School/Class News





Three 2018 Military Guides Recognize Queens College’s Outstanding Support of Veterans

— “Triple Play” of Awards an Unprecedented Honor for the College —

QUEENS, NY, January 19, 2018 –For the first time in a single year, Queens College has received three awards recognizing it as a top school for easing veterans’ transition into college life and offering services that help ensure their success.

Since 2014, Queens College has been listed as a top Military Friendly® School in the annual guide from Victory Media, a veteran-owned publisher that connects the military and civilian worlds. This year, Queens College has earned the special recognition of a Silver Award, which only ten colleges in New York State were qualified to receive. In 2017, QC also received the designation of a Top School in the Military Advanced Education & Transition (MAE&T) Guide to Colleges & Universities; QC appears again in its newest edition. And now, the college can add another stripe to its badge of honor because of its inclusion in Military Times Best: Colleges 2018 rankings (formerly known as Best for Vets).

“I’m very gratified that Queens College has received triple recognition as an outstanding choice for veterans,” says Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, president of Queens College. “These dedicated women and men made sacrifices, sometimes putting their lives on the line, to serve our nation. We, in turn, are pleased to demonstrate our thanks by helping them in every way possible to achieve as students in our college community.”

As part of its continuing commitment to student veterans, the college also unveiled a newly renovated veterans club space in 2017, made possible by an $8,000 Vet Center Initiative Grant from Student Veterans of America (SVA) and The Home Depot Foundation. The college—among 50 nationwide grant recipients—used the funds to enhance an already welcoming campus environment for student veterans by purchasing lounge and kitchen furniture, a computer, appliances—including a refrigerator, microwave, and Keurig coffee machine—and renovation supplies.

The college maintains an active Veterans Support Services office headed by Dennis Torres, who served for ten years in the Marine Corps Reserve and was deployed to Iraq and the Syrian border area. While serving, he managed to earn a BA and MA in Industrial Psychology.

“My goal is to remove any obstacles that veterans may encounter when transitioning to college,” says Torres, who advises on GI Bill tuition benefits, works closely with the students’ Veterans Club, and makes referrals when needed to external, veteran-specific resources. He also conducts outreach to recruit and welcome America’s former servicemen and women, communicating the college’s commitment to them and their educational aspirations.

Below are further details of the three listings:

2017-2018 Military Friendly® School list is based on public data from more than 8,800 schools nationwide, input from student veterans, and voluntary responses to its survey. For this edition, 849 schools earned the designation “Military Friendly® School.” According to the publisher, the Military Friendly® designation “is the standard that measures an organization’s commitment, effort and success in creating sustainable and meaningful benefit for the military community.”

Top School in the Military Advanced Education & Transition 2018 Guide to Colleges & Universities measures best practices in military and veteran education. More than 600 institutions are named in the guide. Says the publisher: “From community colleges to state universities, online universities and nationally known centers of higher learning, MAE&T’s Guide arms students with information about institutions that go out of their way to give back to our men and women in uniform.”

Military Times Best: Colleges 2018. The rankings were very competitive due to the record number of colleges that participated in this year’s survey–but fewer than half met the high standard. Colleges were evaluated as to how they stacked up across five categories: university culture, academic quality and outcomes, policies, student support, and cost and financial aid. “Only the best made the cut,” says editor George Altman.

Another first for the college is the Thomas A. Mattia Scholarship for Veterans, established in the name of a Queens College graduate who served with great valor in the Navy during World War II. Torres will be chairing a scholarship committee to identify the veteran student who will receive this new award.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY CHANCELLOR MILLIKEN TESTIFIES AT JOINT LEGISLATIVE HEARING ON STATE EXECUTIVE BUDGET PROPOSAL

Citing “the many reasons for our excitement and optimism at CUNY,” Chancellor James B. Milliken testified today at the Joint Senate and Assembly public hearing in Albany on Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s 2018 – 2019 State Executive Budget proposal. With nationally known economists finding that CUNY is “an unsurpassed engine of social mobility, lifting almost six times as many lower-income students to the middle class and beyond” as the Ivy League colleges plus Duke, MIT, Stanford and Chicago combined, he said,  “New York has much to be proud of.”

The Chancellor welcomed the governor’s proposed $70 million increase for CUNY’s senior colleges for mandatory fringe benefit increases, the continuing deployment of free online textbooks and course materials and more; and the $118 million to cover the expansion of the family income threshold for state Excelsior Scholarships to $110,000 for the 2018-2019 school year.

He praised the governor’s proposal to enact a New York State DREAM Act, “which would extend financial aid to CUNY’s many undocumented students, a well-deserving group that brings ambition, talent and hard work to our campuses and our state.” Since 2015 CUNY has partnered with the philanthropic TheDream.US foundation to offer scholarships to 775 DREAMers. More than 90 percent remained in college, he said, “higher than comparable numbers for their American citizen classmates” and last year 70 percent of the 474 enrolled scholarship winners had cumulative GPAs of 3.0 or higher. Arguing for a state DREAM Act, he added that DREAMer graduates “do the jobs that make our city and state work in health care, finance, IT and the legal profession.”

The Chancellor said he was pleased with the $284 million proposed for critical maintenance at CUNY’s senior colleges and the $49 million in matching funds for work at the seven community colleges. With 272,000 degree students and more than 250,000 in continuing education and professional studies, “our 24 institutions are open seven days a week, with classes scheduled throughout the day and most evenings. … There are 40,000 more CUNY students using our facilities today than a decade ago … the equivalent of adding a university about the size of the University of Michigan.”

He thanked the governor and the Legislature for their continuing support of The City University of New York, “especially your support for CUNY’s historic mission of accessibility, inclusion and high quality.”  That, he added, “is a good part of what makes me optimistic about the future of what we unabashedly call ‘the greatest urban university in the world.’”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Queens College Names One of Top 20 Best Value Colleges for Teaching Degrees

— Queens College Named Most Affordable Option on 2018 List, Highest Overall Ranked School from New York —

January 23, 2018 (Queens, NY) – Queens College today was named one of the top 20 best value colleges for teaching degrees on the Best Value Schools’ 2018 list, and the most affordable overall. Queens College is the highest-ranked school in the State of New York. The ranking of the 50 best, most affordable colleges for teaching degrees in the U.S. focused on four-year, public and private (non-profit) colleges and universities that offer multiple bachelor’s degrees in teaching. Ranking factors included program popularity, breadth of programs, acceptance, graduation and retention rates, and net price.

“We are thrilled to be recognized as one of the top value schools in the nation for students to earn teaching degrees as well as being first in New York State. We take great pride that more teachers and administrators in the New York City public school system graduated from Queens College than from any other school in New York,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Queens College has been long recognized for its prestigious education division, diverse undergraduate and graduate programs, and for equipping future teachers and school professionals with the skills they need to be successful partners with their communities.”

Queens College offers 97 registered programs that prepare teachers and other school professionals for New York State certification, including undergraduate programs in art teacher education, childhood education, English adolescent education, family and consumer science education teacher, mathematics adolescent education, music teacher education, physical education teacher, science adolescent education, social studies adolescent education, linguistics, and world languages.

In describing Queens College’s position on the list, Best Value Schools staff declared:

Not only will you find an extremely cheap bachelor’s degree in teaching at CUNY Queens College, but you’ll also find a school that seeks meaningful engagement with its community. Thanks to the Center for the Improvement of Education, you can be part of a city-wide effort to bring together schools, agencies, businesses, and other organizations to help children flourish and grow. Another benefit of these partnerships is that it helps the school design teaching degrees that meet the needs of local students. Of course, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to help local students yourself when you complete a field experience in the city.

Four-year public and private colleges and universities with an average annual net price below $30,000 were considered to receive the designation. In addition, schools must offer multiple bachelor’s degrees in teaching and also have retention and graduation rates greater than 50% and admission rates below 85% to be eligible.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


The Miami Herald and The Chicago Reader Win 2018 John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Awards

The Miami Herald and The Chicago Reader Win 2018 John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Awards

New York, NY, January 23, 2018 – Karol V. Mason, President of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, today announced that Spencer Woodman of The Chicago Reader and The Investigative Fund, and the investigative team of Carol Marbin Miller and Audra D.S. Burch of The Miami Herald are the winners of the 13th annual John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim 2018 Awards for Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting.

“We are proud to honor these journalists for their enterprise and for the inspiring example they set for their colleagues,” said President Mason.  “They demonstrate the continuing importance of the role played by our media in today’s criminal justice debates.”

The prizes, administered by John Jay’s Center on Media, Crime and Justice (CMCJ), recognize the previous year’s best print and online justice reporting in a U.S.-based media outlet between November 2016 and October 2017. Winning entries in each of the two categories share a cash award of $1,500 and a plaque. Runners-up (see below) receive a certificate of Honorable Mention.

The 2018 winners:

Spencer Woodman of The Chicago Reader has won the 2018 John Jay Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award (single-story category) for his investigation of Chicago’s Cook County Jail. His story, produced in partnership with The Investigative Fund, entitled, “Incarceration Without Trial,” revealed backlogs in the city’s court system that have resulted in more than 1,000 inmates awaiting trial for two years or more. Woodman’s year-long investigation, which began with a Freedom of Information request, disclosed that people of color account for 93 percent of those in pretrial detention for at least two years, and brought home the troubling fact that “the right to a speedy trial has become a distant dream in Chicago’s Cook County Jail,” said Esther Kaplan, Editor of The Investigative Fund, in her nomination letter. Among other responses, it prompted calls for reforms to the bail system.

Carol Marbin Miller and Audra D.S. Burch of The Miami Herald have won the 2018 John Jay Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award (series category) for their multi-part series “Fight Club,” a six-part investigation of conditions in Florida’s juvenile justice detention centers.  “Marbin Miller and Burch documented a cavalcade of casual brutality, sexual exploitation, medical neglect and administrative incompetence,” wrote Herald senior editor Casey Frank in his nominating letter. As a result of the “overwhelming” response to the story from the public and officials, Frank added, “juvenile justice, an afterthought for years, moved front and center on the state’s agenda heading into the spring (2018) legislative session.”

Runner-up in the single-story category was awarded to Cary Aspinwall of The Dallas Morning News for “Overlooked,” which focused on the plight of children of imprisoned parents.  “Cary was able to prove that neither law enforcement nor the courts watched out for kids whose mothers went to jail,” said editor Mike Wilson, noting that Cary’s investigation documented a 44 percent increase in the number of women imprisoned in Texas jails over the last five years. “The power of the narrative – a real-life ‘Moonlight’, one reader called it—helped focus attention on the flaws in the way Dallas handles pre-trial detention,” and prompted promises by county authorities to “fix a bail system that prefers to jail women rather than allow them to care for their kids.”

Runners-up in the series category were Sharon Cohen and Adam Geller of The Associated Press for “Locked up for Life,” a multipart examination of individuals sentenced to life without parole for crime committed as juveniles.  The story, produced with contributing reporter Juliet Linderman and contributing video journalist Mike Householder, and assisted by files from AP reporters in all 50 states, was the first nationwide examination of the aftermath of the 2012 Supreme Court decision that banned mandatory life without parole for juveniles in murder cases, and the Court’s subsequent 2016 ruling that those already serving such sentences—more than 2,000—may be entitled to new sentences and a chance at freedom.  Their “relentless reporting” showed wide disparities in how the reforms mandated by the Court were implemented, said AP Enterprise Editor Pauline Arrillaga in her nominating letter, and have already fueled calls for “further court action.”

Jurors for the 2018 awards were:

Alexa Capeloto, Associate Professor, John Jay College; Joe Domanick, Associate Director, CMCJ; Ted Gest, president, Criminal Justice Journalists; Ann Givens, of The TraceKatti Gray, contributing editor, The Crime Report; Mark Obbie, a criminal justice writer and former executive editor of American Lawyer; and Topher Sanders of ProPublica (co-winner of the 2017 Journalism Prize in the Series Category).

The awards will be presented February 15, 2018 at a dinner in New York City, held in conjunction with the 13th annual John Jay/Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America.   Reservations for the dinner, which will also honor broadcasting legend Bill Moyers as this year’s “Justice Trailblazer,” can be made here. Moyers’ award will be presented by John Jay President Karol Mason, former NY Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman, and emcee Errol Louis of NY1.

H.F. GUGGENHEIM SYMPOSIUM ON CRIME IN AMERICA

The awards dinner is the cornerstone event of the 13th Annual Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City February 15-16, 2017.

The symposium, “Justice in the Heartland,” will explore the opioid crisis and other challenges of the changing environment for criminal justice reform in 2018.

Speakers include: Louis Dekmar, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police; The Hon. Craig Hannah, presiding judge of Buffalo’s Opioid Treatment Court; Leanne Bertsch, president of the Association of State Correctional Administrators; and Eric Gonzalez, Brooklyn (NY) District Attorney.  A one-time fee of $25 is required for attendance at the on-the-record symposium.  For a full list of speakers, and to register for the conference, please click here. 

JOHN JAY/H.F. GUGGENHEIM & QUATTRONE REPORTING FELLOWS

A record 33 U.S. journalists from print, online and broadcast outlets have also been awarded Reporting Fellowships to attend the 13th annual Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America, including four who have received special investigative fellowships from the Quattrone Center on the Fair Administration of Justice at the University of Pennsylvania Law School for projects examining systemic issues in the justice system. These unique fellowships are aimed at encouraging and promoting top-quality journalism on criminal justice. The Fellows were selected from a wide pool of applicants based on editors’ recommendations, and on investigative reporting projects underway or in the planning stage. A full list of the journalism fellows is below.

The John Jay/Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium, administered by the Center on Media, Crime and Justice art John Jay College, is the only national gathering that brings together journalists, legislators, policymakers, scholars and practitioners for candid on-the-record discussions on emerging issues of U.S. criminal justice.

Overall support for the conference and fellowships comes from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice, the Pew Center on the States Public Safety Performance Project, and John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

2018 John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Reporting Fellows (in Alphabetical Order)

Alexandria Bordas   Asheville Citizen Times,  North Carolina
Melissa Brown   Montgomery Advertiser, Alabama
Lynsi Burton SeattlePI
Kathryn Casteel FiveThirtyEight
Lelani Clark   TV host/producer, Tough Cookie Productions
Sharon Cohen Associated Press
Micah Danney  Freelancer
Kia Gregory  Freelancer
Megan Guza Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
John Hinton Winston Salem-Journal
Anat Kamm  Freelancer
Ashley Kang The Stand
Kamala Kelkar PBS NewsHour Weekend
George Lavender KCRW-Santa Monica
Madeleine List Cape Cod Times
Craig McCarthy NJ.com/The Star-Ledger
Thomasi McDonald The News & Observer (Raleigh NC)
Lauren McGaughy The Dallas Morning News
Sam Newhouse Metro Philadelphia
Madeleine O’Neill Erie Times-News/GoErie.com
Kenneth R. Rosen The New York Times
Caitlin Schmidt The Arizona Daily Star
Zachary Siegel Harvard Law Fair Punishment Project
Mallory Simon  CNN
Irene Spezzamonte  Freelancer
Sean P. Sullivan NJ.com/The Star-Ledger
Monica Vendituoli Fayetteville Observer
Grace Toohey The Advocate (Baton Rouge)
Conrad Wilson Oregon Public Broadcasting

2018 Quattrone Investigative Reporting Fellows (in Alphabetical Order)

Jaylyn Cook Herald & Review (Decatur, Illinois)
Jonathan Edwards The Virginian-Pilot
Donna Ladd Jackson (Miss) Free Press
Eva Ruth Moravec Texas Justice Initiative/freelance

 

About John Jay College of Criminal JusticeAn international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nationsIn teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit

The Center on Media, Crime and Justice, established at John Jay College in 2006, is the nation’s only practice- and research-oriented think tank devoted to encouraging and developing high-quality reporting on criminal justice. Publisher of The Crime Report, it promotes better-informed public debate on the complex 21st century challenges of law enforcement, public security and justice in a globalized urban society.

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation sponsors scholarly research on problems of violence.

The Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice at the University of Pennsylvania Law School [LINK] is a national research and policy hub created to catalyze long-term structural improvements to the US criminal justice system.


“The Future of Humanity” and other CCNY titles

Forthcoming titles by CCNY faculty Michio Kaku (above top) and Lynda G. Dodd (above)

The Future of Humanity,” is the title of renowned physicist Michio Kaku’s latest book, one of new and forthcoming releases by City College of New York faculty.  It will be published on Feb. 1.

“It’s all about our exciting destiny in space, about colonizing Mars, the solar system, and eventually the stars,” said Kaku, Henry Semat Professor of Physics in City College’s Division of Science and an American Physical Society Fellow.

Co-founder of the string field theory, Kaku’s previous books include the best-sellers “Hyperspace,” “Beyond Einstein,” “Physics of the Impossible” and “Physics of the Future.”

Following are other new and forthcoming titles from CCNY faculty:

 

·         “Taming the Rights Revolution,” by Lynda G. Dodd, Joseph H. Flom Professor of Legal Studies and Political Science, Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership;
·         “Missing Persons, Animals, and Artists,” by Roberto Ransom, translated from Spanish by Daniel Shapiro, Distinguished Lecturer, Division of Humanities and the Arts;
·         “Ivo van Hove Onstage,” edited by David Willinger, professor, Division of Humanities and the Arts;
·         “Historical Dictionary of United States-Caribbean Relations,” co-written by Jacqueline Anne Braveboy-Wagner, professor, Colin Powell School.

 

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Macaulay Honors College Hosts the 2018 City Nature Challenge April 27-30

Every New Yorker can join us in their favorite local park and become a citizen scientist.


Macaulay Honors College has been named the official New York City host of the City Nature Challenge, a national, four-day public event that invites New Yorkers to contribute to science education and benefit New York City’s unique urban wildlife environment. The New York City Nature Challenge will bring together nature lovers of all ages in the greenspaces of their communities to record examples of urban wildlife with smartphones.

Throughout April 27-30, public parks, preservation societies, gardens and other natural organizations around New York City’s five boroughs will host City Nature Challenge events that are open to all. Macaulay students, staff and faculty will be on hand to teach and guide participants. Then, after the 4 days of observation has ended, students will help properly identify and catalog the species in a marathon technological session. Macaulay will share the results of the challenge with the public, students, and educators later in the Spring.

Local citizen scientists from all walks of life will represent New York City in this national challenge, taking place in cities all across the country. In addition to a bit of friendly city-to-city competition, our efforts will contribute to our understanding of urban wildlife and the United States as a whole.

The event expands the scientific body of knowledge so that educators can instill a love for science and planners can build cities that work better for humans and wildlife. The City Nature Challenge was created by iNaturalist.org and the California Academy of Sciences.

Contact:
Kathryn Lineberger
Macaulay External Affairs
kathryn.lineberger@mhc.cuny.edu

Dr. Kelly O’Donnell
Macaulay Director of Science Forward
kelly.odonnell@mhc.cuny.edu

 

 


Queens College Celebrates Black History Month on the Theme of Sankofa: Reclaiming our Time

— Highlights Include an Appearance by Katrina Adams, Chairman of the Board, CEO, and President of the United States Tennis Association —

QUEENS, NY, January 22, 2018 − An appearance by Katrina Adams, Chairman of the Board, CEO, and President of the United States Tennis Association, will be among a wide-ranging series of events announced today by President Felix V. Matos Rodriguez as Queens College celebrates Black History Month 2018. Adams is the first African-American, first former professional tennis player, and youngest person to serve as president in the organization’s 135-year history.

The theme for the month-long celebration is Sankofa: Reclaiming Our Time. A word from the Akan people of Ghana, Sankofa means “We must go back and reclaim our past in order to move forward.” This is reflected in many of the planned events.

“Waging Peace: 100 Years of Action” is the leadoff event on Thursday, February 1 and includes a reception. Other events include a presentation by culinary historian, cookbook author, journalist and Queens College faculty member Jessica Harris titled “My Soul Looks Back: Reflections on My 50-Year Career at Queens College.” Author Vanessa K. Valdés will make a presentation based upon her book Diasporic Blackness: The Life and Times of Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, about the black, Puerto Rican-born scholar, collector, and archivist whose personal library was the basis of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library. Among other presentations/panel discussions will be “The Origins of Black History Month” and “What is Blackness?: A Disclosure of Identity, Ethnicity and Race.” The final event on February 28 will be a panel discussion on “Black Women and the Vote: From Suffrage to the Age of Trump.”

An event schedule can be found at www.qc.cuny.edu/BHM. All events are free and open to the public.

Queens College has long played a role in the struggle of African Americans for equal rights. In May 1965 Dr. Martin Luther King was the first speaker in the college’s John F. Kennedy Memorial Lecture Series, highlighting the power of peaceful resistance in his remarks. “Nonviolence,” Dr. King said, “is the most potent weapon available to oppressed people in their struggle for freedom and human dignity.” A year earlier, Queens College student Andrew Goodman was murdered along with James Chaney and Michael Schwerner during the Freedom Summer voter-registration project in Mississippi. The college’s Rosenthal Library clock tower is named for the three civil rights workers. In past years the college has honored civil rights pioneers such as Aaron Henry, who received the Queens College Medal in 1990, and John Lewis, who received an honorary degree in 2009.

Many prominent African Americans have graduated from Queens College, including Queens Borough President Helen Marshall, New York Assemblywoman Barbara Clark, New York Urban League Chairman Noel Hankin, former Vice Chairman of the CUNY Board of Trustees Philip A. Berry, and Olympic medalist Gail Marquis.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Grove School at CCNY receives $1M anonymous gift

City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, the only public school of engineering in the city, is the recipient of a $1 million anonymous gift. The largesse creates a permanent endowed fund to provide scholarships and other support for Grove School students.

Named “The Endowed Scholarship Fund to Support the Pursuit of Engineering Careers,” it will be administered by The 21st Century Foundation.

“The 21st Century Foundation and the City College of New York are honored to receive this gift, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of one of our engineering alumni,” said Dee Dee Mozeleski, interim executive director of the Foundation. “It is designed with the unique needs of Grove School of Engineering students in mind.”

Gilda A. Barabino, dean and Berg Professor at the Grove School, one of the most diverse engineering schools in the nation, said: “The Fund will have a lasting impact on our students and ensure that CCNY continues to provide access to excellence for remarkable students from a diversity of backgrounds and to produce the engineering innovators of tomorrow.”

The fund is expected to provide up to 10 students in need with approximately $4,000, or 50 % of their annual tuition, per academic year. In addition, they will receive a $750 book allowance for hardcopy or digital books; software needed for advanced courses, or other bookstore-related purchases as suggested by course requirements.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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Elle Documentary Spotlights Professor Zinga Fraser’s Scholarship on African-American Women

The director of Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism at Brooklyn College also recently received the prestigious American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Zinga A. Fraser Ph.D. has been very busy. As the director of the Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism at Brooklyn College, and assistant professor in Africana studies and women’s and gender studies, who is also working on a groundbreaking book about black congressional women in the post-civil rights era, she is a deeply committed academic. But she’s also incredibly popular. Her expertise was called upon to solidify the foundation of a new Elle documentary, Braided: An American Hair Story. The film takes an in-depth look at the politics surrounding black beauty, specifically black women’s hair. Fraser was featured alongside Oscar-winning actor Lupita Nyong’o, chart-topping rapper Young M.A., actor Karrueche Tran, and author Ayana Bird.

In the documentary, Fraser discusses the rich history of black women’s beauty politics as well as the societal challenges surrounding black women’s hair. “There is a certain kind of demonization of black women’s and black girls’ hair choices,” says Fraser, “a demonization that is at odds with how non-black women and girls are treated even when they adopt styles created specifically by and for black people. Think of the Kardashian women, for example. When they sport these styles, whether braids, cornrows, or dreadlocks, they become desirable and trendy. But when black women and girls wear these same styles, which they created, there are significant negative consequences that span from the suspension of adolescent girls from school to the firing or demotion of black women from the armed forces because their braided hair style violated the dress code.”

Braided, part of Elle‘s new push toward digital content, was produced by Lenise Angel. Elle sought out Fraser because of her reputation, prestige, and scholarship, which revolves around black women’s history and politics.

In honor of her work, Fraser was recently named the 2017–18 American Association of University Women (AAUW) Postdoctoral Fellow—the first African-American woman at Brooklyn College to receive the distinction. Distinguished Professor of Political Science Jeanne Theoharis received the award in 2009. The fellowship, which dates back to 1888, is one of the oldest and most prestigious fellowship programs in the world exclusively for women. It supports scholars who are completing doctoral dissertations, conducting postdoctoral research, or finishing research for publication. Fraser is currently at work on her book, Sister Insider/ Sister Outsider: Shirley Chisholm and Barbara Jordan Black Women’s Politics in the Post-Civil Rights Era, which compares and contrasts the political lives of Congresswomen Shirley Chisholm ’46 and Barbara Jordan. It will be the first comparative study of black congressional women.

“I am honored to have received this prestigious fellowship, which will allow me to complete this most important and timely work on black women’s politics,” says Fraser. “This work hopes to transform not only how we understand the political lives of Chisholm and Jordan, but also understand the ways in which black women help us to reimagine democracy in the United States.” Fraser suggests that “while recent media attention has highlighted the consistency of black women voters, black women representatives and voters have been an essential political subgroup within the Democratic Party for the past 40 years.”

Elle.com video producer Lenise Angel (left) and Director of the Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism Zinga A. Fraser Ph.D. on set for the Braided: An American Hair Story documentary.

Fraser became director of the college’s Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s activism in 2015. The project is a repository of women’s grassroots social activism in Brooklyn from 1945 to the present. Its archive consists of documents and other materials, including oral histories from people who knew or worked with Chisholm and from the extraordinary diversity of women’s activist organizations in Brooklyn since 1945. Housed in the Brooklyn College Library, it is a resource for students of all ages, community activists, public policy experts, scholars, and the general public. The archive aims to expand the understanding of women’s place in history and of the significance and consequence of social activism itself.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Chisholm’s historic election to the U.S. Congress. In honor of that milestone, Fraser is planning a very special event for Shirley Chisholm Day, which is typically celebrated on Chisholm’s birthday, November 30.

“We will host a conference and events on the significance of Chisholm’s anniversary as well as black women’s current political activism and work,” she says. These activities will bring together scholars, students, faculty, community leaders, and organizations throughout Brooklyn and New York City.”

A noted scholar on the intersections of gender, history, politics, and race, Fraser earned her doctorate in African-American Studies from Northwestern University; a Master of Arts from the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University. In addition to her academic accolades Fraser spent a significant amount of her time in politics and the non-profit world. She previously worked for the former Congressman Major R. Owens, the Lawyer’s Committee for Human Rights, and served as the U.S. Policy Program Coordinator for the Women’s Environmental and Development Organization, where she developed a policy agenda to address human rights issues for women and girls in the U.S.

Fraser designed a course at the college entitled “Race, Gender and Inequality” that examines the historical construction of race and gender and how those differences contribute to structural and institutional inequalities. “Today more than ever we need a firm analysis of how marginalized groups navigate formal and informal political spaces,” she says.

Fraser will be featured in an upcoming USA Today article with Congresswoman Maxine Waters on the legacy of Shirley Chisholm in American politics. The article will also examine the history and influence of black women in politics.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


The Giving Spirit

A generous gift from chemist Ed Birnbaum ’64 will support undergraduate research in chemistry at Brooklyn College.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

“I had been thinking about giving back to Brooklyn College for a long time,” said Ed Birnbaum ’64, who has enjoyed a lengthy and distinguished career as a chemist. “I essentially received a free college education. That was a gift. And I was looking for some mechanism through which I could return the favor.”

Birnbaum has generously invested $20,000 in Brooklyn College via a charitable gift annuity, offered through the Brooklyn College Foundation (BCF). A charitable gift annuity provides fixed payments to donors for life in exchange for their gift of cash or securities to the BCF. The funds remaining at the end of the donor’s life are considered a donation to the college. By making this investment, Birnbaum will receive income and tax benefits. His remaining balance will be utilized to support undergraduate research in the Department of Chemistry, the area of study in which he received his Bachelor of Science degree, and his legacy will live on for generations.

The son of a Polish immigrant, Birnbaum was born and raised in Brooklyn and attended Brooklyn College because of its affordable, rigorous education. He originally intended to study math when he enrolled, but a meeting with one of the chemistry professors prior to classes starting changed his mind.

“I joined the brand new pilot program in chemistry established in 1960 by Professor J.G. Sharefkin,” Birnbaum recalled. “One of the hallmarks of this program was to have students take a calculus-based two-semester physics sequence starting in the spring of freshman year, and the year-long physical chemistry sequence as sophomores, both novel ideas for the time. We also had a much more closely integrated lecture and laboratory program with a lot of freedom in completing our laboratory assignments.”

During his senior year, Birnbaum carried out research on the chemistry of the lanthanides (elements with atomic numbers 58–71 that share common characteristics, including size and chemical reactivity) under the direction of the department chair, via the National Science Foundation Undergraduate Research Participation Program (NSFURPP).

“Professor Sharefkin generated a lot of enthusiasm among the pilot program students, which along with my experience in the NSFURPP program encouraged me to go on to get my Ph.D.”

After graduating from Brooklyn College, Birnbaum went on to earn both his master’s and doctorate degrees at the University of Illinois.

“I was only the third member of my extended family to go to college and the first to go to graduate school. I was quite nervous about whether I could handle it. I soon discovered that I was well-prepared to compete with the other 85 or so other first-year chemistry Ph.D. students from all around the country,” Birnbaum said. “In fact, thanks to the quantum chemistry class I took as an undergrad, I was one of only three or four students to pass that portion of the entrance exam. Also, unlike many of my peers, I was also able to pass the German exam for chemistry graduate students the first time around, thanks to my two years of German at Brooklyn College.”

Birnbaum spent a summer doing research at ESSO (now Exxon), where he decided that he preferred a career as an academic chemist rather than an industrial chemist because he liked the freedom of the academy as opposed to the constraints of the corporate world. After receiving a DuPont Teaching Fellowship during his last year of graduate school, and teaching the chemistry laboratory for the entering freshman chemistry majors at the University of Illinois, he decided that being a chemistry professor was the right path for him. Birnbaum’s first academic position was as a professor at New Mexico State University (NMSU), where he and his associates were among the first to use nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy of lanthanide ions to probe both inorganic and biological systems. After 24 years, Birnbaum left NMSU, spending a year at Los Alamos National Laboratory, two years at the University of Hawaii, and another 15 years at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. At the University of the Sciences, he was also the chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

Birnbaum (right) in the summer of 1964, after graduating from Brooklyn College. He and a friend pose just outside of Yellowstone National Park during a cross-country trip.

“As department chair, I spent a lot of time mentoring and talking to chemistry students about their careers. The job market is much more challenging now. When I graduated, the success rate for obtaining a National Science Foundation grant was somewhere around 50 percent. Now it’s, maybe, 15 percent,” Birnbaum said. “In light of this, I encourage students looking to work in this field to have good writing and speaking skills and to be confident in their abilities; they have to be willing to push themselves and put themselves out there, make presentations at meetings and conferences, introduce themselves to experts in the field, and be willing to listen and receive constructive feedback.”

Birnbaum is now retired and living in New Mexico.

To learn more about the impact that giving has on Brooklyn College students and the various donor options available, please visit the Brooklyn College Foundation website.

There are many ways to support Brooklyn College: Make a planned gift through a will, trust, or retirement plan; designate gifts for specific purposes, such as scholarships, awards, prizes, internships, travel funds, research fellowships, or departmental discretionary funds; join the Boylan Society, a monthly sustainer program; purchase a Commemorative Brick and leave behind a lasting legacy at Brooklyn College; or make a one-time gift online. The Brooklyn College Foundation, Inc. was established in 1958 to encourage and promote the academic purposes of Brooklyn College of The City University of New York and the educational welfare of students, faculty, alumni, and the community. Through a full spectrum of fundraising programs, the foundation provides resources that advance the mission of Brooklyn College.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


CCNY study explores why antidepressants don’t work for half of the people taking them

Julia Castello and Lauren Malave

According to the World Health Organization more than three hundred million people worldwide suffer from depression. Unfortunately, the antidepressants commonly used to treat them only work for 50% of the population.

A recent paper published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry explores how a protein named CK2 could be playing a key role. The lead author of the paper, Julia Castello, is a biochemistry student at the CUNY Graduate Center working in Eitan Friedman‘s neuroscience lab at The City College of New York.

As the research points out, the most used antidepressants are called Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). The problem is that there are 14 different types of serotonin receptors, but it is not known which are the mediators of the therapeutic effect of SSRIs. Castello, along with her team, are the first ones to identify CK2 as a modulator of a serotonin receptor, 5-HT4. Manipulation of CK2 in the brain decreases depressive and anxious states through the 5-HT4 receptor.

Castello says: “Identifying new targets broadens our understanding about the cause of depression as well as the mechanism of action of antidepressants, which could lead to the formulation of new antidepressants that work more efficiently and faster for more people.”

A separate study of CK2’s potential role in Parkinson’s is the subject of another research project at City College. Its findings, published in The Journal of Neuroscience in December, identify CK2 as a major player in the molecular mechanisms and targets that contribute to modulate L-DOPA induced dyskinesia. L-DOPA is currently the most effective medication available in the market. But a side effect of this drug is that after years of treatment, patients develop involuntary movements that can be debilitating.

The lead author of that paper is Marisol Cortes, a biochemistry major and City College Fellow now at Johns Hopkins. Lauren Malave, a RISE fellow student and lead scientist for dyskinesia at CCNY and Castello were also co-authors.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of January 15, 2018 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

I am hoping that this Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day and weekend have provided you and your family with the reflective space to consider the ways in which our individual actions and interdependence can foster a community of strength and love.

Upper Grades Students: This is the final week of Semester 1. Please ensure you are aware of end-of-semester assessments (exams or projects) and reach out to teachers when support is needed.

Congratulations to NEST+m’s Award-winning Chess Players and 5th Grades Spelling Bee Champions (see details below)!

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Announcements

Celebrating Chess @ NEST+m
Despite frigid temps, 53 NEST+m students ventured out to play in the Greater New York Scholastic Chess Championships last weekend, a heated competition among the finest NYC schools.  As always, our players fought hard and persevered through the ups and downs of the weekend.

The NEST+m chess tradition continues on as we celebrate successes from both the team and individual players!  Thank you to the players, parents and coaches for all your support.

2018 NEST+m team trophies include:

  • 2nd Place Team – Elementary Championship (Davis Zong, Charles Hua, Dylan Ma, Jai Shah, Eric Tang, Nicolas Shulga, Matthew Chin, Maya Nozaki)
  • 5th Place Team  – Primary Championship (Rhys Black, Dylan Kang, Spencer Chin, Oliver Hua, Ryan Ma)
  • 3rd Place Team  – Primary U600 (Zachery Ng, Liam Chan, Joshua Dai, Henry Borredon Shmurun, Eloise Roberts, Joshua Duca-Evans, Adrian Li)
  • 3rd Place Team  – K-1 U400 (Ivan Volovnyk, Aruju Guaraja, KC Murchy, Arabella FAng, Glib Dunikov, Amelia Cotler, Sophie Ma, Atharva Gupta)

Individual Trophy Winners:

  • 2nd Place – Davis Zong – Elementary Championship
  • 5th Place- Charles Hua – Elementary Championship
  • 8th Place- Kai Tsuboyama- Elementary U1100
  • 5th Place- Jack Faissal – K-1 Championship
  • 3rd Place and CO-CHAMPION- Ivan Volovnyk – K-1 U400 with a perfect 5.0 score!
  • 11th Place- Arjun Gururaja – K-1 U400
  • 6th Place – Fikirte Hunt – HS Championship

Honorable mentions with 4 out 5 wins:  Julia Lin (Elem U700), Zachery Ng, Liam Chan, and Joshua Dai (Primary U600),

Manhattan Spelling Bee Champions!
NEST+m 5th graders Mark Tsybulski and Evan Schleck finished in the top 10 of the 2018 Manhattan Spelling Bee, held on January 9th.   This great showing qualifies them to compete in the NY Daily News Spelling Bee in March.  The top two finishers of this citywide tournament move on to the Scripps National Bee in Washington, DC to compete for the national championship!


