes the Resource Center’s innovative use of the e-portfolio, a pedagogy tool that allows students and faculty to showcase their work through the online e-portfolio platform.

“Students are creating these websites that become the story of who they are, and help them launch the careers they’re interested in and the graduate programs they want to pursue,” said Dan Auld, Director of Learning Technologies and Support.

The program first began at John Jay in 2012, but in 2015 it was expanded immensely due to a funding increase of $650,000 through CUNY Strategic Investment Initiatives. Since that time, it has seen a 600% increase in usage on campus. Over 3,200 student accounts were created last year, and today there are more than 6,000 accounts.  All John Jay students have free access to the platform.  They can create an e-portfolio at any time, and they can continue to use it after they graduate.

E-portfolio users can create online pages rich in text, images, videos, and other media to effectively communicate the depth and breadth of their scholarly work, making the e-portfolio a convenient alternative to compressing years of research and study into a single page resume or cover letter. The finished product is a compelling digital portrait of an individual and their unique accomplishments, which can be used to apply for graduate school or other career opportunities.

According to Auld, the e-portfolios help address a “digital divide” among college students in which more privileged students at private universities often have greater access to technology than CUNY students. “This gives them an opportunity to build their digital literacy skills and create their own story about what they’re doing at John Jay,” he said.

But it turns out the e-portfolio has even greater potential than originally thought.

Margaret Roidi, Manager of the MSRC at John Jay, has been spearheading an initiative that incorporates the e-portfolio into their tutoring services. According to Roidi, “Traditionally, the e-portfolio has been used as an extension of the classroom to showcase student work. But we wanted to use it as a professional development tool. When I came to John last November, I saw that the Math and Science Resource Center had a good framework for their training program. I said ‘I bet I can combine the two.’”

Since then, Roidi has expanded the impact of the e-portfolio program by integrating it into the student tutoring program at the MSRC with the goal of creating smarter, better-equipped tutors who can use the platform keep track of their work and reflect on tutoring methods and best practices.

ePortfolio at John Jay logo

Roidi said the use of e-portfolios allows tutors to ask themselves questions such as: Were my goals accomplished? Did I become a better tutor? Did I work with a diverse student body? What type of abilities did I develop?

Tutors can then use their e-portfolios as a marketable portfolio when seeking employment.

“It becomes a tool for them to document the skills they develop while working here,” Roidi said. “It’s not just about being a tutor – it’s about transitioning into being a learning center professional.”

It was this particular usage of the e-portfolio that caught the eye of the NCLCA, prompting them to award the John Jay MSRC with their Innovative Use of Technology award.  This September, Roidi along with Manuel Chaparro, Assistant Manager at MSRC, will be traveling to San Antonio to the NCLCA annual conference to accept the award and give a live presentation on the use of the e-portfolio.

“We’re super excited,” Roidi said, “it’s going to be a really great experience.”

The first annual John Jay ePortfolio Showcase was held on May 2, 2017 and 30 students presented e-portfolios documenting their work inside and outside the classroom.

Students interested in creating their own e-portfolio can learn more on the Digital Journey Support webpage.


Cadets Make Great Cops

Cadets Make Great Cops

 

The idea that police officers could benefit substantially from a college education is hardly a new one. In fact, it is the very reason John Jay College came into being in 1964. But for a long time, most John Jay students were cops during the day and students at night; they were established police officers earning degrees during their spare time. What the Cadet Corps sought to establish was the reverse: a program that would create a channel for college students to join the police department. To date it has been responsible for putting 3,503 college-educated police officers on the streets of New York. Unsurprisingly, John Jay students contribute significantly to the ranks of the NYPD Cadet Corps, numbering 364 students this year, or 61 percent of all cadets.

John Reynoso is a cadet and John Jay student in his senior year, and currently works at the 46th precinct in the Bronx as a telephone switchboard operator. Previously he worked with the Special Victims Unit in Manhattan. “It’s definitely exciting,” he said. “As a cadet, you get to see a lot of what goes on in the precinct. Another perk is you get priority to come back [to the precinct] if you make the right connections.”

Reynoso put his finger on another major goal of the program: “The police community and the communities they serve don’t have the best relationship,” he said.  “There isn’t much understanding between them.  I definitely want to help change that, and I feel like if the right people get hired it can really make a difference.”

Rosemary Gallardo, a cadet in her junior year with a background in volunteer work, joined the Cadet Corps through Apple Corps, another program at John Jay that provides a wide array of benefits to freshmen and sophomore students interested in becoming police officers. She said she joined because she’s always loved serving her community.  “You really get to see behind the scenes of what it’s like interacting with officers. They’re not how the media portrays them,” she said, “they’re really nice and will help you in anything you ask them to.”

Gallardo said she hopes to work as a detective or with a canine unit.  “The discipline they give you helps improve your skills all around,” she added.

What is today a robust and thriving program began as a memo entitled “A Third Option,” sent by former John Jay President Jeremy Travis, then Special Counsel to the Police Commissioner, to Commissioner Ben Ward in July of 1985. Mayor Ed Koch had been pressuring the police department to up recruitment levels and increase diversity among officers, and there was a big debate among those involved on just how to do it. Travis was given the task of advising the mayor on the competing ideas, and he helped lay out a new idea where students in their junior or senior years would be offered a $2000 stipend in addition to having their tuition covered to serve as a police cadet working as an aid to a community patrol officer.

The idea won the favor of Commissioner Ward and Mayor Koch, and was soon put into action. But during the 2000s the program was cut drastically as a way to save money. As recently as 2014, there were just 107 spots in the entire program. This was not due to lack of interest or applicants, but simply lack of funds.

According to First Deputy Commissioner and John Jay alumnus Benjamin Tucker, “The only obstacle to getting people to come in was that the headcount was maxed out at 107. So we lobbied for the funding with the mayor, and said ‘we really ought to think about seriously getting this back up and running.'”

Tucker, along with Inspector Michael McGrath, who was part of the training bureau at the time and is now Commanding Officer of the Cadet Corps, lobbied Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office, which eventually restored funding for the program. Today, the budgeted headcount is back up to 635. “And just about 5 months ago we had maxed out all 635 of those slots,” said Tucker. Of those slots, more than half are John Jay students.

One reason Tucker was adamant to get Cadet Corps back to full capacity is that officers who come up through Cadet Corps often go on to achieve high ranks and hold long, successful careers with the NYPD. In other words, cadets make great cops. 82 former cadets have currently achieved the rank of captain or above including 46 captains, 18 deputy inspectors, 10 full inspectors, 4 deputy chiefs, and 4 assistant chiefs.

“It’s not just a career path for the purpose of entry level – it has proven itself to be a very effective motivator for young people to take promotional exams and to excel in that regard,” Tucker said. “It suggests that you’ve got some stellar people who came in because of that experience early-on, and it helped motivate them up through the ranks.”

In addition to being a career path, Cadet Corps also provides flexible, paid employment for college students who might otherwise be forced to choose between work and studying.

Said Reynoso, “You don’t even have to become a police officer – you can pursue a career, or use it as a job experience. I definitely recommend the program to anybody.”


Professor Monica Varsanyi’s NEH-Funded Research Looks at Hispanic Identity in New Mexico

Professor Monica Varsanyis NEH-Funded Research Looks at Hispanic Identity in New Mexico

 

Monica Varsanyi, associate professor of political science at John Jay College, obtained a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for her research project, “The Contentious Evolution of Hispanic Identity During the Chicano Movement in New Mexico, 1962-1974,” which she has been working on this summer.

The project is inspired by research Varsanyi first conducted for Policing Immigrants: Local Law Enforcement on the Front Lines, a book she co-authored with Doris Marie Provine (along with Paul Lewis and Scott Decker), who is also part of the NEH project. During her research, Varsanyi became fascinated with the dynamic between New Mexico and Arizona, two neighboring states with much in common but vastly different stances on immigration policy. Arizona, for example, does not allow undocumented immigrants to pay in-state college tuition while New Mexico does. Similarly, Arizona doesn’t allow undocumented people to hold a driver’s license, while New Mexico was one of the first states to extend this privilege to that community. Arizona has among the strictest, most conservative immigration policies in the nation while New Mexico’s policies are among the most liberal.

How could this be?

One common explanation is that New Mexico is a state of immigrants, therefore it must be immigrant-friendly.  But Varsanyi said this is far too simplistic of an explanation.  Varsanyi’s new project focuses on tracing the complex history of the Chicano people, a history she hypothesizes has had a big effect on the state’s attitudes towards immigration.

“My contention is to understand how identity evolved in the Chicano period to start embracing ‘Mexican-ness’ and Mexican roots. I think this has something to do with how New Mexico has become a more immigrant-friendly state,” Varsanyi said.

Rather than simply being a “state of immigrants,” there is a distinction among New Mexicans between those who are descended from Mexico, and Hispanos who are descended from Spanish settlers. Traditionally, Hispanos have rejected any connection to Mexico, tracing their ancestry back hundreds of years to some of the earliest European settlers. This framing of identity by some New Mexicans as non-Mexican prompted a social movement in the 60s called the Chicano Movement, in which the term Chicano came to represent people with Mexican descent who sought to express cultural pride and self-educate themselves on their history and shared cultural identity.

Varsanyi contends that this cultural pride that developed in the 60s has contributed to a more liberal and understanding view of Mexicans, and therefore immigration. “From a scholarly perspective, very little is known about the Chicano period in New Mexico,” she said, “so I hope to add some voices and information to that discussion.”

The project for which Varsanyi obtained NEH grant of $6,000, and about which she intends to publish a journal article, is largely historical in nature, comprised of archival research and oral history interviews. “A lot of the people I’m interviewing are in their 80s, so I’m happy to be interviewing them to capture their stories before it’s too late” she said, adding that while some historical research has been conducted on Chicano populations in Texas and California, there is a scarcity of research on New Mexican Chicanos.