Our Week Ahead

Monday, January 15th 

  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day: schools closed

Tuesday, January 16th

  • School Leadership Team (SLT) meeting, 4:00pm, Library

Wednesday January 17th

  • Upper Grades Winter Concert, 6pm, Auditorium

Thursday January 18th

  • Jazz at Lincoln Center / Jazz for Young People concerts for grades 5 & 6 (during the school day)

Friday January 19th

  • Middle Grades (SONYC) Musical, “High School Musical,” 7:00pm

Saturday January 20th

  • Middle Grades (SONYC) Musical, “High School Musical,” 6:00pm

 


Looking ahead

  • Week of January 22: During January 2018 Regents Week is 1/22 to 1/26, No Upper Grades Students will be in attendance except for students taking Regents exams.
  • January 25: Middle Grades Winter Art & Music Festival. Art show starts at 5pm , concert at 6 pm.
  • January 29: Chancellor’s Conference Day in High Schools. HS Students do not attend
  • January 30th: Spring Term begins for HS students.

Opportunities for NEST+m students

August Writers’ Workshop
The School of The New York Times is excited to announce our new end-of-summer August Writers’ Workshop for rising middle and high school students (grades 7-12) of all writing abilities on August 13–17 in New York City. This week-long program helps students enhance their writing skills under the tutelage of some of the best writers in the world. Students will emerge with strengthened communication skills, confidence in their writing and a profound sense of the power of the written word and visual communication—all right before school starts! The August Writers’ Workshop is the perfect way to kick off the academic year and occurs right after our NYC Summer Academy.

Workshop Quick Facts
Date: August 13–17, 2018
Grade Eligibility: Rising 7-12
Click here for more information.
Click here to register.

Summer 2018 College Credit Courses at Baruch College
Current 10th and 11th graders can apply to enroll in one of the following college credit bearing courses for FREE:

  • Business Fundamentals – BUS 1011 (3 Credits)
  • Journalistic Writing – JRN 3050 (4 credits)
  • Cultural Anthropology – ANT 1001 (3 credits)
  • Critical Health Issues – HED 1911 (3 credits)

Program Details:

  • All courses will take place at Baruch College from July 5th – August 16th
  • Courses will be from Monday through Thursday from 9am – 2pm

Eligibility:

  • Be a current NYC public high school 10th or 11th grader
  • Have the following test scores: PSAT/SAT Verbal (Min. 480) OR English Language Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR  ACT English Score (Min. 20),  OR  Overall 80+ English average

Online Application: www.baruch.cuny.edu/collegenow. Deadline for application and ALL supporting documents: April 13th, 2018

GlamourGals
GlamourGals is a national nonprofit whose mission is to inspire and organize teen volunteers to provide ongoing companionship and complimentary beauty makeovers to women living in senior homes.
We would like to invite students from your school to attend a Valentine’s Day service event at Goddard Riverside NORC (689 Columbus AvenueNew York, NY 10025) on 2/14 from 4:30 – 6:00 pm.

Please click here for more information.

Baruch STEP Academy Kaplan Scholars Program
The Spring 2018 Program runs February 10th through April 28th at 9am on Saturdays.

  • Juniors meet for 8 sessions for $175
  • Application deadline: Friday, January 26th
  • Winter Break: February 17th and February 24th
  • Spring Break: March 31st and April 7th

Learn more about the Baruch STEP Academy by visiting http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/step/

Center for Architecture
The Center for Architecture has upcoming K-12 spring and summer programs. Please click here for more information.

College Scholarship for High School Seniors
Citrin Cooperman is a Top 25 nationally recognized full-service Accounting firm with locations throughout the Northeast and over 900 employees.

For the past 10+ years, we have been offering college scholarships to High School Seniors interested in pursuing a degree in Business. Each year, we select  students to receive a yearly scholarship of $1,000 for each of their 4 years of college.

Please click here for the official application for the 2018 Citrin Cooperman High School Business Grant.

Arts Connection Teen Programs
Please click here for information regarding many art programs in NYC.

Ladders for Leaders
The New York City Department of Youth & Community Development offers the Ladders for Leaders (L4L) Program for local high school and college students between the ages of 16 to 22. The program hopes to include about 1,700 participants at 500 worksites citywide, matching adolescents with professional opportunities within corporations, government agencies, and non-profit organizations.  Some examples of businesses that have participated in Ladders providing internship opportunities include AOL, Pandora, Tishman Speyer, KPMG, Kate Spade and various city agencies included NYC Department of Design and Construction, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Our goal as an L4L provider is to help place individuals in work environments that suit their abilities and interest, while also providing them with work readiness training.  The participants participate in the program throughout the summer. Participants work anywhere from 25-40 hours per week.  Additionally, all participants will take part in 20-30 hours of pre-employment workshops. These workshops teach basic work readiness skills, including, but not limited to, resume writing, job interview skills, and dealing with conflict in a work environment.

Participant applications for Ladders for Leaders are now available for those who are interested. Applications can be found at https://application.nycsyep.com/  – make sure you choose Central Queens YM & YWHA – Queens as their provider, or use our PIN# 230795.
BMCC STEP Program
The Borough of Manhattan Community College’s (BMCC) Science & Technology Entry Program (STEP) is now accepting applications for the Spring 2018 session.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 22, 2018. Click here to visit the BMCC STEP Application or the BMCC STEP Website.

3T Writing Workshops
Naked Angels Theater Company’s fantastic, fun and free writing program for all public high school students starts on Feb 5th, 4-6pm!   Write a play, story or screenplay and hear it read by professional actors–and it all happens in just three consecutive Thursdays!   And it also all happens at The New School for Drama, 151 Bank St, our partner in theater.

For over 7 years, our students have been using essays, scripts, films and stories they have developed in 3T for college essays, writing samples and submissions to the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards and Young Playwrights as well as making their own films.  Most of all, our students tell us 3T is a place where they can be as creative as they want to be in an encouraging and fun environment of writers and actors of all ages.   Application deadline Feb 1st, 2018.  More info and an app can be found at our website 3T Workshops or email 3T@nakedangels.com for more information.

Urban Leadership Fellows
ULF exposes exceptional graduating high school seniors to the municipal securities industry through highly supported paid summer internships. Each student is paired with a mentor the duration of the internship.

  • Student Recruitment: High School seniors with at least a 3.0 GPA interested in pursuing finance, law and/or government in college. Big push for NYCHA residents.
  • Duration & Hours: 40 hours/week for 6 weeks in July and August 2018
  • Program Requirements: Interns work 40 hours per week and attend events organized by Futures and Options, including orientations, an opening breakfast, municipal bond school, Excel workshops, public speaking, writing, and presentation trainings, a trip to DC hosted by the MSRB, and a closing luncheon
  • Deadline: Priority deadline: February 2nd, 2018 or Final deadline: March 9th, 2018
  • Scholarship: $500 book grant for all participants, ULF alumni entering their sophomore, junior, and senior year who earn a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher receive $1,250 every year. ULF alumni who maintain a cumulative GPA between 3.25 and 3.49 and received $1,000 college scholarships

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

Interested in medicine or engineering? 
We’re very excited to announce an upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, NY. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments.

We are now seeking applicants for our New York, NY program. Participants should be women in grades 10 and up with an expressed interest in science, medicine and/or engineering.

Applicants should fill out our online application in advance of the March 21, 2018 application deadline. Additional information can be found on our website: www.perryinitiative.org — The application may be accessed directly using the following link:http://perryinitiative.org/programs/student-online-application/ — More information and a printable flyer for this event can be found here.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C.

Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life!

Please click here for more information: https://summer.gwu.edu/precollege
Please click here to apply: https://summer.gwu.edu/apply-precollege

Engineering Exploration Experience
This spring, Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers (SWE) will be hosting its annual Engineering Exploration Experience. The event will expose female high school students to the exciting career opportunities available in all branches of engineering. The event provides students with the opportunity to participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak with professional women in various engineering industries.

Registration will open within the next few weeks and will be on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Event Details:
Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building
Participation Fee: Early Bird (Before January 30th) – $10, Regular – $15

Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

CURIE Academy
Curie Academy is a one-week summer residential program for high school girls who excel in math and science, enjoy solving problems, and want to learn more about careers in engineering

  • Website: https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Dates: July 15-21, 2018 (attendance is required for the entire program.)
  • Application: Available online at
    https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Deadline: Received by March 1, 2018
  • Rising seniors (class of 2019) who are women and African/Black American, Latino, Native American/Alaska Native, or Pacific Islander and/or first generation college students meeting the requirements below will automatically be considered for a full tuition waiver for the 2018 CATALYST Academy.

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
January

  • Prep starts for March 10 SAT on 1/20 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • Prep starts for March 21 SAT on 1/27 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • SAT or ACT Practice Exams on 2/3 (Register here)

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018

Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of January 8, 2018 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

We are hoping that you have been able to stay warm during the past few frigid days!

We have a full 5-day instructional week ahead of us.

Students: Together we create NEST+m each day! Thank you for being your best self always.

Let’s Soar.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

Tuesday, January 9:

  • K-5 Principal’s Coffee in the Cafeteria from 8:30am to 9:30am, All are welcome to join this meeting with parents.

Thursday January 11th:   

  • DOE College Awareness Day. This is the DOE’s Third Annual Citywide College Awareness Day. If your children have attire from any college or university, please encourage them to wear school gear!
  • Grades 6-8 Principal’s Coffee in the Cafeteria from 8:30am to 9:30am,  All are welcome to join this meeting with parents.
  • School Photos – Makeup day (rescheduled from last week)

Friday January 12th:   

  • Grades 9-12 Principal’s Coffee in the Cafeteria from 8:30am to 9:30am,  All are welcome to join this meeting with parents.
  • Upper Grades Winter Dance, 5pm to 8pm in Cafeteria

Looking ahead

  • January 15th: No School. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Holiday. Please see this link for resources related to the King National Holiday. https://www.timeout.com/newyork/martin-luther-king-day
  • January 17: Upper Grades Winter Concert, 6pm in Auditorium
  • January 19th and 20th: Performances of High School Musical by MG SONYC Theater program. Tickets are still available at nestmpta.tix.com
  • Week of January 22: During January 2018 Regents Week is 1/22 to 1/26, No Upper Grades Students will be in attendance except for students taking Regents exams.
  • January 25: Middle Grades Winter Art & Music Festival. Art show starts at 5pm , concert at 6 pm.
  • January 29: Chancellor’s Conference Day in High Schools. HS Students do not attend
  • January 30th: Spring Term begins for HS students.

Opportunities for NEST+m families

Lower Manhattan Community Middle School has extended a special invitation for their workshop on Drugs use in adolescents. The guest speaker are from the Odyssey House and from the Manhattan DA office. The Workshop is on Thursday, January 25th at 6:00 pm, at Battery Park City School (55 Battery Place)

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

Interested in medicine or engineering? 
We’re very excited to announce an upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, NY. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments.

We are now seeking applicants for our New York, NY program. Participants should be women in grades 10 and up with an expressed interest in science, medicine and/or engineering.

Applicants should fill out our online application in advance of the March 21, 2018 application deadline. Additional information can be found on our website: www.perryinitiative.org — The application may be accessed directly using the following link:http://perryinitiative.org/programs/student-online-application/ — More information and a printable flyer for this event can be found here.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C.

Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life!

Please click here for more information: https://summer.gwu.edu/precollege
Please click here to apply: https://summer.gwu.edu/apply-precollege

Engineering Exploration Experience
This spring, Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers (SWE) will be hosting its annual Engineering Exploration Experience. The event will expose female high school students to the exciting career opportunities available in all branches of engineering. The event provides students with the opportunity to participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak with professional women in various engineering industries.

Registration will open within the next few weeks and will be on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Event Details:
Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building
Participation Fee: Early Bird (Before January 30th) – $10, Regular – $15

Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

CURIE Academy
Curie Academy is a one-week summer residential program for high school girls who excel in math and science, enjoy solving problems, and want to learn more about careers in engineering

  • Website: https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Dates: July 15-21, 2018 (attendance is required for the entire program.)
  • Application: Available online at
    https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Deadline: Received by March 1, 2018
  • Rising seniors (class of 2019) who are women and African/Black American, Latino, Native American/Alaska Native, or Pacific Islander and/or first generation college students meeting the requirements below will automatically be considered for a full tuition waiver for the 2018 CATALYST Academy.

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
January

  • Prep starts for March 10 SAT on 1/20 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • Prep starts for March 21 SAT on 1/27 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • SAT or ACT Practice Exams on 2/3 (Register here)

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018

Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.


Baruch College Highlighted in Princeton Review’s “Colleges That Pay You Back: 2018 Edition”

Only 7 Percent of Four-Year Colleges Nationwide Included in the Guide

 

Baruch College is one of the nation’s best colleges for students seeking an excellent education with great career resources and at an affordable price, according to The Princeton Review.

The education services company recommended Baruch College in the 2018 edition of its annual guide: Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck.”

Only 7 percent of the nation’s four-year colleges made it into this year’s book, which analyzed data from more than 650 colleges.

In its profile of Baruch, The Princeton Review said students gain a “quality education that won’t break the proverbial bank” due to low tuition and generous financial aid. It added that Baruch provides several “amazing resources such as peer counseling, the writing center and tutoring,” and that undergrads can “easily tap into a strong alumni network” to gain access to career resources.  The Princeton Review also praised Baruch’s “excellent professors who clearly have a passion for what they teach.”

“These schools were bona fide standouts for the return they deliver on one’s college investment,” said Robert Franek, lead author and The Princeton Review’s Editor-in-Chief. “They offer stellar academics, generous aid services from day one plus a lifetime of alumni connections.”

Methodology:

The selections for this year’s book were based on a comprehensive analysis of data from surveys of administrators at more than 650 colleges in 2016-17. Survey topics covered academics, cost, financial aid, career services, graduation rates, student debt, and alumni support.  The methodology also factored in PayScale.com data collected through April 2017 from alumni surveys covering starting and mid-career salaries and job satisfaction.

 

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STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON GOVERNOR CUOMO’S FY 2019 EXECUTIVE BUDGET

“We applaud the important increased investment in CUNY’s operations, as well as the continued commitment to critical maintenance.  By raising the income-eligibility cap for the Excelsior Scholarship, and including legislation to launch the DREAM Act, Governor Cuomo’s budget affords hope and opportunity by moving us closer to a future in which quality higher education is accessible to all low- and middle-income New Yorkers at no cost.”

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CUNY CITIZENSHIP NOW! GEARS UP FOR EMERGENCY EVENTS TO HELP DREAMERS REQUEST RENEWAL OF DACA IMMIGRATION STATUS                                                                                               

CUNY Citizenship Now! will hold two emergency DACA assistance events, Thursday and next Tuesday, to help CUNY Dreamers and others seek renewal of their immigration status following a federal court order partially reopening the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

In response to the U.S. District Court decision, the CUNY Citizenship Now! assistance sessions will be held Thursday, Jan. 18, and Tuesday, Jan. 23, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the CUNY School for Professional Studies, 119 W. 31st St., Manhattan.

You can get free help with DACA if:

You currently have valid DACA status and your employment authorization expires in 180 days or less, or your DACA expired on or after Sept.  5, 2017, or you had DACA but it expired before Sept. 5, 2017, or was terminated.

If you never had DACA, you cannot apply now.

To make an appointment for DACA help, or get more information, write to citizenshipnowinfo@cuny.edu or call 646-664-9400.

“CUNY has been a leader in assisting and supporting the thousands of DACA students at CUNY and other institutions as they face the threats of deportation, inability to work and the loss of the only country they know, love and contribute to every day,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “With last week’s ruling permitting DACA renewal applications again, CUNY and Citizenship Now! stand ready to help.”

Judge William Alsup of Federal District Court in San Francisco last week reinstated part of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, saying the Trump Administration’s decision to kill it was improper and that the program, which had been scheduled to end March 5, must be maintained as legal challenges proceed. President Barack Obama created DACA in 2012 to give the undocumented young immigrants known as Dreamers the ability to work here legally. President Trump announced his intention to end the program in September, but the preliminary injunction issued by Judge Alsup blocked the federal government from ending DACA for current Dreamers and requires it to allow renewal applications.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Princeton Review lists CCNY among top colleges that pay you back

The City College of New York is one of the nation’s best schools for students seeking a superb education with great career preparation and at an affordable price according to The Princeton Review®.  The Review lists CCNY in its 2018 annual guide “Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck,” (Penguin Random House / Princeton Review Books) published today.

The education services company chose the schools based on data it collected in 2016-17 from its surveys of administrators at more than 650 colleges. It also factored in data from its surveys of students attending the schools and surveys of school alumni that PayScale.com conducted through April 2017.

In all, The Princeton Review crunched more than 40 data points to tally ROI (return on investment) ratings of the colleges that determined its selection of the 200 schools for the book. Topics covered everything from academics, cost, and financial aid to graduation rates, student debt, alumni salaries, and job satisfaction.

“We salute City College, and all of our “Colleges That Pay You Back” schools.  They stand out for their outstanding academics and their affordability via generous financial aid to students with need and/or comparatively low sticker prices,” said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s Editor-in-Chief and lead author of the book. “Students at these colleges also have access to extraordinary career services from their freshman year on, plus a lifetime of valuable alumni support.”

In the book’s profile of CCNY, The Princeton Review editors praise the school for its “astonishingly low cost” and quote from CCNY students surveyed who described the college as “affordable…an important factor in these tough economic times.” Students also cited the three C’s: “convenience, cost, and concentration.” In addition, CCNY was lauded for its rigorous academic programs that “rival that of the nation’s premier universities.”

The “Career Information” section in the profile lists an exceptional ROI rating score of 87 for City College.  It also cites PayScale.com figures reporting CCNY graduates with at least a bachelor’s degree have a median starting salary of $51,400 and median mid-career salary of $93,000.

This is the second major accolade for CCNY by The Princeton Review in six months. Last July, City College was named one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education.

About The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep, and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. Its Tutor.com brand is the largest online tutoring service in the U.S. It comprises a community of more than 3,000 tutors who have delivered more than 15 million one-to-one tutoring sessions. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University. For more information, visit The Princeton Review. Follow the company on Twitter @ThePrincetonRev.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Physical Activity Impacts Child Growth, New Hunter Study Finds

Scientific Reports, an internationally recognized open access journal, has just publishedPhysical Activity Impacts Child Growth, New Hunter Study Finds an important new study by Hunter post-doctoral research fellow Samuel Urlacher. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Dr. Urlacher is a biological anthropologist whose research seeks to understand variation in human health, physiology, and behavior through the lens of evolutionary theory. His recent study, “Evidence for energetic tradeoffs between physical activity and childhood growth across the nutritional transition,” suggests that physical activity can considerably impact child growth and the deposition of body fat. The study also indicates that in economically developing societies, the behavioral shifts that come with increased technology and lifestyle change likely contribute to larger body size and increased obesity rates.

Humans, like all organisms, spend energy (i.e., calories) on a number of critical life tasks, including physical activity. Children must also spend calories in order to grow. When a child’s energy supply is limited, metabolic competition for calories can lead to tradeoffs between growth and physical activity; if children are more active, growth should be reduced. While this is logical, there is a dearth of actual documentation for this phenomenon in the scientific literature. As communities in the developing world change their patterns of behavior, it is particularly unclear how these changes are related to increasing body size and body fat.

Taking advantage of a rare dataset spanning twenty years of early economic development in a Maya farming community in Mexico, Dr. Urlacher and his co-author, Dr. Karen Kramer of the University of Utah, analyzed the amount of time that children engaged in nearly 200 different behaviors and used this information to estimate physical activity levels. They show, for perhaps the first time, that children who spend a greater proportion of their overall energy budget on physical activity are significantly shorter, lighter, and have lower levels of body fat than their less active peers. Moreover, they demonstrate that dramatic differences in child body size between 1992 and 2012 (children in 2012 were on average approximately 7 cm taller and 3 kg heavier) are almost completely explained by a reduction in physical activity levels. This change in physical activity was driven predominantly by less time spent in work and play and more time spent in sedentary activities such as watching television. “This finding has implications for understanding the factors causing the global rise in obesity,” said Dr. Urlacher. “More research is needed, but our results suggest that ongoing changes in early life physical activity, in addition to changes in diet, may play a critical role promoting poor metabolic health in the developing world.”

Dr. Urlacher collected the data for the 2012 phase of the study while living alone in the Maya study community for a two-month period. He continues his work with the Maya, as well as with other small-scale indigenous groups in Ecuador and Papua New Guinea.

The full study can be found here:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-18738-4


New Study Finds Dolphins Demonstrate Self-Awareness Earlier than Humans and Chimpanzees

Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) show the capacity for mirror self-recognition (MSR), an indicator of self-awareness,New Study Finds Dolphins Demonstrate Self-Awareness Earlier than Humans and Chimpanzees at an earlier age than humans and chimpanzees, as reported in a new study in PLOS ONE. According to co-authors on the study, Diana Reiss, Professor at Hunter College of the City University of New York and Rachel Morrison, Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, dolphins are one of a few species that show the capacity for MSR, along with humans, great apes, elephants, and magpies.

The new study entitled “Precocious Development of Self-awareness in Dolphins,” examined the age at which young dolphins first show this ability as indicated by their behavioral responses towards a mirror. Dr. Reiss and a prior colleague previously demonstrated the capacity for MSR in adult dolphins, but this is the first developmental study conducted with young dolphins during their first years of life. The findings shed new light about their path to self-awareness and the similarities they share with humans.

Previous research has found that humans first show self-directed behavior at a mirror between 12-15 months of age and pass the mark test between 18-24 months of age; chimpanzees have been observed to exhibit MSR behaviors later in development. The emergence of MSR in children has been correlated with sensorimotor development and growing social and self-awareness. Dolphins show advanced sensorimotor and social awareness during the first weeks of life and this inspired the authors of this study to investigate whether dolphins, likewise, might also show MSR at an early age as well.

Morrison and Reiss tracked the behavior of two young bottlenose dolphins at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Maryland as they interacted with their own mirror image over the course of a three-year- study. The study’s authors observed and categorized the dolphins’ behaviors at the mirror and found that one dolphin exhibited self-directed behaviors, indicative of mirror self-recognition, as young as seven months of age. “The early emergence of this level of self-awareness coincides with the dolphins’ precocious development of social awareness and advanced sensorimotor skills,” said Morrison.

Reiss stated, “The findings, in this first study on the age of emergence of this level of self-awareness in dolphins, add new layers to our understanding of factors that may contribute to the capacity for MSR across species and the evolution of intelligence in the animal world.”

PLOS ONE, the online publication publishing the study, is the world’s first multidisciplinary open access online science journal, now in its eleventh year. Professor Morrison, who is lead author on the paper, was a doctoral student in Professor Reiss’s lab at the time of the study. She has since become a professor herself.

Video of a young dolphin looking at herself spinning at a mirror is available here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TWyaYApA7w&feature=youtu.be


REBNY Donates Historical Documents to the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College

Wagner Main

LaGuardia Community College (“LaGuardia”) and the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY) jointly announce the donation of REBNY’s papers, and other historical items from the late 19th century through the present, to the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives (“the Archives”). Housed on the LaGuardia campus in Long Island City, Queens, the Archives serves as a repository of collections that illuminate the social and political history of New York City. The REBNY collection will be made available for examination to LaGuardia students, as well as for researchers, policymakers, journalists, urban planners, and more.

“We are pleased to donate our documents and artifacts to the LaGuardia Community College. This collection of New York City real estate history will now be available to students, researchers, and the general public for generations to come,” said Real Estate Board of New York President John H. Banks. “The addition of REBNY’s records to the other historical collections housed by LaGuardia, together present important snapshots of key moments in New York City’s history.”

“REBNY’s decision to contribute their collection to our college’s LaGuardia and Wagner Archives is monumental,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “Researchers seeking to understand about New York City will have more than 125 years of documentation about land use, ownership, design trends, and building codes—revealing the people who have built our city and lived, worked, and visited here, as well as signals about what the future may hold. And as an educational tool, our students will have the rare privilege of studying from original documentation—an experience that should deepen their understanding of our city’s history, and how it’s linked to their current lives. It becomes an intellectually alive process—showing the students that they’re a part of history.”

The REBNY Collection will exist alongside the mayoral and personal papers of nine former New York City mayors, as well as the records of theNew York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), the New York City Council, and the additional collections of the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives.

“Having the REBNY collection exist next to the records of both NYCHA and the City Council is entirely apposite,” said Richard Lieberman, Ph.D., professor of history and director of the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives. “Researchers will have a single source from which to access New York City’s public and private real estate history for the past 125 years and to examine the legislative policies from the City Council that impacted this history. Both NYCHA and REBNY, representing public and private housing, are essential parts of New York City’s story—together revealing how our neighborhoods were shaped, community revitalizations, and much more.”

Highlights of the collection include the REBNY Diary and Manual, an annual book that compiles changes in building codes and zoning updates, reflecting major issues facing industry each year, and tracks REBNY membership comprised of New York City’s leading real estate professionals. It also features more than 300,000 property cards for houses, buildings, and other private properties located in Manhattan from the 1920s through the 1990s (after which time these records were continued by the New York City Department of Buildings). Each card contains information about property ownership, sales prices, and more.

Wagner Second Image

Many of these documents will be digitized, allowing the documents to live both online to ensure global access, and in the physical space at the Archives on the LaGuardia Community College campus located in Long Island City, Queens.

The LaGuardia and Wagner Archives has a total of more than 2.3 million documents available for download and study on its website, from its 14 total collections. More than half of these documents, greater than 1.3 million, are documents of the City Council. Recent City Council documents filmed and digitized include files of Vice Chairman/Majority Leader Thomas Cuite, Speaker Peter Vallone Sr., as well as the printed bill and other documentation related to newly introduced legislation.

The Archives encourages New York City architects, urban planners, real estate developers, and builders, who also contributed to shaping New York City, to consider donating their archival records to the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives for posterity. Those interested should contact Archivist Douglas Di Carlo at (718) 482-5065 or ddicarlo@lagcc.cuny.edu.

Click here to watch a video about the REBNY Collection and the process of its donation to the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College, part of The City University of New York.

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About the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY)
The Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY) is the City’s leading real estate trade association with more than 17,000 members.  Founded in 1896, REBNY represents commercial, residential, and institutional property owners, builders, managers, investors, brokers, and salespeople; banks, financial service companies, utilities, attorneys, architects, and contractors; and other associations, organizations, institutions, corporations, co-partnerships, and individuals professionally interested and engaged in business allied to New York City real estate.

REBNY is involved in crucial municipal matters including tax policy, city planning and zoning, rental conditions, land use policy, building codes, and other cities, state, and federal legislation. REBNY regularly publishes real estate market research and policy reports as well as broker surveys. In addition, REBNY provides for its members: informational, technical, and technological resources; networking and charitable service opportunities; qualifying and continuing education courses; professional education programs, seminars, and designations; career-changing awards; legal advice; and a wide range of additional member benefits. For more information, please visit www.REBNY.com.

Follow REBNY on FacebookInstagramLinkedInTwitter, and YouTube.

About the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College
The LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, established in 1982, serves as a repository for NYC’s social and political history, which includes among the largest collection of New York City mayoral papers. Archive records include the personal papers and official documents of Mayors Fiorello H. LaGuardia, Robert F. Wagner, Abraham D. Beame and Edward I. Koch, the records of the New York City Housing Authority, the piano maker Steinway & Sons, The Council of the City of New York and a Queens Local History Collection. Assets from these collections are regularly referenced in news stories and studied by journalists, policymakers, and other researchers. The Archives regularly produces public programs exploring its collections, including an annual calendar devoted to a theme of importance to the Greater New York Metropolitan area. Click here to learn more.

About LaGuardia Community College
LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more. Or engage with on Twitter at @LaGuardiaLIC.

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Statement from Chancellor James B. Milliken On Martin Luther King Jr. Day Observance  

Today we commemorate the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a true American hero whose impassioned leadership in the struggles for racial equality, social and economic justice, inclusion and opportunity helped define the conscience of a nation.   And while it is altogether fitting that we celebrate his extraordinary contributions, it is striking and most unfortunate that his teaching continues to be in some ways as urgent and essential as it was half a century ago.

We recognize the goals Dr. King passionately articulated and relentlessly pursued as bedrock American values. They represent values we cherish at The City University of New York, and we hope they guide our actions every day.  CUNY is a nationally recognized engine of opportunity, social mobility, and inclusion, and has long provided the pathway for educational and economic success for immigrants, low income and underrepresented students on a grand scale.   CUNY’s leadership in the fight for Dreamers is a critical and unfortunately necessary example of our ongoing work in furtherance of the values our community shares.

Nearly 50 years ago, in his commencement address to the graduates of The City College of New York, Dr. King spoke of the nation’s racial and economic gaps, but insisted that Americans were tied together in “a single garment of destiny.” That message resonates today as we pursue the unfinished work that Dr. King gave his life to lead, and challenges us to live up to the timeless values he set forth.

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Mural in Facebook’s NYC Office Created by Lehman Art Professor Dannielle Tegeder

Professor Dannielle Tegeder from Lehman’s Art department gets a big thumb’s up “like” for the large, fascinating, and diagrammatic mural she created for the lobby of Facebook’s New York City office.

The permanent, site-specific mural, entitled “Center of Machine-Life Transmissions,” is part of Facebook’s Artist-in-Residence program. Tegeder was among 20 artists chosen to utilize different spaces for public art projects around the social network giant’s offices at 225 Park Avenue South in Manhattan. Facebook even documented Tegeder creating the mural in a short online video.

Work on the mural began last March, ahead of the arrival of hundreds of Facebook employees moving from another Manhattan workplace. Completing the project in the midst of what was basically a construction site as the lobby and offices were refitted for Facebook—complete with carpenters, electricians, painters, and other tradespeople at work nearby—made the creative enterprise “an interactive performance in itself,” Tegeder chuckled.

Predominantly vermilion and encompassing about 300-square-feet, the hard-to-miss mural features a complex structure of abstract shapes connected and transected by a variety of narrow lines. In her proposal for the Facebook mural, Tegeder stated that her idea for the lobby space was to imagine “the infrastructure that exists behind the lobby’s walls and how it intersects with the work that is being done outside them…and how the connections made in the drawings reflect maps or meeting places that exist between us all.”

With Tegeder, Facebook certainly found an artist able to create an embodiment of connectivity. Throughout her career in the fine arts as a painter and sculptor, she has focused on the complex interconnections between people, structures, and ideas—both seen and unseen. This preoccupation, Tegeder admitted, was nurtured during her earliest years. Raised in a family of steamfitters in New York City’s northern suburbs, her first imaginative drawings mimicked the schematics and blueprints made by her father and uncles for building construction, which were often piled on the dining room table at home.

“My first ‘art school’ was watching draftsmen make these meticulous, beautifully crafted drawings every morning for different construction jobs around the Bronx and in Yonkers,” Tegeder said. Her love of drawing led her first to Purchase College, SUNYand then the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she received her BFA and MFA, respectively. Since then, her work has appeared in galleries and group exhibitions around the country and in Europe, most of it utilizing the visual language of architecture, urban design, and modernist abstraction.

It took 10 days for Tegeder to complete the Facebook mural using various types of paint as well as other mediums such as ink and markers. To get the job done, she hired a dozen assistants—to buy materials, tape and mask the lines Tegeder had drafted, manage the work site, and clean up—including two of her former students at Lehman: Maria Estevez, a fine arts major who graduated in 2012; and Sima Schloss, who received her MFA last year.

“Dannielle’s art is different from mine, but I learned a lot about utilizing space and different shapes while working with her on this project,” said Schloss. “And her courage to paint with red—bravo! I was sad when we finished and it was time to leave.”

Added Estevez: “The mural was definitely one of the largest works of art I have been associated with, and so it was challenging. When it was finished we all felt so proud that we had tackled this monster. It’s pretty impressive.”

Tegeder is now involved in three new public arts projects: a 30-foot enameled painting at a school in Tribeca; a wall installation for Capital One Bank’s headquarters in McLean, Virginia; and a set of paintings for a Washington, D.C.-based law firm. She also has a solo exhibition of her work opening on January 26 in the H&R Block Artspace at the Kansas City Art Institute.


At Lehman Big Data Conference, Students Share Their Experiences Working for Microsoft

Last summer, Rosemarie Liriano (‘19) and Keri Mallari (‘19) became the first Lehman College students to be accepted into the highly competitive Microsoft Data Science Summer School. Located at the new Microsoft Research facility in Manhattan’s Chelsea district, the school receives approximately 300 applications every year but only eight students are admitted.

Last month, at a Lehman-sponsored conference announcing the College’s new data science minor, they discussed their time at Microsoft. Liriano told the audience she applied for the program due to her “passion for research” and the opportunity to thrive in Microsoft’s fast-paced, big data-driven environment. “I want to find out where technology and social science intersect, and I want to see how we use technology as a tool to solve social problems,” said Liriano, a computer science major who is also pursuing a minor in sociology.

The eight-week program is a comprehensive introduction to data science and includes intensive coursework, as well as group research projects. Classes are taught by leading scientists at Microsoft and each student receives a $5,000 stipend and a laptop.

The two Lehmanites were part of a team assigned to investigate a series of issues confronting New York City public school students. They examined 11 years of New York City Department of Education data—including high school academic rankings, test scores, as well as gender and ethnicity statistics—covering 1,800 schools from 2005 to 2016.

The team crunched data to examine what factors impact student dropout rates, if models can be established to predict which students will drop out, and who would benefit most from early intervention. “Parents want to know if their kids are getting perfect scores in 3rd grade, are they going to keep getting them in 8th grade,” Mallari, a Macaulay Honors student at Lehman, who is pursuing a double major in mathematics and computer science, told the audience.

Jake Hofman, a senior researcher at Microsoft and one of the co-founders of the Data Science Summer School, praised the two Lehman students who attended the program. “Both of them were extremely hardworking and very attentive to detail,” said Hofman, adding he would offer recommendations to help them find work after graduation. Students who have attended the program have found employment at companies such as Credit Suisse, Morgan Stanley, Google, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital.

However, Liriano already knows where she wants to work after graduation. “Microsoft is the first company I’ve ever wanted to work for,” she said. “I would like to work there sometime in my career.”

To apply to the Microsoft Data Science Summer School please email Violet Fredericks. To learn more about the College’s new data science minor, please contact the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.


BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center Presents Akie Bermiss

Akie Bermiss, pianist, singer/songwriter and composer

The BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center, the longest operating performance venue in lower Manhattan, proudly presents pianist, composer and singer/songwriter Akie Bermiss on Friday, February 16 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $21 and available online, at the door, and by phone at (212) 220-1460.

Akie Bermiss, a Brooklyn native and Bard College graduate, presents raucous, guttural and soulful vocals, a fusion of Donny Hathaway, Macy Gray and Tom Waits. He’s equally adept singing neo-soul, funk, contemporary jazz, alternative rock and hip hop. His current touring schedule includes playing keyboards and providing backup vocals for the veteran indie, multi-genre band Lake Street Dive’s national concert series in support of their latest CD, Side Pony.

Over the past half a dozen years, Bermiss has become a visible contributor to the Brooklyn music scene as a musician, songwriter or featured vocalist with a collective of upstart groups such as FutureSoul band Aabaraki, Screaming Headless Torsos, Miri Ben-Ari (the Hip Hop Violinist) and Rap sensation Soul Khan.

He also founded the Akie Bermiss Trio; independently released his first self-titled solo EP via Rockwood Records in 2014, and continues to mine a loyal fan base, performing at cutting-edge venues including Rockwood Music Hall, The Falcon, BAM Cafe, The Apollo Cafe and others.

In addition, Bermiss is the author of a children’s book, I Hate to Be Sick, from Scholastic Books.

BMCC Tribeca PAC is Downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families and audiences of all ages. BMCC Tribeca PAC strives to present a broad global perspective through the presentation of high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. BMCC Tribeca PAC is located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue & West Street) and is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R/W subway lines and the New Jersey Path Train. For more information, please visit www.tribecapac.org.


City College’s András Kiséry wins NEH faculty award for research

 

CCNY English professor and NEH Award for Faculty winner András Kiséry.

András Kiséry’s proposal for a profound study of the dissemination and consumption of English literature between the 16th and 18th centuries is a winner with the National Endowment for the Humanities. It’s earned The City College of New York English associate professor a highly competitive $50,400 NEH award for research leading to publication of a book on the subject.

“The NEH is pleased to offer you an Award for Faculty to undertake the promising project described,” Jon Parrish Peede said in a letter to Kiséry. “For more than fifty years, our federal agency has underwritten hundreds of our nation’s most significant humanities projects through its fellowship programs. We look forward to adding your future work to that august list.”

Kiséry’s project, entitled: “Forming English Literature in the Early Modern World,” is among the few accepted by the NEH in what Peede described as a “high competitive funding cycle.” Only 10 % of the proposals made the cut.

Erec R. Koch, dean of City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts, hailed the award as an important accomplishment and recognition of Kiséry’s scholarship.

Kiséry will conduct research at libraries in America and Europe in the 2018-2019 academic year. “I will be working at US libraries, including the New York Public Library and the Folger Shakespeare Library; as well as research libraries in Germany at Wolfenbüttel and the UK at the British Library,” he said.

His numerous writings include the book “Hamlet’s moment: drama and political knowledge in Renaissance England” (Oxford University Press, 2016).

Kiséry is a 1994 graduate of Hungary’s Eötvös University (BA, English), University of Bristol in England (MA in Shakespeare and English Literature, 1995) and Columbia University (PhD in English and Comparative Literature, 2008).

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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New Study Finds Dolphins Demonstrate Self-Awareness Earlier than Humans and Chimpanzees

Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) show the capacity for mirror self-recognition (MSR),New Study Finds Dolphins Demonstrate Self-Awareness Earlier than Humans and Chimpanzees an indicator of self-awareness, at an earlier age than humans and chimpanzees, as reported in a new study in PLOS ONE. According to co-authors on the study, Diana Reiss, Professor at Hunter College of the City University of New York and Rachel Morrison, Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, dolphins are one of a few species that show the capacity for MSR, along with humans, great apes, elephants, and magpies.

The new study entitled “Precocious Development of Self-awareness in Dolphins,” examined the age at which young dolphins first show this ability as indicated by their behavioral responses towards a mirror. Dr. Reiss and a prior colleague previously demonstrated the capacity for MSR in adult dolphins, but this is the first developmental study conducted with young dolphins during their first years of life. The findings shed new light about their path to self-awareness and the similarities they share with humans.

Previous research has found that humans first show self-directed behavior at a mirror between 12-15 months of age and pass the mark test between 18-24 months of age; chimpanzees have been observed to exhibit MSR behaviors later in development. The emergence of MSR in children has been correlated with sensorimotor development and growing social and self-awareness. Dolphins show advanced sensorimotor and social awareness during the first weeks of life and this inspired the authors of this study to investigate whether dolphins, likewise, might also show MSR at an early age as well.

Morrison and Reiss tracked the behavior of two young bottlenose dolphins at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Maryland as they interacted with their own mirror image over the course of a three-year- study. The study’s authors observed and categorized the dolphins’ behaviors at the mirror and found that one dolphin exhibited self-directed behaviors, indicative of mirror self-recognition, as young as seven months of age. “The early emergence of this level of self-awareness coincides with the dolphins’ precocious development of social awareness and advanced sensorimotor skills,” said Morrison.

Reiss stated, “The findings, in this first study on the age of emergence of this level of self-awareness in dolphins, add new layers to our understanding of factors that may contribute to the capacity for MSR across species and the evolution of intelligence in the animal world.”

PLOS ONE, the online publication publishing the study, is the world’s first multidisciplinary open access online science journal, now in its eleventh year. Professor Morrison, who is lead author on the paper, was a doctoral student in Professor Reiss’s lab at the time of the study. She has since become a professor herself.

Video of a young dolphin looking at herself spinning at a mirror is available here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TWyaYApA7w&feature=youtu.be


New Study by Centro Finds 5% Enrollment Increase among Puerto Ricans in Florida Schools after Hurricane Maria

The Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College (Centro) estimates that 10,324 Puerto Rican students have already enrolled.

In light of the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria, the Center for Puerto Rican Studies New Study by Centro Finds 5% Enrollment Increase among Puerto Ricans in Florida Schools after Hurricane Mariaat Hunter College (Centro) has released a new report that estimates the total number of Puerto Ricans enrolled in Florida schools districts and the areas most impacted by the loss of school enrollment and school closings in Puerto Rico.

Thousands of Puerto Ricans have already been forced from the island, with more arriving each day.  Florida officials estimate that over 200,000 Puerto Ricans have made their way to the state since September 20.

In this report, Centro’s survey of school districts and data provided by the Florida Governor’s Office indicate that 10,324 Puerto Rican students have enrolled in Florida school districts after September 20, 2017. School enrollment data is considered a more reliable indicator of permanent migration than other data currently available. In Puerto Rico, authorities are challenged by the drastic decline in enrollment and school closings.

“As we all know, Hurricane Maria has devastated Puerto Rico,” said Dr. Edwin Melendez, Director of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College.  “Hunter College and CUNY have renewed our efforts to raise awareness and support among the American public about the ongoing humanitarian crisis and what we can all do to support over three million American citizens in need.   Centro’s estimates of the impact of the population exodus from Puerto Rico on school districts in Florida and in the island are alarming and point to the urgent need to both rebuild the island’s economy and to prepare schools and support services for these students in need.”

According to Centro estimates, the exodus of Puerto Rican students who have enrolled in Florida schools as a result of Hurricane Maria represents an increase of 4.9% over the school enrollment level in 2015. Two school districts, Orange (2,590) and Osceola (1,960), account for about half of the total statewide Puerto Rican student enrollments (47.7%) in Florida. Post-Hurricane Maria Puerto Rican student enrollment is concentrated in Central Florida and to some extent in Southern Florida school districts.

In a prior study, Centro estimated that 22,710 to 42,771 school-age children will migrate from Puerto Rico to the United States with their families, with the Florida segment representing about half of the national total. These children will be enrolled in public and private schools across the country requiring enrollment and transfer services, English as a second language or bilingual education, afterschool programs, and counseling. Many of these students have already tested at low levels of English proficiency. These children will also need pediatric care, and many of their parents will need access to translation and culturally-sensitive health care services.

High school juniors and seniors in particular require special care and guidance to makes sure they can transfer required courses in order to be able to graduate. For instance, the state of Florida has strict course requirements and seniors must pass standardized tests before graduating. These students require immediate academic counseling, guidance in choosing the courses required for graduation and preparation for upcoming standardized tests.

“It is urgent to address the needs of youth that have transferred from Puerto Rico schools to Florida, New York and elsewhere in the country,” says Dr. Melendez. “It is also important to remember that after Maria, Puerto Rico authorities are challenged by the drastic decline in enrollment and school closings and that they need our support in securing a future for Puerto Rican youth,” he added.

Prior to the Hurricane, the US Census Bureau data for the Puerto Rican population was updated as recently as September 2017. They estimate that 3.25 million people lived in Puerto Rico prior to Hurricane Maria (as of July 1, 2017). Also, their numbers showed that the stateside population had grown in the past year, from 5.37 million to 5.45 million, a difference of 1.4%.

It also showed other established trends such as more Puerto Ricans settling in more diverse geographical regions.  Virginia and Texas, for instance, saw their Puerto Rican populations grow by 8% and 7% respectively; while California (8.5%) and Georgia (8.1%) also saw significant growth.


Hunter College and the Aspen Institute: “At the Crossroads of Arts and Science”

Hunter College and the Aspen Institute recently teamed up at Hunter’s Kaye PlayhouseHunter College and the Aspen Institute: “At the Crossroads of Arts and Science” for a celebration of curiosity and creativity. Marking the publication of Walter Isaacson’s new book on Leonardo da Vinci, the event was a salute to art, science, imagination, and discovery. The evening of performance and discussion was hosted by Aspen Arts Program Director Damian Woetzel and featured Isaacson along with noted artists, musicians, and scientists, including Lil Buck (Dancer and Aspen Institute Harman-Eisner Artist in Residence), Jacqueline Bolier (Soprano), Kurt Crowley (Music Director and Pianist, Broadway’s Hamilton), Kate Davis (Vocalist and Multi-instrumentalist), Michelle Dorrance (Tap Dancer and Director, Dorrance Dance), Chase Finlay (New York City Ballet), Brian Greene (Physicist, Author and Co-Founder of World Science Festival), Andrea Lee (Cellist) Tiler Peck (New York City Ballet). We hope you enjoy it:


CCNY leads four-nation NSF-funded complex fluids project

PIRE Project leader Masahiro Kawaji [right] with CCNY Grove School of Engineering PhD students [from left] Artur Zych, Fanny Thomas and Fang Liu.

A five-year research project on complex fluids with potential for transformative scientific discoveries in industries from petro-chemical to cosmetics is underway at The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering.  Funded by a $5.2 million National Science Foundation grant, the initiative includes 11 partner institutions in France, Germany and Norway.

Possible outcomes of the research include:

  • Lubricants that enable more efficient undersea drilling of oil and gas;
  • Improved processes for freezing and solidifying gas for the refrigeration industry;
  •  More efficient manufacturing processes for cosmetics.

Leading the hi-tech research, under the aegis of the NSF’s Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) program, is Masahiro Kawaji, acting director of the CCNY-based CUNY Energy Institute.

CCNY’s European partners are, in Germany:

In France:

And in Norway:

In addition to engaging top scientists and engineers from these institutions in what Kawaji terms “advancing knowledge and making transformative scientific discoveries that could result in far reaching innovations, in both experimental and modeling methods,” the PIRE Project is also a boon for scores of students on both shores.

At CCNY, up to 30 students are involved hands-on in this invaluable opportunity for international collaborative research at the highest level. The tally includes seven PhD candidates, three postdoctoral fellows, 10 graduates and 10 undergraduates.

CCNY’s Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation chapter will support two CUNY undergraduate scholars annually for summer research experiences at one of the aforementioned European partner institutions.

Other foreign research experience include attendance at annual review meetings in New York City, Norway, France and Germany, and a six-month internship for all seven PhD students at institutions in Europe.

Summing up the potential of the expansive project, whose NSF proposal name was “PIRE: Multi-scale, Multi-phase Phenomena in Complex Fluids for the Energy Industries,” Kawiji said: “It could lead to improvements in energy and process efficiency in industrial systems on a global scale.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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A woman’s place is in the lab: CCNY joins Columbia & Barnard to cohost conference for undergraduate women in physics

As CUWiP’s impact has grown, so has the number of undergrad women who attain physics degrees

Conference of Undergrad Women in Physics group photo

On Jan 12-14, The City College of New York, Columbia University, and Barnard College will join together for a common purpose: advancing women in Physics. The three institutions will co-present the 2018 Conference for Undergrad Women in Physics (CUWiP) in the NYC region. For most student attendees, it will be their first opportunity to experience a professional conference, get information about graduate school and professions in physics, and access to other women in physics of all ages with whom they can share experiences, advice, and ideas.

In addition to the NYC regional conference, 11 other regional CUWiP conferences will be held simultaneously nationwide, with a combined total of 2,000 female students expected to attend.

Myriam Sarachik, Distinguished Professor of Physics at City College explains why it’s important to participate: “We’re co-hosting this CUWiP with Columbia and Barnard because of the scale of the impact we can have together. The number of attendees at the nationwide conferences (around 2000 this year) is comparable to the number of undergraduate women receiving a degree in Physics each year (around 1600). Which means we’re reaching the majority of such students nationwide.” ​

It will be an action-packed few days for attendees, who will visit all three campuses. There will be talks by the best and brightest, including keynote speaker Patricia Burchat, Gabilan Professor at Stanford University on topics like Astrophysics, Condensed Matter, Undergrad Research, NanoFabrication, Work/Life Balance, and How to Give a Compelling Physics Talk. There will also be breakout sessions, networking, student talks, lab visits, awards, and social events like ice skating in Central Park.

The conference dinner will be held on Jan 13 in the CCNY Faculty Dining Room. Tony Liss, Martin & Michele Cohen Dean of Science at CCNY, will provide opening remarks. Sarachik, who is only the third woman to be elected President of the American Physical Society, will be the featured speaker and will address the amazing improvement in opportunities for women in physics.

The first CUWiP was held in 2006 at the University of Southern California. Within a few years, there were six nationwide conferences. To date, an estimated 10,000 female undergrads have attended CUWiP conferences (including 2018).

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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U.S News Ranks CUNY School of Professional Studies 16th in Nation in 2018 Best Online Bachelor’s Degrees

New York, NY — January 9, 2018 — U.S. News & World Report has ranked the CUNY School of Professional Studies 16th in the nation for the quality of its online bachelor’s degree programs, putting it in the top 5 percent of all ranked institutions for 2018, and making it the highest nationally ranked program in the state.

The magazine assessed more than 350 institutions in four criteria: student engagement; faculty credentials and training; peer reputation; and student services and technology.

“This important recognition emphasizes the success of our exceptional online programs, which give adult learners and working students the opportunity to earn valuable degrees, and supports our initiative to greatly expand online programs under our new strategic framework,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “The benefits of an excellent education are indispensable in the knowledge economy, and our online degree strategy will help us fulfill our special mission by giving even more students the tools to achieve their dreams.”

John Mogulescu, dean of the school and senior University dean for academic affairs, said, “Ranking in the top 5 percent of the country affirms the high quality of our online programs and the dedication of our faculty and staff. This is the fourth year we’ve been included in this list, and achieving the 95th percentile nationally and the highest ranking among the institutions located in New York State is enormously gratifying.”

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

The complete information for the CUNY School of Professional Studies ranking can be viewed here.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Historian Mike Wallace discusses “Greater Gotham” at CWE

Historian Mike Wallace returns to The City College of New York’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education on Feb. 7 to discuss his new book “Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898 to 1919.” His talk begins at 6:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

In “Greater Gotham,” Wallace, a Distinguished Professor of History at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, specializing in the history of New York City, picks up where he left off in his 1,400-page Pulitzer Prize-winning tome “Gotham.”

“Wallace has written another amazing synthesis based on thousands of sources,” said CWE Dean Juan Carlos Mercado. “The writing is of great quality and provides a voluminous wealth of information presented in a way that is easy to keep up with the story.”

Wallace first visited CWE back in 2009 to discuss Gotham as part of the Center’s Book Talk Lecture Series. He impressed students, faculty, staff and guests with his talk on New York City history up to 1898. “It was only appropriate to have him back for the sequel, which addresses New York City history from 1898 through the Second World War,” said Mercado.

Beginning with the consolidation of the five boroughs and ending just after WW1, this long-awaited sequel surveys two decisive decades that saw the city’s physical and population grow into the world’s second-largest metropolis and a center of global finance. “Greater Gotham” covers every aspect of the city, from politics to the subway system, to the aqueducts, and a host of other areas.

Wallace’s one-hour lecture in the CWE auditorium, located at 25 Broadway (7th floor) in lower Manhattan, will be followed by a brief Q & A.  A photo ID is required to enter the building. Click here for more information on the talk.

About CWE
The Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education (CWE) is a division of The City College of New York.  Founded in 1981, it has become one of the leading working adult educational institutions in New York City committed to a population that would be otherwise underserved at the college level. Its courses, educational programs, and its student advising model are specifically designed for students whose access to higher education may have been limited or interrupted due to financial limitations, work responsibilities, and family obligations. CWE offers a BA degree in Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences with a number of special concentrations, a BS degree in Early Childhood Education, an MA in the Study of the Americas, as well as a BA/MA dual degree in the Study of the Americas. CWE attracts over 600 working students per semester and reflects the multi-ethnic composition of New York City and its workers.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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U.S. NEWS RANKS CUNY SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 16TH IN NATION IN 2018 BEST ONLINE BACHELOR’S DEGREES  

U.S. News & World Report has ranked the CUNY School of Professional Studies 16th in the nation for the quality of its online bachelor’s degree programs, putting it in the top 5 percent of all ranked institutions for 2018, and making it the highest nationally ranked program in the state.

The magazine assessed more than 350 institutions in four criteria: student engagement; faculty credentials and training; peer reputation; and student services and technology.

“This important recognition emphasizes the success of our exceptional online programs, which give adult learners and working students the opportunity to earn valuable degrees, and supports our initiative to greatly expand online programs under our new strategic framework,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “The benefits of an excellent education are indispensable in the knowledge economy, and our online degree strategy will help us fulfill our special mission by giving even more students the tools to achieve their dreams.”

John Mogulescu, dean of the school and senior University dean for academic affairs, said, “Ranking in the top 5 percent of the country affirms the high quality of our online programs and the dedication of our faculty and staff. This is the fourth year we’ve been included in this list, and achieving the 95th percentile nationally and the highest ranking among the institutions located in New York State is enormously gratifying.”

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

The complete information for the CUNY School of Professional Studies ranking can be viewed here.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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City Tech Student to Represent the United States in International Cooking Competition

On November 9, City Tech student, Mimi Chen, Department of Hospitality Management, and Chef Matthew Kirkley were selected to represent the United States as the 2019 Team USA in the prestigious Bocuse d’Or competition in Lyon, France. The competition, which takes place every two years, is held at the Sirha, a professional tradeshow dedicated to food service and gastronomy. Chen first met Kirkley when she assisted the 2017 Team USA in Lyon at the last Bocuse d’Or competition.

The Team USA competition, sponsored by the “ment’or” BKB Foundation and held at The Venetian, in Las Vegas, followed the Bocuse d’Or format in which chefs have five hours and 35 minutes to prepare and present a platter composition and a plated dish to a panel of 21 jurors. Chen and Kirkley spent three months this year—from August to November—in San Francisco at Kirkley’s three-star Michelin restaurant, COI, practicing for the Las Vegas competition.

“Mimi is competing among the best chefs in the world. As a young woman, she will have much to prove throughout her journey. Continuing her academic studies while training will surely be an additional challenge, but it is one Mimi is addressing with rigor and determination. We are proud of her accomplishments and look forward to seeing how much she will grow as she trains for her upcoming competitions and academic course work,” said Professor Karen Goodlad, CSW, Department of Hospitality, City Tech.

City Tech has produced a long list of hospitality industry professionals who have gone on to successful careers at major restaurants and hotels around the world including celebrity chef and author Michael Lomonaco, owner of Porter House New York; Feliberto Estevez, executive chef at Gracie Mansion; William Yosses, author and owner of Perfect Pie and the former pastry chef at the White House; Sherry Yard, author and owner of Helms Bakery District and former pastry chef at Spago Beverly Hills as well as Jay Stein who is the CEO of Hampshire Hotels and Resorts, to name just a few.

Next Chen and Kirkley will travel to Mexico City in April, 2018, to compete against 12 teams. Five of those teams will go on to the next step of the Bocuse d’Or in Lyon, which brings together 24 young chefs from all over the world. Among the most promising talents of their generation, the competing chefs prepare dishes live before an audience. A jury composed of the most illustrious chefs of the world decides the winner.

“I am very proud of Matthew and Mimi for having the confidence and the courage to have participated in this competition. It takes great teamwork and collaboration to achieve this goal. It’s a monumental moment that signals the beginning of the Road to Lyon. They are here not only to represent the United States, but to defend our gold medal,” said Chef Thomas Keller, president of ment’or.

Beyond a mere cooking contest, the Bocuse d’Or is a show that receives extraordinary media coverage. Many talented chefs have made a name for themselves by winning the contest, like the winner of the Bocuse d’Or 2011, Danish chef Rasmus Kofoed – restaurant Geranium (Copenhagen) – who successively won the Bronze Bocuse, Silver Bocuse, and Gold Bocuse.

Upon graduation from the High School of Hospitality Management in Manhattan, Chen won a full-tuition scholarship from C-CAP (Careers Through Culinary Arts Program) to attend Manhattan’s International Culinary Center. Once she completed the six-month program, she enrolled at City Tech to earn a bachelor’s degree in hospitality management. Chen also won the ment’or BKB Commis Competition in 2016, where she was awarded a month stage with Team USA 2017. The “month stage” provided her with the opportunity to assist the team with practice runs and to attend the competition in Lyon.

“I was there watching them during the competition in France and when they announced that Team USA was the winner,” said Chen. “It was such an incredible moment, being a part of the team and actually being there to witness it was so surreal. And I was determined that I would get on Team USA for the 2019 competition. Now I’m focusing on doing well in Mexico City and am grateful for all the support I’ve received from my professors at City Tech and, of course, Chef Kirkley.”

“Since 2007, when I first saw the Bocuse d’Or in Lyon, I have dreamed of competing for my country on the world’s greatest culinary stage. I am deeply grateful for the opportunity to do so. I look forward to the challenges ahead, and to work with the great group of people that make up Bocuse d’Or Team USA,” said Chef Kirkley.

About Bocuse d’Or: In January 1987, Paul Bocuse created the Bocuse d’Or, a revolutionary gastronomy contest. Replicating the codes of major sporting events, he imagined a true show placing the emphasis on cooking and on the chefs. Thirty years after its creation, faced with the increasing number of nations who want to take part in the prestigious contest, the Bocuse d’Or inaugurated in 2007 the concept of pre-selection events by introducing the continental events: Bocuse d’Or Europe, Bocuse d’Or Latin America and Bocuse d’Or Asia, that became Bocuse d’Or Asia-Pacific in 2014 and now includes Australia.

These events are the continental finals and aim to select the 24 countries that will reach the international final. The Bocuse d’Or now features nearly 60 national and continental contests over a two-year cycle, all leading to the culmination in the world final that is held in Lyon, France.

About BKB Foundation and ment’or: Since 1987, there has been United States representation at the Bocuse d’Or World Competition. In 2008, Chef Paul Bocuse asked Daniel Boulud to develop a structure to provide more support to the US team, particularly for the training period leading up to the global competition. Chef Boulud engaged Thomas Keller and Jérôme Bocuse to form the Board of Directors, of what is now the BKB (Boulud, Keller, Bocuse) Foundation.

In addition to supporting Team USA, the Foundation is committed to helping support young culinary careers through educational grants and opportunities. In 2014, ment’or was unveiled as the new name for The Bocuse d’Or USA Foundation. ment’or remains dedicated to inspiring culinary excellence in young professionals and to help elevate and promote the fine culinary arts in America.


ICYMI: How Universities Are Trying to Do Right by Puerto Rico

Chronicle of Higher Education
By Brianna Tucker

About two weeks after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico last September, Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York called on his state’s public universities to offer to enroll the territory’s students at in-state tuition rates. “This action,” he said, “will alleviate a huge burden for these families as they try to repair and rebuild their lives.”

Since then, dozens of institutions in the State and City University of New York systems have opened their doors to students from Puerto Rico and other affected American territories in the Caribbean. CUNY has identified 121 students from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands who qualify for in-state tuition for the remainder of the academic year. A senior staff member has been assigned to help the students navigate the application, financial-aid, and college- and course-selection processes.

Several CUNY presidents are also exploring possible exchange programs with the 11-campus University of Puerto Rico system, said Vita C. Rabinowitz, provost and executive vice chancellor at CUNY, that would be modeled on a program that Queens College operates through the National Student Exchange. CUNY students would be able to work in internships and contribute to relief efforts in Puerto Rico, while Puerto Rican students could come to the mainland, she said.

“We want a more genuine exchange, universitywide, and we’re working together to do that,” said Ms. Rabinowitz.

CUNY and SUNY institutions are among many colleges nationwide that are seeking to help students devastated by the hurricane, which has left more than a million people without electricity and hundreds of thousands without clean water even though more than three months have passed since it struck the island. And helping, as many colleges are finding, can be a complicated process. The lack of available housing can curb ambitions to offer aid. Administrative details, like who receives tuition and how it is paid, can present pitfalls. And efforts to help students can have unintended and harmful effects on the island’s campuses.

New York University, for example, announced a Hurricane Maria Assistance Program that would cover full-time tuition, housing, a meal plan, and health insurance for Puerto Rican students. Instead of paying their tuition to NYU, visiting students would pay their home institution.

The application deadline was initially December 15, but, at the University of Puerto Rico’s request, NYU moved it to December 1. That way, UPR could have more time to calculate its budget, said Josh Taylor, NYU’s associate vice chancellor for global programs. “There’s a fine line between being helpful in a way that’s also supportive of institutions in Puerto Rico,” Mr. Taylor said. “We’ve been doing everything we can to make sure we don’t contribute to further damaging those institutions.”

NYU received more than 250 applications from students enrolled in the Universities of Puerto Rico and of the Sacred Heart, which is in San Juan. NYU has paid special attention to applicants who were already in New York, and has admitted about 50 students.

Officials at Tulane University, in New Orleans, have a sense of what UPR is going through. In 2005, when Hurricane Katrina displaced more than 100,000 students attending colleges along the Gulf Coast, thousands of Tulane students evacuated the city and found temporary homes at other institutions. Roughly 86 percent of those students eventually returned to Tulane. Driven by a desire to serve Puerto Rico’s students in the way theirs were, Tulane officials announced a Guest Semester Program.

“It was because of the support of other institutions nationally that we were able to keep our doors open,” said Satyajit Dattagupta, vice president for enrollment management and dean of undergraduate admission. “It was an overwhelming sense to give back after the way universities took Tulane students in.”

At NYU, Tulane expects visiting students to pay tuition to their home institutions, while Tulane will cover the remaining costs: full-time tuition, housing, and a basic meal plan. But both universities have found their efforts stymied by a common problem: a shortage of student housing. More than 500 students applied to Tulane, but because of the lack of on-campus housing, just 62 spots could be offered.

On Campus and Online

The State University System of Florida plans to welcome about 3,300 students from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. “We are doing everything we can to help them throughout this process,” said Gov. Rick Scott in a written statement directing the system’s 14 colleges to offer in-state tuition to Puerto Rican students affected by the hurricane.

Nearly all of the public institutions in the state stepped up. Visiting students will pay tuition to UPR or their home institution, to alleviate the potential financial burden on them. To make transfer easier and more transparent, Florida’s universities also set up dedicated websites and phone lines for their academic programs, university contacts, and coursework. The Florida system will monitor how long the students stay at its institutions, what courses they take, and how successful they are.

Florida International University will welcome the most visitors to its campus: 880 graduate and undergraduate students, whose out-of-state tuition waivers will be good for the remainder of the academic year. Students from Puerto Rico, with an eye on the slow pace of recovery, have asked whether that period will be extended. “At this point,” the university said in a report to the state system, “we are encouraging students to plan their courses at FIU in light of eventual return to their home institutions.”

At least one institution in the system, the University of North Florida, envisions a longer commitment: It will waive out-of-state tuition for its 32 Puerto Rican students for up to eight semesters.

The University of Florida, meanwhile, has adopted an unusual approach: Students can pursue their degrees through its online degree program, UF Online.

“We thought deeply about the kind of assistance that won’t interrupt their studies, but also successfully return to their home institution,” said Zina Evans, vice president for enrollment management and associate provost.

Roughly half of the island’s population is without electricity due to power-grid damage, and many residents live by the power of emergency generators. While a handful of campuses have already reopened, some students are still without access to clean water or livable conditions.

But the University of Florida stands by its choice of aid. “We feel this kind of continuity provides a sense of normalcy — a good student can be successful face to face or online,” said W. Andrew McCullough, its associate provost for teaching and technology.

It expects to accommodate almost 1,000 students in an online classroom, and at least 300 students have enrolled in UF Online so far.

When Puerto Rico’s students come to Florida’s institutions, the state system hopes they will feel at home. “We’re all being very accommodating, to the point where they want to stay,” said Kristin Whitaker, the system’s associate vice chancellor for public policy and advocacy. “But I’m sure many are ready to get home and be with their families, and whatever our universities can do to make that possible, we will.”

Student Involvement

Students at mainland colleges have also risen to the occasion. Many are leading their own efforts to support the visiting students and connecting them with resources they’ll need once they arrive.

Florida International’s student-body president, for example, created a campaign for current students to donate their dining-hall money to the visiting students, said Ms. Whitaker.

At CUNY, students have begun a disaster-relief fund to send supplies and money directly to the people of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

And at NYU, students have proposed ways to help Puerto Rican students with unexpected expenses like public transportation. NYU students have also proposed raising money for things like laboratory equipment and supplies for Puerto Rico’s campuses.

But students in Puerto Rico have more than financial concerns; the psychological aftermath of Hurricane Maria may keep students from traveling to the mainland in the first place.

Take Axel Javier Noguera Colón. He’s a third-year industrial-biotechnology student at UPR at Mayagüez, and one of thousands anxious about the future of their campus and surrounding community. Students on the island lack money to buy food, he said, or to pay rent for their apartments.

Mr. Noguera Colón decided to stay at UPR-Mayagüez so he could help his family in Guayama, a two-hour drive away. The campus itself has recovered its internet service, clean water, and electricity. But his family’s home lacks those resources as well as communications.

He also feared that a decision to leave might imperil the future of a specialized program like his. Jumping ship could mean fewer students enrolled, which Mr. Noguera Colón worries will result in less financial aid and funding for expensive lab equipment and, potentially, an end to his biotechnology program.

For many students in Puerto Rico, the far-off prospect of a return to normalcy can feel deflating. To commute to class, absorb material, and readjust to being a full-time student is a slow process — one that proceeds, he said, “step by step.”


Queens College and Kupferberg Center for the Arts Commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. with Performance by Sweet Honey in the Rock on January 14

— New York City Public Advocate Letitia James Will Offer Keynote; Dr. Hazel N. Dukes Named as This Year’s Honoree —

Queens, NY, January 5, 2018—The acclaimed a cappella women’s ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock will headline Queens College’s fourth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemoration on Sunday, January 14. New York City Public Advocate Letitia James will deliver the keynote; Hazel N. Dukes, president of the NAACP New York State Conference and a member of the NAACP’s national board of directors, will be recognized for her ongoing efforts to further the work of Dr. King with a Special Award presented by Jackie Arrington-Pinkard, from the Greater Queens Chapter of The Links, Inc.

The keynote speaker and honoree for the January 14 commemoration were chosen by a steering committee composed of distinguished representatives from Queens College, Queens Public Library, Langston Hughes Library, Resorts World Casino, the New York Daily News, the NAACP, Kupferberg Center for the Arts and the Athletics Department at Queens College, the Louis Armstrong House Museum, the United States Tennis Association (USTA), and Madison House/Goldenvoice. Michelle Stoddart, Resorts World NYC director of PR and Community Development, and Andrew Jackson, former director of Langston Hughes Library and Queens College faculty, chaired the committee.

Queens College has a longstanding history of involvement in the struggle for equality and social justice. In 1964, Queens College student Andrew Goodman was slain, along with fellow civil rights workers James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, during a voter registration project in Mississippi. The following spring, as the inaugural speaker in the college’s John F. Kennedy Memorial Lecture Series, Dr. King emphasized the power of peaceful resistance. In 2015, at its 91st commencement ceremony—and fifty years after Dr. King’s address—the college awarded a posthumous honorary doctoral degree to Goodman.

“We take enormous pride in our long association with the civil rights movement, personified by the sacrifice and commitment of so many of our alumni, in particular Andrew Goodman. We are also deeply grateful to those alumni and friends of Queens College who have generously donated their personal papers and artifacts to our library’s Civil Rights Special Collections archive for the benefit of future generations of students and researchers,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

Also in recent years, the college awarded President’s Medals to journalist Jerry Mitchell and the Philadelphia Coalition’s Leroy Clemons—whose work led to the indictment of former Ku Klux Klansman Edgar Ray Killen for the murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner—and an honorary degree to Georgia congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis.

“Queens College has long been committed to creating a community of diversity and equality, characteristics emblematic of Dr. King’s life work,” said Public Advocate Letitia James. “As we continue our efforts to move our society forward, we must spread Dr. King’s message of love and inclusion, especially among our students. I want to thank Queens College for this opportunity to commemorate the great life and legacy of Dr. King.”

Tickets for the event, which will take place at Colden Auditorium at 4 pm, cost $25-35 and are available at ticketmaster.com. The program is sponsored by New York Community Bank.

Since 1973, Sweet Honey in the Rock has been educating, empowering, and entertaining audiences by singing and signing—for the hearing impaired—repertoire rooted in African American history and culture. To date, the group has released 24 recordings and received three Grammy nominations, and collaborated with artists ranging from Stevie Wonder to the Alvin Ailey American Dance Company and the National Symphony Orchestra.

Public Advocate Letitia James made history in 2013 as the first woman of color elected to citywide office in New York City. Among the causes that she supports are tenants’ rights and community renewal. As a City Council member, James fought for paid sick leave and passed the Safe Housing Act, which ensures prompt and complete repairs to rental apartments. She has also advocated for children in foster care and with disabilities, and to provide universal free lunch to children in New York City public schools as of fall 2017. In 2016, James introduced landmark legislation that led to New York City becoming the first municipality in the nation to ban questions about salary history from the employment interview process. A lawyer by training, Letitia James previously served as an assistant attorney general and a public defender.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and
internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.


NYC Men Teach Scholar Wins Prestigious Award

Jamel Holmes (‘19) is a 2017 recipient of the Peter Greeman Scholarship, awarded by the Community Teachers Initiative (CTI) to master degree candidates pursuing teaching careers in a New York City public school or an urban school district in the New York metropolitan area. He is the first Lehmanite to win the award.

“Winning this scholarship has forced me to believe in myself,” said Holmes, who is an active member of Lehman’s NYC Men Teach program, which supports and helps train men of color who want to pursue careers as educators. “This accomplishment will allow me to continue my work.”