More broadly, Varsanyi said she is thrilled that the prestigious NEH decided to fund her work. “I’m just very appreciative of the support. The NEH is under pressure to be eliminated by the current administration, so I think socially relevant research in the humanities is very important, and there should be a mandate for the federal government to fund this kind of work.”

Varsanyi plans to continue her work studying the Chicano movement, which she said contributes to the larger goal of identifying how states create immigration policy and understanding why Arizona and New Mexico, once considered a single territory, now lie on polar opposite planes when it comes to immigration policy.


John Jay College Tapped to Support NYC Crime Reduction Initiatives

John Jay College Tapped to Support NYC Crime Reduction Initiatives

 

The Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College recently launched a large, new body of work for the New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice (MOCJ). With $18 Million in total funding, the Center (JohnJayREC) is supporting MOCJ in two initiatives focused on the safety and well-being of New York City neighborhoods.

Crime rates have fallen dramatically in many areas of New York in recent years, but some neighborhoods remain beset by violence, especially gun violence. City officials are investing significant resources in these neighborhoods to elevate public safety throughout the City. The Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice plays a leadership role in creating and sustaining criminal justice policies that protect City residents. The Office turned to John Jay College for strategic guidance and research support for two high-profile initiatives.

 

Jeff Butts
 

“We are excited and honored to be working on these important and large-scale projects for City Hall and MOCJ,” said Dr. Jeffrey Butts, director of JohnJayREC and Principal Investigator for the projects. “New York City is already a national leader in developing and sustaining effective strategies for reducing crime and violence, and these ambitious new programs may demonstrate even more ways to improve neighborhood safety for the City’s families.”

JohnJayREC is assisting MOCJ with the implementation and evaluation of the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP), a comprehensive Mayoral initiative designed to make neighborhoods safer in and around 15 public housing developments operated by the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA). MAP enhances coordination between the New York City Police Department, NYCHA, other City service agencies and public housing residents. The initiative deploys a wide range of approaches, including direct services, improvements to physical structures, and the mobilization and activation of social networks. Researchers at JohnJayREC are supporting MOCJ in formulating some of the implementation strategies used in MAP and they are helping to coordinate the efforts of various other partners. In addition, JohnJayREC will be evaluating the outcomes and overall impact of the MAP initiative in New York. Final results of the study will be available in 2019, but interim products will be released throughout the effort.

JohnJayREC staff members are also helping MOCJ to carry out an evaluation of New York City’s Project Fast Track, a Mayoral initiative that is designed to drive down levels of gun violence through a targeted, system-wide focus on individuals involved in firearm violence. Researchers from John Jay are measuring the implementation of the strategy and analyzing its effects on policing, court operations and overall community safety.

The John Jay College Research and Evaluation Center  is an applied research organization that provides members of the academic community at John Jay College with opportunities to respond to the research needs of justice practitioners in New York City, New York State, and the nation.  The JohnJayREC provides direct assistance to agencies in the justice system, designs and carries out studies of innovative strategies to prevent and reduce crime, and works to improve the effectiveness of interventions at the individual and community level.


ACE Program Celebrates First Student Success Story

ACE Program Celebrates First Student Success Story

 

The ACE program at John Jay (Accelerate, Complete, Engage) celebrated its first graduate last month: Piotr Tandek. Tandek was part of the very first cohort of ACE students, and his path to graduation was a unique one. He graduated in just two years, due to a combination of credits earned in high school and a rigorous, non-stop course load that included summer and winter classes. Still, Tandek’s success indicates the potential of CUNY’s and John Jay’s ACE program to deliver on its intended goals.

Designed primarily to increase student retention rates, the ACE program provides a wide array of benefits and resources such as a tuition gap waiver for Pell or TAP recipients, a free monthly Metrocard, a textbook voucher, scholarship opportunities, and a personal advisor and career specialist to individually guide students from entry to graduation, among other benefits.  The program is based on the principles of the CUNY Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), and aims to help students complete their academic journey in four years.

John Jay was the first college to implement this program, which Chancellor James Milliken said he hopes can be replicated at other four-year CUNY schools.

The program was highlighted in a recent article in Politico, which also featured recent graduate Tandek. As reported in the article, “The first cohort of the ACE pilot at John Jay began in fall 2015 with 262 students. The retention rate at the end of the fall 2016 semester was 83 percent, compared with 78 percent for similar students. Of those retained, 95 percent of ACE students were in good academic standing, according to CUNY data.”

Going forward, all eyes are on John Jay to see just how effective this program can be. If the 2015 cohort continues to outperform students outside of the ACE program, it is likely that the program will see a much wider rollout throughout the CUNY system, and become a national model for retaining and graduating students.


Money Magazine Ranks John Jay College in Top Quarter of “Best Colleges for Your Money”

Money Magazine Ranks John Jay College in Top Quarter of “Best Colleges for Your Money”

 

John Jay College of Criminal Justice was ranked in the top quarter of Money magazine’s latest Best Colleges for Your Money list.  Out of 711 institutions ranked, John Jay was 154, placing it among five CUNY schools to make the list including Brooklyn College, Queens College, Hunter College and Baruch which came in at number two, just behind Princeton University.

“This ranking proves that when it comes to educational excellence, John Jay stands side by side with the best in the nation,” said President Jeremy Travis.  “I continue to be inspired by the success of our students, and the accomplishments of our alumni.”

Money magazine’s college rankings are widely respected because of their sound methodology. According to the article, “Money ranks colleges based on 27 measures of educational quality, affordability, and alumni success. And this year we gave weight to new data developed by Stanford economist Raj Chetty that shows how many low-income students schools propelled into the upper middle class over the past 20 years—pointing to colleges that help students achieve the American dream.”

Rankings such as these are widely read among prospective students and their families as the rising costs of college tuition have come under increasing scrutiny during recent years, and students face the realization that graduating from an expensive college doesn’t necessarily guarantee a high-paying job, but it almost certainly guarantees a high level of debt. Cost has become one of the chief factors for students deciding where to enroll. “You’ve heard of the Ivy League? Nowadays, bragging rights are going to colleges in what we’ll dub the Paycheck League—schools that the real numbers show provide a boost in the job market,” said Kim Clark, author of the article for Money.

CUNY has received media attention, most recently in a recent New York Times article, for its success in providing affordable education that boosts low-income students into the middle class, reinforcing its role as a powerful engine for social mobility.

“College rankings can vary in usefulness, but Money magazine’s methodology is refreshing and very practical because of its focus on student success, not just inputs.  It’s not surprising that Money magazine’s assessment confirms what so many have consistently found,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said. “CUNY schools offer high-quality education, great access and affordability, and a tremendous boost up the social ladder. CUNY has become America’s premier urban university by providing generations of low- and middle-income students the means to achieve their aspirations.”

Previously, John Jay was ranked number ten in the nation for student social mobility, according to a report from The Equality of Opportunity Project.  The report, entitled Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility, showed that of the 54% of John Jay students who come from lower-income families, 61.1% later rise to the top 40% in higher income.


Citizenship Now! Call-in

Citizenship Now! Call-in

 

For a full week starting on Monday, June 16, the first floor of the New Building at John Jay was a hive of activity as students, volunteers, and dignitaries Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill put on headsets and sat down to answer the phone for the CUNY/Daily News Citizenship Now! 15thannual Call-In.

The Call-In has become the biggest event of the year for the non-profit, which provides free, high quality, and confidential immigration law services to help individuals and families on their path to U.S. citizenship, and is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.

And for the first time ever, the event was held at John Jay.  “We think it’s terrific here. The people have been great, the facility is great, and the branding is great because this is a justice school,” said the organization’s director Allan Wernick. “Our vision is to go forward in the future and make this a John Jay project.”

The Call-in utilizes 80 volunteers on 80 phones lines answering calls from immigrants in 59 different languages. The volunteers are trained to get as much information as possible from the caller, then they consult with a handbook or speak with one of the lawyers on call before providing advice or directing the caller to external resources that can help with their specific needs.

According to Wernick, “Our philosophy is that poor or working class people should get the same quality of service as somebody who can hire the best immigration lawyer in town. They may have to wait a couple of hours, they won’t have the hand holding, but the legal advice they’ll get will be the same as the best immigration lawyers.”

One student volunteer, Maria Negrete, a senior Latin American Studies major at John Jay and president of a club called La Voz, said a lot of people she talked to have been legal residents for a long time and are trying to start the process of becoming citizens.  “I would ask them how long they’ve been a resident, what’s their age, and where they live in New York so I can help them connect with some of the resources they have available to them,” she said.

Alexis Juca, a political science major going into his sophomore year, said he has family members who have gone through the citizenship process before, and understands how difficult that process can be. He said working at the Call-in was “a great experience, with amazing people from all different backgrounds. It’s wonderful to help this community reach greater heights.”

One reason the Call-in has become so successful is that in addition to being a free service, it’s also anonymous.

“Anyone can pick up the phone and call from anywhere around the country,” said Eboni Mason, the organization’s events manager. “You can ask any question you might have about immigration without that fear that people are experiencing right now in the country.”

Negrete corroborated this, saying that, “not everyone resorts to city agencies, either because they’ve had experiences with fraud or they simply don’t feel safe sharing their information.”

Since its inception in 1997, CUNY Citizenship Now! has grown to be the largest legal service volunteer project in the country, with over 500 active members and six main offices.  They operate part time out of 32 city council member offices, host two events each month, and involve a wide range of volunteers including students, teachers, lawyers, and civic-minded citizens.