It is no surprise that Holmes is excelling at the head of the classroom. He has wanted to teach since he was a youngster in the Bronx. “I believe that children need a safe and nurturing environment to grow,” said Holmes, who grew up in the Parkchester section of the borough. “With the assistance of teachers, children are able to mature emotionally, intellectually, physically, and socially.”

After graduating from City College with a B.A. in interdisciplinary studies in 2016, he enrolled at Lehman, where he is currently pursuing a master’s in childhood and childhood special education. He also works as a teaching assistant at P.S./M.S. 29 in the South Bronx.

Holmes clearly loves his job and recalls excitedly the time he helped a first grader learn how to read. “The student went from being an emergent reader to being on grade level by the end of the school year,” he said. “It was both rewarding and challenging.”

“Jamel represents excellence through both his academic performance and his willingness to organize test preparation classes. He makes a point to encourage and uplift others who are part of NYC Men Teach,” said Fatima Sherif, director of Lehman’s NYC Men Teach program. “He will be a wonderful educator because he is committed to the young learners of our community.”

Holmes will be on hand for a screening of the documentary, Developing Your Teacher Identity Beyond the Classroom, that will be shown at Lehman College on February 9th from 4-6 p.m. in the Faculty Dining Room in the Music Building. Following the film, which highlights a trip to Washington D.C. last spring by members of Lehman’s NYC Men Teach program, there will be a special panel discussion and dinner.

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/696-0645


CCNY Mini-Medical School wants to know what’s on your plate

You are what you eat. But there are many conflicting opinions about what should be on your plate.

Learn what you should be eating to promote your health in the new year at a Mini-Medical School hosted by the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York on Wednesday, January 10th from 5:30pm-7pm. Ann Meyer, a Registered Dietitian and Clinical Nutrition Manager at NYC Health & Hospitals/Harlem will present the topic: “What’s On Your Plate? Breaking Down My Plate & Nutrition in the Media”. Ms. Meyer will also answer any questions you might have.

RSVP for this free event, which is open to the public and takes place in the North Academic Center (NAC) Room 1/201 on the CCNY campus. Refreshments will be served.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center Presents Jazz in Progress: The Next Faces of Jazz

 

 

Perrin Grace

The BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center is proud to present the winner and two finalists from the DC Jazz Festival’s DCJazzPrix emerging band competition. AMP Trio featuring Tahira Clayton, the Ernest Turner Trio, and SULA will perform three concerts on February 10, February 24, and March 30, respectively.  Each evening show begins at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets are $30 for each concert (students/seniors $20).  All performances will be held at BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers Street, between Greenwich and West Street.  They can be purchased by calling Ticketing Services at (212) 220-1460 or visit the BMCCTPAC website at http://tribecapac.org. Tickets can also be purchased in person by visiting the Box Office at 199 Chambers Street, Tues-Sat from 12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Jazz in Progress: The Next Faces of Jazz is a partnership between BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center and the DC Jazz Festival.  DCJazzPrix, part of DC Jazz Fest, is a global competition created to recognize and support top rising jazz band talent, and is designed to help launch and promote the careers of emerging jazz ensembles. This past year’s competition was held at the University of the District of Columbia on June 15, 2017. For more information on DCJazzPrix, please visit https://dcjazzfest.org/dcjazzprix.

ARTIST BIOS 

AMP Trio Featuring Tahira Clayton Saturday, February 10 at 7:30 p.m.

Tahira Clayton – Vocals

Addison Frei – Piano

Perrin Grace – Bass

Matt Young – Drums

Pianist Addison Frei, drummer Matt Young, and bassist Perrin Grace met as students at the prestigious University of North Texas jazz program. Now in their 5th year as a band, AMP Trio, is preparing to release their third full length record, Three, later this spring. AMP Trio brought vocalist Tahira Clayton into the fold with their second album, m(y)our world, In the last year AMP Trio and Tahira Clayton have been heard at the Mid-Atlantic Jazz Festival in Rockville, MD, the Kitchen Café in Dallas, TX, and Kerrytown Concert House in Ann Arbor, MI among others. They have collaborated in New York at venues such as Rockwood Music Hall and the Cell Theatre. AMP Trio has also performed alongside talented artists such as saxophonists Tim Green and Quamon Fowler and trumpeter John Raymond. AMP Trio has recorded together as a rhythm section for albums by Aaron Hedenstrom, Spenser Liszt and Adam Hutcheson. Find out more at www.amptrio.com.

Ernest Turner Trio—Saturday, February 24 at 7:30 p.m.

Jonathan Curry – Drums

Lance Scott – Bass

Ernest Turner – Piano

The Ernest Turner Trio has been active on the music scene in Durham, North Carolina.  They have toured nationally and internationally (State Department Rhythm Road 2009 alumni). In addition to his performance schedule he has been very active in Jazz education, doing numerous music clinics/educational performances and serving on the faculty at East Carolina University from 2006-2010. The Ernest Turner Trio has been involved in various musical projects in the North Carolina area, including a recently released live album of trio and quartet music, as well as an upcoming studio album.

SULA—Friday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m.

Michael Mayo – Vocals

Caili O’Doherty – Piano

Diego Joaquin Ramirez – Drums

Tamir Shmerling – Bass

Wayne Tucker – Trumpet

Asaf Yuria – Sax

‘SULA’ is a NYC-based crossover jazz group, led by drummer Diego Joaquin Ramirez. The group formed in 2016 and has since been refining their sound with performances around New York City, and were finalists of the 2017 DC Jazz Prix Competition. The group’s members hail from Ireland, Israel, Portland, Los Angeles, and Syracuse, and are alumni of Berklee College of Music, The Thelonious Monk Institute, Betty Carter Jazz Ahead Program, The New School, and SUNY Purchase. SULA’s members have performed and recorded with musicians including Taylor Swift, Terri Lyne Carrington, Jimmy Cobb, Vijay Iyer, Mike Stern, Adam Cruz, and Nate Smith.

BMCC Tribeca PAC is Downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families, and audiences of all ages.   BMCC Tribeca PAC strives to present a broad global perspective through the presentation of high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. BMCC Tribeca PAC is located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue & West Street) and is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R subway lines and the New Jersey Path Train.  For more information please visit our website, www.tribecapac.org.


A Landmark Event, with Everyone at the Table: The Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center’s NYC Food as Medicine Summit

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food,” prescribed Hippocrates 2,400 years ago.A Landmark Event, with Everyone at the Table: The Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center’s NYC Food as Medicine Summit

Western society has still largely failed to fill that prescription. But in New York City today, progress is being made by academics, health-care professionals, policy makers, community organizations, and concerned citizens. On November 30, 2017, at the Silberman School of Social Work in East Harlem, Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center brought hundreds of those stakeholders together for the first time.

Under the banner “Bringing Everyone to the Table,” the inaugural NYC Food as Medicine Summit presented 35 speakers and panelists to a capacity crowd of 600 and more than 200 additional livestream viewers. Admission was free, discussions were accompanied by cooking demonstrations, and a nutritional lunch was served.

The three keynote speakers were Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams; Dr. Robert Graham, co-founder of FRESHMed NYC; and Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center. Other representatives of health-care institutions, community-based organizations and city government included Dr. Robert Osfeld, director of Montefiore Medical Center’s Cardiac Wellness Program; Nancy Easton, executive director of Wellness in the Schools; Dr. Francesca Gany, chief of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service; and Stephen O’Brien, director of strategic partnerships at the NYC Department of Education’s Office of School Food.

Among the panelists representing the producers and distributors of healthful foods were Erika Freund of the West Side Campaign against Hunger, and Delma Avila of Food Bank NYC’s Just Say Yes to Fruits and Vegetables program. Panel discussions of diet’s role in fighting or contributing to cancer, diabetes and heart disease included analyses of the obstacles posed by poverty, homelessness and food insecurity.

“It’s clear that eating unhealthy food is a major cause of food-related chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers,” said Charles Platkin, executive director of the Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center. “Food needs to be part of the solution. For real, sustainable change to occur, everyone needs to be brought to the table, including chefs, restauranteurs, physicians, dietitians, other health-care professionals, government staffers, elected officials, and community-based organizations. The Center’s Food as Medicine Summit was a catalyst, and one of the first in New York City to bring so many to the table.”


CCNY engineers partner DRPILLA and Mayor’s Office in wind research study

CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering Professor Yiannis Andreopoulos.

Funded by a $563,000 grant from the New York City Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resilience, City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering is helping study the effects of hurricane strength winds on certain buildings under various climate change scenarios. Its partners include the structural engineering firm DRPILLA and the New York City Department of Buildings.

Leading the project, entitled “New York City built environment and public safety under extreme wind effects in a changing climate,” are the Grove School’s Yiannis Andreopoulos, Michael Pope Professor of Energy Research; Jorge Gonzalez, Fred Moshary and Mark F. Arend.

The research objectives of the partners include:

  • Determine the types of existing buildings at risk of causing falling debris due to factors such as wind, age, construction classification, construction methods and materials; height and occupancy;
  • Analyze the effects of wind on existing buildings that are raised, lifted, elevated or moved in order to comply with city building codes or to address flood hazard concerns;
  • Analyze the effects of wind on buildings that are under construction, including the effects of wind on buildings with incomplete façade assemblies, temporary installations used in construction, and construction materials that are stored on construction sites;
  • Analyze forecasts related to potential changes in the frequency, intensity, and path of future storm events along with consideration of whether climate change may impact wind speeds and other factors;
  • Examine the benefits of installing and maintaining weather stations across the city, including on high-rise buildings, to better understand localized wind patterns.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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STATEMENT FROM CUNY CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON GOVERNOR CUOMO’S STATE OF THE STATE MESSAGE                                     

“We applaud Governor Cuomo’s plan to invest in food pantries on all public university campuses. CUNY has been a leader in addressing food insecurity on campus and runs pantries on more than half of our 24 campuses, including at six of our seven community colleges.  Research conducted by the CUNY School of Public Health and Health Policyindicates that almost 15 percent of our students—28,430 young women and men—go hungry at some point because they can’t afford to buy enough food.  CUNY’s research found that food-insecure students have lower grade-point averages and are far more likely to take leaves of absence than comparable well-fed students.

“This new investment will make a critical difference for our students, as has the Excelsior Scholarship program.  By enabling eligible students to attend CUNY tuition-free, the Excelsior Scholarship has played a significant role in the increases in applications, enrollment and credit-taking that we have seen since the program’s introduction.”

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NSF grant enhances CCNY’s Hispanic-Serving/STEM thrust

CCNY is one of seven Hispanic-Serving Institutions nationwide awarded the NSF’s first grants designed to enhance undergraduate education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at HSIs.

With a Latino student population comprising nearly a third of its more than 16,000 enrollment, The City College of New York’s designation as a Hispanic-Serving Institution is receiving another boost from the National Science Foundation in 2018. City College is a recipient of the first NSF grant designed to enhance undergraduate education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at HSIs.

CCNY had the only successful proposal from the Northeast among seven winners nationally announced by the NSF today.

“For decades, NSF has worked to provide members of communities traditionally underserved in STEM with access to STEM education and opportunities in STEM careers,” said Jim Lewis, acting NSF assistant director, Education and Human Resources. “Through our HSI Program, NSF aims to identify the most critical challenges and important opportunities for learners in undergraduate STEM education at HSIs.”

Established in 2017, the HSI Program is the result of NSF’s work with the HSI community and lawmakers to find ways to bolster the quality of undergraduate STEM education.

At CCNY, the NSF’s $100,000 grant will support an initiative entitled “Urbano-Increasing Access and Success in Urban STEM,” led by Jorge E. Gonzalez of the Grove School of Engineering.

“URBANO is a conference we’re are organizing this spring to explore challenges that Urban HSI/STEM institutions face in their quest to provide a quality, 21st Century education to a large number of students,” said Gonzalez. “Hispanics are the fastest growing demographic in the nation and are expected to make up 30% of the population by 2050. Their full participation in STEM is essential for the nation to maintain its global leadership.”

More than 100 experts in STEM education will present solutions for increased access to students; modernizing curriculums, and applying technology in the classroom. This is all in response to the growing need for a skilled and diverse workforce.

Overall, the NSF grant brings to more than $5 million its funding for HSI programs at CCNY since 2017.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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CUNY FRESHMAN APPLICATIONS RISE FOR FALL 2018, WITH SHARP JUMP ATTRIBUTED TO EXCELSIOR PROGRAM

Freshman applications to The City University of New York for Fall 2018 have risen to a record 50,546 – an 11.1 percent increase as of Dec. 24, 2017, over the same time the year before, the University announced today.

This follows a previous record 9 percent increase in applications in December 2016 over 2015, which resulted in the largest-ever freshman class – 38,372 strong – enrolling in Fall 2017. In addition, this fall CUNY saw a 10 percent increase in first-time freshmen taking 15 or more credits in their first semester.

Both the record freshman enrollment and boost in credit-taking are being attributed to the introduction of the Excelsior Scholarship. The program makes New York State public universities tuition-free for families making up to $100,000, while requiring students to earn 30 credits a year in order to qualify.

“Students are seeing the tremendous opportunity and value that CUNY offers,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “We believe that Gov. Cuomo’s Excelsior Scholarship played a significant role in the increases in applications, enrollment and credit-taking by enabling eligible students to attend tuition-free.”

CUNY conducted a comprehensive outreach program to ensure that all eligible students were aware of the Excelsior Scholarship. Chancellor Milliken emailed all CUNY faculty, staff and students. The University not only reached out extensively on social media, but also contacted more than 3,000 high school guidance counselors, teachers, and community-based organizations leaders and met in person with 80 guidance counselors. CUNY also hosted a Facebook Live Information session viewed by more than 3,950 unique students and families. As a result, CUNY received more than 30,000 applications for Fall 2017, of which the state Higher Education Services Corporation identified more than 10,000 eligible students; about 4,700 students actually received Excelsior Scholarship funding to attend CUNY colleges tuition-free this fall.

The Dec. 24 application data represent a snapshot in time in an ongoing application process. The final number of students who enroll in CUNY’s colleges won’t be known until the next academic year starts.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of January 1, 2018 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Happy New Year!

We look forward to welcoming you back to school on Tuesday January 2, 2018.

Given that cold weather continues to be forecast for the week ahead, please note the following Cold Weather Guidelines from the NYC Department of Education: “Children benefit from vigorous exercise and should be given the opportunity to play outside whenever possible. Unless it is snowing, or there is ice on the playground, or the wind-chill factor is below zero degrees Fahrenheit (-18 degrees Celsius), temperature alone should not preclude outdoor play.”

We will maintain outdoor play periods, take precautions to keep students warm and ensure that they are appropriately dressed on very cold days. When outdoors, we will prompt students and staff to cover exposed skin, wear warm clothing, and use multiple layers to maintain warmth. Please note that we will absolutely exercise common sense and avail ourselves of indoor recess if this is needed.

We look forward to a wonderful week ahead!

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Announcements

  • Upper Grades Students: We have 13 instructional days until the end of Semester 1 which concludes on Friday, January 19th! Should you have any questions about your courses, please be in touch with your teachers and take advantage of our NHS peer tutoring program, which meets each Monday and Tuesday afternoon from 2:45pm – 4:00pm in the library.

Our Week Ahead

Monday, January 1

  • Schools Closed. Happy New Year.  

Wednesday, January 3

  • LG Assembly: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Thursday, January 4 and Friday, January 5

  • School Photos – Retake Days

Looking ahead

  • January 9: Principal’s Coffee, MG – 8:30 am in the cafeteria. All are welcome.
  • January 11: Principal’s Coffee, LG – 8:30 am in the cafeteria. All are welcome.
  • January 12:
    • Principal’s Coffee, UG – 8:30 am in the cafeteria. All are welcome.
    • Winter Dance for UG students – 5 pm in the cafeteria
  • January 15th: No School. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Holiday
  • January 19, 2018 is the end of Marking Period 2. During January Regents 2018 Regents Week, No Upper Grades Students will be in attendance except for students taking Regents exams.
  • January 26: Scoring Day for High Schools. HS Students do not attend.
  • January 29: Chancellor’s Conference Day in High Schools. HS Students do not attend
  • January 30th: Spring Term begins for HS students.

Opportunities for NEST+m students

CURIE Academy
Curie Academy is a one-week summer residential program for high school girls who excel in math and science, enjoy solving problems, and want to learn more about careers in engineering

  • Website: https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Dates: July 15-21, 2018 (attendance is required for the entire program.)
  • Application: Available online at
    https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Deadline: Received by March 1, 2018
  • Rising seniors (class of 2019) who are women and African/Black American, Latino, Native American/Alaska Native, or Pacific Islander and/or first generation college students meeting the requirements below will automatically be considered for a full tuition waiver for the 2018 CATALYST Academy.

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
January

  • Road to College Seminar by Jane Mathias of Nardin Academy at Buffalo State College & Online on 1/6 (Register here)
  • Prep starts for March 10 SAT on 1/20 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • Prep starts for March 21 SAT on 1/27 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • SAT or ACT Practice Exams on 2/3 (Register here)

High School Summer Internship Program at the NYC Department of Design and Construction
This internship is designed for students interested in architecture, engineering, building trades, public administration, business administration or information technology.  It is to enable students to test the waters of the NYC design, building and construction fields and offer them valuable hands on work and educational experience.  The program lasts for 6 weeks with students attending 5 days a week.  It begins Thursday, July 5th and ends Friday, August 10, 2018.

To Qualify, students must reside in New York City, and be a high school student at lease 16 years of age.  Students must be available to work the entire duration of the program, be eligible to work in the US and have working papers.   Applications are completed online by January 5, 2018.  There will also be an interview for the process.  Completed applications should be sent to www.nyc.gov/ddc and visit the STEAM tab section of the website.   If you have any questions, you can call 718 391-2888 for assistance.  The email address is STEAM@ddc.nyc.gov.

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of December 18, 2017 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Our week ahead features five full days of instruction, 8:20am to 2:40pm. There are no after-school activities on Friday 12/22/17. Students will be asked to head home following the school day on Friday.

As a reminder, schools are closed from 12/25/17 to 12/29/17 and on 1/1/18. School Resumes on Tuesday January 2, 2018.

We hope that you and your family have a wonderful Winter Break and a Happy New Year.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Announcements

  • Thank you to Melissa Hernandez, for her 1.5 years as NEST+m’s parent coordinator. Melissa has  accepted an opportunity to work for the Office of Student Enrollment’s Family Welcome Center in the Bronx. We thank Melissa for her service to the NEST+m community and wish her all the best as she transitions following this week.
  • Congratulations to Chad Cinquegrana who has earned recognition as a National Board Certified Teacher, one of only five NBCT health teachers in NY State! To find out more about this achievement, see: http://www.nbpts.org.

Our Week Ahead

Monday, December 18

  • Ryan’s Story Presentation for Students in Grades 6-10, in the Auditorium. See details sent separately.
  • Ryan’s Story, Evening Presentation for parents, 6 pm in the NEST+m Auditorium. All are welcome to attend.  http://www.ryanpatrickhalligan.org/

Tuesday, December 14

  • SLT Meeting in the Library, 4 pm

Friday December 22

  • Family Friday for 4th and 5th Grades, 8:30 am

Looking ahead

  • Regents week will be January 22. Please note that the only UG students in attendance will be those taking the January exams.

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Urban Barcode Research Program
We have opened registration for the Urban Barcode Research Program pre-requisite courses being held at the Harlem DNA Lab during the NYC DOE Winter and Spring recesses.  Information about the UBRP and the registration link for courses can be found at:

http://www.dnabarcoding101.org/programs/ubrp/ubrp-courses.html

Community Service Learning Program
The Community Service Learning Program (CSLP) is an 8-month internship (January– August 2018) that aims to develop 8 high school interns into future leaders. Interns will discover their potential and interests by:

  • Working at an organization in lower Manhattan,
  • Learning through trainings coordinated by the TRC and
  • Collaborating to create a final project.

CSLP encourages discussions on community, health issues, and creating change. Applications Due: Friday, December 29, 2017 @ 11:59PM at www.bit.ly/CSLP2K18
Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
December

  • Holiday Discount – Save up to $100 if you enroll by 12/31 ($50 off any Group – Holiday50SmallGroup, $100 off Private Tutoring – Holiday100PrivateTutoring)
  • Prep for the February 10 ACT starts on 12/16 (Register here)
  • Last ACT/ACT Hybrid on 12/16 (Register here)

January

  • Road to College Seminar by Jane Mathias of Nardin Academy at Buffalo State College & Online on 1/6 (Register here)
  • Prep starts for March 10 SAT on 1/20 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • Prep starts for March 21 SAT on 1/27 – Limited seats available (Register here)
  • SAT or ACT Practice Exams on 2/3 (Register here)

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

High School Summer Internship Program at the NYC Department of Design and Construction
This internship is designed for students interested in architecture, engineering, building trades, public administration, business administration or information technology.  It is to enable students to test the waters of the NYC design, building and construction fields and offer them valuable hands on work and educational experience.  The program lasts for 6 weeks with students attending 5 days a week.  It begins Thursday, July 5th and ends Friday, August 10, 2018.

To Qualify, students must reside in New York City, and be a high school student at lease 16 years of age.  Students must be available to work the entire duration of the program, be eligible to work in the US and have working papers.   Applications are completed online by January 5, 2018.  There will also be an interview for the process.  Completed applications should be sent to www.nyc.gov/ddc and visit the STEAM tab section of the website.   If you have any questions, you can call 718 391-2888 for assistance.  The email address is STEAM@ddc.nyc.gov.

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.

YOUTH INSIGHTS ARTISTS at the Whitney Museum
January 31–May 17 / Wednesdays or Thursdays: 4–6:30 pm

Youth Insights (YI) is a free, after-school program open to New York City high school students in ninth through twelfth grade. Each semester, YI brings teens together with contemporary artists and Museum staff, providing opportunities to work collaboratively, discuss art critically, think creatively, and create art inspired by this exchange.

Participation in the program is free and all supplies are provided. Students also receive a one-trip MetroCard each week to travel home from the Whitney. Prior experience in similar programs is not required for students to participate in Youth Insights.

Apply online now. Applications are due by 11:59 pm on Monday, December 18. Students must have a teacher or reference fill out theonline recommendation form in addition to the online application.

Students and teachers should contact Teen Programs directly with any questions about the application process by calling (646) 680-6248 or emailing youthinsights@whitney.org.

Kaplan Test Prep
Kaplan Test Prep will be running an SAT Class at NEST+M School in preparation for the March 21st SAT Test date! Class will include 2 Practice Tests and 6 three hour Classroom sessions.   Seating is limited   Register today,  by calling 1-800-527-8378 or visiting https://www.kaptest.com/college-prep/nestm .Use CodeNEST400 to get a $400 discount on the course!!   Prices go up 3 weeks prior to the class start date!

Class Code: SAIKM18005P
Discount Code: NEST400
Schedule: Wednesdays starting at 2:50.  First session is 1/10/18!

Concerts in Motion
Attention high school students: Would you like to brighten a senior citizen’s day, practice performing your music (instrument or vocal), and earn volunteer service hours all at the same time?

If this sounds good to you, Concerts in Motion, a nonprofit that serves senior citizens who can’t leave their homes, is looking for student volunteers!  We are looking for students to sign up to visit a senior citizen in Chinatown for a minimum of one visit per month.  All visits will be supervised by an adult from Concerts in Motion.  Vocalists and instrumentalists of all levels are welcome – we just ask that you come ready to perform 2-4 pieces.

If you are interested in this wonderful service opportunity, please contact Melany at operationsmanager@concertsinmotion.org and she will send more information on how to sign up.  Students are asked to commit to one Monday per month but are welcome to sign up for additional Mondays, too!

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.


CUNY Law Student Awarded 2018 Skadden Fellowship

Third-year CUNY School of Law student Jessica “JP” Perry has been awarded a Skadden Fellowship for 2018.

The Skadden Fellowships founded in 1988 by the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in honor of the firm’s 40th anniversary, are intended to fund a small group of law graduates nationally in full-time work for legal and other advocacy organizations, and encourage them to build public service careers. Described as “a legal Peace Corps” Skadden Fellowships are awarded for two years to law students committed to public interest work, as they embark upon specific projects at sponsoring organizations.

Portrait of student JP Perry

JP Perry

Perry will work with the New York Civil Liberties Union to represent immigrant and young English Language Learners and their families who are facing discrimination and harassment in public schools on Long Island, NY. In collaboration with grassroots organizers, she will investigate instances of discrimination, conduct outreach, create know-your-rights materials and develop impact litigation in an effort to make high-quality education accessible to all young people.

“I am thrilled that one of our graduates will provide critically needed representation to immigrant communities on Long Island, as a Skadden Fellow, said CUNY Law Dean Mary Lu Bilek. “The Skadden Fellowship Program is invaluable because makes it possible for creative, new lawyers, such as JP to chip away at emerging and urgent legal needs and pursue law in the service of human needs.”

Perry is one 29 graduates selected this year for the fellowship. Since the program’s inception, 14 CUNY Law graduates have served as Skadden Fellows. 2017 graduates Annemarie Caruso and Maggie Gribben are currently serving as Skadden Fellows. Caruso is tackling educational inequity and Gribben is empowering low wage workers.


CUNY Law Student Awarded 2018 Skadden Fellowship

Third-year CUNY School of Law student Jessica “JP” Perry has been awarded a Skadden Fellowship for 2018.

The Skadden Fellowships founded in 1988 by the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in honor of the firm’s 40th anniversary, are intended to fund a small group of law graduates nationally in full-time work for legal and other advocacy organizations, and encourage them to build public service careers. Described as “a legal Peace Corps” Skadden Fellowships are awarded for two years to law students committed to public interest work, as they embark upon specific projects at sponsoring organizations.

Portrait of student JP Perry

JP Perry

Perry will work with the New York Civil Liberties Union to represent immigrant and young English Language Learners and their families who are facing discrimination and harassment in public schools on Long Island, NY. In collaboration with grassroots organizers, she will investigate instances of discrimination, conduct outreach, create know-your-rights materials and develop impact litigation in an effort to make high-quality education accessible to all young people.

“I am thrilled that one of our graduates will provide critically needed representation to immigrant communities on Long Island, as a Skadden Fellow, said CUNY Law Dean Mary Lu Bilek. “The Skadden Fellowship Program is invaluable because makes it possible for creative, new lawyers, such as JP to chip away at emerging and urgent legal needs and pursue law in the service of human needs.”

Perry is one 29 graduates selected this year for the fellowship. Since the program’s inception, 14 CUNY Law graduates have served as Skadden Fellows. 2017 graduates Annemarie Caruso and Maggie Gribben are currently serving as Skadden Fellows. Caruso is tackling educational inequity and Gribben is empowering low wage workers.


STORYTELLING AND ART DEPICT LINK BETWEEN HUMAN PAIN AND CRIME

Storytelling and Art Depict Link between Human Pain and Crime

 

25 years ago, long before she became an adjunct assistant professor at John Jay, Irina Zakirova worked as a police officer in Europe, where she was part of an intelligence unit for an international policing organization. And like most people in law enforcement, interaction with criminals was part of the job. For Zakirova, those interactions soon turned into conversations. She learned about their lives, how they became involved in crime, and the circumstances that led them to become involved with the police. And over the course of time, these conversations began to have a major impact on Zakirova and her perception of crime and criminals.

“I realized that they are not a bad people,” she said. “It’s very primitive to think that way, that criminals are bad people. Certain circumstances, life events, or even coincidence can force them to be in the path of crime.”

The experience of working and speaking with criminals had such an impact on Zakirova that she turned those conversations into stories and published them in her book, “The Pain Within My Soul.” It’s a collection of short, fictional stories based on the real lives of the individuals she spoke with and the journeys that brought them into the criminal justice system.

A quarter century later, Zakirova still wonders what may have happened to them.  “Maybe they died, maybe they’re behind bars, and maybe some are in the reintegration process. But I feel bad because I saw what happened with their lives. So there is a pain within my soul for them, because society labeled them as criminals,” she said.

Zakirova said it was her students that first got her thinking about publishing these stories. In the classroom, she noticed that when she used stories and personal experiences to help explain the policies and theories in the textbook, the students found it easier to grasp and far more compelling. For example, in one assignment, students would read one of her stories, and then search through the textbook for a policy that may have helped to prevent the crime that occurred in the story. “They participated, all of the students, and that’s my goal,” she said.

Sometime during one of these assignments, a student produced a drawing – their interpretation of a character in one of the stories. “So the students began to make me think about a gallery,” said Zakirova.

In 2015 Zakirova, who teaches as part of the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration, and her students organized a college-wide drawing contest where students submitted drawings of their interpretations of the stories in “Pain Within My Soul.”  The works were displayed in the Shiva Gallery, but the idea didn’t stop there – Zakirova was soon receiving work from outside the college. Artists from Colombia, Turkey, the Dominican Republic, and other countries read the stories and shared their artistic interpretations with Zakirova, who compiled them into an online gallery (https://www.socartproject.com/books).

According to the gallery website, “These internationally and artistically diverse artists demonstrate their engagement with the existing cultures, and their own civil standing while attempting to provide a new perspective toward identifying and understanding the element which is most often ignored in current studies of crime, but should be thoroughly studied: pain.”

Zakirova is continuing to organize gallery shows, and is currently in negotiations to have a permanent gallery space in Turkey.

This past summer, Zakirova conducted a workshop at the University of Split in Croatia. The workshop was based on her book, using similar techniques where students apply criminology ideas and practices to scenarios found in the stories. Zakirova said she is always surprised at how people from different cultures and ethnicities have very similar reactions to the stories.

“I realized that students from Croatia and John Jay are not very different. They react the same when it comes to injustice. These people are individuals first, only then can we consider them criminals or offenders or not. Behind the scar is the story of the human being.”


CRIME REPORT PICKS #ME TOO MOVEMENT AND ROBERT MUELLER AS JUSTICE NEWSMAKERS OF THE YEAR

Crime Report Picks #Me Too Movement and Robert Mueller as Justice Newsmakers of the Year

 

New York, NY, December 20, 2017 —The #Me Too Movement and Special Counsel Robert Mueller have been chosen by readers of The Crime Report as the top Justice Newsmakers of 2017.

Announcing the results of its Seventh annual readers’ poll, The Crime Report said the policy reversals at the Department of Justice, the resistance of sanctuary cities to the Trump Administration’s immigration policies, and sexual misconduct in high places led the list of the Top 10 justice stories of the year.

“Our readers felt this year’s newsmakers rose above the polarized national mood to become profiles in courage,” said TCR Editor Stephen Handelman.

“Mueller’s steady by-the-books probe of Trump campaign connections with Russia in the face of White House resistance burnished his reputation as a critic of government abuses of power,” Handelman added.

“And the thousands of women who flooded social media with stories of long-suppressed trauma suffered at the hands of sexual predators from Hollywood to Main Street transformed our national conversation about sexual misconduct.”

The annual poll is aimed at singling out the individuals, stories and developments that had the greatest impact on criminal justice during the year, and are likely to continue resonating in 2018.

Some 80% of TCR readers who responded to the poll selected the series of policy changes enacted after Attorney General Jeff Sessions took over the Justice Department as the most impactful development of 2017.

Those changes amount to a “slow unraveling of many (though not all) of the justice reform efforts begun during the previous administration,” and include efforts to curtail civil rights reviews of police agencies and remove Obama-era mandates to soften sentencing for nonviolent federal drug offenders.

The efforts “haven’t stopped the national momentum,” said Handelman, noting that many states in fact are pursuing their own reform strategies. “But the federal retreat from the reform debate will have a significant impact.”

The resistance of “Sanctuary Cities” to reporting undocumented immigrants to federal immigration authorities “takes place against a context of rising an immigration crackdown which one reader said underlines the administrations “stubborn refusal to draw distinctions between ‘criminal’ and ‘non-criminal’ immigration violators (and) represents an ideological escalation of crimmigration policy.”

Other stories or developments singled out by TCR readers this year included: the spreading opioid epidemic, the ongoing war of words between the White House and the FBI which threatens to “undermine the effectiveness” of the country’s top law enforcement agency; and the bipartisan justice reforms enacted by Louisiana this year aimed at reducing the state’s current profile as the jurisdiction with the world’s highest incarceration rates.

For the full list of stories and developments please click here
 

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nationsIn teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality, and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu and follow @JohnJayCollege on Twitter.

The Crime Report,  published daily by  John Jay’s Center on Media, Crime and Justice,  is a national online site located at www.thecrimereport.org, that provides analysis, research news  and commentary prepared for practitioners, criminologists, journalists and others across the criminal justice community.

The Center on Media, Crime and Justice was established at John Jay College in 2006 as the nation’s only practice- and research-oriented think tank devoted to encouraging and developing high-quality reporting on criminal justice, and to promoting better-informed public debate on the complex 21st Century challenges of law enforcement, public security and justice in a globalized urban society. For more information, visit the Center on Media, Crime and Justice website.


PROFESSOR JODIE ROURE IS RECOGNIZED BY CONGRESS FOR PUERTO RICO RELIEF EFFORT

Professor Jodie Roure Is Recognized by Congress for Puerto Rico Relief Effort

 

When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on September 20, Professor Jodie Roure, who teaches Latin American Studies at John Jay and is an ACLU fellow in Puerto Rico, was on the island with her two children. Roure, who has done extensive human rights and domestic violence prevention work throughout the Americas, remembers firsthand the scale of devastation that quickly followed.

“I suffered the wrath of Maria and I was speechless at the destruction,” Roure said at a livestreamed panel hosted at John Jay about the state of Puerto Rico’s humanitarian efforts. “When the storm hit, I realized very quickly that there was no relief.”

Upon returning to the United States, Roure assembled her own medical relief effort with over 25 doctors and nurses to fly to Puerto Rico to provide humanitarian aid. They traveled through some of the hardest hit regions of Puerto Rico over 18 days and had such enormous success that Roure was invited to testify before Congress as well as present at the Library of Congress. Roure has also been honored with an award from the Puerto Rico College of Surgeons/Doctors.

Jodie Roure and doctors in Puerto Rico

The devastation in Puerto Rico was hitting close to home at John Jay: several of Roure’s students, many of whom were unable to reach to their loved ones, were coming to her, distressed.

With the assistance of Gabriela Ramirez-Vargas, assistant director of the Department of Latin American and Latina/o Studies, and students Melanie Monroy and Magdalena Oropeza, Roure contacted her network of media, legal, and human rights contacts and began assembling a team. She gained the support of Attorney Betty Lugo, former President of the Puerto Rican Bar Association, as well as Michelle Leung from VICE News, who helped secure JetBlue flights that allowed Roure’s team to take $100,000 worth of surgical supplies to and from Puerto Rico. The group became known as Doctors for Maria Relief.

“Our goal was to supplement what doctors were doing,” said Roure. “We didn’t want to go in with a colonial mentality that we were going to take over.”

Her approach quickly gained her the trust of both the Puerto Rican government and community organizations. In New York, Gabriela Ramirez-Vargas received daily Facebook requests for aid that came from hospitals and clinics on the island that had gotten wind of the relief effort.