“I think people are recognizing that immigration is really the civil rights issue of this period,” said Wernick, who’s been with the organization since the beginning. “There are many other important issues like women’s rights, gay rights, black lives matter – all of these things are important and we progressive people support those issues – but I think there’s a general consensus among all groups that immigration laws are really the issue for the next few years.”

One of Wernick and Mason’s goals for Citizenship Now! is to eventually host an event every week.  Wernick also wants John Jay to have its own office.  “I think we need to do it. That’s the next step,” he said.


BMCC Pre-Law Program Expands to Include Mentoring Opportunity with Brooklyn Law School

 

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Pre-Law Program, offered  through the BMCC Academic Advisement and Transfer Center, has just selected 10 students to be mentored at Brooklyn Law School.

The BMCC Pre-Law program started in Fall 2017. Rick Naughton, a Senior Academic Advisor at BMCC who holds a law degree from Penn State University, developed the program after consulting with pre-law advisors at Baruch College, John Jay College of Criminal Justice and Hunter College.

“I was motivated to create the program after meeting with dozens of students who expressed an interest in attending law school but weren’t sure what steps needed to be taken to achieve that goal,” says Naughton, who is BMCC’s Pre-Law Advisor, on record with the Law School Admissions Council.

He adds that another option for students is the BMCC Pre-Law Society club, which gives students the opportunity to learn about law and legal careers in an informal social setting.

The Pre-Law Program: Networking, law fairs and other resources

Students in the Pre-Law Program at BMCC attend networking events and law fairs throughout the New York City area, among other activities.

“It’s important for students to be able to talk first-hand with law school representatives to learn about scholarships and other resources, and be able to ask questions they might have,” Naughton says.

Through these events, students will broaden their awareness of the diverse options available to a person with a law degree, he says, such as working in the public or corporate sector and in areas such as human rights, criminal law, immigration, estate planning and many others.

The Pre-Law Mentoring Program: A first-hand look at law school

Ten students in the Pre-Law Program at BMCC have been selected to be paired with a law student at Brooklyn Law School, through that college’s mentoring program.

“Participants will meet regularly with their law school mentors, sit in on actual law school classes and witness first-hand the rigors of law school,” Naughton says.

He adds that both the Pre-Law Program and mentoring program “will provide role models to underrepresented students who might not have considered the option of a legal career.”

BMCC students in both the Pre-Law Program and mentoring program will meet law students and working lawyers, as well as learn about the long-standing tradition of minority lawyers such as those who graduated from Brooklyn Law School and went on to be trailblazers in their field.

These include David Dinkins, the first African American mayor of New York City; Percy Sutton, the first African American Manhattan borough president and Dorothy Chin-Brandt, the first Asian American woman judge in New York State.

The Pre-Law Society: Learning about law in a social setting

BMCC student interest in the field of law has also resulted in a new club, the Pre-Law Society. “This club will provide a social setting through which students can focus on legal careers and the law,” Naughton says.

Events the Pre-Law Society might present could include movie nights, “with a theme surrounding the legal profession,” he says. “Or they might bring in speakers who are friends or family members who are in law school or have gone on to start a career in law.”

For more information, please contact Rick Naughton at rnaughton@bmcc.cuny.edu or prelaw@bmcc.cuny.edu.


Convergent evolution of mimetic butterflies confounds classification

David Lohman

CCNY’s biology professor David Lohman is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies.

David Lohman, associate professor of biology at The City College of New York’s Division of Science, is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies  “An illustrated checklist of the genus Elymnias Hübner, 1818 (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae).” Lohman and his colleagues from Taiwan and Indonesia revise the taxonomy of Asian palmflies in the genus Elymnias in light of a forthcoming study on the butterflies’ evolutionary history.

The scientists discovered numerous cryptic species–two or more species erroneously classified as one species–as well as single species mistakenly described as two or three. Frequently, species discriminated with genetic data are each others’ closest relatives, but can be distinguished by stark genetic differences; this suggests a lack of interbreeding—a hallmark of species distinctiveness.

However, in Elymnias, Lohman and his associates found that cryptic species were unrelated to each other and resulted from a novel cause: mimicry. Different species on different islands of the Indo-Australian Archipelago frequently evolved to resemble a single, widespread model species, and different Elymnias species therefore evolved to resemble each other. Lohman and his colleagues conducted the comprehensive phylogenetic study using DNA sequence data from over 200 specimens representing nearly every species of Elymnias.

In addition, the team visited more than a dozen museums to study and photograph hundreds of specimens, and obtained additional material from fieldwork and many private collections. More than 100 male and female specimens were dissected to assess genitalic differences and distribution information was collected from dozens of sources to provide distribution maps of every subspecies.

Lohman studies the ecology, evolution, and biogeography of insects in the Old World tropics using a combination of field ecology and molecular phylogenetic methods.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Workplace Connected

CUNY Programs Such as WiTNY and #CUNYCodes Forge Vital Relationships for Students With NYC Employers

Laisa Barros, a computer science major at City College, knew she was taking the right courses toward a career in technology – but not exactly what her destination was or how she would get there. What she needed was a clear sense of her targeted area—and guidance in building the specific skills, experience and contacts that would lead her to the promised land: a good job in a high-growth sector after graduation.

Barros found a vital step forward in CUNY’s Women in Technology and Entrepreneurship in New York, or WiTNY, a partnership with Cornell Tech that was started in 2016 to encourage, train and support more women interested in technology careers. She was among the first group to participate in WiTNY’s Career Access Program, which is overseen by the CUNY Office of Workforce Partnerships and offers an array of workshops, coaching and access to internship opportunities with major corporate partners such as Verizon/AOL, AppNexus, SquareSpace, Citibank, IBM and Xerox.

“We met every week for three hours, and it was eye-opening,” Barros said. “They helped you develop yourself for your career and prepare for the real world of job searching — building a resume that’s targeted for tech, becoming a better speaker, and being part of a community to increase the number of women in tech.” It was through WiTNY that she joined #CUNYCodes, a program in which students work in small teams for 12 weeks, developing apps under the supervision of professional mentors and presenting their products at the conclusion. It led to a summer and fall internship at Cornell Tech — “doing what I like to do, front-end development,” Barros said. It also put her in position to graduate into a good first job.

WiTNY and #CUNYCodes are important pieces of a broad, strategic effort by the University to expand and forge new relationships with New York’s most promising employment sectors to help CUNY students win the top-paying jobs and launch successful careers.

“CUNY graduates tens of thousands of highly skilled and highly motivated students every year, and the tech sector is just one example of where we’re working with businesses to customize educational programs to help fill their hiring needs, and seamlessly integrate our students into high-paying jobs,” said Associate Vice Chancellor Andrea Shapiro Davis. “We’re educating corporate leaders about CUNY, our students and our diversity, and why we are a great source for their workforce needs. Once employers meet our students, they want to hire them.”

The expanded efforts reflect CUNY’s strengthened commitment to student career development as a University-wide imperative – one of the pillars of the Connected CUNY strategic framework unveiled by Chancellor James B. Milliken earlier this year. The Career Success theme of the strategic framework is an ambitious plan to connect CUNY with partners in all sectors of the innovation economy and to send its graduates into the world with 21st-century skills and access to competitive jobs. Experiential learning, extracurricular training and targeted internship programs are all key components of the mission.

Technology is leading the way. CUNY is creating partnerships such as WiTNY and initiatives such as CUNY Tech Meetup, monthly gatherings where students engage with companies ranging from Google to Etsy to learn about the tech industry and meet people in the field, including CUNY alumni. More than 2,000 CUNY students have participated since the first meetup two years ago, and the pipeline will grow with CUNY’s commitment to increasing enrollment in STEM fields, particularly among women and underrepresented minorities.

More broadly, the University is systematically identifying the city and region’s employment drivers, and the most dynamic employers within those sectors, as a first step in facilitating relationships that yield internships and, ultimately, well-paying jobs.

“We want our 50,000 graduates each year competing and landing jobs at competitive salaries,” said Angie Kamath, who joined CUNY earlier this year in the new position of University dean for continuing education and workforce development. A former deputy commissioner of the city’s Department of Small Business Services and later the head of a national IT job-training nonprofit, Kamath has assumed a new position broadly focused on putting CUNY graduates on track for economic mobility. “We have the proof that we catapult a lot of folks into the middle class, but it’s really important to make sure our students graduate into jobs with competitive wages because that first salary sticks with you for a while and you’re always negotiating off that base.”

Kamath leads a team of 38 people collectively seeking to do a few big things to get closer to that goal. On the student side, she said, “We need more career-exploration and skill-building programs leading to internships that convert to full-time job offers. We’re creating new ways to introduce our students to the major job sectors: What do these careers look like? What do you need to do to be competitive for those jobs? What paths did CUNY alumni in these fields take? The thing that’s exciting about our challenge is that our students are strivers, they’re diverse, they’re in New York and staying. But they generally don’t have a ton of social capital, so we need to give them career development opportunities that will make them more competitive.

“On the employer side, we need to make our system easier to tap into. The employers I speak with desperately want diversity and love the idea of hiring from CUNY but often have no idea where to start. They don’t want to go to 24 different colleges, so we need to be a navigator for them to find talent across the University. We’ll be the quarterback, telling them, ‘Work with these schools if you want data scientists, work with these schools if you want RNs.’”

One example of the new partnerships is a program with Revature, a leading technology talent development company that offers CUNY students and graduates — in any major, regardless of experience — free, 12-week coding boot camps that can lead to jobs with the company. More than 3,500 CUNY students have enrolled since the program’s launch in the fall of 2016, and 250 have been hired. This summer CUNY and Revature announced an expansion that brings WiTNY into several initiatives in order to recruit more women into tech careers.

Apart from the tech push, CUNY is working to develop relationships with employers in many fields identified as well-paying and rapidly growing: finance, industrial/construction, government, transportation, hospitality, health care, life sciences and nonprofits. In some cases, partnerships grow from synergy — an alignment of an employer’s needs with CUNY’s ability to create new curriculum to match them.

A prime example is a partnership between CUNY and Community Care of Brooklyn, an entity created by Maimonides Medical Center to serve the borough’s Medicaid population. Maimonides wanted to add a staff of community health care coaches and approached Kingsborough Community College about starting a program to train them. Kingsborough developed a new curriculum for a nine-credit certification program. About 100 students have completed the program and been hired so far.

Meanwhile, the CUNY Tech Meetups are a model that the Office of Workforce Partnerships is seeking to replicate in all the employment sectors – monthly gatherings at different companies where panels of professionals give students an introduction to their fields, a sense of what the path to a job looks like, and the chance to make contacts.
“What an employer in the tech sector needs in its entry-level and midlevel workforce is very different from what the health care or hospitality sector needs,” Kamath said. “That’s why it’s important for students to have access to career exploration – to learn what these industries are, what the opportunities are, so they can make some choices about what’s interesting to them – and then give them ways to build skills with some low-stakes experiential learning: Take a class, do some field study, an internship.”
At the same time, a challenge to that ideal comes from the financial and time pressures that can make it difficult for students to take advantage of opportunities. According to University data, about 20,000 CUNY students get internships each year but only 3,000 of them are paid. “The majority of our students need to work,” Kamath said, “but of those who work only 25 percent are doing it to explore careers. Most are working for money and many can’t afford to do unpaid internships. We want to increase that group getting paid.”

The goal of the workforce partnerships office is to cultivate partnerships with 10 or so big employers in each sector that want to hire locally. “For us, it means selling the CUNY brand. Our product is our students. So we’re asking, ‘How do we become a campus recruiting entity for you? Give us some feedback on our candidates.’ There’s also a really important role for our alumni. At JPMorgan Chase there are something like 900 Baruch alumni. We want to leverage that. We’re not taking the place of the colleges that have their own relationships with employers. But there are thousands of employers out there who aren’t touching CUNY colleges because they don’t know how. There are 250,000 businesses in New York, plenty of room to bring in new partners.#CUNYCodes


A 17th-Century Champion for Women’s Autonomy Inspires Student Learning

 

Professor Sophie Marinez and her students at BMCC

 

“Students love her story,” BMCC French Professor Sophie Maríñez says of Anne-Marie-Louise Duchesse de Montpensier (1627-1693), the subject of her book, Mademoiselle de Montpensier, Writings, Châteaux, and Female Self-Construction in Early Modern France just released from Brill, a leading academic publisher in Europe. “Mademoiselle de Montpensier authored a memoir, novels and letters in which she expressed her views against marriage and in support of the autonomy of women. When I teach her in my course on early modern French women writers, students are fascinated by these women who resisted the norms thatconstrained their lives.”

Maríñez’s work on Mademoiselle de Montpensier is the culmination of her doctoral dissertation, which she completed in 2010 at The Graduate Center, CUNY, under the direction of Distinguished Professor Domna C. Stanton, and for which she received the Carolyn B. Heilbrun DissertationPrize awarded by the Women’s Studies Certificate Program.

This book, she says, has been made possible by a series of grants and fellowships she received while completing her dissertation, an NEH Summer Stipend award she received when she was a visiting faculty member at Vassar College, before she joined BMCC, and two PSC-CUNY grants she received as a CUNY faculty.

Maríñez also received a BMCC Faculty Publication Cost Grant from the Office of Provost Karrin E. Wilks, “which helped defray the cost of image reproduction fees,” she says. “Although it is based on my research, the book is also an art book in the sense that it discusses and shows the chateaux Montpensier and other women commissioned in early modern France.”

Applying research and enriching student learning

Professor Maríñez teaches all levels of French language and literature at BMCC, including a class on French women writers. “In addition to Montpensier’s writings,” she says, “I teach the works of Christine de Pizan, a medieval writerconsidered by some to be the first pro-women advocate, who lived in France and wrote The Book of the City of Ladies (1405). In class, we analyze the literature as well as gender issues, and students apply those concepts to discuss the treatment of women today.”

The range of perspectives her students bring deepens these discussions. “We have such an incredibly diverse student population at BMCC: Muslim and Christian students, recent immigrants, people who grew up in New York, and students from many different socio-economic backgrounds,” she says. “This makes our talks about the women we are studying really rich and alive, despite the distance in time.”

To Professor Maríñez, bringing her research into the classroom is vital: “It makes my class more alive when I can bring the passion that I have for my scholarly projects into the classroom,” she says. “Students like to hear when I am going to a conference or working on the book. They get a glimpse into the process of being a writer and researcher, and see that speaking another language is a valuable skill in the professional world.”

A role model for majors in Modern Languages

Now that the Modern Languages Department at BMCC offers Associate of Art degrees in French, Italianand Spanish, students are exploring career options for dual-language speakers.

Maríñez herself worked as a translator when she first arrived to New York. Today, she says, opportunities for Modern Language majors are growing beyond the academic career path that she chose herself.

“In New York and other cities, we are seeing the growth of French-speaking African immigrants who are from Senegal, Mali, Morocco, Algeria, and other countries,” she says. “These recent immigrants need human, social, paralegal, and other services in French, andpublic schools are developing more bilingual programs in French to accommodate them.”


NSF awards CCNY consortium $5.2 million to advance fluids research

The CUNY Energy Institute housed in CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering is the recipient of a $5.2 million grant from the NSF.

The City College of New York-based CUNY Energy Institute is the recipient of a five-year $5.2 million National Science Foundation PIRE grant for advanced research on complex fluids. It will fund the Institute’s “PIRE: Multi-scale, Multi-phase Phenomena in Complex Fluids for the Energy Industries” project that involves 11 international partner institutions from France, Germany and Norway.

This collaborative research is expected to advance knowledge and make transformative scientific discoveries that could result in far reaching innovations, in both experimental and modeling methods. “This could lead to improvements in energy and process efficiency in industrial systems on a global scale,” said Masahiro Kawaji, acting director of the CUNY Energy Institute.

The PIRE project will also accelerate education and training of students and early career researchers by providing them unique opportunities to participate in substantive international research experiences, taking advantage of the scope, scale, expertise, and facilities of the PIRE network, added Kawaji.

Multi-phase fluid flows involving mixtures of liquids and often solids and gases as well, play an important role in nature and in the environment. Research on multi-phase flows is of vital importance to many key energy technologies globally, including oil-gas production and processing, energy conversion and storage, refrigeration and heating/cooling systems, as well as the materials, minerals, pharmaceutical, personal care and food industries.

According to Kawaji, an important societal outcome of the project is that it will propel key energy technologies and engineering systems that are of high relevance in the industries identified above, significantly improving their energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. The research and education plans will ensure that the U.S. maintains its competitive status in the field of complex, multi-phase fluids and their applications to engineering systems.

Kawaji’s CCNY partners from the Grove School of Engineering and the Division of Science include: Sanjoy Banerjee, Joel Koplik, Taehun Lee, Robert Messinger, Jeffrey Morris,  Vincent Pauchard and Charles Watkins.

About the PIRE Program
Partnerships for International Research and Education is an NSF-wide program that supports international activities across all NSF-supported disciplines.  The primary goal of PIRE is to support high quality projects in which advances in research and education could not occur without international collaboration. PIRE seeks to catalyze a higher level of international engagement in the U.S. science and engineering community.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of September 18, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Our week ahead features three instructional days, as schools are closed on Thursday 9/21 and Friday 9/22 for Rosh Hashanah.

Principal’s Coffees
Each year the NEST+m administrative team hosts a series of Principal’s Coffees — parent outreach meetings that typically take place in the morning. In consultation with NEST+m’s PTA Co-Presidents, our September Coffee Dates have been calendared to take place on these dates and times:

  • Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee: Wednesday September 20, 2017, 8:30am to 9:30am in the Cafeteria (visitor sign-in via Main Entrance).
  • Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee: Monday September 25, 2017, 8:30am to 9:30am in the Cafeteria (visitor sign-in via Main Entrance).
  • Upper Grades Principal’s Coffee will take place during Curriculum Night, Thursday 9/28 (7:00pm to 7:45pm) in the Auditorium.

All are welcome to join our monthly Principal’s coffees which feature formal announcements and/or teaching led by our administrative, guidance and teachers teams as well as parent-generated Q&A.

CURRICULUM NIGHT
Please Save the Date for Curriculum Night, Thursday 9/28, 5pm to 8pm. Curriculum night provides the opportunity to meet your child’s teacher(s) and learn about our instructional goals for the year ahead. Specific details forthcoming.

ENTRY AND EXIT PROCEDURES
Please see these important announcements regarding our entry and exit procedures.

DOORS OPEN

  • Our doors open for students at 7:30am. Breakfast also starts at 7:30 am.
  • Students may enter between 7 – 7:30 am if they are part of a school activity supervised by a teacher or advisor such as math team, chess, tutoring or sports’ practices.

MORNING COURTYARD PLAY

  • The NEST+m Main Courtyard is reserved for K-5 students who are supervised by parents. If you are dropping off your K-5 child, they must enter the building and cannot stay in the courtyard.
  • Grades 6-8 students may also stay in the Main courtyard. Ball playing is limited to the wings on both sides

ENTERING THE BUILDING

  • Grades K-2 students who are being dropped off by parents or bus will report to the Cafeteria where they will be supervised. They will be picked up by teachers directly from the Cafeteria.
  • Grades 3-5 students who are being dropped off by parents or bus will report to the Auditorium where they will be supervised. They will be picked up by teachers directly from the Auditorium.
  • Grades 6-8 students who are being dropped off by parents or bus may be in the courtyard OR may go sit outside their homeroom.
  • Grades 9-12 students enter our building via the courtyard OR the Columbia Street Entrance. Grades 9-12 students may report directly to the 3rd floor.