In Puerto Rico, Roure encountered several challenges, including an inability to reach some of the places where need was highest. “A trip that should take 2 hours was taking us 6 to 8 hours to make,” she said.

There were other unanticipated obstacles.  Orlando Sola, one of the medics on the trip, found that the devastation had created dire medical need among those with easily manageable conditions. Those who suffered from chronic illness like asthma or diabetes suddenly found themselves in dire straits when unable to access their medicine because of a lack of refrigeration or because their local health center was indefinitely closed.

Jodie Roure and team in Puerto Rico

Since Roure returned from Puerto Rico, she has been relentlessly spreading awareness about the current state of the island. She and her team launched a website designed to help other groups make similar relief efforts and identify the current need. Roure also emphasizes that the hurricane affected not only Puerto Ricans but thousands of other foreign nationals who live on the island, and that the issue should be understood as a global one.

At John Jay, her efforts have been noticed. “John Jay has been a leader in responding to the needs of Puerto Rico,” said President Karol Mason, who appeared at the panel discussion hosted by Roure in November. “Thank you to Professor Roure for the work she did to make this wonderful idea happen.”

As a result of her team’s success, Roure has heard from hundreds of doctors who are eager to go on future aid trips, but Roure says the work in Puerto Rico goes beyond relief efforts. “This is not just direct service, but about much larger policy issues—about homelessness, poverty, displacement, housing. It’s about how we rebuild Puerto Rico. How do we train John Jay students to start taking those issues on?”


FRESHMEN SHOW OFF RESEARCH AT 10TH ANNUAL FIRST YEAR STUDENT SHOWCASE

Freshmen Show Off Research at 10th Annual First Year Student Showcase

 

On December 7, John Jay freshmen gathered in the Student Dining Hall for the 10th Annual First Year Student Showcase. The showcase is a momentous opportunity for students to present their first research projects conducted as college students. This year, the projects were diverse in topic and medium, reflecting the various expertise and research interests of John Jay’s newest undergraduate class.

Angelica Alonso, an Adelante! Latino/a Leadership student who is studying Political Science, created a digital storytelling video on corruption in Venezuela to bring greater awareness on campus to that country. “We felt like people weren’t necessarily talking about Venezuela,” she said. “We wanted to change that.”

Similarly, student Michael Torres’s PowerPoint presentation aimed to shed light on Puerto Rico’s current economic predicament. “I’m Puerto Rican so it’s great to be able to express my pride, but the biggest success is being able to inform others,” he said.

Angelica Alonso

Angelica Alonso

View the full gallery of photos here

For many students, conducting research allowed them to delve into topics they’ve always been curious about. Students Michelle Dieguez and Rahat Fatima from the Accelerate, Complete, Engage (ACE) program were interested in how children internalize gender roles from the adults who are closest to them. “Often times we don’t think about the way we act, but we’re not born doing the things we do,” said Fatima.

“We picked this topic because we wanted to explore what society expects from us,” added Dieguez.

Other research projects represented students’ vested interest in social justice and commitment to New York City communities. Students Cossette Felix, Christina Montenegro, Trisha Salcedo, and Aman Afzal, who are part of the APPLE Corps program for students interested in public service or law enforcement careers, looked at attitudes towards gentrification and immigration in three Brooklyn neighborhoods. The students did research in the field by approaching neighborhood residents and conducting informal interviews and surveys, a process that exposed them to both the challenges and joys of doing research.

“You have to be open-minded and not take people’s responses personally when doing research,” said Felix. “I learned communication skills from this project that I can apply to any of my classes.”

“We were determined to get answers,” added Aman. “We can use that determination anywhere.”

New York City Police First Deputy Commissioner and alumnus Benjamin Tucker also attended the student showcase and delivered remarks. “You have to be fierce advocates for justice,” he advised the first-year students.

Judging from the research presented at the showcase, it seems like students have already taken that advice to heart. Students Rosa Fernandez, Alex Desiderio, Tayaba Bibi, and Melanie Delgado from the Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge program (SEEK) looked at how homelessness affects young people’s ability to succeed in school. “People don’t think about it, but if you look at the statistics it’s a huge issue,” said Delgado.

Fernandez agrees, and added that one of her biggest takeaways from the project was an appreciation for the wide breadth of opportunities she has at John Jay. “Here at John Jay, we’re doing great because we get so much academic support,” she said. “I don’t take that for granted.”


Baruch College Earns #1 Ranking in QuantNet’s Best Financial Engineering Programs

Second Consecutive Year in Top Spot by the MFE Program at Weissman School of Arts & Sciences

 

Baruch College’s Masters in Financial Engineering (MFE) program has ranked #1 for the second consecutive year in QuantNet’s survey of the “Best Financial Engineering Programs, Mathematical Finance” in North America.

The MFE program at Baruch College, which is part of Mathematics department in the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, shared the top ranking with UC Berkeley. Both school’s finished with a total score of 100. The top-five were rounded out respectively by Carnegie Mellon University, Columbia University, and Princeton University.

Throughout the years, Baruch College’s rankings has steadily risen in QuantNet’s survey, placing #1 in 2016; #2 in 2015; #4 in 2013; and #5 in 2011.

“Ranking #1 in 2016 and now in 2017 compared to other prestigious MFE programs throughout the United States and Canada is richly deserved recognition to the strength of our program,” said Dan Stefanica, PhD, co-director of Baruch’s MFE program. “It also reflects on the drive and accomplishments of our talented students and of our dedicated alumni.”

Accolades from Academics to the Trading Floor

In its description of Baruch College’s MFE program, QuantNet pointed to the high quality and relevancy of the academic instruction, along with the sophistication of the Wasserman Trading Floor in the Subotnick Financial Services Center.

“Over the years, the program has transformed from theoretical, mathematical focused into a practical, computational focused with many new cutting-edge courses being offered as a result of suggestions from its alumni, teaching adjuncts and industry connections. The program is known today for its emphasis on providing its graduates a very strong practical and technical training.”

QuantNet added, the Wasserman Trading Floor is “is one of the largest and most complete educational facilities of its kind. The Center introduces Baruch College students to economic, financial, journalism, and technology principles using professional market data systems and analytic software.”

For additional information about the program, as well as student and alumni reviews, go here.

Methodology:

The QuantNet rankings surveyed 29 master programs in Financial Engineering, Mathematical Finance, and Quantitative Finance from September to November 2017 on admission statistics, placement success, and career services information. For more details about QuantNet’s methodology, read here.

QuantNet says the rankings “help prospective applicants decide where to apply and enroll in those master quantitative programs.” A complete list of the QuantNet rankings can be seen here.

 

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Learning from Alumni Practitioners: The Implications of Non-Compete Covenants

At the end of the Fall 2017 semester, first-year students heard from CUNY Law alum practitioners about employers’ use and abuse of non-compete covenants, the primary legal issue in their lawyering seminars simulation.

Professor Susan Markus, director of Legal Writing Center and one of the lawyering faculty brought together a panel of alumni working in the field of employment law to discuss the uses and abuses of non-compete covenants. Erin Lloyd ’06 of Lloyd Patel LLP, David Rosten ’86 of Law Office of David Rosten and Dennis Torregiani ’00 who serves as a senior administrative law judge for the Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board in New York City, made up the panel.

“Having spent 14 weeks analyzing the enforceability of a non-compete covenant against a food-truck employee, the students were primed to hear how the controversial contract clause is viewed and enforced in real life; particularly in light of the growing use of non-competes in a variety of law-wage contexts,” said Professor Markus.

Non-compete agreements, which are subject to enforcement by state courts, serve to restrict an employee from going to work for competitors. Torregiani pointed out that there is a tension between upholding an existing contract and the right of people to make a living.

Dennis Torregiani ’00, David Rosten ’86 and Erin Lloyd ’06 discuss non-compete agreements in a panel discussion moderated by Professor Susan Markus.

Lloyd, who overwhelmingly represents employees in employment disputes, emphasized that a lot rests on the first step in the process, the temporary restraining order hearing, where the employer makes a case that the non-compete agreement is being violated.

The panelists discussed the power dynamics of this type of dispute, noting that employers often have more financial resources to pursue the case for longer, which disadvantages the employee.

Torregiani explained that in his role as an arbitrator of disputes, he spends a lot of time deciding whether an individual has been properly classified as an employee or whether he or she is really an independent contractor, which has broad implications for employment law cases.

Lloyd noted that in New York, Uber is allowed to classify its drivers as independent contractors which means that the New York human rights law does not apply to them, and opens the door to discrimination. In California by contrast, Uber drivers are classified as employees.

Lloyd also pointed out that the use of non-compete agreements can have ripple effects on the economy, using the example of the technology industries in California and Massachusetts. In California, non-compete agreements are not allowed, while in Massachusetts, they are.

“The panel discussion brought to life many of the legal and economic issues students grappled with as they analyzed the issues in the lawyering seminar simulation, said Professor Markus. “Many CUNY Law students come to law school motivated to protect and improve workers rights. Hearing from lawyers in the field was informative and inspiring.”

Torregiani urged students to seize opportunities to work on real cases assisting people, and approach that work with humility, persistence and creativity. “Part of your job as a lawyer is to figure out what this piece of paper [any legal document] can do for your client,” he said.

WATCH A VIDEO OF THE DISCUSSION


Project at CCNY helps assemble complex molecules

Nucleosides are fundamental building blocks of genetic material which makes them attractive for a number of biologically relevant applications and as potential pharmaceuticals. At The City College of New York, scientists are developing facile methods for modifying nucleoside structures to make chemical processes more efficient.

Mahesh Lakshman, professor in City College’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, leads a team that has developed easy access to relatively complex nucleoside analogues.

They have devised a carbon-nitrogen bond forming strategy leading to new nucleoside analogues, using “hypervalent iodine” reagents that are of increasing importance in molecule building.  However, the nucleosides used had several possible centers that could combine in these reactions.

The researchers found that these nucleosides bend into certain patterns to drive specific reactive centers to combine, depending upon the conditions used.  They also analyzed the possible fundamental pathways of these reactions.

Their work was ranked “highly important” in the review process and was the cover feature in issue 21 of the journal “ChemCatChem.”

The research expands on previous modifications of nucleosides conducted by Lakshman, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.  Working with postdoctoral associate Sakilam Satishkumar, he has sought to manipulate nucleosides using hypervalent iodine reagents, in order to access new molecules, which showed interesting fluorescence properties depending upon structure.

Because they are genetic building materials found in all living organisms, nucleosides possess great potential, from drug candidates to detection tools.

In addition to Satishkumar, the current nucleoside research also includes Prasanna Vuram, Dellamol Sebastian, Lijia Yang and Padmanava Pradhan from CCNY, and collaborators from GVK Biosciences Pvt. Ltd. (India).​

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Victory Media ranks CCNY #6 military friendly school in the US

The City College of New York is ranked #6 in the nation by Victory Media in its 2018 Military Friendly® Schools survey. CCNY’s ranking is in the “large public” category.

The survey is the longest-running most comprehensive review of college and university investments in serving military and veteran students. “Our 2018 Military Friendly® Schools list is more exclusive than ever, and covers institutions offering certificate programs to doctoral degrees,” said Victory Media.

More than 1,600 schools completed the survey.

Some 130 former servicemen and women are enrolled at CCNY, according to Christopher Gorman, director of the Office of Veteran Affairs.

Several programs offered by City College and New York State help lighten the financial load for veterans attending CCNY. They include the New York State Veterans Tuition Awards for eligible veterans matriculated full time or part time in an approved program.

CCNY also runs a veteran club, officially the City College Veterans Association, that serves as an outlet for the public service spirit instilled in members while in uniform.

In addition, CCNY is the home of a CUNY-wide ROTC (Reserve Officers’ Training Corps) program. It currently has more than 100 cadets.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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KINGSBOROUGH EXCEEDS SPARK PERFORMANCE TARGETS, WINS HECKSCHER FUNDING FOR THIRD YEAR IN A ROW                                                        

A program that is dramatically improving college retention among students with high remedial needs at Kingsborough Community College will receive more than a half-million dollars from the Heckscher Foundation for Children for the third consecutive year, Chancellor James B. Milliken announced today.

The program, Strategic Partnerships for Achievement and Retention at Kingsborough (SPARK) aims to close the educational and employment gaps of students entering Kingsborough with the most significant remedial needs, preparing them to transfer to four-year CUNY institutions or enter the workforce. It provides customized financial, academic and personal support, as well as comprehensive case management, including SingleStop services.

The Heckscher Foundation’s Board of Trustees last week approved $581,987, bringing to nearly $1.7 million the foundation’s support of the program since 2016.

“The City University of New York is gratified by the Heckscher Foundation’s commitment and continuing support of the SPARK program, of Kingsborough and of CUNY,” Chancellor Milliken said. “This life-changing initiative exemplifies the University’s critical goals of expanding access, opportunity and social mobility for low-income, at-risk students.”

Heckscher Foundation Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Peter Sloane said, “The SPARK program is an effort to deliver much-needed support services to underserved students at a lower cost. The results are phenomenal. We think Kingsborough is doing an extraordinary job in meeting the needs of first-generation students.

“We establish benchmarks for success for all of our grants,” Sloane added. “In each of the years of this program, Kingsborough has exceeded those targets and as a result, we have continued our support.”

“Kingsborough appreciates the support and trust that the Heckscher Foundation has placed in us as we strive to work holistically with our most vulnerable students,” said Kingsborough Interim President Peter Cohen. “This support allows Kingsborough to continue to address the true mission of CUNYand the role that community colleges play in the higher education landscape: that is to provide access, excellence and opportunity to all.”

Students recruited for SPARK generally have received the lowest scores on the CUNY reading, writing and math entrance exams, and placement in the lowest-level English and math courses. However, although starting at the lowest level of developmental education, the Fall 2016 SPARK cohort achieved significantly higher first-semester developmental course pass rates, higher GPAs and more accumulated credits than their non-SPARK peers in remedial English and math, and significantly higher pass rates than students in remediation in past semesters.

Retention rates among the SPARK cohorts are significantly higher than rates among other Kingsborough freshman populations, according to the Brooklyn community college’s data:

  • From the first to second semesters, retention rates stand at 91.1% and 93.3% for the Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 cohorts, respectively, and the year-to-year retention rate stands at 82.9% for the Fall 2016 cohort, surpassing the initial goal of 77%.
  • Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 SPARK English cohort students completed the English developmental course sequence at rates of 54.5% and 80%, respectively. – significantly higher than regular Fall 2015 developmental English students who completed the English developmental course sequence at a rate of 36%.
  • Fall 2016 SPARK math cohort students completed the math developmental course sequence at a rate of 58%, significantly higher than regular Fall 2015 developmental math students. Spring 2017 math data is pending.

SPARK is intended as a cost-effective approach to developing and expanding upon Kingsborough’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) model. The high-impact, ASAP initiative, focusing on community college retention and completion, was launched in 2007 at CUNY community colleges. Based on ASAP’s success, former Kingsborough President Farley Herzek and his successor, Interim President Cohen, implemented SPARK as a lower-cost ASAP-like solution.

Prior to SPARK, the Heckscher Foundation’s previous support of Kingsborough made the Brooklyn college the first CUNY SingleStop center. The foundation gave more than $900,000 in support to Kingsborough’s SingleStop facility for three years, 2008, 2010 and 2011, according to Sloane.

The foundation also supported a CUNY Graduate Center effort to identify promising job openings for underserved youth in different New York City industries, Sloane said, and last month, Heckscher committed $100,000 to cover tuition and fees at CUNY for students who left Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands after this year’s devastating hurricanes.

Prior to the new, 2018 grant for SPARK, the Heckscher Foundation supported the Kingsborough program with $540,674 in 2016 and $540,920 in 2017.

About the Heckscher Foundation for Children

The Heckscher Foundation was founded in 1921 to promote the welfare of children in the State of New York and elsewhere throughout the United States. The primary aim of the Heckscher Foundation’s grant-making is to “level the playing field” for needy youth by providing access to education and the varied experiences that make for a richer, forward-reaching life. It seeks to identify underfunded issues or projects that can provide widespread benefit, generate other engagement and funding, and then help leverage that interest to scale. The Foundation also seeks to incubate ideas and initiatives that will lead to high-impact services and improved opportunities. To learn more, please visit www.heckscherfoundation.org.

About The City University of New York

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Timely CCNY research on barriers for male victims of sexual violence

Martina Delle Donne

As the #metoo conversation continues, another group of victims is being recognized: men. A recently published paper in the American Journal of Men’s Health shows that some men who have experienced sexual violence are hesitant to speak out or seek help.

The lead author of the study is Martina Delle Donne, a visiting researcher in the lab of Victoria Frye, associate medical professor in the Community Health and Social Medicine Department, at the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York.

This research aims to fill the gap in the literature and better understand how men, both straight and gay as well as cisgender and transgender, conceptualize, understand, and seek help related to sexual violence. Key findings show that those who both self-identify as men and as members of sexual-orientation minority populations are at higher risk of sexual violence and are less likely to report or seek support services. Like women, these men face barriers. But some of those barriers are unique, including:

  • Traditional gender norms that encourage men to be “strong” and not show vulnerability
  • Stigma associated with both being gay and being a victim of sexual violence (e.g. “you asked for it”)

It’s worth noting that the majority of the study participants who experienced violence stated that it was from another man, which is in line with the data reported from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (2011) which show that when men are raped, in 79.3% of the cases the perpetrator is another man.

According to Delle Donne, “The goal of this exploratory study is to describe the barriers in order to interrupt stigma, reduce shame, and diminish stereotypes that have left men who experience sexual violence feeling silenced and invalidated. As one of the Silence Breakers, Terry Crews noted, right now it’s crucial to speak out and advocate for victimized people’s rights.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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Learning the Visual Language of Art

Negativity is frowned upon in college—but negative space has a valued role in the toolkits of advanced painting students at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY).

Liberal Arts major and aspiring painter Herron Hutchins puts it like this: “We learned that the background is just as important as the foreground.”

She’s standing in front of her final class project, a 30-by-40-inch oil painting that features a small group of models who sat for the class over a 5-week period.

The paintings that resulted from those sessions, including Hutchins’ piece, are part of an exhibition showcasing Painting Studio III (ART 374) and Studio Painting IV (Independent Study, ART 903) students, on display now in the Theatre 1 Breezeway Gallery at 199 Chambers Street. An opening reception was held December 14 and the exhibition will run through February 7.

Step-by-step preparations for the large canvas

Thaddeus Radell, Director of the Art Program in BMCC’s Music and Art Department—and a painter whose work has been featured for more than 30 years in exhibits throughout the Eastern Seaboard, Paris and New York City—says the students started with a small charcoal drawing based on Cezanne’s The Card Players. Next, they completed a black-and-white composition study of the same painting, and finally, they made a small color study.

“Then and only then,” Radell says, “were they allowed to move to the big canvas.”

Their subject for that phase of the project was a group of four models who sat for the class for five weeks. Students noticed the light on the models, the drape of fabric on the clothes they were wearing, their posture and other qualities, as they rendered the scene into art on the blank canvas before them.

Painting Students

“They all drew the same configuration of models, who were seated in a circle at the front of the room,” Radell says. “It has actually been a great incentive to get them to class on time, so they can choose a seat with the best vantage point.”

Those shifts of perspective were among the qualities students focused on, as they took part in large-group critiques and gained fluency in concepts related to visual art.

“First you have to know the grammar, the principles behind a painting,” says Radell. “Art is a language of color and form, and the students in my classes learn how to talk about and compare paintings. I talk to them as I would to graduate students and they pick it up quickly. I ask, ‘Does each color plane have a weight and function?’ and they talk about the rhythm of the color, the plasticity of the painting itself and many other aspects.”

Making every inch of the painting serve its purpose

As he walks through the exhibit of his students’ work, Radell says there are successful “sections” in all of them.

“In this one,” he says, stopping to comment on one of the student pieces, “every color plane has been carefully mixed. Whenever a section or plane is interrupted, the color changes in a subtle way. Nothing is taken for granted. This student artist is thinking about the negative space. In fact, that is Cezanne’s famous mantra—‘The negative space is as important as the positive space’.”

Herron Hutchins, whose work is included in the show, takes that mantra to heart. “Paul Cezanne works a lot with light and dark tones. It’s a lot about the edges, where one color meets the other. That’s the important message, and that’s what I tried to do in my work.”

“We tried to make sure every inch of the painting serves its purpose,” she says, and points to her painting hung eye-level in the gallery. “If you don’t have underlying shapes and colors right, here on the face, the eyebrows won’t make sense.”

Not all art students at BMCC are aspiring visual artists, but many aspire to careers that place them in the field of fine art. According to Hutchins, the painting classes have given her insight into creativity, itself. “I need to be able to talk about the work and understand what I’m looking at,” she says.

Setting the stage for a vibrant community of artists

While BMCC already offered Painting Studio I (ART 174), new courses include Painting Studio II (ART 274) and Painting Studio III (ART 374), as well as Independent Studies courses Painting Studio IV and Painting Studio V (ART 903), Radell says.

These courses are offered through the Music and Art Department, and can build toward an Associate of Arts (A.A.) in Art Foundations: Art History, or an Associate of Science (A.S.) in Art Foundations: Studio Art. Graduates of both programs are on track to transfer to bachelor’s degree programs at Queens College, CUNY.

“I’m really thankful to Dean [Erwin] Wong for being supportive of the advanced painting classes,” Radell says. “He let us put them in place, even though the enrollment was low at that time. Now we have a vibrant community of student artists, who are very serious about what they’re doing.”

Radell, who is also the faculty advisor for the BMCC Painting Club, is inspired by the emerging artists he meets in class and during club meetings.

“I admire their perseverance, their focus,” he says. “They have respect for the art of painting, and for each other’s work. I tell the students, ‘You are a painter.’ We stand when we paint. We hold our palettes’. You can hear a pin drop, when they are working at their canvases.”

Studio Painting IV student artists on exhibit

Tenzin Choedon IV

Noelia Duarte

Greg Griffith

Herron Hutchins

Shuqi Li

Rachael Phillips

Mark Saldana

Vashtie Seebarran

Studio Painting IV student artists on exhibit

Xiaorui Huang

Massimo Scoditti

Krisztina Simon

 


“Five Artists + Architecture” show at CCNY Spitzer School of Architecture

Five artists highlighted in multi-media installation exploring interdisciplinary influences on design education

The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at the City College of New York is celebrating the work of faculty artists in an exhibition of five distinct and inspired points of view that illustrate the dynamic relationship between art and architecture.

The unique display of faculty fine arts opens Dec. 21 and features works by:

  • Daniel Hauben, celebrated for his deep explorations into urban landscape, has been painting along Bronx streets, parks, and from windows and rooftops for nearly 30 years.
  • Irma Ostroff’s paintings, in vibrant color, are abstract and geometric, subtly influenced by the architectural landscapes she experiences.
  • David Judelson’s work investigates the relationship between form and structure.
  • Alan Feigenberg’s photographs address both person and personality in the built environment.
  • Albert Vecerka, celebrated ESTO photographer, exhibits both his professional architectural work as well as his personal investigations of the architectural environments he has documented.

“Five Artists + Architecture” is curated by Lance Jay Brown, FAIA, urban designer and Distinguished Professor at the Spitzer School. “The Spitzer School of Architecture has always recognized the value of giving students the opportunity to integrate a wide range of visual arts studies into their studio design education and research,” said Brown. “This show offers insight into how artists’ work introduces new ways of thinking about the designed environment and ways of seeing that augment the architecture curriculum.”

On Dec. 20 at 6:00PM, the opening reception for “Five Artists + Architecture” will include introductory remarks by Sarah Lawrence professor and Metropolitan Museum of Art lecturer Jerrilyn Dodds. The exhibition will be held in the school’s Atrium Gallery, 141 Convent Avenue, New York, NY and runs through Feb. 16, 2018. The show is free and open to the public Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., except holidays.

About the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture

The City College School of Architecture and Environmental Studies was established in 1968. Now known as the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture, it is the only fully accredited public school of architecture in New York and it is committed to creating a just, sustainable, and imaginative future for a rapidly urbanizing planet. Through innovative research and interdisciplinary collaboration, the degree programs in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, and Sustainability in the Urban Environment seek to educate a diverse student body to become engaged professionals, both reflecting and enriching the complex communities of local and global environments. The School acts in the spirit of the City College of New York’s historic Ephebic Oath: “To transmit the city, not only not less, but greater, better, and more beautiful than it was transmitted to us.” To learn more, visit https://ssa.ccny.cuny.edu/

About The City University of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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At Homecoming, John Jay Celebrates the End of a Historic Year

At Homecoming, John Jay Celebrates the End of a Historic Year On November 28, John Jay’s Homecoming drew hundreds of John Jay students, alumni, faculty, staff, and fans to celebrate the end of an incredibly successful year for the Bloodhounds.

Homecoming has quickly become known on campus as one of the most fun athletic events of the year and excited fans gathered for pre-game festivities in the auxiliary gym before the first event of the evening, the women’s basketball game.
 

View all the photos from Homecoming here!

 

 

John Jay Bloodhound taking a selfie with students at John Jay Homecoming                             Student holding up t-shirt

 

Student athletes from the cheerleading team and rifle team were announced and honored for their 2017 successes. In March, the coed rifle team won its 12th and 13th Mid Atlantic Conference (MAC) championships in air rifle and small-bore, making it the team with the most titles in Bloodhound history. This spring, the cheerleading team also made history by winning the 2017 CUNYAC Cheerleading Champions, their first ever CUNYAC Cheer Championship.

 

Cheerleaders at the John Jay Homecoming

 

The women’s basketball game started with a ceremonial tip-off by President Karol Mason.

Watch the livestreamed video of the women’s basketball game here.

 

Ceremonial tip-off by President Karol Mason

 

During halftime, the Homecoming Royals were announced, followed by an exuberant cheerleading performance. “Being a part of the cheerleading team makes me feel like I have a home within John Jay,” said Isis Samuels, junior-captain of the cheerleading team who was named CUNYAC Performer of the Year. “At Homecoming, we’re able to showcase our skills in front of everyone.”

John Jay Bloodhound posing with students                             John Jay Cheerleading team

After the women’s game, the men’s game would soon begin. But first, graduating student athletes were honored at center court.

Students at John Jay Homecoming

 

More student teams were recognized for their successes this fall, including the men’s soccer, women’s volleyball, and women’s tennis teams. John Jay’s women’s tennis team won their first CUNYAC championship, marking another landmark success in the College’s history. The men’s soccer team and the women’s volleyball team both made appearances in the CUNYAC Championship tournaments this year. On court, students proudly pointed to the banners that were unfurled to celebrate these victories.

Students on basketball court

 

Finally, the men’s basketball game started with hundreds of eager fans cheering them on.

Watch the livestreamed video of the men’s basketball game here. 

 

John Jay Basketball team

 

During halftime, Student Affairs Vice President Lynette Cook- Francis drew the name of one lucky student who shot from mid-court for the chance to win $10,000.

 

Student Affairs Vice President Lynette Cook- Francis drew the name of one lucky student

 

From the fifth floor sky box, alumni gathered to cheer on the Bloodhounds and celebrate the success of their alma mater’s teams.

 

Alumni on the fifth floor skybox                             Alumni on the fifth floor skybox

 

This year was particularly busy for the Athletics Department because of the number of landmark victories made by Bloodhound teams. Brandon Fieland, Assistant Athletics Director for Media Relations, said that the turnout was higher than it has been in several years. “The whole community gets involved for Homecoming,” he said. “I enjoy seeing the entire John Jay community coming together and showing their school spirit.”

 

Fans cheering from the stand                             Fans cheering

 

In an interview with play-by-play announcer Jonathan Perez, President Karol Mason showed her enthusiasm for Bloodhounds. “It’s my first Homecoming and this is amazing,” said Mason. “I love the students and the spirit of our students. I’m a Bloodhound now.”

 

President Mason petting the bloodhound

 

Photos by: Leo Correa


Five Years After Sandy, Professor Leigh Graham Shares Lessons from Research On Disaster Recovery

Five Years After Sandy, Professor Leigh Graham Shares Lessons from Research On Disaster RecoveryFive years after Hurricane Sandy, Professor Leigh Graham has been featured on PBS Newshour as well as CUNY TV to discuss the successes and challenges of recovery efforts in New York City. Last year, Graham co-published a report comparing the experiences of the Lower East Side and the Rockaways after Sandy, two NYC areas significantly impacted by the storm.

In the wake of recent hurricanes both in the US and around the world, we spoke with Professor Graham to learn more about her experience and how we can better prepare for future disasters.

How did you first come to this work?

Leigh Graham: I started this work shortly after I was hired at Seedco—a national non-profit in New York. My first day was the Monday after 9/11, and one of the first things we did was meet with the NYC Economic Development Corporation to figure out our response.

From there, I applied for my Urban Planning Degree at MIT in 2004, and during my second year, Katrina hit. I went to New Orleans and wrote my dissertation, focusing on community economic development practice and the preservation of public housing, as well as green cities and urban equity.

When Sandy hit, I was teaching my first semester at John Jay. I lived in Queens, and I really liked the Rockaways. I thought I could look at recovery there.

From your research looking at various neighborhoods and disasters, have you identified any patterns in what makes a recovery effort successful?

LG: The broad finding is that when communities are well-organized, have civic infrastructure, shared solidarity, and ties not only to each other but to external power brokers, they can respond. That’s true across multiple disasters and multiple contexts.

One thing that was interesting for us from our research on Sandy was what we found on gentrification. Gentrification is almost always seen as having a negative impact on communities, but we saw that Lower East Side organizations had rallied around that issue, and as a result, they’d built the skills and frameworks to respond to Sandy.

In the Rockaways, they didn’t have that. Despite it being a small strip of land, there’s segregation as well as racial and geographic conflict. Organizations have historically lacked the resources and political will to come together. There wasn’t the civic infrastructure to respond.

How can your research apply to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria?

LG: In the aftermath of any disaster, the politics of inequality and equity come to the fore. You see who will be displaced and who will have a harder time rebuilding. You see where resources are likely to be directed.

The impact of Hurricane Maria sounds just as bad as Katrina, but it’s not dominating the news like it should be. We have an administration that’s not interested. Even President Bush went to Katrina and gave heartfelt speeches about inequality and unequal recovery. Trump hasn’t done that.

There are a lot of folks around the College who have a lot to say on this. [John Jay Professor] Denise Thompson was recently explaining to me that in the Caribbean, lots of island nations have come together for a cohesive emergency response. But as a territory of the US, Puerto Rico isn’t well integrated into the Caribbean, and it’s also isolated from the continental United States. That puts Puerto Rico in a precarious position.

What are some key takeaways for people to understand about disaster recovery?

LG: It’s important to know there’s a difference between response and recovery. Response is what happens immediately after. It’s emergency management, and includes getting people shelter and resources.

The recovery period kicks in after that. That’s when you’re thinking how do we rebuild? How do we get people’s lives to what they were like beforehand, and with ideally some improvements so they can be resilient going forward? That recovery period can last years.

There’s always a tension between the sense of urgency to respond and the reality of how long it takes to rebuild a community. Managing that is really important, especially if you are a bureaucrat or politician and need people to have realistic expectations.

Does rebuilding need to happen within the community? What about people outside the community who might want to assist?

LG: When you have an outsider come in and say I want to help, there’s always this question of what that help really looks like. It makes a world of difference if you come into a community with an invitation.

When I first went to New Orleans after Katrina, I had never been there, but I was given good advice. I was told to learn the history and dynamics of the city, and I did. By doing that, you’ll still be an outsider, but you won’t be uninformed.


A Court Interpreting Internship Gives Students An Opportunity to Launch Their Careers

A Court Interpreting Internship Gives Students An Opportunity to Launch Their CareersAt John Jay, students are on their way to launching their careers as certified court interpreters through a new CUNY-wide internship that was created in partnership with the New York State Unified Court System. This semester, six John Jay Spanish-language students participated in the internship and gained professional experience interpreting.

Though the program officially launched as a 20-hour pilot in the spring of this year, Professor Aída Martínez-Gómez says that John Jay students had long been welcomed into the courts as observers as part of the College’s certificate program in legal translation and interpretation.

Now, that collaboration has been formalized into an internship that prepares students to take the rigorous exam to become per-diem certified court interpreters. Students María Vanesa Maldonado-Giordano and Brandon Martínez, who completed the 20-hour pilot and went on to complete the 100-hour internship this winter, have both recently taken the exam. “I’m excited to pass and starting working,” said Maldonado-Giordano, who graduated in May with a major in Law and Society and is currently finishing her Certificate in Spanish Legal Translating and Interpreting.

“It was real career experience,” said Martínez, who is graduating this year with a major in Spanish.

Throughout the internship, students also met regularly for classes and discussed the unique responsibilities of interpreting as well as some of the challenges.

“Sometimes people in court want to talk to you but you have to remember you’re there to translate, and not to communicate outside of that,” said Martínez.

Maldonado-Giordano agrees that interpreting came with a set of challenges, among them ethical responsibilities: “It’s a lot of work and practice to be able to listen to someone and reproduce what they’ve said. If you don’t do a good job you might be sending someone to jail.”

The internship allowed students to work with mentors in family courts, civil courts, and criminal courts, giving them exposure to the full range of their responsibilities as interpreters. Students also learned how essential interpreters are not just in the court, but at every step of the legal process. “Interpreters are needed from the first day when someone files a case all the way to the holding cell before appearing before the judge,” said Maldonado-Giordano.

 

María Vanesa Maldonado-Giordano
María Vanesa Maldonado-Giordano 

At times, students needed to know highly specialized medical and legal terms. “For my exam, I had to interpret the testimony of an expert witness,” said Maldonado-Giordano. “I had to know the names of organs in the body, what direction gunshots went in and out of the body.”

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for interpreters and translators specializing in law is growing at a much higher rate than average for all occupations, especially for Spanish speakers. In New York City, where the population of Spanish speakers is increasing, the internship provides a significant opportunity for John Jay students.

“The courts are experiencing a higher volume of court users without English proficiency,” said Dr. Martínez-Gómez. “This internship is not only an enriching learning experience—it’s giving students a window into their future careers.”

Maldonado-Giordano is excited to make a career out of interpreting. “I find this to be the most rewarding internship I’ve ever done,” she said. “When I interpret, I get the feeling that I’m helping people.”

Martínez, who eventually dreams of joining the NYPD, says the opportunity to be supported through career-building internships like these is what he appreciates most about the College. “The professors at John Jay are always there for you,” he said, “especially if you want to find a job or internship.”


Alumna and Faculty Member Chelsea Binns Publishes Landmark Book on Fraud Hotlines

Alumna and Faculty Member Chelsea Binns Publishes Landmark Book on Fraud Hotlines

Chelsea Binns, assistant professor in the Department of Security, Fire and Emergency Management, has written the first book on fraud hotlines ever published.

Binns, who graduated from John Jay with both her MA and PhD in Criminal Justice, is a licensed private investigator and certified fraud examiner who has extensive experience in the public and private sector. She has worked in an investigative capacity at the New York City Department of Investigation, the New York State Office of the Attorney General, Morgan Stanley, and later at Citibank as the senior vice president in fraud surveillance. She has long been fascinated by fraud hotlines, but was shocked at how little knowledge there was available on how they operate and whether they’re effective.