All classes begin at 8:20 am. To ensure timely arrival for class, students should arrive no later than 8:10am.

DISMISSAL

  • Our school day ends at 2:40 pm.
  • Students with supervised after-school activities including After3, SONYC, PSAL, clubs, tutoring, and academic meetings with teachers, are welcome to stay at school for the duration of these activities. All other students are asked to please leave the school grounds by 3:10 pm. Students may stay in the courtyard if they have a parent or caretaker present.
  • This note is of particular import as our front courtyard is not a supervised site after school.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of September 11, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Thank you for the wonderful start to our 2017-18 school year!
It was truly exciting to connect with so many students and families during our first days of learning.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

 


Consent Matters: Decoding Consent and Boundaries at Guttman

Guttman’s Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards demonstrated the college’s commitment to Consent Education by presenting “Consent is Sexy” on September 7, 2017. Designed to be part of the Office of Student Engagement series of activities during Weeks of Welcome, the interactive discussion aimed to engage new and continuing students and celebrated the start of a new academic year. “Consent is Sexy” was designed to enable participants to identify consent, communication around it, and the danger signs of unhealthy relationships and personal boundaries that can affect campus life.

Carolee Ramsay, Guttman Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards and Sylvester Allen AccessABILITY Specialist

Carolee Ramsay, Guttman Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards and Sylvester Allen AccessABILITY Specialist, facilitated student-guided discussions through live polling and the consent game.

The program was also part of a broader campaign aimed towards Affirmative Consent that will continue with online trainings for special groups of students, in-person trainings and activities by the Office of Student Conduct and Title IX Office, and more activities during Women’s History and Sexual Assault Awareness months. Affirmative Consent is a paradigmatic shift away from the “No Means No” approach, which is seen as more negative and places too much angst on the receiver to say no. “Consent is Sexy” was a deliberate attempt to get participants to understand that when the burden is shifted from the survivors to the initiators, it’s simple: consent is consent.

The main focus of “Consent is Sexy” revolves around the idea that consent must be given knowingly, voluntarily, affirmatively and continuously. Students were introduced to videos of other college students and their definitions of consent, scenarios from which volunteers played the consent game and participated in live, anonymous polling to determine fundamental myths and assumptions about consent and personal boundaries. Most participants understood the definitions of consent, but when it came to practical applications personal biases and traditions emerged. There was no universal definition of consent and boundaries, but most agreed that all parties in any given situation must be willing participants. For instance, 89% of the respondents agreed that a person cannot give consent when incapacitated or drunk.

The outcomes demonstrated the need for more conversations and programming around these areas. Dominick Hull, a junior, remarked that prior to this program, he never understood that consent had to be given each time. The polls indicated that many students had anxiety about behaviors that might get them accused of sexual assault while others had trouble creating personal boundaries out of fear of being accused of being selfish. The lines became even more blurred when participants began to distinguish verbal and non-verbal cues as a means of achieving consent and to learn that consent in the past does not determine consent in the present/future. 70% of students polled indicated that because someone didn’t resist doesn’t mean he/she has consented — a clear understanding of Affirmative Consent. However, 33% of these same respondents stated that consenting to some sexual activity, such as touching, can indicate consent to other activities, especially when we take non-verbal communication into consideration. The challenge here lies in the nuances of consent and students’ assumptions that nonverbal cues add more ambiguity to obtaining consent.

Students playing the Consent Game

Students played the “Consent Game” and indicated their responses about presented scenarios with traffic signals.

From the perspective of the Office of Student Conduct, it’s another piece of evidence that when we explain affirmative consent to college students, they are likely to embrace it and students can negate cultural myths and underlying assumptions that their needs and boundaries matter. Guttman and The City University of New York recognize the significant impact of all experiences of sexual assault and violence and are committed to promoting a culture in which these issues are not tolerated and that the campus is responsive and accountable to its constituents. While continuous education is necessary, students left “Consent is Sexy” with a greater awareness that meaningful consent is a voluntary, mutual, honest and verbal agreement which can never be implied and assumed. Most participants said they now have a greater awareness of the concept of consent, sexual assault and boundaries.

For more information on programs presented by the Office of Student Conduct, contact Carolee Ramsay at carolee.ramsay@guttman.cuny.edu or visit the Student Conduct page. Students can also join the campaigns or the conversation on social media @GuttmanOSC and #GCCWOW

 


CCNY-led research team identifies new organelle in parasitic wasp venom

A CCNY-led research team has identified new organelle in parasitic wasp venom.

City College of New York biologist Shubha Govind and her research team have identified the composition of “virus-like particles” (VLPs) found in the venom of a wasp that is a parasite of fruit flies. Invisible to the eye, wasp VLPs suppress the flies’ immune responses by killing their blood cells.

Wasps lay their eggs along with spiked VLP particles into the worm-like immature bodies of Drosophila melanogaster, the long-venerated genetic model of human disease and development. In the wild, parasitic wasps attack insects and are used to naturally control crop damage by insect pests. The Govind lab has developed a model to study this host/parasite interaction in the laboratory. While the particles were originally termed “virus like” due to their size and structure, this work has shifted that view.

The new study reports that VLPs have a profile of “extracellular microvesicles” that are microscopic, membrane-bound transport structures most animal cells use to package and traffic proteins to the outside. Strikingly, VLPs also have proteins that resemble bacterial proteins, found on their needle-shaped “injectisome” used to invade animal cells. The VLP proteins are similarly located on their surfaces/spikes, suggesting parallel mechanisms of invading hosts’ blood cells.

Given the VLP particles’ mixed prokaryotic/eukaryotic properties, the researchers have renamed them MSEVs for “Mixed Strategy Extracellular Vesicles.”

Govind’s team included CCNY Division of Science graduate students, Mary Ellen Heavner and Johnny Ramroop, and collaborators Shaneen Singh (Brooklyn College) and Rong Wang (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai).

The research, which appears in the journal Current Biology, was co-funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and NASA.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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BMCC Student Entrepreneurs Visit Ghana: Looking Back, to See Ahead

  

Birthright AFRICA /BMI Scholars with Entrepreneurs at ImpactHub Accra that shared their stories and career paths in innovation in Ghana.

 

Five Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students — Christiana Agyepomaa, Brittany Broderick, Kasson Colon-Mangin and Tredesha Howard — as well as BMCC alumnus Milton Henriquez and two other CUNY undergraduates, traveled together to the Republic of Ghana for ten days in August 2017.

The trip, co-sponsored by the CUNY Black Male Initiative (CUNY BMI) and Birthright AFRICA, was led by Shawn Best, University Associate Director of CUNY BMI, along with Birthright AFRICA’s Founder and Chief Umoja (Unity) Officer, Walla Elsheikh, and its Founding Fellow and Program Director, Ashley Johnson.

Before leaving for Ghana, the students met with entrepreneurs who are part of the African diaspora in New York, and visited cultural sites in both New York and Washington, D.C.

In the Ghanaian cities of Accra and Kumasi, they met with business leaders and innovators, as well as visiting university campuses and other sites.

Six weeks of cultural, historical and personal preparation

“The Birthright AFRICA Scholars were transformed as they explored their cultural roots and legacy of innovation in New York and Washington D.C., and experienced the culminating 10-day, life-changing trip to Ghana,” said Birthright AFRICA Founder Elsheikh.

Overall, the students “gained an in-depth knowledge of historic figures and present-day leaders and entrepreneurs of African descent that have paved the path for them to fulfill their aspirations,” she adds. “To see them experience a country on the African continent for the first time and be affirmed in their resilience and brilliance as people of African descent was a major highlight. They fully embraced the people and culture of Ghana with plans to stay connected and revisit, which is truly inspiring.”

In New York, the students visited the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Weeksville Heritage Center, the African Burial Ground and National Monument, Apt Deco, WeWork HarlemThe Brooklyn Commons and The National Black Theatre.

In Washington D.C., they toured the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial and Innovation Partners such as The Human Diagnosis Project. They also visited the African American Studies department at Howard University, kicking off a series of campus tours that would continue in Ghana, where they also met with business leaders at the African Center for Economic Transformation (ACET), Ostec and Airtel Ghana, as well as meeting with entrepreneurs at Impact Hub Accra.

“Know your history, to know where you are going”

The experience of being in two cities in Ghana — Accra and Kumasi — “opened the students’ eyes to the possibility of who they could be in the world,” says Birthright AFRICA Founder Elsheikh.

CUNY BMI Associate Director Best describes the benefit of the trip by referencing the Sankofa principle that Birthright AFRICA is based on: “Know your history to know where you are going.”

Birthright AFRICA, he says, “not only held trainings for six weeks straight, they gave the students MetroCards and fed them. Walla connected us with thought leaders in New York who are Senegalese, Nigerian, Ghanaian and also African Americans, the entire diaspora. We would meet and have conversations, and then the students would map out their own plans for innovation.”

Finding community, inspiration and truth

For BMCC Business major Tredesha Howard, a highlight of the trip was meeting Lucy Quist, an international business leader and CEO of Airtel Ghana, which provides telecommunications services to 15 African countries.

“She was a strong, fearless and bold black woman who was extremely graceful and humble,” Howard says. “Her knowledge and experience were truly an encouragement; despite what stands before you, push through.”

Another impactful segment of the trip was visiting one of the Slave Castles along the Ghanaian Cape Coast, fortresses that held an estimated six million enslaved Africans before they were shipped to other countries.

Physically being in the site “was extremely heavy for me and probably the hardest part of my trip,” Howard says. “Learning the truth about what my people went through in slavery was emotional and at times very tough to digest. However, I have an indescribable gratitude for my ancestors who survived the unspeakable.”

The Ghanaian cities of Accra and Kumasi feel similar to the neighborhoods in Barbados, where she grew up, Howard realized. In Ghana, she says, “There was always this sense of community. Though many people are on the streets selling the same things, there are no traffic lights and very little police presence; everyone for the most part is respectful and peaceful. I would even say they live harmoniously. Yes, Ghana has its issues but it is far from the picture that has been painted about it. I barely even saw one mosquito in my 10 days there. Just like in America there are good parts as well as bad parts.”

The inspiration of the African diaspora

Kasson Colon-Mangin, a Liberal Arts major at BMCC, was impressed by the group’s visits to Asheshi University and the University of Ghana in Accra, as well as to Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Kumasi.

“We also visited several corporations, organizations and black-owned businesses, where we were able to connect with leaders from the African diaspora,” he says.

That concept of an African diaspora was an important thread connecting the students’ meetings with entrepreneurs in both New York and Ghana.

For example, says CUNY BMI Associate Director Best, “We met a Jamaican gentlemen working out of Impact Hub Accra,” which provides assistance to innovators as they develop and deliver a viable product. “In our tour of the space, we met leaders and entrepreneurs within Impact Hub who were from around the world, showing there are more than Ghanaian people in Ghana. That was eye-opening for our students.”

To process the impact of those experiences, each student on the trip to Ghana completed an assignment, describing the innovators and projects they found most inspiring.

“My research topic is focused on visual communications, such as the Adinkra symbols that people in West Africa used to communicate, and on the first topographical map of the world, which was created in Africa,” says Colon-Mangin, who is also investigating “origin stories of the cosmos, Afrikan fighting sciences, proverbs and art.”

One individual who stood out for him on the trip was Dr. Obadele Kambon from the University of Ghana.

“He was able to explain the Bakongo cosmograms and the Adinkra symbols,” says Colon-Mangin. “He also showed the connection between the origins of the universe and the fighting style Capoeira. I was able to receive a one-on-one training session in the Capoeira fighting science of which he is a master. He gave a lecture comparing the Eurocentric teachings we have been mis-educated with, to what our African ancestors created — clearly showing how the ideas were stolen.”

Helping students build their own legacy, and academic success

Looking back on the trip to Ghana, Birthright AFRICA Founder Elsheikh describes it as being “full of affirming, life-changing moments,” for both students and staff.

As Tredesha Howard puts it, the experience “has reaffirmed my staying on track with my goals for the future, because in order to bring about change, you must be in a position to make or influence change. Thus, the only way I can do that is to get my degrees.”

CUNY BMI Associate Director Best takes that analysis a step further, relating the trip’s impact to long-term student success.

“Students felt energized, inspired to be creators of their own legacy in their own field,” he says. “The trip inspired the students to achieve and bring back to the BMI community that keen sense of belonging that keeps them connected to each other, to Africa and to BMI — and in the long run, that sense of belonging is a significant factor in building retention in college.”

 

For more information about the CUNY Black Male Initiative at BMCC, contact Ashtian Holmes, Director of the BMCC Urban Male Academy: (212) 220-8000, x7276 or aholmes@bmcc.cuny.edu.


BMCC to Partner in New Groundbreaking Library Study

A. Philip Randolph/BMCC Library

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) will partner with nonprofit research service Ithaka S+R and Northern Virginia Community College in an 18-month study that seeks to assess and improve library support systems within community colleges.

In addition to BMCC and lead investigator Northern Virginia Community College, five other community colleges, including three CUNY schools, will participate in the study.  The project is funded by a $449,388 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ Laura Bush 21st Century Library Program.

The project will explore how community college student success can be defined in a way that is inclusive of both policy priorities and students’ own needs. Project participants will also explore what services academic libraries can offer to most effectively help students attain success.

Ithaka S+R will publish two public research reports over the course of the project: one on community college student perspectives, practices, and needs; and a second report that will provide specific assessments of library service offerings that will be developed over the 18 months of the project.

BMCC together with the other study participants will also publish a toolkit that can be further adopted by both community colleges and community college systems to test these and other service concepts that are relevant to their student populations.

“We are very excited about this project as it seeks to assess and demonstrate the impact of library services on student success, said Kathleen Dreyer, chief librarian, BMCC. “Ultimately the grant will allow us to articulate the important role libraries have in student success and our role in the community,” she says.

On an even broader scale, this project seeks to strengthen the position of the nation’s community college libraries as an anchor in the campus community. It will also help libraries collaborate more effectively with their partners and increase library contributions to student success.


Directors Bring Experience in the Art of Assessment and the Curating of Art

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) welcomes Bryan Dowling, Director of Assessment in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analytics, and Lisa Panzera, Director of the Shirley Fiterman Art Center.

Bryan Dowling, Director of Assessment

Applying more than a decade of experience streamlining data collection, analyzing institutional self-studies, strategizing around Middle States reports and more, Bryan Dowling assumes his role as Director of Assessment in the BMCC Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analytics.

Brian Dowling

“I look forward to joining the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analytics, and working with students, faculty and administration to ensure our students step out into the world with everything they need to succeed,” says Dowling, who comes to BMCC from the Psychology Department at Hunter College, where he served as Research Programs Manager. In that role, he maintained departmental data, coordinated courses serving up to 500 students and managed budgets slated for faculty research.

Dowling earned a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from SUNY Plattsburgh. He earned a Master of Science in Psychology with a concentration in Animal Behavior at Hunter College, CUNY, and a Ph.D. in Psychology — with concentrations in Biopsychology, Behavioral Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology — at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

“I’ve spent 21 years at public institutions, starting my higher education at a community college, moving on to SUNY for my bachelors degree, and ending up at CUNY — first as a graduate student and then as an employee,” he says. “I’m delighted to continue my career with CUNY and help carry out the mission of our public colleges to provide a quality education for all our students. I’ve heard nothing but the best about BMCC and am excited to join the team.”

Lisa Panzera, Director of Shirley Fiterman Art Center

In her former role as Senior Director of Fergus McCaffrey, a contemporary art gallery in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, Lisa Panzera organized 10 to 12 exhibitions and art fairs a year. When Fergus McCaffrey moved from its 1,400-square-foot space on the Upper East Side to its current 9,000-square-foot space in Chelsea, she oversaw the gallery’s expansion. She served as General Editor of catalogues the gallery produced, secured relationships with artists, and fostered affiliations with museums, institutions and collections.

Lisa Panzera

Panzera started her career as a curatorial intern at the Smith College Museum of Art in Northampton, Massachusetts. Later roles included curator of the Levy Gallery for the Arts in Philadelphia, and associate curator at both The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Fondazione Prada in New York.

Overall, she brings more than 30 years experience working in galleries and internationally renowned museums to her new position directing the Shirley Fiterman Art Center at BMCC.

“I greatly look forward to joining the BMCC community,” Panzera says. “I am very excited at the prospect of building the Shirley Fiterman Art Center’s exhibition program and to cultivating both existing and new relationships to raise awareness of the Art Center.”

After earning a Bachelor of Arts in Art History at Smith College, Panzera went on to earn both an M.Phil. and Ph.D. in Art History at the Graduate Center, CUNY. At Hunter College, she taught graduate courses in Modern Art, Special Topics in 20th Century Art, and Theory and Criticism. She has lectured at the Museum of Modern Art, the School of Professional Studies in the Continuing Education department at New York University, the Whitney Museum of Art, and Marymount College. She has also published widely in journals including ARTnews and Art in America.


To Govern For The Good

CUNY Institute Seeks Ways to Enhance
State and Local Public Service Nationwide

AT TIME OF DEEPLY POLARIZED NATIONAL POLITICS, a rare point of bipartisan agreement is the need to change decades of poli- cies that have made the United States the most incarcerated country in the world. Too many nonviolent offenders and too many young men of color go to prison for too long, experts and elected o@cials say. But while most of the attention tends to focus on state and federal prisons, the problem starts at the gateway of the criminal justice system – the 3,200 local jails where mil- lions of nonviolent offenders wait for their cases to be adjudicated.
The search for solutions to over-incarceration has led to CUNY, where the University’s four-year-old Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG) has quickly established itself as a thoughtful and forceful pioneer of programs to help governments serve the public more effectively. Helping to lead a $100 million initiative funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the institute is working with 20 cities and counties across the country to reduce the populations and racial disparities of their jails — and create models for localities across the country.
The incarceration initiative is a prime example of how ISLG is forging strong partnerships that produce innovative, evidence-based public policy. “We wanted to create a place where data-driven
approaches could be developed to make government fairer, more humane and more e@cient,” said Michael Jacobson, ISLG’s founding director. “The focus is on the local and state levels because that’s where most of government is, and it’s where the action is in the push for reform.”
The institute works on an array of initiatives that put in practice one facet of the University’s Connected CUNY strategic vision — using cutting-edge research to design programs that improve our communities and cities, often in collaboration with other research institutions. Along with CUNY centers and programs that focus on important public issues such as sustainable energy, HIV prevention and immi- grants’ rights, ISLG is an exemplar of the University’s civic impact in New York and far beyond.
“Our new strategies are highly collaborative and partner the great resources of our faculty and our colleges to provide richer educational experiences that also have a real impact on the well being of our communities,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “We don’t just create knowledge through our research; we put it to use, making sure that the people who invest in us benefit from the insights we develop at CUNY.”
The Institute for State and Local Governance was founded in 2013 by two veterans of New York City government who had long imagined starting a research and policy institute to help governments across the country deliver more equitable and e@cient public service. Jacobson was a deputy budget director, as well as a commissioner of the city’s correction and probation departments. His co-founder, Marc Shaw, is a for- mer first deputy mayor who is now the University’s interim chief operating o@cer. He chairs ISLG’s advisory board.
Since its inception, the institute has grown to a staff of 40 policy researchers, ana- lysts and managers. The ISLG team has built partnerships with major foundations, nonprofits and government entities to initiate more than a dozen ambitious and well-funded projects. Several are making their mark as incubators of new ideas for addressing entrenched social problems.
A project called Equality Indicators, for instance, provides cities with tools to mea- sure and understand the inequities that disadvantaged people in their communities struggle with daily – a first step in closing the gaps. In another major endeavor, ISLG was selected by the Manhattan district attorney’s o@ce to spearhead a $250 million program of criminal justice initiatives funded by forfeitures from financial crime prosecutions. And when a federal monitor overseeing NYPD policy reforms wanted to study whether police body cameras change community experiences and perceptions, he reached out to the institute to help create a citywide research survey that would be conducted by CUNY students.
“State and local governments are good at the basic services they have to deliver,”