“All financial firms operate fraud hotlines—it’s the primary way we learn about organizational fraud,” Binns said. “We rely on them so much but for the most part we don’t know how they’re functioning.”

Binns sought to fill in the gaps in that data in her new book Fraud Hotlines: Design, Performance, and Assessment, which reviews the history of fraud hotlines, how they are being used today, and how an organization can design one and evaluate its performance. The book also includes case studies that show how hotlines are used to thwart crime both in the US and in other countries.

In recent years, the value of fraud hotlines has been increasingly recognized as a means to prevent major catastrophes. According to Binns, many experts believe that internal crimes contributed to the financial crisis of 2008—if those crimes had been reported via fraud hotlines, the crisis may have been prevented. It was that line of reasoning that led Congress to pass the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010, which created monetary incentives for employees to report internal crimes directly to the Department of Justice or the Securities and Exchange Committee.

“The Dodd-Frank legislation shows that people are using hotlines, and they are valued as a source for tips,” said Binns.

In addition to preventing financial catastrophes, hotlines can be used to stop cybercrime and cyber-attacks. But Binns says that fraud hotlines as an open avenue of reporting can be used to address any number of justice issues. “Fraud hotlines are a multifaceted vehicle,” she said. “The basic application can be used to address a variety of issues, including things like sexual harassment complaints.”

Interest in Binns’ research is far-reaching, and has drawn international interest. This November, a delegation of prosecutors from Shanghai traveled to John Jay to listen to Binns lecture on the findings of her book. This is the fifth delegation Binns has received from China.

Delegation leader Xiao Kai, Director in the Financial & IP Crimes Department of Shanghai People’s Procuratorate, is pictured next to Binns.

Binns, who also serves on the board of the New York Chapter of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (NYCFE), organizes the annual NYCFE Conference that brings together national and local leaders in fraud detection and deterrence. With 80,000 members, the ACFE is the largest anti-fraud organization in the world. Since Binns first brought the NYCFE Conference to John Jay’s campus four years ago, students have served on the conference’s planning committee and 200 have been able to attend free of charge.

For Binns, who fondly remembers being a student at John Jay, providing those expanded learning opportunities is something she loves about being at the College. “The students here are so inquisitive,” she said. “They make us better professors.”


JOHN JAY STUDENT MIRANDA BARNES IS BREAKING INTO THE ART WORLD WITH HER ASTOUNDING PHOTOGRAPHY

John Jay Student Miranda Barnes is Breaking Into the Art World With Her Astounding PhotographyWhen John Jay student Miranda Barnes first created her photo series “Doubles” as part of a course she was taking to fulfill her minor in Art, she had no idea it would be picked up in major news outlets that included Vice, Huffington Post, Bust, and more. The photo series, which focuses on black female twins, was conceived by Miranda as a way to challenge traditional representations of family and race in America.

Now, Barnes has received her first commission for Vice, where her photos can be viewed alongside a short story by Jamaican writer Alexia Arthurs. Barnes, who is also a first-generation Jamaican, says the assignment was a perfect fit.

Barnes came to John Jay as a transfer student from Queensborough College, where she won a photo contest and first purchased Robert Frank’s seminal book The Americans. It was this book that launched her interest in photographing the aspects of contemporary American life that often go unseen. At John Jay, she further developed this vision by working on “Doubles” while taking several classes in the humanities and arts.

“It was Professor Catherine Kemp who made me think about the philosophy of our everyday interactions,” Barnes said. “I thought about that when I went on this voyage to figure out why when we think about family, we think about white families. You don’t see representations of black female twins.”

Barnes, who grew up in Brooklyn but went to high school on Long Island, says that representation is something she’s thought about ever since she was a young child. “I was one of the only black kids at my school, and I also grew up with a white-passing mother. I remember feeling like an anomaly, or knowing that our family didn’t look the way we were supposed to.”

 

Miranda Barnes portrait

 

Though Barnes could have considered enrolling in a college for art, it was ultimately John Jay’s commitment to social change that inspired her to become a Humanities and Justice major to complement her minor in the arts. “I’ve always wanted to be on the right side of history and be a champion for people’s rights. I knew I didn’t want to be a police officer or lawyer, but I was intrigued by John Jay’s mission to seeing things through an ethical lens,” Barnes said. “History, philosophy, and law are giving me a broader context to understanding both the world and art.”

Barnes has seen the intersection between social justice and art modeled by faculty like professors Claudia Calirman and Isabela Villanueva, who curated an exhibit last year that featured art that exposed violence and injustice in Latin America. Opportunities like this have inspired Barnes to reflect on how she can further incorporate justice into her own work.

Barnes has high hopes for the future, and is considering becoming an immigration lawyer or launching a full-time career in photography. Even with her recent success, Barnes recognizes that it can be hard, especially for those without strong networks, to break into the art world. “The art industry is a bubble and I have to work three times as hard,” Barnes said. “The people in my photo world aren’t as diverse as they are here at CUNY.”

“But people love me because I’m authentic,” she said. “I represent what other native New Yorkers can be. People see me and think, oh—maybe we should give kids from the city a chance.”


At Planking Ceremony, John Jay College is Recognized as A Member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Program

At Planking Ceremony, John Jay College is Recognized as A Member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary ProgramOn November 28, the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Auxiliary University Detachment held its first planking ceremony in which inductees were officially recognized as members of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary (USCG) program.

The ceremony celebrated the establishment of the detachment and included President Karol Mason as well as prominent USCG active duty personnel and senior level Auxiliary officials: Admiral Steven Poulin, Commander of the USCG for the Northeastern United States; Captain Michael Day, Captain of the Port of NY; Commander Grossman, Director of the Auxiliary, First District, Southern Region; Deputy National Commodore Alex Malewski, Northeastern Portion of the US; and Vincent Matsui, Flotilla Commander Flotilla 014-05-03-001.

View more photos of the planking ceremony here

In 2016, John Jay became an official detachment of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Auxiliary University Programs (AUP). The national initiative prepares undergraduate and graduate students for future public service and opportunities to gain boating education, learn about homeland security, and gain operational and leadership experience.

The John Jay detachment is affiliated with USCG Auxiliary Flotilla 014-05-03-001, or the lower Manhattan flotilla, which provides rigorous coursework that includes incident management, safe boating and boat operations, communications, marine safety, vessel examination, aviation, and public affairs. Students in the AUP detachment gain access to a leadership capstone course at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut as well as a 95-hour hands-on internship program.

 

Commander Grossman, Director of Auxiliary First District Southern Region with Detachment Leader Dr. Susan Pickman

 

Creating the detachment at John Jay was spearheaded by Professor Susan Pickman and supported by Chair of the Department of Security, Fire and Emergency Management Charles Nemeth, who immediately recognized it as a program that would generate great rewards for students, especially for those who want to enlist in the Coast Guard. Students who complete the AUP have a 73 percent chance of being accepted into the highly selective Officer Candidate School.

That John Jay now has an AUP detachment is important for a college that has so many students who have either served in the military or are interested in learning more about what the military has to offer. With over 525 veteran currently enrolled, John Jay has one of the largest veteran populations at CUNY.

Richard Pusateri, Manager of the Military and Veteran’s Services Office, says that John Jay’s commitment to supporting veterans extends to providing veteran students with opportunities to be honored, including the SALUTE National Honors Society Induction that immediately followed the planking ceremony.

Last year, John Jay became a member of the SALUTE National Veterans Honor Society, a national veteran student honor society that was founded in 2009 and has chapters at over 200 U.S. colleges and universities. At the ceremony, several students were inducted into the society, which was shortly followed by dinner and remarks from Keynote Speaker Rear Admiral Steven Poulin. Trustee Gerry Byrne, who has generously supported veterans on campus, was also honored at the event.

The planking ceremony and the induction ceremony marked the end of a series of month-long events in November to commemorate Veterans Day.


Student Filmmakers Impress Crowds at Festival

 

The lobby outside Theater One was filled with conversation and laughter as friends, family and guests gathered for the red carpet portion of the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Student Film Festival, November 30.

The festival is produced by the BMCC Video Production Club. The competitive event occurs twice each year near the end of the fall and spring semesters.

Thirty-four short films by BMCC students and six by other CUNY students—ranging from documentaries to dramas to music videos, comedies and animation—were screened. Only films with BMCC students as producer, director, screenwriter or main talent (acting, music or dance) were eligible for the competition.

The festival also recognized one filmmaker as a “Rising Star” with the Michael Vincent Rosen-Pipitone Special Recognition Award, named after a BMCC student who died unexpectedly in 2013. Pitpitone’s parents were special guests at the event, as they have been every year since the festival’s inception in 2014.

The judges included director and producer Nicolas Panoutsopoulos, whose credits include the award-winning short film Blackberries; director and producer Caroline Mariko Stucky, an independent filmmaker whose most recent project is Starfish, and Jayson Simba, star of the film Soft In the Head, named one of the Top 20 Films of 2014 by Richard Brody at The New Yorker.

A foothold in the industry

“The festival was founded by students in the Video Production Club who wanted to have a more official and prominent event to showcase their work,” said BMCC Media Arts and Technology Professor Anastassios Rigopoulos. All the films were shorts, and ranged in length from 11 seconds to nearly 20 minutes. All but one of the festival winners students are either Video Arts and Technology or Animation and Motion Graphics majors. Many of the students hope to eventually find jobs in New York City’s thriving film, media or animation sector. The film industry alone employs more than 170,000 in New York City, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The Media Arts and Technology department at BMCC helps students get a foothold in the industry by providing them with necessary tools not only to further their education, but also to find work in a media-related field.

“There are jobs in animation that our student population may not even know about. I have some talented students and we’re excited to see what they’re doing,” said Animation and Motion GraphicsProfessor Jamal Sullivan.

Animation and Motion Graphics major Bruno Bergallo, who won the Best Sound Award, wrote and animated his film, Penny and Taco—the story of a clueless creature that lacks emotions, goes looking for food and finds Taco, a living diamond who is scared of everything.

BMCC has offered him a starting point for the career he’s always dreamed of pursuing, he says, adding his professors have provided him with skills to be a successful artist. “In five years, I see myself with a bachelor’s degree in advertising and pursuing my dream to be an art director,” he said.

Video Arts Technology major Shana Nelson took home the festival’s Rising Star Award for her film, The Thing Called the News—a satirical look at the television news business.

Nelson says she wrote the script as the protests and violence erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia in August 2017.

Nelson hopes to have a career in film.

“In five years I see myself being a successful director and living in Los Angeles, about to be nominated for an Oscar, Emmy or a Grammy,” she said.

Festival Award Winners

Best Narrative FilmThe Coming Storm, Misael Chum (Video Arts and Technology major)

Best Director: An American Experience, Greg Wright(Animation and Motion Graphics)

Best PerformanceThe Beast from Dark Below, Hector Bosquez (Video Arts and Technology) and Sharif Byer (Liberal Arts)

Best CinematographyVision, Nurlan Baidaliev (Video Arts and Technology)

Best EditingAllucinatus, Cliff Brathwaite (Video Arts and Technology)

Best Screenplay: Blind, Nanako Senda (Video Arts and Technology)

Best DocumentaryThe Making of Dickhead, Nelli Toth (Video Arts and Technology)

Best SoundPenny and Taco, Bruno Bergallo (Animation and Motion Graphics )

Best AnimationThe Last Flower, Trevor Vecilla (Animation and Motion Graphics)

Best Experimental, Music VideoBe Yourself, Concetta D’Angelo (Video Arts and Technology)

The Michael Vincent Rosen-Pipitone Rising Star Award: Shana Nelson (Video Arts and Technology)


Professors Develop Novel Approach to Critical Reading Course

Nationwide, two thirds of incoming college freshmen are not reading proficient, according to data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress. At Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), many of those students—a significant portion whose first language is not English—find themselves in non-credit bearing developmental reading courses.

Introductory Academic and Critical Reading (ACR) or developmental reading courses are designed to improve students’ comprehension and bring them up to speed for college-level work. Even so, as recently as Spring 2016, around one third of developmental reading students did not progress or dropped out of college altogether.

In an effort to make developmental reading courses more engaging, two ACR professors, Patrick Flink and Tim Leonard, are applying an innovative approach. “BMCC has cultivated an environment where professors can reflect on practice, consider new teaching methods and implement those innovations as well,” Leonard says.

The interactive trial program also falls under BMCC’s Service Learning umbrella—a college-wide effort that guides students to take skills learned in the classroom, and use them to give back to their communities.

Students spend one full class each week, reading stories aloud to the pre-school-aged children of fellow BMCC students in the college’s Early Childhood Center.

“Each student picks a storybook, then sits down and reads it to a child, connecting the preschooler to the story,” said Flink.

“We designed this program to help our students become more involved with the class and improve their reading skills. We wanted them to take part in something bigger than themselves, to give back to their college community, which helps fulfill the college’s service-learning mission,” he said. “It also counters some of the frustration or stigma many students in non-credit bearing developmental courses feel.”

Gaining critical skills

Early one morning during a typical session at the childhood center, a BMCC student sat alongside a child, both in tiny chairs, as the BMCC student pointed to an illustration of a big house. “It’s really red, isn’t it?” the BMCC student asked the child, who answered “Yes!” and began naming other colors on the page.

Leonard say that the program is helping the BMCC students think more critically about what they are reading, as they work to keep the child’s attention and engage them in the narrative.

“A lot of students who came up through the New York City public school system can read, but they haven’t pushed themselves to read critically,” Leonard explains.

Both Leonard and Flink say that the oral reading process also helps improve comprehension and fluency. Bringing an audience of small children into the equation, they say, nurtures social and emotional wellbeing as well.

Reflections on the process

As the BMCC students read to the children, they are encouraged to employ classroom concepts such as identifying the main idea of the story, and to make critical connections between the book and societal issues.

At the close of each session, the BMCC students gather to reflect on their experience, recording their thoughts into a handwritten journal.

Sociology major Carline Resiere says the children warm her heart. “I love to entertain them. I put my own little twist in the way I read them the story,” she says. “When you read to them, you’re modeling pronunciation of simple words that they can take into their vocabulary, and that makes me very happy.”

Accounting major Zhinyuan Chen, who plans to transfer to a four-year college and pursue a career in business, came to the United States from China at age four and has struggled with his English over the years. “I’ve had ups and downs,” he says. “This class has helped me overcome my self-consciousness about speaking English to people who grew up here. I like reading to the children because I feel like I’m also helping them gain confidence in their skills.”

Criminal Justice major Vincent Lallo said he takes his time reading, and helps the children, many who come from homes where English is not spoken, understand how to pronounce words in the books.

“When they laugh at the story, it makes me happy, because I know I’m bringing them some joy,” said Lallo.


Tomorrow’s Leaders Begin Fellows Program

On December 11 in the Fiterman Conference Center, 15 of BMCC’s best and brightest full-time staff members gathered for a reception honoring their selection into the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Leadership Fellows Program, Leading from the Middle.

“The Leadership Fellows Program reaffirms our efforts to prepare BMCC’s future leaders, to not only formulate innovative solutions but to ensure that BMCC retains its prominence as one of leading community colleges nationally,” said Antonio Pérez, President of BMCC.

Funded by the American Express Foundation, the program attracts talented individuals—and prospective leaders—working throughout BMCC. The Fellows were selected through a formal application, and recommendation of the selection committee.

This year’s program will focus on the role the Fellows play in ensuring the success of the College, and how they support the people they supervise and inspire. An intensive training will take place January 8 through 12, 2018. Experts on topics related to policy, management and issues confronting urban community colleges will provide intensive seminars for the Fellows. These experts include college presidents, CUNY senior officials and prominent experts in the field of higher education.

The Fellows will also meet with a mentor at BMCC, and participate in quarterly meetings with BMCC President Antonio Pérez and senior administrators at the College. Fellows will be responsible for completing a yearlong project relating to the college’s five-year strategic plan, and they will be expected to complete other activities that demonstrate their leadership capabilities.

“The current cohort represents our largest and most diverse group of Leadership Fellows,” says John Montanez, Dean of the Office of Sponsored Programs. “It also underscores BMCC’s commitment to succession planning and the development of future leaders capable of responding to the challenges facing the college and most importantly, our students.”

2018 Leadership Fellows

Nandrani Algu, Learning Resource Center; Ray Bartholomew, ASAP; Kristina Borowski, Academic Advisement; Louis Chan, Public Affairs; Mariana Chapen, Student Activities; Katty Cherubin, Enrollment Call Center; Maria Deckinger, Human Resources; Karen Ehrlich, Academic Advisement; Courtney Fusco, BMCC Learning Communities; Joseph Ginese, New/First Year Experience; Ashtian Holmes, Urban Male Leadership Academy; Liany Marcial, Human Resources; Vinton Melbourne, Media Center; Thierry Thesatus, Career Development; Bryce Tolbert, College Discovery and Franklin Winslow, Learning Resource Center.


CCNY’s Rosemarie Wesson makes AIChE history

CCNY chemical engineer Rosemarie Wesson, the first female treasurer in AIChE history.

The American Institute of Chemical Engineers can point to numerous advances — most of which have benefitted industry and society — by its members since its inception in 1908. In their latest pioneering move, AIChE members elected Rosemarie D. Wesson, associate dean for research in City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, the organization’s first ever female treasurer. She begins a three-year term in 2018.

AIChE is a professional society of more than 53,000 chemical engineers in 110 countries. Its members work in corporations, universities and government using their knowledge of chemical processes to develop safe and useful products for the benefit of society.

A professor of chemical engineering in the Grove School, Wesson has served AIChE in several senior positions. She sat on the Board of Directors from 2012 to 2015, was elected AIChE Fellow in 2014 and has been a Trustee of the AIChE Foundation since 2015.

Wesson also chaired AIChE’s Washington Internships for Students in Engineering, between 2010 and 2015.

Through its varied programs, AIChE continues to be a focal point for information exchange on the frontier of chemical engineering research. Areas include nanotechnology, sustainability, hydrogen fuels, biological and environmental engineering, and chemical plant safety and security.

AIChE has honored Wesson for her contributions with its MAC (Minority Affairs Committee) Eminent Chemical Engineers Award (2014) and Achievers in Chemical Engineering accolade (2010).

Among her other honors are NSF Director’s awards for Superior Accomplishment (2012) and Collaborative Integration (2008 and 2011).

Prior to joining City College in 2015, Wesson spent more than 13 years at the NSF in the Directorate for Engineering. She excelled there as both a director and program director.

She’s a graduate of MIT (BS) and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (MS, PhD) with all her degrees in chemical engineering.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Food, Coat and Toy Drives in Full Swing

Three Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) departments are collecting coats, canned food and toys as part of the College’s annual efforts to make the holidays a little brighter for less fortunate New Yorkers.

“We do this because it gives our students a chance to be part of a bigger cause and further develop a sense of civic responsibility,” said Victoria Apostal-Marius, Program Coordinator at the BMCC Women’s Resource Center, where the coat drive—one of three collection efforts—is being staged.

Helping others keep warm in winter
The BMCC Sisterhood Society Club kicked off the coat drive last month as part of the annual effort by the nonprofit New York Cares.

Last year, with the help of caring New Yorkers, including many BMCC students, New York Cares distributed 109,000 winter coats to families that might otherwise have faced a cold winter without them.

“We understand the harsh realities of a cold winter in New York City,” said Apostal-Marius. “Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to donate new or gently used coats Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. at the Women’s Resource Center, Room S-340 at 199 Chambers Street.”

The coat drive ends December 20.

Feeding the Hungry
It’s not just the cold weather that takes a toll on the less fortunate—hunger in New York City is more common than many realize. An estimated 1.4 million New York City residents rely on emergency food programs such as those provided by the Food Bank for New York City, a nonprofit organization that supplies as many as 63 million free meals a year to New Yorkers in need.

BMCC students are encouraged to do their part this holiday season and drop off canned food and non-perishable food items at the Office of Academic Advisement and Transfer Center in Room S-108 at 199 Chambers Street.

This year’s food drive will be open through December 15 at 2 p.m.

Last year, BMCC students collected almost 500 cans of food and non-perishables such as pasta. The food was delivered to a Food Bank for New York drop-off site at the New York City Fire Department on Duane Street in Tribeca.

Bringing joy to a disadvantaged child
Each year, the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program collects new, unwrapped toys in the three months leading up to the holidays. A primary goal of the program is to deliver a message of hope to disadvantaged children.

BMCC’s Veterans Resource Center has joined those efforts and is heading up a large drive to collect toys until December 19.

BMCC students are encouraged to drop off toys in one of four locations: The Veterans Reource Center, Room S-115; the Student Government Association Office, Room S-242; the Office of the Registrar, Room S-315 or the Nursing Deparment, Room S-730.

As Liberal Arts major Rodin Peguero, a veteran of the U.S. Navy explained, a portion of the goal behind Toys for Tots is to unite local communities in this common cause.

“When you see all the toys and imagine a child playing with them, that’s very fulfilling,” said Peguero.


Gary Ackerman, Former U.S. Congressman, Donates His Papers to the Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library at His Alma Mater, Queens College

— Collection Documenting Ackerman’s Over 30 Years in Public Office Will Be Made Available to the Public for Research Purposes; Ackerman Will Also Contribute Oral History to the School —

Queens, NY, December 13, 2017— Former U.S. Congressman and Queens College alumnus Gary Ackerman (photo attached) announced the donation of his personal papers to the Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library at Queens College at a December 1 alumni reception in Washington, D.C. The papers and material will be arranged and described by Queens College archivists and made available to researchers as one of the school’s growing number of Special Collections.

The Ackerman collection includes 12 boxes of material containing personal and professional papers that tell the story of his political career; photographs, albums, and scrapbooks; original audio and video material in various formats; and other objects and artifacts, such as campaign memorabilia. Eventually the material will be digitized and made available online. (Some exceptions will be made based on privacy concerns.)

“Congressman Ackerman has mightily contributed to the best interests of our city, this borough and the college throughout a long and distinguished career in the roles of school teacher, businessman, newspaper publisher and media executive, elected official and alumnus. We are honored that he has chosen Queens College as the home for his personal and public papers so that this rich history of service and the city, state, and national political record will benefit future generations of students and researchers,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

By placing his papers in the Rosenthal Library, Ackerman hopes to ensure that they will be studied by generations of researchers in the context of his political career in the borough. He will also do an oral history with the college to be included as part of Queens Memory, a joint Queens College/Queens Library project designed to collect stories, images and artifacts documenting life in the borough.

“As a child of immigrants, I benefited enormously from the opportunity to attend and graduate from Queens College. I can never fully repay the debt of gratitude to the college for equipping me for the challenges that were and still are to come. I am delighted to contribute my personal and professional papers to my alma mater with the hope that this at least satisfies the requirement of the papers that were overdue,” said Congressman Ackerman.

Congressman Ackerman’s materials will join an already noteworthy Personal Papers archive that preserves the history of the borough of Queens and the New York City region, with contributions from New York State Assembly Speaker Saul Weprin, Congressman Benjamin S. Rosenthal, and Queens College founder Judge Charles S. Colden. Among the other archives in the library’s Special Collections are the Civil Rights archive, which documents civil rights work of Queens College students during the early 1960s; and Seamen’s Church Institute archive, which focuses on maritime ministry, waterfront labor and New York City history, specifically the transformation of lower Manhattan from shipping hub to financial center. The college also houses and maintains a Louis Armstrong collection, which is owned and managed by the Louis Armstrong House Museum.

“These papers have a tremendous public research value, as well as pedagogical value to the Queen College faculty and students. We are thrilled with this gift and can’t wait to make the materials available to our community,” said Queens College Chief Librarian Kristin Hart.

Gary Ackerman, a representative of the country’s most diverse constituencies in Queens and Long Island’s North Shore, was reelected to the United States Congress 15 times before retiring from public service in January 2013. Prior to his career in politics, he was a New York City schoolteacher and the founder, publisher, and editor-in-chief of what would become the largest chain of community newspapers in Queens. Congressman Ackerman has served as a senior member or chair on several major committees, including the Financial Services Committee, the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit, the Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia, the House Committee on International Relations, and the Panel on Asia and the Pacific.

Congressman Ackerman has also played pivotal roles in passing the US-India Civil Nuclear Energy Agreement and the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act, and in negotiations with North Korea. He was also responsible for spearheading an unprecedented relief effort by New York’s schoolchildren for children affected by the Ethiopian famine. Congressman Ackerman was elected to the New York State Senate in 1978 and to Congress in a special election in 1983, where he served for 30 years. He is a graduate of Brooklyn Tech High School and Queens College. Read Congressman Ackerman’s full bio here.

About the Queens College Special Collections and Archives
The Queens College Special Collections and Archives part of the Benjamin Rosenthal College Library comprises 4,500 cubic feet of primarily college records from 1937 to the present. Collecting began formally in the late 1960s.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Baruch College Earns Top National and Regional Recognition from Niche’s 2018 Best Colleges Niche 2018 Best Colleges

Baruch College earned top accolades in the “2018 Best Colleges in America” from Niche.com.  The annual survey assessed over 1,500 colleges and universities across the country, analyzing key statistic and millions of student and alumni reviews.

Both nationally and regionally, Baruch scored high marks in several categories, including #11 for “Standout Colleges in America;” and #5 for “Top Public University in New York” and #6 for “Best Colleges for Business in New York.”

At a Glance:

National Rankings:

#11 “Standout Colleges in America”

#30 “Best Colleges for Accounting and Finance”

#71 “Best Colleges for Business”

New York State:

#2 “Best Colleges for Accounting and Finance”

#5 “Top Public Universities”

#6 “Best Colleges for Business”

#7 “Best College Locations”

#16 “Best Colleges for Computer Science”

#17 “Best Colleges for Economics

#18 “Best Colleges for Political Science”

#18 “Best Value Colleges”

For a complete listing of the rankings in all categories by Niche.com, go here.

Methodology: According to Niche, it uses the most comprehensive data available on U.S. colleges and universities. Niche rankings are based on an analysis of academic, admissions, financial, and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education along with millions of reviews from students and alumni.

For more on Niche’s methodology, see here.


Baruch College Ranks in Top 30 “Best Accounting Degrees” by College Choice

Zicklin School of Business undergraduate and graduate accounting programs praised in nationwide survey

Baruch College ranked in the nation’s top 30 schools to obtain both an undergraduate and graduate accounting degrees by College Choice in its 2017 survey.  Located within the Zicklin School of Business, the Bachelor of Business Administration program with a specialization in accounting ranked #29, and the Master of Science in Accountancy program ranked #23.

To compile its rankings, College Choice analyzes data of five factors that “matter most to the broadest array of students” – quality, reputation, affordability, value, and satisfaction.

“Prestigious Research Centers and Facilities”

In its description of Zicklin’s undergraduate degree program, College Choice noted that students “will gain both a foundation in liberal arts and in business practice while developing a holistic understanding of accounting theory and applications.” It also praised the College’s “many prestigious research centers and facilities. Included among them are the Lawrence N. Field Center for Entrepreneurship, the Center for Nonprofit Strategy and Management, and the Weissman Center for International Business.”

Partnerships Provide Opportunities

Profiling Zicklin’s graduate degree program, College Choice pointed to students being “eligible to sit for the CPA exam in the state of New York. Partnerships help strengthen the school’s ability to provide their students with real-world internship opportunities…”

To read more about College Choice’s methodology, read here.


Top photonics breakthrough by CCNY researcher

Alexander Khanikaev

From left Xiang Ni, Alexander Khanikaev,  Ben Hopkins,  Sahana Bhattacharyya,  Matthew Weiner,  Mengyao Li

One day soon your camera phone lens could be even thinner and flatter. Satellites could be smaller. Your laptop could stay cooler and your battery last longer. Diseases could be detected earlier. All thanks to breakthroughs in topological photonics research being done by a team of researchers led by Alex Khanikaev, associate professor in the Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York.

Khanikaev’s photonics work in metamaterials – specifically in 3D optical circuitry – has just been recognized by the Optical Society of America as one of the 30 most important breakthroughs in the field. In fact, it has been featured on the cover of the December issue of Optics and Photonics News.

What are metamaterials? Materials whose structure has been changed on a nanoscopic level to allow them to have properties not found in nature. For example, glass that’s as reflective as metal or metal made transparent by structuring it on a nanoscopic scale – which is much smaller than the wavelengths of light. Khanikaev’s ultimate photonics goal: to create metamaterials that let us change how we control light.

Why is this breakthrough so important right now? Khanikaev says: “As the need to be smaller, faster, lighter, and yet more powerful continues to accelerate, the technology is reaching the limits of what electronics is capable of. The paradigm of how everything works must shift. Metamaterials perform better. They appear to be protected from defects and disorder. They’re capable of robust guiding and control of light in three-dimensions, which puts us one step closer to the integration of topological photonics, electronic, and quantum computing. That’s the future.”

Khanikaev, who joined City College only a year ago, is thankful for all of the support the Grove School of Engineering and CCNY has shown him and he is proud to be part of building a center of photonics excellence.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of December 11, 2017 (Repost)

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you and congratulations to our Kindergarten students, teachers and families for making this past Friday’s All About Me celebration such a great success.

  • Students engaged in Purposeful Reading and Writing
  • Students Learning From and With Each Other
  • Public Exhibition of Student Learning

What a joy to see these attributes of NEST+m learners, and more, all on display.

Our week ahead features additional opportunities to celebrate students’ learning including this upcoming Tuesday’s 5th Grade Ballroom Dancing Celebration and Friday’s Family Friday for 1st, 2nd and 3rd Grades.

Thank you, families, for the many ways in which your direct partnership supports our learning community.

With ten instructional days until Winter Break, as always, please ensure that students are present for our full instructional day, 8:20am to 2:40pm.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

Tuesday, December 12

  • 5th Grade Ballroom Dancing Performance, 8:30 am in the Auditorium

Thursday, December 14

  • UG Open Mic Event, 3 pm in the Library

Friday December 15

  • Senior Class Photos (Day 2) in the Auditorium.
  • Family Friday for 1st and 3rd Grades, 8:30 am
  • Family Friday for 2nd Grade, 9:00 am

Looking ahead

  • December 22 is the last day of school before Winter break. There will be no afterschool activities on December 22. Please plan accordingly.
  • Winter Break is December 25-January 1. School resumes on January 2.
  • Regents week will be January 22. Please note that the only UG students in attendance will be those taking the January exams.

 


Opportunities for NEST+m students

All About PSAT, SAT, & ACT
Students’ PSAT scores will be available by December 13th. Come learn what they mean, then we will discuss the main differences between the SAT and ACT. We will help you decide which test is better for your child, when to take them, how much to prepare for them, and more. Learn what colleges really look for and what you need to plan for.

All About PSAT, SAT, & ACT
Thursday, December 14th

7:00pm EST / 4:00pm PST

Click here to reserve your spot.

High School Summer Internship Program at the NYC Department of Design and Construction
This internship is designed for students interested in architecture, engineering, building trades, public administration, business administration or information technology.  It is to enable students to test the waters of the NYC design, building and construction fields and offer them valuable hands on work and educational experience.  The program lasts for 6 weeks with students attending 5 days a week.  It begins Thursday, July 5th and ends Friday, August 10, 2018.

To Qualify, students must reside in New York City, and be a high school student at lease 16 years of age.  Students must be available to work the entire duration of the program, be eligible to work in the US and have working papers.   Applications are completed online by January 5, 2018.  There will also be an interview for the process.  Completed applications should be sent to www.nyc.gov/ddc and visit the STEAM tab section of the website.   If you have any questions, you can call 718 391-2888 for assistance.  The email address is STEAM@ddc.nyc.gov.

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

MedDOCs Program
The MedDocs program is starting up again January 2018!  First-year medical students teach the MedDOCs students about organ anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology through various hands-on teaching modalities. This initiative aligns with MedDOCs’ overall vision to spur the interest of minority and underserved youth towards a career in medicine and to increase minority representation in the basic science and medical fields. MedDOCs aims to inspire self-confidence, provide individualized guidance, and maintain a support system for students as they progress through the Mount Sinai CEYE pipeline program

The spring session will run Thursdays 4:00-5:30 from January 11th to March 8th at Mount Sinai Hospital. The curriculum will focus on the pulmonary system. High school students will be taught by 2 medical students and will have the opportunity to dissect a sheep’s lung, see a human lung, and attend pulmonary simulator sessions.

Application DEADLINE: Friday, December 15th at 11:59pm. Click HERE to access the online application.

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.

YOUTH INSIGHTS ARTISTS at the Whitney Museum
January 31–May 17 / Wednesdays or Thursdays: 4–6:30 pm

Youth Insights (YI) is a free, after-school program open to New York City high school students in ninth through twelfth grade. Each semester, YI brings teens together with contemporary artists and Museum staff, providing opportunities to work collaboratively, discuss art critically, think creatively, and create art inspired by this exchange.

Participation in the program is free and all supplies are provided. Students also receive a one-trip MetroCard each week to travel home from the Whitney. Prior experience in similar programs is not required for students to participate in Youth Insights.

Apply online now. Applications are due by 11:59 pm on Monday, December 18. Students must have a teacher or reference fill out theonline recommendation form in addition to the online application.

Students and teachers should contact Teen Programs directly with any questions about the application process by calling (646) 680-6248 or emailing youthinsights@whitney.org.

Kaplan Test Prep
Kaplan Test Prep will be running an SAT Class at NEST+M School in preparation for the March 21st SAT Test date! Class will include 2 Practice Tests and 6 three hour Classroom sessions.   Seating is limited   Register today,  by calling 1-800-527-8378 or visiting https://www.kaptest.com/college-prep/nestm .Use CodeNEST400 to get a $400 discount on the course!!   Prices go up 3 weeks prior to the class start date!

Class Code: SAIKM18005P
Discount Code: NEST400
Schedule: Wednesdays starting at 2:50.  First session is 1/10/18!

Concerts in Motion
Attention high school students: Would you like to brighten a senior citizen’s day, practice performing your music (instrument or vocal), and earn volunteer service hours all at the same time?

If this sounds good to you, Concerts in Motion, a nonprofit that serves senior citizens who can’t leave their homes, is looking for student volunteers!  We are looking for students to sign up to visit a senior citizen in Chinatown for a minimum of one visit per month.  All visits will be supervised by an adult from Concerts in Motion.  Vocalists and instrumentalists of all levels are welcome – we just ask that you come ready to perform 2-4 pieces.

If you are interested in this wonderful service opportunity, please contact Melany at operationsmanager@concertsinmotion.org and she will send more information on how to sign up.  Students are asked to commit to one Monday per month but are welcome to sign up for additional Mondays, too!

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.

3T Writing Workshops
3T Writing Workshops hopes to offer a place for students to write freely about what is on their minds and have their words validated by actors bringing their words to life.

Students are invited to join their upcoming workshop on Dec 14 at The New School for Drama 151 Bank St. from 4-6pm.

Please click here for an application. More information is found on their website.


Hunter’s Gary Mallon Receives 2017 Adoption Excellence Award

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)Hunter's Gary Mallon Receives 2017 Adoption Excellence Award has awarded the 2017 Adoption Excellence Award to Dr. Gerald P. Mallon, the Julia Lathrop Professor of Child Welfare and Associate Dean for Scholarship and Research at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College.