Jacobson said, “but they don’t have a lot of time or capacity to think about how to do things differently or to look at what others are doing around the country. An institute like ours can bring that capacity – the research, the analysis, the tech- nical assistance and training – whether it’s about thinking differently about tax policy or reducing the size of your jails.”
Jacobson has deep roots at CUNY and said he long thought it would be the right place for the institute. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and later spent seven years on the faculty of John Jay College of Criminal Justice before leaving to run the Vera Institute of Justice. He returned to CUNY when Shaw recruited him to start the institute.
“I always felt that as the biggest urban public university CUNY could and should have a real presence in the whole world of working with governments and training students and faculty for government, not just in New York City but nationally,” Jacobson said. To that end, he has put together a team of high-level researchers and policy specialists with experience in government, academic study and the foundation world.
“We have a unique sta„,” said Reagan Daly, the institute’s research director, a former assistant commissioner for research and planning in the city’s probation department who has a Ph.D. in criminology. “We place value not just on the technical research and being able to run sophisticated analysis but also on putting it in the larger context of knowing how government systems work. So we’re good at translating research into recommendations and boiling it down to the three or four things that are really important, not just giving people a lot of dense findings and tables.”
The institute has also worked to tap the resources of the University, collaborating on projects with a growing number of colleges and schools in ways that further CUNY’s drive to be a more integrated and collaborative university. Among those working with the institute are John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College, the Department of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter and Graduate Center entities including the Center for Urban Research and the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality.
“One of our goals is to partner with as many CUNY schools and faculty within those schools as we can,” Jacobson said. “We see ourselves as a version of a not-for-profit in the context of a huge public university, which we love because it gives us access to all sorts of resources.”
It also provides a unique teaching opportunity. With an academic appointment as a professor of sociology at the Graduate Center, Jacobson teaches a capstone course in which Ph.D. and master’s students are paired with institute projects and work closely with senior sta„. (This summer Jacobson also began hosting “The Wonk,” a new show on CUNY TV that focuses on key public policy issues in the city.)
“Nurturing future government leaders and people interested in careers in policymaking is central to our mission,” said Siobhán Carney, the institute’s policy director. “We want to see a pipeline of CUNY students come through our doors because exposure to real-life projects really makes a di„erence.”
Here is a look at a few of the institute’s major projects:

REDUCING LOCAL JAIL POPULATIONS

There are more jails than colleges in the United States — a strong indicator of the mass incarceration that drives support for criminal justice reform. But what gets too little attention, say advocates of penal reform, is the overuse of local jails to house people accused of nonviolent offenses while their cases make their way through the system, including many who are incarcerated for weeks or months only because they are too poor to post bail.
“Eleven million people a year are going to jail – nearly triple the number 30 years ago. That’s an astounding number,” said Jacobson. “City and county jails have the same overcrowding and racial disparities as large prisons but often don’t have the resources or expertise to do anything about it.”
In 2014, ISLG helped the MacArthur Foundation launch a $100 million initiative called the Safety and Justice Challenge, an open call to local jurisdictions across the country to compete for grants of up to $2 million a year to help them change the way they use their jails and make their local justice systems more fair and effective. “We got 190 applications, so clearly there was a sense that people were ready for reform,” Jacobson said. “It’s obviously a very complicated thing, but there are two simple goals: Shrink your system and improve your racial and ethnic disparities within your system.”
Twenty jurisdictions were selected, and since 2015 ISLG has been working with local o@cials on their goals, their strategies and methods for reaching them, and their benchmarks for measuring progress. The project, directed by Daly, has a team of eight ISLG staff members, including six who regularly visit the sites to work with local o@cials.
“These 20 counties have determined that there are too many people in their jails and too many people who don’t belong there – people who can’t pay small amounts of bail, people there for low-level offenses who don’t pose a risk,” Daly said. “They are looking at all the decision points in criminal justice that drive jail populations, from arrest through sentencing. Case-processing time is an area that can have a big impact and a lot of our sites are working on ways of reducing it in their systems.”
The Safety and Justice Challenge will continue for several years, and ISLG hopes it will yield reforms and practices that are adopted beyond the 20 jurisdictions. “We want this to have an impact nationally,” Jacobson said.

EQUALITY INDICATORS

How do you measure inequality? And how do you change it? These broad and deeply complex social questions are at the heart of one of the most significant initiatives undertaken by ISLG.
The project, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, uses hard data on six themes — economy, education, health, housing, justice and services. It breaks down the multi-dimensional nature of inequalities into 96 “proxy indicators” – disparities in misdemean- or arrest rates as a measure of fairness of the justice system, for instance, or Common Core data as an indicator of educational performance — to tease out the drivers of inequality and whether a city’s policies are a contributing or mitigating factor.
“It’s not news to anyone that there are disparities in, say, math performance, but it’s important to track how those disparities are changing as a city makes efforts to address them,” said Victoria Lawson, the Equality Indicators project director. “We want to see whether they’re improving or whether this is an area where more attention is needed.”
ISLG developed Equality Indicators first for New York City and began expanding it earlier this year to five other cities: Pittsburgh; Tulsa, Okla.; Dallas; St. Louis; and Oakland, Calif. “The idea is to be more than an academic exercise — we want this to be about how data can be used to drive change and move the needle,” Lawson said. “The first step is knowing who is most disadvantaged and what the disparities are. Then we can make rec- ommendations based on where we see things changing and where they’re not.”
Jacobson said the project’s real value, ultimately, is in helping local o@cials and leaders in cities throughout the country adopt evidence-based policies. “It’s important for juris- dictions to look closely at the data they have to really understand what’s going on, what’s working, and where improvement needs to be made,” he said.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE INVESTMENT INITIATIVE

spend hundreds of millions of dollars on programs to improve public safety, prevent crime and promote a fair and effective justice system. The fund came from penalties levied against three international banks prosecuted by his o@ce and the U.S. Justice Department for violating federal sanctions. Vance designated $250 million for a project he named the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative (CJII) and put out a request for proposals to create a blueprint for investing the money and carrying it out. ISLG got the job.
“The DA’s o@ce is the biggest criminal justice funder in the world right now and $250 million moves through CUNY,” Jacobson said. “We’ve done all the analytic work to create the portfolio of projects, we run all the competitions to give out the money and we oversee the grantees. So in some ways, we’re like a mini-operating foundation.”
ISLG spent two years developing a far-reaching program that involves nonprofit and community-based organizations throughout New York City and beyond. “We went out and asked experts, ‘Where are the big gaps?’ ” said Siobhan Carney, who oversees the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative on behalf of ISLG. The result of the answers they got is a host of programs that have engaged more than 100 nonprofit organizations so far.
“ISLG’s extraordinary research empowered us with the information we needed to make unique investments that would have lasting impact,” said Vance.
One initiative announced earlier this year is a $46 million program to create and con- struct five “Youth Opportunity Hubs” in targeted Manhattan neighborhoods, part of the CJII’s overall mission to help young people with life issues such as education, employment and housing, and reduce the likelihood of their involvement in the justice system.
Another area of the CJII is developing new approaches for serving victims of crime, while a third is focused on options to divert people from the criminal justice system at var- ious points and reducing recidivism. This includes a statewide College-in-Prison Reentry Program announced in August by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and District Attorney Vance.
ISLG will oversee the $7.3 million program, which will create 2,500 slots for incarcerated individuals in 17 New York State prisons with college-level instruction leading to degrees or certificates.

TAPPING CUNY STUDENTS

A federal monitor was appointed as part of the 2013 court finding that the New York
Police Department’s stop-and-frisk practices were unconstitutional. Last year, the mon- itor asked ISLG to help conduct a study of a pilot program to outfit police with body cameras in communities with the highest incidence of stop-and-frisk. “What the monitor wanted was our ability to use CUNY students to do interviews in and around public housing to supplement their polling,” Jacobson said. “Fifteen thousand CUNY students live in public housing so we jumped at that project. It was a way to get students involved and give them an experience they could use in their classes.”
ISLG partnered with the CUNY Service Corps, which provides students with paid work experiences on projects with community-based organizations and government agencies. In April, under the direction of Neal Palmer, an ISLG senior research associate, 39 stu- dents were trained and then sent out to 10 police precincts to interview hundreds of resi- dents. About half the surveys were conducted in precincts where body cameras were going to be implemented first and the other half were conducted in neighborhoods where police would not yet have body cameras. A follow-up survey will be conducted later to determine if the cameras have an impact on police practices and residents’ experiences and percep- tions of the police.