An adoptive parent himself, Dr. Mallon is an internationally recognized expert on LGBTQ youth and family issues, particularly as they relate to child welfare, adoption, and permanency planning. Since joining the Hunter College (now Silberman) School of Social Work faculty in 1993, he has championed a commitment to supports and opportunities for vulnerable children and families. In 1997, he established the National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections, based at the School of Social Work, which remains under his leadership as the National Center for Child Welfare Excellence (NCCWE). His teaching and research have significantly shaped the School’s acclaimed child welfare practice specialization, and its strength in advocacy and education for practitioners who with children and families across all specializations and methods.

Dr. Mallon’s scholarship, teaching, advocacy, and training have also influenced major policy developments across the United States and globally, concerning LGBTQ children, youth, and families within the child welfare system.

The Adoption Excellence Award has been given by HHS every year since 1997, through its Administration for Children & Families (ACF) Children’s Bureau (CB). It recognizes individuals who “share and support HHS’s priority for permanency for children in public foster care” through their leadership, innovation, and dedication to the successful adoption of children from foster care.

Dr. Mallon formally received the award at a ceremony on November 16 in Washington, D.C.

The Hunter College community commends Dr. Mallon for this highly deserved recognition of his extraordinary career serving children, youth, and families.


CCNY-led team develops cancer imaging aid from horse chestnuts

Research at The City College of New York shows that cancer imaging can be simplified by a photonic process utilizing molecules derived from horse chestnuts. The study with potential to better detect the presence of cancer is led by George John, professor in City College’s Division of Science, in collaboration with Jan Grimm, a physician scientist at   Sloan Kettering Institute who is also affiliated with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College.

The team has developed a radiation responsive esculin-derived molecular gel, that is both scintillating and fluorescent, to enhance the optical photon output in image mapping for cancer imaging.

Esculin, or Æsculin, is a coumarin glucoside that naturally occurs in the horse chestnut, a plant extract. It is beneficial to circulatory health.

A challenge currently in cancer imaging is that optical imaging of radiotracers through Cerenkov light (the Grimm lab is one of the leading labs in this field) often produces light that is typically low in intensity and blue-weighted (greatly scattered and absorbed in vivo). It is therefore imperative to increase or shift the photon flux for improved detection.

The gel has been developed to address this challenge.

“Tailoring biobased materials to synthesize thixotropic thermo-reversible hydrogels offers image-aiding systems which are not only functional but also potentially economical, safe, and environmentally friendly,” said John.

“The possibility of developing a topical application from the gel makes this innovation an attractive potential improvement to current techniques of cancer imaging with Cerenkov light,” added Grimm.

A Fellow of Britain’s Royal Society of Chemistry, John’s research is rooted in the idea that innovation can be inspired by nature to develop economical and green technologies for a sustainable future.

Also involved in the research at CCNY’s Center for Discovery and Innovation and scientists from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, the Graduate Center, CUNY and Hunter College. The team includes Julian Silverman, Nabendu B. Pramanik, Malick Samateh and Sai Sateesh Sagiri from City College; Travis Shaffer and Qize Zhang from MSKCC.

The study appears in the journal “ACS Appl Mater Interfaces.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Educational theatre program presents “Annie Jr.”

PS 161 drama club students rehearsing for Annie Jr.

PS 161 drama club students rehearsing for “Annie Jr.”

The City College of New York’s Graduate Program in Educational Theatre is collaborating with PS 161 for a presentation of “Annie Jr.” This is the seventh co-production with the Harlem-based school.

Candidates in the graduate program, directed by Jennifer Katona, provide technical theatre support as students from PS 161’s drama club prepare for the performance. The showcase is part of the Fundamentals of Teaching Technical Theatre course taught by adjunct instructor Paul Brewster and supported by the partnership with the Roundabout Theatre Company.

The PS 161 middle school students have been rehearsing since September under the direction of full-time theatre teacher and CCNY education theatre alumna Wendy Rojas as well as PS 161 teachers Desiree Miller, Tyler Beattie and Wanda Bernard.

The students will sing songs from the classic musical including “It’s a Hard Knock Life” and “Tomorrow.” Little orphan Annie’s inspirational tale of a little girl in 1930s New York City is sure to inspire hope looking towards a brighter tomorrow.

Annie Jr. takes place at 6 p.m., Thursday, December 14 at PS 161 with a community potluck at 5 p.m. To reserve tickets, please click here, and for more information, access the Graduate Program in Educational Theatre website here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Baruch College Honors John H. Banks, III and Betsy Werley at “Power of Community” Reception

(L to R): Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein; John H. Banks, III, president of the Real Estate Board of New York; Betsy Werley, director of network expansion, Encore.org

New York, NY, December 8, 2017 – Baruch College honored John H. Banks, III, president of the Real Estate Board of New York, and Betsy Werley, director of Encore.org’s network expansion, at its “Power of Community” reception held on December 6. The annual event was created to celebrate outstanding individuals who contributed greatly to Baruch College, and to New York City.

“For more than a decade, Baruch has hosted this event as a way to recognize the value, importance, and power of what can be accomplished when we work together as a community,” said Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD., in his opening remarks.

Among those attending the event where representatives from Flatiron 23rd Street Partnership, Manhattan Community Board 6, Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce, and Gramercy Neighborhood Associates.

Distinguished Leader Award: John H. Banks, III

In recognition for his contribution to public service and continued work on behalf of New Yorkers, John H. Banks, III received Baruch’s Distinguished Leader Award.

In 2014, Banks was appointed as president of the Real Estate Board of New York, the city’s leading trade association with more than 17,000 members. During his tenure, Banks has advocated for the enactment of the Affordable New York Housing Program, the approval of the Greater East Midtown Rezoning, and legislation to address critical issues ranging from sustainability and illegal short-term rentals. He established the Residential Listing Service Syndication which provides up-to-date information for consumers and the real estate industry.

Previously, Banks was the vice president of government relations at Consolidated Edison, Inc. for 13 years. He also served as vice chairman of the New York City Charter Revision Commission in 2010, and worked on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s transition in 2013.

Prior to Con Edison, Banks operated as the Chief of Staff for the New York City Council from 2000 to 2002, and worked at Mayor Edward Koch’s Office of Operations, where he was responsible for reviewing, monitoring, and preventing potential corruption in city administrative and tribunal agencies.

Banks is an alumnus of Baruch College, holding an Executive Master of Public Administration from the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs. He currently serves on the boards of the New York Public Library, Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection, and Manhattan College.

Community Partner Award Winner: Betsy Werley

The Community Partner Award was given to Betsy Werley for her role in establishing the Financial Women’s Association (FWA) Mentoring program at Baruch, and for her accomplishments in the public, non-profit, and private sectors that continue to enrich the lives of the College’s students and many New Yorkers today.

Werley, who was past president of FWA and a long-time board member, began her career as a corporate lawyer and business executive at JPMorgan Chase. In 2005, she moved to the nonprofit sector as the first executive director of The Transition Network, a resource for professional women 50 and older who are seeking new connections, resources, and opportunities. Under Werley’s leadership, The Transition Network grew from one to 12 chapters.

She was also a founding member of Coming of Age New York City and the Encore Network Steering Committee. Encore Network is a coalition of leaders and organizations who are committed to turning older adult’s lives into valuable assets by operating programs that help create a better future for young people and future generations.

Werley has dedicated the current phase of her career to building the encore movement to help older adults realize their potential for improving our communities. In 2014, she officially joined Encore.org to develop its global strategy, and today serves as its director of network expansion.

About Baruch College:

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak more than 129 languages. Ranked among the top 15% of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. As a public institution with a tradition of academic excellence, Baruch College offers accessibility and opportunity for students from every corner of New York City and from around the world.  For more about Baruch College, go to http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Suzanne Bronski, (646) 660-6093, Suzanne.Bronski@baruch.cuny.edu


CUNY AND PSC REACH AGREEMENT ON TEACHING WORKLOAD

The City University of New York and Professional Staff Congress have reached agreement on a restructuring of the workload of full-time teaching faculty that will enable professors to devote more time to individual work with students, to advising, holding office hours, conducting academic research and engaging in other activities that contribute to student success.

The agreement reduces the annual contractual undergraduate teaching workload by three credit hours and will be phased in over three years, one credit hour a year, starting with the 2018-19 academic year.  The agreement covers both the senior and community colleges of CUNY and all full-time classroom teaching faculty.

Chancellor Milliken said: “This agreement recognizes that faculty work encompasses critical elements in addition to classroom teaching, better positioning our faculty to address critical responsibilities such as student advising and mentoring.  This important step not only aligns faculty work to achieve CUNY’s ambitious strategic goals, it reflects peer and best practice nationally and will strengthen the University’s competitiveness in attracting and retaining talented faculty.”

Dr. Bowen said: “This is a breakthrough for the University, its faculty—and above all, its students.  Multiple studies show that the single most important academic factor in student success is time spent individually with faculty.  The agreement will give us that time.  CUNY faculty members will embrace the opportunity to provide the support students need, contribute to important research and offer an education worthy of our students’ aspirations.”

Dr. Vita Rabinowitz, the University’s Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost said: “By moving CUNY closer to a teaching workload that is in line with those in place at other quality universities and colleges, this agreement further strengthens our ability to compete in the recruitment of top-tier faculty.  Just as important is the additional time faculty will now spend meeting and advising students, as well as on their research and scholarship.  This time invested outside the classroom will provide critical support to CUNY’s goals of increasing graduation rates and remaining a premier research university.”

When the University and PSC settled the last collective bargaining agreement in June 2016, they agreed to convene a joint labor-management committee with the goal of addressing the faculty’s teaching workload.  With the agreement announced today, the university and union will move on to negotiating a successor to the recently expired contract.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

The Professional Staff Congress (NYSUT, AFT #2334) represents almost 30,000 full- and part-time faculty and staff at the City University of New York. PSC members educate hundreds of thousands of mostly low-income New Yorkers, the majority from communities of color.

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Baruch College Launches the New York Confucius Institute for Global Finance

Extra-curricular, non-degree program will offer Chinese language classes, cultural workshops, and global finance seminars

From left: Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD; Jiang Feng, PhD, chairman of the University Council, Shanghai International Studies University; Sun Xinwei and Matthew LePere, co-directors, New York Confucius Institute for Global Finance at Baruch College

New York, NY, December 8, 2017 – Baruch College held a formal opening ceremony on December 6 to launch the New York Confucius Institute for Global Finance (NYCIGF@Baruch). The Institute is an extracurricular, nondegree educational collaboration between Baruch College, Shanghai International Studies University (SISU), and Hanban, an entity affiliated with the Chinese Ministry of Education.

The mission of NYCIGF@Baruch is to further U.S. students’ and business executives’ understanding of China and the integral role it plays in the worldwide financial system and to provide Chinese students and business executives with a better understanding of the U.S. and global financial markets.

Baruch President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, presided over the ceremony with participation from Dr. Jiang Feng, chairman of the University Council, SISU, and Deputy Consul General Zhao Yumin, of the Consulate General of the People’s Republic of China in New York.

“Bringing the Confucius Institute for Global Finance to Baruch College was the work of many colleagues in both countries, and it is part of a larger, long-term strategy at Baruch to deepen our engagement with the world outside our campus,” said Dr. Wallerstein in his opening remarks. “China is an important political and economic power—not just in Asia but throughout the world. Our goal is to provide all our students with a global perspective on world affairs and a critical awareness of the political and ethical issues that the world faces today.”

As part of the formal launch, Dr. Wallerstein and Dr. Jiang bestowed a large silver key to the U.S. and Chinese co-directors to symbolize the official opening of the NYCIGF@Baruch.

“There is the Pacific Ocean between us, but we’ve come together to forge a partnership for our shared goals: to promote people-to-people exchanges and advance our cooperation in the fields of finance, business management, and international relations,” said Dr. Jiang. “The Confucius Institute will become a platform for a full range of cultural exchanges between our two educational institutions, two cities, and two countries. I share the same idea with Dr. Wallerstein that, through the Confucius Institute, SISU and CUNY Baruch College will further our cooperation in various fields and provide more opportunities for both our faculties and students to learn from each other.”

Building a Bridge Between China and the U.S.

Beginning Spring 2018, the NYCIGF@Baruch will offer Chinese language classes, cultural workshops, and global finance seminars to students. Plans are underway to expand the Institute’s programs to alumni and New York City residents in the near future.

Programming will also examine the differences between Chinese and U.S. social and business cultures and provide an introduction to China’s financial system and market.

Inaugural Event: “Global Finance: Past, Present, and Future”

To celebrate the NYCIGF@Baruch launch, a free public event, entitled “Global Finance: Past, Present, and Future,” was held following the ceremony. Moderated by Lin Peng, PhD, David Krell Chair in Finance at Baruch College, the panel featured industry experts who addressed a host of topics, including the 2007 financial crisis, the current state of the U.S. financial system, forecasts for the global economy, and the business relationship between the U.S. and People’s Republic of China.

 

About Confucius Institute

The Confucius Institute program began in 2004. There are currently 110 Confucius Institutes in the United States, with the first established at the University of Maryland in 2005. China has set up about 500 Confucius Institutes in 134 countries and regions and more than 1,000 Confucius classrooms in primary and secondary schools. A full list of colleges and classrooms that offer a Confucius Institute can be found here.

About Baruch College

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak 129 languages. Ranked among the top 15 percent of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. For more about Baruch College, go here.

About Shanghai International Studies University

Shanghai International Studies University (SISU), upholding the motto of “Integrity, Vision and Academic Excellence,” is an internationally recognized, prestigious academic institution distinctive for its multidisciplinary and multicultural nature, committed to preparing innovative professionals and future global leaders for a wide range of international expertise to address the critical challenges of our times. For more about SISU, visit here.

 

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Media Contact: Suzanne Bronski 646-660-6093 / suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu


Mellon Foundation support to CCNY tops $2 million, produces PhDs

Mellon Mays Fellows at CCNY, front (from left): Chayanne Marcano, Victoria Juste, Josias Augustin Mendez, Jasmine Kasheboon Khoury and Jared Heron. Back (from left) Naajidah Aakitah Correll, Yasmine El Gheur, Brandon Latorre, Omer Alfalahi and Bryan Guichardo.

Since 2001, support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is credited for guiding more than a dozen talented City College of New York students from traditionally underrepresented groups to PhDs in the humanities and social sciences. With 17 more Mellon Mays Fellows from City College currently in doctoral programs, a new $70,000 one-year grant to CCNY brings this funding to approximately $2 million.

Beneficiaries of this support include René Cordero and Vannessa Velez, both recently accepted to PhD programs in history at Brown and Stanford universities, respectively.

Like their peers and predecessors, Cordero and Velez each won two-year Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowships from the Mellon Foundation while at CCNY.

The MMUF program is designed to encourage the most talented students from groups traditionally underrepresented in graduate education as well as others committed to diversity in the academy to enter PhD programs and pursue careers in research and college teaching.

“What sets Mellon Mays apart from other undergraduate research programs is that the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation provides financial and structural support to the fellows from when they are in graduate school to when they begin their careers as junior faculty,” said Isabel Estrada, Associate Professor of Spanish and Director of the City College Fellowships Program.

This support comes in the form of dissertation proposal workshops for graduate students and book publication seminars for junior faculty, among others.

Since the start of the Mellon Foundation-CCNY collaboration, 80 CCNY students have been awarded Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowships.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Queens College Choral Society Presents Mozart’s Requiem and 1001 Voices: A Symphony for a New America on December 16

— 1001 Voices—Composed in 2012—Features Elements for Chorus, Orchestra, Ethnic Instruments, Actors, and Visual Projections in a Celebration of the Diversity of the Borough of Queens —

Queens, NY, December 5, 2017—The Queens College Choral Society will perform Mozart’s Requiem and 1001 Voices: A Symphony for a New America in concert on Saturday, December 16, at 8 pm in Colden Auditorium. Mozart’s Requiem is an extraordinary masterpiece, performed in times of sorrow, but also used to bring communities of people together for the greater good. 1001 Voices (composed in 2012) is a remarkably powerful piece for chorus, orchestra, ethnic instruments, actors, and visual projections. It celebrates the mix of languages and cultures found in Queens, one of the most diverse places on earth, and examines our changing ideas of migration and home. It is especially meaningful in today’s political climate, presenting a vision of inclusion and understanding for peoples of all backgrounds and cultural heritages, as well as a renewal of hope for a world in which kindness and compassion bring people together.

Frank London, known for his work with the Klezmatics, wrote the music for 1001 Voices, which combines a mix of musical languages and sound-worlds, not only orchestra and chorus, but tabla and Chinese fiddle (erhu). Deep Singh, tabla soloist, is a renowned percussionist and Indian Classical musician, born in London and currently living in New York City; Feifei Yang, erhu soloist, is an award-winning musician and singer with a passion for building bridges between China and diverse cultures and art forms.

Judith Sloan, co-author along with Warren Lehrer of the award-winning book Crossing the BLVD: strangers, neighbors, aliens in a new America, is the librettist and a featured actor in the piece. Warren Lehrer, author and artist/designer known mostly for his highly visual books and multimedia projects, created the animated visual projections. Like Queens itself, the libretto is written and performed in multiple languages.

James John, Professor of Conducting at the Aaron Copland School of Music, and Music Director of the Queens College Choral Society, will conduct the combined forces of over 200 chorus and professional orchestra members. Vocal soloists include students and alumni from the Aaron Copland School of Music, and young professionals from the New York City area: Katherine Doe and Elizabeth Muñoz (sopranos); Katherine Doe and Linda Collazo (mezzo-sopranos); Deepak Marwah (tenor); and DeAndre Simmons (bass).

The Queens College Choral Society is “a singing organization of and for the public, and the students and staff of Queens College.” QCCS is unique in its diversity of singers; from high school musicians, through the high school outreach program, to singers who have performed with the society for over 40 years, QCCS is a treasure in the borough. The Society typically performs two concerts per year with orchestra (in December and May) devoted to the great masterpieces of choral literature such as Verdi’s Requiem, Handel’s Messiah, and Britten’s War Requiem. The QCCS has also performed multiple premieres of new works, including pieces composed by Queens College Music School faculty.

Tickets are $20 and are available through the Kupferberg Center Box office at (718) 793-8080 or online at www.kupferbergcenter.org. Group discounts for high school students and teachers are also available. To take advantage of this offer, contact Emily John, QCCS Administrative Coordinator, at ejharpist@aol.com

For directions to Queens College, visit
http://www.qc.cuny.edu/welcome/directions/Pages/default.aspx


CUNY Baccalaureate Student Sujoy Manir Awarded U.S. Department of State’s Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to Study Abroad

The U.S. Department of State is pleased to announce that Sujoy Manir, from CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies and Hunter College is one of nearly 1,000 American undergraduate students from 386 colleges and universities across the United States selected to receive the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to study or intern abroad during the 2017-2018 academic year. The complete list of students who have been selected to receive Gilman Scholarships this term, including students’ home state, university and host country, is available on the website: gilmanscholarship.org. Sujoy will participate in Brooklyn College’s Public Health program in Jamkhed, Maharashtra, India this January.

Gilman Scholars receive up to $5,000 to apply towards their study abroad or internship program costs with additional funding available for the study of a critical language overseas.  The Gilman scholarship supports American undergraduate students of limited financial means to study or intern abroad and, since 2001, has enabled more than 25,000 outstanding Americans of diverse backgrounds to engage in a meaningful educational experience abroad. The program has successfully broadened U.S. participation in study abroad, while emphasizing countries and regions where fewer Americans traditionally study. .

The late Congressman Gilman, for whom the scholarship is named, served in the House of Representatives for 30 years and chaired the House Foreign Relations Committee. When honored with the Secretary of State’s Distinguished Service Medal in 2002, he commented, “Living and learning in a vastly different environment of another nation not only exposes our students to alternate views, but adds an enriching social and cultural experience.  It also provides our students with the opportunity to return home with a deeper understanding of their place in the world, encouraging them to be a contributor, rather than a spectator in the international community.”

The Gilman Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and is supported in its implementation by the Institute of International Education (IIE).

 

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CUNY BA is the University-wide, individualized degree. It is an exciting, versatile, rewarding degree route for highly motivated, self-directed students whose academic goals transcend traditional majors. Students create their own degree plans working directly with faculty mentors and academic advisors.

The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs’ (ECA) mission is to build relations between the people of the United States and the people of other countries through academic, cultural, sports, professional and private exchanges, as well as public-private partnerships and mentoring programs. These exchange programs improve foreign relations and strengthen the national security of the United States. ECA programs, funding, and other activities encourage the involvement of American and international participants from traditionally underrepresented groups, including women, racial and ethnic minorities, and people with disabilities.  Artists, educators, athletes, students, youth and rising leaders in the United States and more than 160 countries around the globe participate in academic, cultural, sports, and professional exchanges.  For more information about ECA programs, initiatives, and achievements, visit eca.state.gov.

 

The Institute of International Education (http://www.iie.org/) works with policymakers, educators and employers across the globe to prepare students and professionals for the global workforce and equip them to solve the increasingly complex challenges facing our interconnected world. An independent, not-for-profit organization founded in 1919, IIE has a network of 18 offices and affiliates worldwide, and over 1,300 member institutions.

 


BMCC Rooftop Now Home to Manhattan’s Largest Public Solar Panel Project

Workers from the New York Power Authority (NYPA) have installed 947 solar energy panels on the main roof of Borough of Manhattan Community College’s (BMCC/CUNY) four-block-long 199 Chambers Street building. The five by three foot panels of 327 watts—many of which are visible from the streets of Tribeca—are hung vertically on the cooling tower enclosure walls and flat on the western lower roof facing the Hudson River for maximum exposure to the sun.

The BMCC solar array is now the largest public photovoltaic facility on Manhattan island, and has the added distinction of being the first vertical solar facility in all of New York City according to NYPA. First proposed in 2008, the project’s design has improved as technology changed and after BMCC removed its old roof, installed four inches of R-25 insulation and recapped the four-block-long roof.

Each of the solar panels contain 96 cells that will absorb the sun’s rays then feed them into an inverter that converts the light into electricity. The electricity produced powers the Chambers Street building first with any excess generated distributed into the New York City power grid.

BMCC is working collaboratively with regulators including the New York City Department of Buildings and The New York City Fire Department for permits to store solar power in two large 100-killowatt hour (kWh) batteries.  These backup batteries would serve as energy reserves during peak load periods—after a series of hot summer days—to alleviate some of the strain on the city’s electrical resources.  In addition, the electrical reserves can provide power for critical functions, such as emergency lighting, refrigeration for scientific experiments and IT systems, power for the college’s electric vehicle and generators, in the event of a blackout or other emergency situation.

Working toward a more sustainable future

The project, a collaborative effort between the New York Power Authority’s Energy Services Program and BMCC/CUNY, is part of a greater effort to reduce CUNY’s utility costs, improve energy efficiency and reduce its carbon footprint. The project is also contributing to New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s efforts to increase solar power in New York State and create a shift towards a more sustainable, resilient and cost-effective energy future.

“Borough of Manhattan Community College has really stepped up to the plate when it comes to investing in alternative energy resources and advancing clean energy technologies,” said Gil C. Quiniones, NYPA President and CEO. “NYPA is pleased to have led the implementation of this latest major energy-saving project, which will help New York State continue to be a leader in energy efficiency and meet Governor Cuomo’s ambitious goal to supply 50 percent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030.”

Capable of producing over 1MWH (1000kWh) of electricity each day, the BMCC solar array is expected to save the college more than $42,000 each year on its power bill. The reduction in annual greenhouse emissions equates to more than 25,000 gallons of gas, which equates to 48 passenger vehicles being taken off the road or total power use for 24 homes.

“We’re are leading the charge to utilize cleaner and greener energy that also saves on costs,” said G. Scott Anderson, Vice President, Administration and Planning, BMCC who says the college’s overall mission is to be more sustainable and green. “What we’ve done at BMCC is use the pre-existing resources we’ve been given – in this case using our extremely long roof—to help us be more energy efficient. Our partnership with NYPA simplified the process and helped ensure that we met our strategic energy and environmental goals.”

The concentration of buildings in New York City is so dense that local leaders have come to embrace more aggressive policies that center on saving energy, Anderson says.

In 2008, the Office of then Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer provided the initial funding for the project— a $3 million capital support grant—according to Anderson.  “The State provided the critical matching dollars and NYPA provided the absolutely first-class project management to make this all happen quickly without exceeding budget,” said Anderson.

BMCC at the forefront of energy conservation

Buildings account for 39 percent of primary energy consumption and 72 percent of all electricity consumed in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Energy’s buildings energy data book. Buildings account for more energy use than the entire U.S. transportation sector and they produce more greenhouse gas than any other country in the world except China.

In the past four years, “BMCC has been in the forefront of energy conservation and sustainability from insulating and greening its roofs, putting LED lights and motion sensors in its classrooms and public spaces, installing hydration stations in the hallways, and using thermal blankets and steam traps around its pipes,” according to Thomas Ching, Chief Administrative Superintendent.  Since 2012, BMCC has been able to reduce its energy use by 19.6 percent based on NYC Department of Citywide Administrative Services data. DCAS oversees BMCC’s energy use and payments.  “Even with increasing enrollment and the attendant energy demands, BMCC continues to find new ways to conserve energy with the solar panels being the latest energy-efficient practice in our sustainability repertory,” says Ching.

Project design and construction were led by The Fulcrum Group, which contracted with Solar Liberty and Maric Mechanical to complete the PV system installation.

 


You don’t have to be crazy to see a psychologist at CCNY’s Mini-Medical School

Deidre Anglin, associate professor of Clinical Psychology

Mini-Medical School is an ongoing series of health information sessions on topics the Harlem community has identified as being of interest

It used to be that only those with serious mental health issues – or rich neurotic people – would see a psychologist. But today we know that while psychologists still treat serious mental disorders, they also help us cope with the daily stresses of life.

The truth is, everyone can benefit from talking with a psychologist now and again. And on Dec. 13 you can do just that – for free – when Deidre Anglin, an associate professor of Clinical Psychology in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at The City College of New York, talks about how psychologists can help us all live a more meaningful, spiritual and fulfilling life.

Please join us for the CUNY School of Medicine’s Mini-Medical School at CCNY at 5:30 p.m. in the North Academic Center, Room 1/201 to hear Anglin speak – and listen to you. She’ll take your questions about whatever’s on your mind, like family dynamics, financial pressures, work issues, parenting, anxiety, learning disabilities, and more.

This event is free and open to the public. Click here to RSVP.

The Psychological Center at CCNY provides low-cost mental health services to the Harlem community. For more information please call 212-650-6603.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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CCNY’s Yingli Tian beats the odds to become IEEE Fellow

Yingli Tian elevated to IEEE Fellow for her work in automatic facial expression analysis and human activity understanding and monitoring.

Four hundred thousand professionals are working across the globe to advance technology for humanity as members of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.  Each year, the organization elevates less than 1/10th of 1% of them to “Fellow”. Only 3% of that 1/10 of 1% are women. Yingli Tian, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York is one of those women.

Tian has been elevated to Fellow, effective 2018, by the IEEE in recognition of her contributions in two fields. As a world-leading expert in automatic facial expression analysis, Tian’s research on automatic facial expression analysis and the database has had significant impact on the research community and in industry. Her work has proved invaluable when applied to areas such as lie detection, banking, assisted driving, cultural differences, machine learning, and American Sign Language – just to name a few.

Tian’s status as a global technical leader in human activity understanding and monitoring was also a factor in her elevation. Her research work on video surveillance has been integrated into the IBM Smart Surveillance System, helping to detect things like whether a seemingly abandoned package is threatening or not.

All told, Tian’s work thus far has garnered nearly 200 publications with 12,400 citations worldwide, and more than $6 million in research grants.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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Dr. Vincent Boudreau is 13th President of City College

City College’s 13th President Vincent Boudreau

Dr. Vincent Boudreau is the next president of The City College of New York, CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken announced today.

Boudreau has served as Interim President of CCNY since November of 2016. Prior to that appointment, Boudreau was inaugural dean of the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at City College since 2013. He was previously director of the Colin L. Powell Center for Leadership and Service from 2002 through 2013.

“In some ways, the idea of a truly inclusive public education system as an engine of our democracy began on this campus 170 years ago,” said Boudreau. “Shepherding that legacy into the future brings significant challenges that will require the mobilization of the talents and affections of people on our campus and in our communities. I’m confident that the founding mission of CCNY is alive on campus today and I am both honored and awed at the prospect of stewarding that mission.”

In his announcement, Milliken said, “It has become evident to me that Dr. Boudreau not only has the experience, academic capabilities and leadership skills to be a highly successful president, he also has demonstrated this to many of the stakeholders of the College, including the college’s proud and committed alumni, donors and community leaders. In the process, he has won their trust and confidence. I am delighted and encouraged that our search has brought us back home to a candidate who has established over decades his commitment to CCNY.”

CUNY Board Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr. said in a release, “The Board of Trustees is thrilled to have found a home-grown candidate who so ably meets the central charge stated in our search for a new president of The City College of New York: ‘a leader who will chart the college’s course – and steward its core commitments to access and excellence – into the future.’ Vincent Boudreau, who already has done so much to shape today’s City College, is well equipped for the challenge. I want to thank Vice Chairperson Barry F. Schwartz, who led the national search, and the other Board members who gave so much of their time and energy.”

General Colin L. Powell (USA, Ret.), Board of Visitors Chairman at the Colin Powell School, commented:  “I am delighted to learn Vince Boudreau will be the next president of CCNY. I have worked with him for the past twelve years as, under his leadership, a modest Colin Powell Center has grown into the Colin Powell School, with one-third of the CCNY student body graduating from our departments each year. He is an academic, a manager and a leader. Above all, he is totally committed to our students, making sure they get a quality education and that they graduate.”

Other administrative positions Boudreau has held at CCNY include director of the M.A. Program in International Relations, chair of the Department of Political Science, director of the International Studies Program and deputy dean of the Division of Social Science.

He is a professor of political science at CCNY and a member of the City University of New York graduate faculty.

A specialist in the politics of social movements, particularly in Southeast Asia, his latest book is “Resisting Dictatorship: Repression and Protest in Southeast Asia” (Cambridge University Press).

Boudreau is a graduate of Cornell University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1991.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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CUNY NAMES FIRST VICE CHANCELLOR FOR UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT TO BOOST PHILANTHROPIC EFFORTS

The City University of New York Board of Trustees today named Brigette A. Bryant as the first Vice Chancellor for University Advancement, a post in which she is charged with leading the development of a CUNY-wide advancement operation, essential to significantly increasing the University’s effectiveness in private fundraising. Ms. Bryant will work closely with the Chancellor, Board of Trustees, donors, the college presidents and the senior advancement team throughout CUNY to increase the success of fundraising across the University. She will focus on the expansion of major and principal gifts, alumni relations, and annual and planned giving, as well as best practices in resource development systems and infrastructure. CUNY has been working for over a year on plans to build a successful University-wide platform for fundraising, and the recruitment of new advancement leadership is a critical part of these ongoing efforts.

Ms. Bryant is currently Associate Vice President for Development at Seton Hall University and formerly held top fundraising jobs at Tufts University and Case Western Reserve University, as well as other development positions in higher education including at Columbia University. Ms. Bryant brings to CUNY a successful record of building fundraising infrastructure, securing large gifts and leading capital campaigns in higher education institutions.

“The creation of this new post of Vice Chancellor for University Advancement underlines the importance that the Board of Trustees places on increasing support from foundations and donors who believe in the critical mission of public higher education,” said Board Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. “The City University of New York has won national acclaim for its unparalleled ability to move low-income students into the middle class. That accomplishment sets the stage for Vice Chancellor Bryant, who has a critical task ahead of her.”

“Brigette Bryant brings the expertise CUNY needs to expand our private fundraising to support CUNY’s essential mission on a much larger scale,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “As the University expands its efforts to prepare students for a changing world, we need to rely more on support from the philanthropic community. I believe that in Brigette Bryant we have found an accomplished leader with a proven track record who fully embraces CUNY’s mission and strategic vision.”

“I’m a New Yorker by birth,” said Vice Chancellor Bryant, “and grew up on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. I watched my single mother work hard to balance college, work and the care of her two children. It took intense family sacrifice, but she graduated from John Jay College of Criminal Justice just two years shy of my own graduation from Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music and the Arts. CUNY supported her determination. So my interest in CUNY is personal, but also infused with professional commitment to providing access and opportunity to NYC students like my mother and me.”

At Seton Hall, Ms. Bryant more than doubled contributions and increased the number of donors by 35 percent. At Case Western Reserve, she also stepped into a position that had not previously existed, expanding a centralized fundraising team while unifying school-based fundraisers under a single university umbrella; she also managed her own portfolio, leading to a number of principal gifts. At Tufts, she led an alumni campaign, increasing by 25 percent the number of major gift donors and raising the giving level of existing donors. Under her leadership, total school giving represented nearly 40% of the university’s overall achievement.

Ms. Bryant earned a Bachelor of Music in Music Production and Engineering from Berklee College of Music.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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CUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES NAMES VINCENT BOUDREAU AS 13TH PRESIDENT OF THE CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK

The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York today appointed Vincent Boudreau as the 13th president of The City College of New York. He had served as interim president since Nov. 2, 2016.

A professor of political science, member of the CUNY graduate faculty and former department chair, he was the founding dean of the college’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership in 2013 and, from 2002 though 2013, directed the earlier Colin L. Powell Center for Leadership and Service.

“The Board of Trustees is thrilled to have found a homegrown candidate who so ably meets the central charge stated in our search for a new president of The City College of New York: ‘a leader who will chart the college’s course – and steward its core commitments to access and excellence – into the future,’” said Board Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. Vincent Boudreau, who already has done so much to shape today’s City College, is well equipped for the challenge. I want to thank Vice Chairperson Barry F. Schwartz, who led the national search, and the other Board members who gave so much of their time and energy.”

“It has become evident to me that Dr. Boudreau not only has the experience, academic capabilities and leadership skills to be a highly successful president, he also has demonstrated this to many of the stakeholders of the college, including the college’s proud and committed alumni, donors and community leaders,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “In the process, he has won their trust and confidence. I am delighted and encouraged that our search has brought us back home to a candidate who has established over decades his commitment to CCNY.”

Vincent Boudreau

“In some ways, the idea of a truly inclusive public education system as an engine of our democracy began on this campus 170 years ago,” said Boudreau. “Shepherding that legacy into the future brings significant challenges that will require the mobilization of the talents and affections of people on our campus and in our communities. I’m confident that the founding mission of CCNY is alive on campus today, and I am both honored and awed at the prospect of stewarding that mission.”

Boudreau received a B.A. in English and philosophy, summa cum laude, from LeMoyne College (1984), and an M.A. and Ph.D. in government (comparative politics and international relations) from Cornell University (1987 and 1991, respectively). He joined City College’s political science department as an assistant professor in September 1991 and soon assumed administrative assignments in addition to teaching. As he rose to full professor (2007), he directed the master’s program in international relations (1992-1997) and the international studies program (1999-2000) before becoming deputy dean of the Division of Social Science (2000-2001) and chair of the political science department (2008).

From its inception, Boudreau led the Colin L. Powell Center for Leadership and Service, which was named for former Secretary of State and retired Army Gen. Colin L. Powell, a 1958 City College graduate. In part with a gift from Gen. Powell, the center evolved into the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. Its program seeks to build a culture of service and to inspire young people with a sense of public purpose, vision and responsibility, and to strengthen connections between campus and communities. Its areas of focus include international development and global security, education, the environment, community and economic development, and health.