REDUCING LOCAL JAIL POPULATIONS

There are more jails than colleges in the United States — a strong indicator of the mass incarceration that drives support for criminal justice reform. But what gets too little attention, say advocates of penal reform, is the overuse of local jails to house peo- ple accused of nonviolent offenses while their cases make their way through the system, including many who are incarcerated for weeks or months only because they are too poor to post bail.
“Eleven million people a year are going to jail – nearly triple the number 30 years ago. That’s an astounding number,” said Jacobson. “City and county jails have the same overcrowding and racial dispari- ties as large prisons but often don’t have the resources or expertise to do anything about it.”
In 2014, ISLG helped the MacArthur Foundation launch a $100 million initiative called the Safety and Justice Challenge, an open call to local jurisdictions across the country to compete for grants of up to $2 million a year to help them change the way they use their jails and make their local justice systems more fair and effective. “We got 190 applications, so clearly there was a sense that people were ready for reform,” Jacobson said. “It’s obviously a very complicated thing,
but there are two simple goals: Shrink your system and improve your racial and ethnic disparities within your system.”
Twenty jurisdictions were selected, and since 2015 ISLG has been working with local o@cials on their goals, their strategies and methods for reaching them, and their benchmarks for measuring progress. The project, directed by Daly, has a team of eight ISLG staff members, including six who regularly visit the sites to work with local o@cials.
“These 20 counties have determined that there are too many people in their jails and too many people who don’t belong there – people who can’t pay small amounts of bail, people there for low-level offenses who don’t pose a risk,” Daly said. “They are looking at all the decision points in criminal justice that drive jail populations, from arrest through sentencing. Case-processing time is an area that can have a big impact and a lot of our sites are working on ways of reducing it in their systems.”
The Safety and Justice Challenge will continue for several years, and ISLG hopes it will yield reforms and practices that are adopted beyond the 20 jurisdictions. “We want this to have an impact nationally,” Jacobson said.

EQUALITY INDICATORS

How do you measure inequality? And how do you change it? These broad and deeply complex social questions are at the heart of one of the most significant initiatives undertaken by ISLG.
The project, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, uses hard data on six themes — economy, education, health, housing, justice and services. It breaks down the multi-dimensional nature of inequalities into 96 “proxy indicators” – disparities in misdemean- or arrest rates as a measure of fairness of the justice system, for instance, or Common Core data as an indicator of educational performance — to tease out the drivers of inequality and whether a city’s policies are a contributing or mitigating factor.
“It’s not news to anyone that there are disparities in, say, math performance, but it’s important to track how those disparities are changing as a city makes efforts to address them,” said Victoria Lawson, the Equality Indicators project director. “We want to see whether they’re improving or whether this is an area where more attention is needed.”
ISLG developed Equality Indicators first for New York City and began expanding it earlier this year to five other cities: Pittsburgh; Tulsa, Okla.; Dallas; St. Louis; and Oakland, Calif. “The idea is to be more than an academic exercise — we want this to be about how data can be used to drive change and move the needle,” Lawson said. “The first step is knowing who is most disadvantaged and what the disparities are. Then we can make rec- ommendations based on where we see things changing and where they’re not.”
Jacobson said the project’s real value, ultimately, is in helping local o@cials and leaders in cities throughout the country adopt evidence-based policies. “It’s important for juris- dictions to look closely at the data they have to really understand what’s going on, what’s working, and where improvement needs to be made,” he said.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE INVESTMENT INITIATIVE

spend hundreds of millions of dollars on programs to improve public safety, prevent crime and promote a fair and effective justice system. The fund came from penalties levied against three international banks prosecuted by his o@ce and the U.S. Justice Department for violating federal sanctions. Vance designated $250 million for a project he named the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative (CJII) and put out a request for proposals to create a blueprint for investing the money and carrying it out. ISLG got the job.
“The DA’s o@ce is the biggest criminal justice funder in the world right now and $250 million moves through CUNY,” Jacobson said. “We’ve done all the analytic work to create the portfolio of projects, we run all the competitions to give out the money and we oversee the grantees. So in some ways, we’re like a mini-operating foundation.”
ISLG spent two years developing a far-reaching program that involves nonprofit and community-based organizations throughout New York City and beyond. “We went out and asked experts, ‘Where are the big gaps?’ ” said Siobhan Carney, who oversees the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative on behalf of ISLG. The result of the answers they got is a host of programs that have engaged more than 100 nonprofit organizations so far.
“ISLG’s extraordinary research empowered us with the information we needed to make unique investments that would have lasting impact,” said Vance.
One initiative announced earlier this year is a $46 million program to create and con- struct five “Youth Opportunity Hubs” in targeted Manhattan neighborhoods, part of the CJII’s overall mission to help young people with life issues such as education, employment and housing, and reduce the likelihood of their involvement in the justice system.
Another area of the CJII is developing new approaches for serving victims of crime, while a third is focused on options to divert people from the criminal justice system at var- ious points and reducing recidivism. This includes a statewide College-in-Prison Reentry Program announced in August by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and District Attorney Vance.
ISLG will oversee the $7.3 million program, which will create 2,500 slots for incarcerated individuals in 17 New York State prisons with college-level instruction leading to degrees or certificates.

TAPPING CUNY STUDENTS

A federal monitor was appointed as part of the 2013 court finding that the New York Police Department’s stop-and-frisk practices were unconstitutional. Last year, the monitor asked ISLG to help conduct a study of a pilot program to outfit police with body cameras in communities with the highest incidence of stop-and-frisk. “What the monitor wanted was our ability to use CUNY students to do interviews in and around public hous- ing to supplement their polling,” Jacobson said. “Fifteen thousand CUNY students live in public housing so we jumped at that project. It was a way to get students involved and give them an experience they could use in their classes.”
ISLG partnered with the CUNY Service Corps, which provides students with paid work experiences on projects with community-based organizations and government agencies. In April, under the direction of Neal Palmer, an ISLG senior research associate, 39 stu- dents were trained and then sent out to 10 police precincts to interview hundreds of resi- dents. About half the surveys were conducted in precincts where body cameras were going to be implemented first and the other half were conducted in neighborhoods where police would not yet have body cameras. A follow-up survey will be conducted later to determine if the cameras have an impact on police practices and residents’ experiences and percep- tions of the police.


Kupferberg Center for the Arts Celebrates 10th Anniversary Season with Top Performers for Every Taste

— Grammy-Winner Gladys Knight, Folk Singer Peter Yarrow, The TEN Tenors and Sweet Honey in the Rock Are Among the Artists Who Will Appear —

Queens, NY, September 13, 2017— The Kupferberg Center for the Arts (KCA) will mark the milestone of its 10th Anniversary with a special roster of world-class artists who reflect the diverse borough of Queens—aptly called “the world’s borough” by Queens BP Melinda Katz. Tickets are on sale now.

“It is very gratifying that the Kupferberg Center for the Arts has grown and thrived since its founding in 2007,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Providing our neighbors in Queens and the greater metropolitan area first-rate, culturally diverse entertainment will continue to be the KCA mission in the years and decades to come.”

Kupferberg Presents, the entertainment hub of the Center, kicks off its 2017-18 season, sponsored by New York Community Bank, on Saturday, October 28 at 8 pm with singer-songwriter Peter Yarrow of the legendary folk group Peter, Paul and Mary. The musicians earned great fame with “Puff the Magic Dragon” and their versions of “If I Had a Hammer” and “Blowin’ in the Wind.” Their first album, which sold more than two million copies, reflected the group’s political and social activism. Yarrow has continued this lifelong commitment, creating a nonprofit, Operation Respect, to combat school bullying, and offering his audiences inspiring performances that stress our shared humanity, especially in difficult times.

“An Evening with Gladys Knight” on November 9 features the singer-songwriter-actress known as the “Empress of Soul.” The seven-time Grammy winner has enjoyed number-one hits in Pop, Gospel, R&B, and Adult Contemporary music categories. Among her Grammy winners are “Midnight Train to Georgia,” “You’re the Best Thing that Ever Happened to Me,” and “Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye).” Both as leader of Gladys Knight and the Pips and later as a solo artist, Knight has triumphed in her long career, releasing more than 30 albums and ranking #18 on the VH1 network’s list of the 100 Greatest Women of Rock.

The globe-trotting Australian group The TEN Tenors performs a “Home for the Holidays” show on December 10 that will feature their signature combination of classical and contemporary music. Following 17 years of sold-out performances across the globe, including more than 2,000 of their own headline concerts, The TEN Tenors have cemented their place as one of the world’s most-loved music groups. The group’s appearance gives New Yorkers the chance to experience the charm and vocal power that has been shared to date with an audience of 90 million.

Sweet Honey in the Rock, the all-women African American a capella ensemble, has won a Grammy for its unique expression of female African American history through song and dance. Dedicated to empowerment, education, and entertainment, the collective (Carol Maillard, Louise Robinson, Nitanju Bolade Casel, Aisha Kahlil, and featured musician Romeir Mendez on upright acoustic bass and electric bass) is a powerful ensemble that performs with great flair and attracts an avid audience of fans.

Sums up KCA Executive Director Jeff Rosenstock: “In this 10th anniversary year, we thank the extraordinary artists of our new season and the many talented performers such as Johnny Mathis, Carol Burnett and New Shanghai Circus who have graced our stages. We also thank our wonderful supporters: the Kupferberg family, New York Community Bank, and the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, to name a few, as well as our Arts Advisory Board and staff. And most of all, we thank our patrons from many communities throughout Queens, Long Island, and the rest of the metropolitan area who come to enjoy Kupferberg Presents entertainment.”

Please see below for details on all the upcoming performances, including the rest of the 2017-18 lineup: Inti-Illimani, New York Philharmonic Ensembles, and a glittering production of Sleeping Beauty by the State Ballet Theatre of Russia, known internationally as one of Russia’s leading ballet companies.

Visit www.kupferbergcenter.org or call the Box Office at 718-793-8080 for tickets and detailed information. Kupferberg Center for the Arts offers free parking, easy access to the Long Island Expressway, and excellent dining options on the campus of Queens College.

The Kupferberg Presents 2017-2018 Season

An Evening