The Colin Powell School, which encompasses the former Division of Social Science, includes anthropology, economics, political science, psychology and sociology, and interdisciplinary programs including international relations, international studies, Latin American and Latino Studies, mental health counseling, legal studies, public service management, women’s studies and the Skadden Arps Honors Program for Legal Studies. The school offers a wide variety of traditional and interdisciplinary undergraduate and graduate degrees and houses the Dominican Studies Institute and the Ph.D. program in clinical psychology offered by the CUNY Graduate Center.

Boudreau’s scholarship has focused on repression, government transitions to democracy and collective violence. In particular, he has investigated the connections between state repression and social resistance in dictatorships in Burma, Indonesia and the Philippines. In addition to his academic work, he has undertaken projects with ActionAid Asia, Jubilee South Asia and The Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement, and has consulted for Oxfam Asia, Action of Economic Reform (Philippines) and Freedom House.

He has written numerous papers and solicited technical reports, as well as two books, Resisting Dictatorship: Repression and Protest in Southeast Asia (Cambridge University Press, 2004, paperback 2008) and Grassroots and Cadre in the Protest Movement (Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2001).

Reviewing Resisting Dictatorship for the Journal of Third World Studies, the late Wichita State University professor Robert Lawless called it “a brilliant study of dictatorship, resistance and democratization. … Quite often, it seems, a great idea is obvious – but only after it is introduced by an innovative thinker. That the outcome of repression and resistance is conditioned by the case-specific context of the struggle and that therefore it is the interaction that we must investigate should be obvious to everyone after reading Boudreau’s work.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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CUNY ADOPTS NEW SERIES OF REFORMS TO BOLSTER FISCAL AND ETHICAL INTEGRITY OF ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS      

The Trustees of The City University of New York enacted on Monday a second round of reforms of the university’s governance and administrative policies, ensuring greater transparency and accountability by CUNY and its 24 individual institutions. Along with changes adopted by the board in June, the revised policies put CUNY at the vanguard of financial integrity in higher education, said Board Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr.

The new policies strengthen governance on all CUNY campuses in areas ranging from day-to-day fiscal management to financial relationships between the colleges and independent entities that support them. This second round of policy changes this year follow a broad review of administrative practices and financial management at CUNY to address concerns raised by New York State Inspector General Catherine Leahy Scott.

In an interim report issued last year, the inspector general recommended that CUNY implement centralized spending policies and more rigorous controls over the financial management of CUNY-based foundations and their affiliates.

Chairperson Thompson said: “This series of changes, together with those the Board of Trustees adopted in January, February and June, signify our ongoing commitment to the highest level of fiscal and ethical integrity for the City University of New York.  The Board of Trustees’ focus is and will continue to be supporting the best interests of our students.  Please be assured that we take our responsibility very seriously and are committed to increasing transparency and accountability at CUNY.  It is in everyone’s best interest to responsibly grow and upgrade the precious gem that is CUNY.”  Thompson added that “The Board and I will continue to work with the Chancellor to ensure that every dollar preserved is a dollar reinvested in the futures of New York City’s families.”

Chancellor Milliken said: “CUNY is a large and complex educational enterprise with significant administrative functions centrally and at each of its 24 campuses. Developing new policies that strengthen our fiscal oversight and accountability, ensure the highest ethical standards and, where possible, streamline our administrative operations, is key to CUNY’s continued success. I am grateful to the CUNY trustees for their leadership and support in this endeavor, as well as to the administrative leadership across the university.  Though these reforms are largely administrative in nature, they are critical to our commitment to our students and the people of New York. To ensure that CUNY continues to be the most important engine of economic and social mobility in the country demands that we operate with the highest standards and adopt best governance and administrative practices across the university.”

The second series of reforms adopted Monday include:

  1. Updated guidelines for CUNY’s Auxiliary Enterprise Corporations (AECs), which are independent entities that support specific colleges and schools within the University. Last revised in 2007, the guidelines reflect changes in the law and strengthen requirements for governance, accountability, transparency and financial controls. The AECs provide non-instructional auxiliary enterprises and services such as administration of college food services, vending, bookstores, parking operations and short-term licensing of college facilities.
  2. Revised policies for the use of college facilities by outside entities for events, programs and meetings. CUNY colleges are permitted to charge fees and direct costs for the use of their facilities. The policy has been updated to strengthen accountability, transparency and financial controls and to ensure that revenues collected from use fees are spent in compliance with revised CUNY spending policies. The new policy also permits college administrations to deny use of facilities under certain circumstances.
  3. New policies to strengthen accountability regarding the University’s banking and cash management. Guidelines have recently been separated into individual policies for three financial areas—cash accountability, bank account control and petty cash. The new policies, which clarify guidelines issued in 2008 by the Office of the University Controller (now the University Office of Budget and Finance), focus on standardization, oversight, internal controls and accountability.
  4. An amendment to guidelines regarding the use and reporting of non-tax levy funds adopted by the Board of Trustees in June. The new resolution modifies the annual reporting structure to include the central office, and authorizes management to begin to transition non-tax levy funding sources into its integrated CUNYfirst financial system.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 

 


Queens College Student Josephine Cooke Wins 2018 Marshall Scholarship

— Cooke Among 43 Students Nationwide to Receive Prestigious Award That Provides Post-Graduate Education at a University in the United Kingdom —

Queens, NY, December 4, 2017 – Queens College student Josephine Cooke has been selected as one of 43 students nationwide to receive a 2018 Marshall Scholarship as announced today by the British Government. The highly competitive award provides for Cooke’s post-graduate studies at a university in the United Kingdom. Cooke is the third student from Queens College to be named a Marshall Scholar.

The Marshall Scholarship Program began in 1953 as a gesture of gratitude to the people of the United States for the assistance that the UK received after WWII under the Marshall Plan. The scholarships offer talented Americans the chance to study for up to three years at a UK university of their choice. Today, the Marshall Scholarships continue to serve not only as a living gift from the UK Government to the United States for the Marshall Plan, but also as a way to deepen and strengthen the transatlantic relationship through education and cultural exchange.

“The entire Queens College community congratulates Josephine on this superb achievement,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Marshall Scholars have gone on to become some of the most influential and innovative contributors to societies around the world. We wish Josephine continued success as she prepares to start her post-secondary education and we know her accomplishments will inspire students at Queens College for years to come.”

Cooke is a senior neuroscience and psychology double-major at Queens College and will graduate in spring 2018. She plans to complete a PhD at either Imperial College London or Brunel University, focusing on how dance therapy can be used to rehabilitate neurological disorders. Upon completing the degree and returning to the United States, she hopes to open a clinic dedicated to arts therapy and neurorehabilitation.

“Winning the Marshall Scholarship has been a surreal experience. The best part about this opportunity is that I get to spend the next three years exploring two things I’m passionate about: dance and neuroscience,” said Cooke. “The advisors and mentors I have had while at Queens College have been invaluable in helping to get to this point and I’ve gladly come to accept New York and Queens College as a second home.”

The Marshall Scholarship Program is principally funded by the British Government in addition to a number of partnerships with leading British academic institutions. It continues to be one of the only scholarships available to Americans to study any academic subject at any university in the UK. This has led to an unprecedented breadth of expertise in almost every academic field, producing numerous university presidents, six Pulitzer Prize winners, one Nobel Laureate, thirteen MacArthur Fellows, two Academy Award nominees, as well as two current Supreme Court Justices. Since the program’s inception, more than 1,900 Americans have become Marshall Scholars.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE ANNOUNCES EXPANDED SERVICE FOR DISABLED STUDENTS

City Council Member James Vacca Secures Funds to Help the
Visually-Impaired
Master Coursework and Exams

What: Announcement of a major expansion of BCC’s Assistive Technology Center

When: Monday, December 4, 2017, 11:15 to 12:15 p.m.

Where: Loew Hall, Room 215, Bronx Community College, 2155 University Avenue, Bronx, New York

About:  Bronx City Council Member James Vacca (District #13) will be on campus for the announcement of a major expansion of BCC’s Assistive Technology Center and Testing Lab in Loew Hall, which uses the latest computer software to help visually-impaired students study and take exams. The $200,000 in New York City funds made possible by Council Member Vacca will double the number of students the ATC supports to some 600 by the beginning of the Fall 2018 semester. “I am proud to have allocated resources to ensure that the new visual impairment testing lab becomes a reality,” says Council Member Vacca. “My father struggled for years with a visual impairment. I intimately know the impact that the lack of accessibility and resources has on the lives of those with disabilities. I look forward to the new lab assisting countless students in completing their coursework and degrees.”

The Center will be run by BCC’s Office of Disability Services. “At Bronx Community College, we are determined to remove all barriers to higher education — including physical disability,” notes BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “The funding Council Member Vacca has secured for our new Assistive Technology Center is a huge contribution towards the fulfillment of that mission.”

For further information, contact david.levers@bcc.cuny.edu or 718.289.5157.


Queens College Drama Department Stages First Reading of The Kitchen Plays at December 11 Fundraiser

–Notable Alumni Writers, Actors, and Stage Managers Participate
in Benefit Performance of Works Examining Domestic Themes–

QUEENS, NY, December 4, 2017—Queens College’s Department of Drama, Theatre & Dance is cooking up a special benefit performance on Monday, December 11: a staged first-time reading of The Kitchen Plays, a trio of one-act dramas set in and around the hottest place in every home.

Directed by QC Drama Professor Susan Einhorn, these works address everything but the kitchen sink—marital discord, grief, domestic responsibilities—and draw on the talents of writers, actors, and stage managers who studied at the college. Liz Bartucci, Regina Corrado, and Drew Sachs wrote the dramas. Bartucci has been published in Smith & Kraus’s Best Ten-Minute Plays and is the recipient of a prestigious Disney Fellowship. Corrado, a television writer and producer, was nominated for two Writers Guild of America Awards for her work on Deadwood. Sachs’s plays have been presented by the Boston Theater Marathon IX, The Drilling CompaNY, and PBS Television. The cast, all of whom earned MFAs from prestigious graduate schools in the United States and overseas, will include Joel Bernard, Marvin Duverne, Gabrielle Georgescu, Elyse Price, Max Roll, Thomas Stagnitta, Rosanny Zayas, and Claudia Feldstein, now a full-time faculty member.

A Q&A/talkback with the playwrights, actors, and director will follow the performance. Proceeds of the evening are earmarked for the department.

The Kitchen Plays will be presented in Goldstein Theatre at 7:30 pm. A VIP package, which includes a reception in the lobby of Colden Auditorium at 6:30 pm, is available at $50 per person. General admission is $25; students with QC ID pay only $10. To order tickets, call the Kupferberg Center box office at 718-793-8080 or visit Kupferbergcenter.org or ticketmaster.com.

    About the Queens College Department of Drama, Theatre & Dance

The Queens College Department of Drama, Theatre and Dance offers the study of the subjects appropriate for a liberal arts degree. A balanced combination of theory and practice aims at giving an understanding of the arts of drama, theatre and dance that can serve as a foundation for graduate study. Every effort is made to provide scope for the development of individual talent and skills as a preliminary step for those students who intend to pursue future conservatory training for a stage or dance career.
About Queens College

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.
For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of December 4, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

The next three weeks provide a wonderful opportunity for students to deliberately connect with their teachers when, or if, they are seeking additional challenges or additional supports within specific areas of study.

Each week I share the following message with NEST+m’s teachers and faculty. It is equally applicable to you, our students and families: Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you, students, for always seeking to be your best self-whether academically or as a community member. Your daily practices shape our entire NEST+m community.

It is our shared interactions that enable NEST+m to be the academically rigorous and care-taking school we know it to be.

Parents & Families: Please join me on Tuesday evening as I host a Town Hall meeting that will feature some upfront talking points about year-to-date highlights of our 2017-18 school year, specific responses to questions posed by you through our PTA and more spontaneous questions that will be generated together.  This meeting will take place at 6:00pm on Tuesday in our Auditorium.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

Monday, December 4

  • Financial Aid Night in the Auditorium, 5-7 pm

Tuesday, December 5

  • K-12 Town Hall in the Auditorium, 6-7 pm

Friday December 8

  • Senior Class Photos (Day 1) in the Auditorium. Day 2 will be on December 15
  • Family Friday for Kindergarten, 8:30 am
  • Winter Movie Night in the Library, UG students, 3 pm
  • 6th Grade Potluck Dinner in the Cafeteria, 5:30 pm

Looking ahead

Regents week will be January 22. Please note that the only UG students in attendance will be those taking the January exams.


Opportunities for NEST+m students

MedDOCs Program
The MedDocs program is starting up again January 2018!  First-year medical students teach the MedDOCs students about organ anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology through various hands-on teaching modalities. This initiative aligns with MedDOCs’ overall vision to spur the interest of minority and underserved youth towards a career in medicine and to increase minority representation in the basic science and medical fields. MedDOCs aims to inspire self-confidence, provide individualized guidance, and maintain a support system for students as they progress through the Mount Sinai CEYE pipeline program

The spring session will run Thursdays 4:00-5:30 from January 11th to March 8th at Mount Sinai Hospital. The curriculum will focus on the pulmonary system. High school students will be taught by 2 medical students and will have the opportunity to dissect a sheep’s lung, see a human lung, and attend pulmonary simulator sessions.

Application DEADLINE: Friday, December 15th at 11:59pm. Click HERE to access the online application.

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.

YOUTH INSIGHTS ARTISTS at the Whitney Museum
January 31–May 17 / Wednesdays or Thursdays: 4–6:30 pm

Youth Insights (YI) is a free, after-school program open to New York City high school students in ninth through twelfth grade. Each semester, YI brings teens together with contemporary artists and Museum staff, providing opportunities to work collaboratively, discuss art critically, think creatively, and create art inspired by this exchange.

Participation in the program is free and all supplies are provided. Students also receive a one-trip MetroCard each week to travel home from the Whitney. Prior experience in similar programs is not required for students to participate in Youth Insights.

Apply online now. Applications are due by 11:59 pm on Monday, December 18. Students must have a teacher or reference fill out theonline recommendation form in addition to the online application.

Students and teachers should contact Teen Programs directly with any questions about the application process by calling (646) 680-6248 or emailing youthinsights@whitney.org.

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Kaplan Test Prep
Kaplan Test Prep will be running an SAT Class at NEST+M School in preparation for the March 21st SAT Test date! Class will include 2 Practice Tests and 6 three hour Classroom sessions.   Seating is limited   Register today,  by calling 1-800-527-8378 or visiting https://www.kaptest.com/college-prep/nestm .Use CodeNEST400 to get a $400 discount on the course!!   Prices go up 3 weeks prior to the class start date!

Class Code: SAIKM18005P
Discount Code: NEST400
Schedule: Wednesdays starting at 2:50.  First session is 1/10/18!

Concerts in Motion
Attention high school students: Would you like to brighten a senior citizen’s day, practice performing your music (instrument or vocal), and earn volunteer service hours all at the same time?

If this sounds good to you, Concerts in Motion, a nonprofit that serves senior citizens who can’t leave their homes, is looking for student volunteers!  We are looking for students to sign up to visit a senior citizen in Chinatown for a minimum of one visit per month.  All visits will be supervised by an adult from Concerts in Motion.  Vocalists and instrumentalists of all levels are welcome – we just ask that you come ready to perform 2-4 pieces.

If you are interested in this wonderful service opportunity, please contact Melany at operationsmanager@concertsinmotion.org and she will send more information on how to sign up.  Students are asked to commit to one Monday per month but are welcome to sign up for additional Mondays, too!

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.

3T Writing Workshops
3T Writing Workshops hopes to offer a place for students to write freely about what is on their minds and have their words validated by actors bringing their words to life.

Students are invited to join their upcoming workshops on Dec 7 and Dec 14 at The New School for Drama 151 Bank St. from 4-6pm.

Please click here for an application. More information is found on their website.

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of November 27, 2017 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

We are hoping that this Thanksgiving holiday weekend has provided you with the opportunity to feel rejuvenated and connected with your family, friends and loved ones.

Congratulations once again to everyone who participated in the Spelling Bee on 11/14. Here are the top results.

  • First place wiinner – Neo Yee (6th Grade)
  • 1st Runner-up – Evan Schleck (5th Grade)
  • 2nd Runner-up – Mark Tsybulski (5th Grade)
  • 3rd Runner-up –  Aaron Wang (7th Grade)

The top three School Spelling Bee finishers will advance to the Manhattan District Spelling Bee in January 2018, where they will have the opportunity to qualify for the Daily News New York Citywide Spelling Bee (a qualifier for the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C. that will take place in May 2018).

Our week ahead features Open School Week as well as our November Principal’s Coffees. Both of these opportunities are intended to provide you and your family with the opportunity to learn more about your child’s courses and experience at NEST+m. For more information, please see below.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


OPEN SCHOOL WEEK

This year, Open School “Week” will be from Monday November 27th to Wednesday November 29th. Parents, please see the following guidelines:

Open School Week provides you with the opportunity to observe your child’s learning experience in action. It also allows us to reinforce our family-school partnership and commitment to each child’s success.

During Open School Week Please Observe the Following Norms:

  • Observe your child /children only.
  • Stay for the entire instructional period.
  • Please do not use cell phones or other electronic devices including cameras.
  • Please do not bring food or drinks into the classroom.
  • Please enter the classroom as if it’s a fishbowl, a space for you to see and enjoy but that you are outside of. This will enable classroom instruction and learning to proceed as usual.
  • Thank you in advance for honoring our request that you refrain from engaging in conversation with your child, other students or your child’s teacher. A simple wave or smile will allow your child to know that you are present. Smiles are always welcomed.

Lower Grades (K-5):

We have scheduled Family Fridays throughout the year for families to learn about the classroom curriculum. The K-5 open school week will showcase our “specials” classes.

Please sign up using this link: NEST+m Lower Grades Open School Week Sign Up

Middle Grades (6-8):

For 6th grade, please click on one of the below links to sign up for one 6th grade class.

Math: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0c4ba9af2da5fa7-open
Science: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0f4aadab2aa5f58-open
ELA: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0c4babae28a0f94-sign/31650677
Social Studies: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/4090a4eaca62caaf49-open1
Theater: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0c4babae28a0f85-open

For 7th and 8th grades, observations of classes are on a first come first served basis with a limit of 5 parent observers per class. No signup is necessary.

Upper Grades (9-12):

Parents have the opportunity to observe your child’s program on one instructional day between Monday November 27th and Wednesday November 29th. Observations of classes are on a first come first served basis with a limit of 5 parent observers per class. No signup is necessary.

 


Our Week Ahead

Wednesday November 29

  • Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee at 8:30 am in the cafeteria. All faculty and families are welcome.

 Thursday November 30

  • Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee at 8:30 am in the cafeteria. All faculty and families are welcome.

Friday December 1 

  • Upper Grades Principal’s Coffee at 8:30 am in the cafeteria. All faculty and families are welcome.

 


Looking Ahead

Tuesday, December 5

  • K-12 Town Hall – we will host a Town Hall from 6-7 pm in the auditorium.

Friday, December 8

  • 6th grade annual potluck dinner will be held at 5:30 in the cafeteria

 


Opportunities for NEST+m students

2018 STEM Research Academy
The STEM Research Academy will allow 25 high school students to take a spring pre-college science course (for H.S. credit) to introduce them to the expectations of working in a research lab environment. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible to participate in a six week paid summer research experience with a Baruch College faculty member. Application deadline is December 1. Please click here for more information.

Kaplan Test Prep
Kaplan Test Prep will be running an SAT Class at NEST+M School in preparation for the March 21st SAT Test date! Class will include 2 Practice Tests and 6 three hour Classroom sessions.   Seating is limited   Register today,  by calling 1-800-527-8378 or visiting https://www.kaptest.com/college-prep/nestm .Use CodeNEST400 to get a $400 discount on the course!!   Prices go up 3 weeks prior to the class start date!

Class Code: SAIKM18005P
Discount Code: NEST400
Schedule: Wednesdays starting at 2:50.  First session is 1/10/18!

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Concerts in Motion
Attention high school students: Would you like to brighten a senior citizen’s day, practice performing your music (instrument or vocal), and earn volunteer service hours all at the same time?

If this sounds good to you, Concerts in Motion, a nonprofit that serves senior citizens who can’t leave their homes, is looking for student volunteers!  We are looking for students to sign up to visit a senior citizen in Chinatown for a minimum of one visit per month.  All visits will be supervised by an adult from Concerts in Motion.  Vocalists and instrumentalists of all levels are welcome – we just ask that you come ready to perform 2-4 pieces.

If you are interested in this wonderful service opportunity, please contact Melany at operationsmanager@concertsinmotion.org and she will send more information on how to sign up.  Students are asked to commit to one Monday per month but are welcome to sign up for additional Mondays, too!

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.

3T Writing Workshops
3T Writing Workshops hopes to offer a place for students to write freely about what is on their minds and have their words validated by actors bringing their words to life.

Students are invited to join their upcoming workshops on Nov 30, Dec 7 and Dec 14 at The New School for Drama 151 Bank St. from 4-6pm.

Please click here for an application. More information is found on their website.

SAT / ACT Test Prep
Class of 2019
FREE Hybrid Exams (11/18 & 12/16; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! These are the last two dates this year for the Class of 2019. (Registration closes at noon the Thursday before the event). Register Here.

March 21 SAT Prep starts by 1/27 – See all SAT prep options here
April 14 ACT Prep starts by 2/24 – See all ACT Prep options here
*Group and Small Group options attached.

Class of 2020
FREE PSAT Exam & Review Seminar (3/10; 8:30am-12:30pm) – Take a practice PSAT Exam, score it, and chat through a few tips and tricks before your PSAT exam this March! Register Here.

FREE Hybrid Exams (4/28, 5/19, & 6/2; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! Register Here.

All Students
Career Planning Seminar (5/12; 10am-1pm) – Explore YOU and find a career that fits! Complete an interest assessment profile and find careers that match your interests. Register Here.

Atlas offers Group ($399+), Small Group ($599+), and Private Tutoring ($999+) prep options to suit the various needs of your students. Don’t forget, we offer unlimited scholarships to our group courses for those who qualify for free or reduced price lunch (verbal confirmation from counselor is the only proof required).

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu


Bill Moyers named the 2018 Justice Media Trailblazer by John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Bill Moyers named the 2018 Justice Media Trailblazer by John Jay College of Criminal Justice

New York, NY, December 1, 2017 — Bill Moyers, a legend in broadcast journalism for four decades, has been selected as the 2018 Justice Media Trailblazer, an award given annually by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and The Crime Report to honor individuals in the media or media-related fields who have advanced national understanding on the 21st-century challenges of criminal justice.

Most recently, Moyers was the executive producer of Rikers: An American Jail. The riveting documentary brings viewers face to face with men and women who have endured incarceration at the country’s largest jail facility. Their stories, told directly to the camera, vividly describe the cruel arc of the Rikers experience—from the shock of entry, to the extortion and control exercised by other inmates, the oppressive interaction with corrections officers, the torture of solitary confinement, and the challenges of reentering civil society.  RIKERS, which won a 2017 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award, is a production of Schumann Media Center, Inc. and Brick City TV LLC, in association with Public Square Media, Inc.

“Bill Moyers has been honored in many venues for his journalism, but the John Jay Trailblazer award is a way of recognizing the impressive contribution he has made in bringing longstanding issues of incarceration to the forefront at this time in our history, and in setting a standard of excellence for other journalists writing on criminal justice,” said Stephen Handelman, Executive Editor of The Crime Report.

“Through him, we are also honoring his documentary team, along with the men and women who bravely shared their experiences at Rikers.”

Moyers, who began his television career in 1971 after serving as deputy director of the Peace Corps and special assistant and press secretary to President Lyndon B. Johnson, has been responsible for groundbreaking public affairs series, such as NOW with Bill Moyers (2002-05), Bill Moyers Journal (2007-10) and Moyers & Company(2011-15). Among his many honors, he has won 36 Emmys and 9 Peabody Awards.

Moyers, the fifth recipient of the annual Justice Media Trailblazer, will receive his award during a dinner on the evening of February 15, 2018 at John Jay College, which will also recognize the winners of the annual 2017-2018 John Jay/Harry Frank Guggenheim Prizes for Excellence in Criminal Justice Journalism, who will be announced in January, 2018.  The dinner is the highlight of the 13th annual John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Symposium on Justice in America.

Previous Trailblazers were: Van Jones of CNN; David Simon of The WirePiper Kerman, author of Orange is the New Black; NPR’s Maria Hinojosa, producer of Latino USA; and New Yorker writer Jelani Cobb.

Former New York State Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman will introduce Moyers at the dinner, which will be emceed by NY 1 News anchor Errol Louis and hosted by John Jay College President Karol V. Mason.

Purchase a seat or table at the Trailblazer dinner here

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nationsIn teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality, and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu and follow @JohnJayCollege on Twitter.

The Crime Report,  published daily by  John Jay’s Center on Media, Crime and Justice,  is a national online site located at www.thecrimereport.org, that provides analysis, research news  and commentary prepared for practitioners, criminologists, journalists and others across the criminal justice community. The Center on Media, Crime and Justice was established at John Jay College in 2006 as the nation’s only practice- and research-oriented think tank devoted to encouraging and developing high-quality reporting on criminal justice, and to promoting better-informed public debate on the complex 21st Century challenges of law enforcement, public security and justice in a globalized urban society. For more information, visit the Center on Media, Crime and Justice website.


New Court-Interpreter Internship Harnesses Students’ Language Skills

New Court-Interpreter Internship Harnesses Students’ Language Skills

November 17, 2017—The New York State Unified Court System is teaming up with LaGuardia Community CollegeHunter College, and John Jay College for Criminal Justice, all part of The City University of New York, to expand training of future court interpreters.

The expansion is prompted by findings in the 2017 “Ensuring Language Access” report, which noted a growing need for qualified language interpreters in the New York State judicial system. The lack of interpreter services in Spanish as well as other non-English languages is significantly problematic given the diverse linguistic needs of new and recent immigrants from Latin America, South Asia and Middle East. According to the NYS Court System, well-trained court interpreters are especially needed in Albanian, Arabic, ASL, Bengali, Bosnian, Burmese, Cantonese, French, German, Haitian Creole, Hindi, Karen, Korean, Mandarin, Nepali, Pashtu, Polish, Punjabi, Russian, Somali, Spanish, Twi, and Vietnamese.

The Unified Court System Internship Program officially launched in Spring 2017. This fall semester included 39 students from LaGuardia, as well as additional students from Hunter and John Jay — all schools with language interpretation and translation programs — to their internship programs in Fall 2017. The internship program is scheduled to expand to more CUNY campuses in Spring 2018. The program provides multilingual students with a 20-hour or 100-hour internship training to prepare them for the state’s Per Diem court-interpreter screening exams—the first step in qualifying for a well-paying job as a court interpreter. Pay for a full-day (more than four hours) per diem interpreting service is $300; pay for a half-day (four hours or less) is $170.

“Working as a court-interpreter has allowed me to contribute to NYC’s Nepalese community, where the English language has become a barrier. I’ve seen cases of miscommunication, and of incorrect information getting passed on, because of a lack of understanding,” said Sandhya Lama Tamang. “This internship has prepared me for a job as a court-interpreter where I get to use my fluency in both Nepali and English. I’m grateful for the experience.”

How did this partnership begin?

Several years ago, a New York State Court was urgently in need of an interpreter for Berber, a language spoken in North Africa, Egypt and the Sahara Desert. After months of searching, causing significant case delays, they found Habiba Boumlik, associate professor of English Language Acquisition (ELA) at LaGuardia Community College/CUNY. Not only was she able to provide Berber-English interpretation, but she is also trained to provide interpretation for French and Arabic—so the court began regularly requesting her interpretation services.

Noting this demand for interpretation and the scarcity of highly-trained interpreters for languages other than Spanish, Professor Boumlik linked up with colleague Tomonori Nagano, associate professor of ELA. As coordinator of LaGuardia’s Modern Languages and Literatures Program, Professor Nagano works with a large number of bilingual students who speak a second language with their families and community—giving them conversational aptitude, but a lack of training in how to use their home language in a professional setting.

“When I heard about the interpreter internship opportunity at the NYS Court System, I immediately thought that LaGuardia, as we’re not only a Hispanic-Serving Institution but we also educate speakers of nearly 100 non-English languages, could make a major impact on the critical shortage of court interpreters,” said Professor Nagano.

“Given the large numbers of minority and new-immigrant students here at LaGuardia, we’re thrilled to help maintain fair and impartial access to our state’s judiciary system for these communities,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “And court-interpretation is a great job path for our multilingual students.”

For Fall 2017, Professors Boumlik and Nagano have recommended 39 LaGuardia students to the 20-hour (entry-level) internship program. The first cohort successfully completed their internship and some are planning to take the Per Diem Court Interpreter examination in December. The diversity of their languages mirror that of LaGuardia, including Arabic, ASL, Bengali, Cantonese, French, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Nepali, Pashtu, Polish, Punjabi, Spanish, Thai, and Urdu.

“We are excited about this new relationship with the NYS Court System and hope to extend our students’ participation in the full-semester internship in the future,” said Professor Boumlik.

Students interested in applying for this program should email their resume, cover letter and unofficial school transcript to: courtinterpreterinternship@nycourts.gov.

Read more about this new program.

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Media Coverage:
Campus News: CUNY hosts new court-interpreter program


JOHN JAY’S FOURTH ANNUAL DAY OF GIVING RAISES OVER $100,000 TOWARDS STUDENT SUCCESS

John Jay’s Fourth Annual Day of Giving Raises over $100,000 Towards Student SuccessOn Thursday, November 16, 2017, John Jay College celebrated its fourth Annual Day of Giving at John Jay. Within the span of 24 hours, 244 donations were made raising a total of $100,026.87.

This Annual Day of Giving, the College identified four priority areas: the Student Emergency Fund, The John Jay 2020 Scholarship, DACA and Undocumented Student Support, and the Annual Campaign.

The Student Emergency Fund offers financial assistance and services to students facing economic challenges, hunger, homelessness and other hardships. The John Jay 2020 Scholarship is a pooled fund with the goal of creating $5 million in new scholarships by 2020. Donations to DACA and Undocumented Student Support go towards providing resources for undocumented students on campus, including the creation of a New America Student Support Center. Gifts to the Annual Fund are used where the need of the College is greatest.

By contributing a gift to the Annual Day of Giving, donors supported John Jay’s promising students so that they can succeed in their future careers.  One of those students is Lisa Cho.

When Lisa Cho’s family was robbed at gunpoint at their restaurant, Lisa, who was only six at the time, was forever changed. Her parents moved from China to the United States shortly thereafter to ensure that Lisa and her older siblings would have a safe and successful future. DACA gave Lisa the chance to apply for a TheDream.US scholarship to earn her degree. “When I got the scholarship I was so happy because that meant my parents didn’t have to find a way to pay for my tuition,” she said. It would have been even more difficult otherwise.

Lisa is now a sophomore studying criminology and one of many DACA students enrolled at John Jay. Lisa’s heart is set on using criminal justice to help people in need: “I experienced a crime at a young age, and my family never got the justice we wanted. Now, I want to become a lawyer. I care about the lives of minorities.”

The College thanks everyone who contributed to making this year’s Annual Day of Giving a success.

“I want to say thank you for showing your strong support for our students and their continued success at John Jay,” said President Karol Mason. “On behalf of the entire John Jay community, I want you to know that you have made a significant difference in the lives of our students.”


ALUMNA ROSARIO ORENGO HAS RECEIVED PRESTIGIOUS BIG APPLE AWARD FROM NYC DOE

Alumna Rosario Orengo Has Received Prestigious Big Apple Award from NYC DOEWhen Rosario Orengo enrolled in John Jay in the fall of 1995, she was sure she would graduate with a degree in Forensic Psychology and become an FBI investigator—just like Clarice Starling. But soon after starting the program, she realized it wasn’t like what she’d seen in the movies, so she went back to her high school to meet with her Social Studies teacher, who encouraged her to study government instead. She didn’t seriously consider teaching until pursuing her Master’s in Education a few years after graduating in 2000. “It was really the prompting of my teacher that got me to do it,” she said.

Today, Orengo is a Social Studies teacher just like her mentor, and this year she was recognized as one of the best in the city by recently winning the prestigious and highly selective Big Apple Award. After being nominated by her principal and a colleague at the Urban Assembly Unison School, Orengo went through an intensive process that included interviews and classroom visits, and eventually narrowed down a group of 7,200 nominated teachers to 19 winners.

Over a 10-month period, the award provides teachers with both leadership development as well as the opportunity to be a direct counsel to Chancellor Carmen Fariña. Since the Big Apple teachers represent the best in the city, they sit on the Chancellor’s Advisory Board, and meet with her to discuss how to improve school climate and parent engagement, two of the Chancellor’s areas of interest.

“There’s so much in education that’s broken and as a teacher, I have ideas,” Orengo said. “Now, I’m able to influence something bigger in the DOE. I work at a school that has figured out a lot of things that if done on a larger scale could have a big impact. I’m hoping that what I have to bring to the table will be seen.”

The Big Apple Award recognizes the unique enthusiasm and dedication that Orengo brings to her work every day. “As hard as teaching can be, I love what I do,” she said. “I like being responsible for young minds and I think what’s most important for me is how am I going to make them civically minded? How do I help them become responsible adults?”

Though John Jay didn’t take her on the path she initially expected it would, she credits the institution for developing her civic-mindedness. “John Jay exposed me to the idea that there is injustice in the world and that we are the ones who can help fix that. What I walked away with was a sense of responsibility for our society and the world, and I want to spread that,” she said.

As a teacher, Orengo influences the minds of New York’s future leaders, and now as a Big Apple Award winner, she has the potential to influence the city’s policies as well. But setting a good example begins at home, with her 16 year-old son and 6 year-old daughter. When Orengo was awarded the Big Apple Award, her daughter was extremely proud. “She wouldn’t stop talking about it at her school, and other teachers congratulated me until even the principal of her school found out,” she said. “She says she wants to be a teacher just like her mom.”


ALUMNUS SHAWN WILLIAMS IS AWARDED PRESTIGIOUS FELLOWSHIP TOWARDS DOCTORAL STUDIES IN SCIENCE

Alumnus Shawn Williams is Awarded Prestigious Fellowship Towards Doctoral Studies in ScienceAfter Shawn Williams graduated from John Jay in 2015 with a degree in Forensic Science, he knew he wanted to pursue an advanced career in the sciences. He began a PhD at Brown University and has now received a Gilliam Fellowship for Advanced Study from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, which will offer financial assistance for the next three years of his doctoral research as well as networking and mentorship opportunities. Shawn credits his education at John Jay, especially the Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math (PRISM), as having first opened his eyes to his potential as a researcher and scientist.

“Until going to John Jay, I didn’t envision myself as a scientist or going to graduate school. I had only seen scientists on TV. PRISM allowed me to see myself as a scientist by setting up a network that said, hey you can do this. They made you want to work and study harder, but they were always there to pick you up. That was key to helping me apply to grad school,” Williams said.

Williams looks forward to continuing his research in biology with the help of The Gilliam Fellowship, which is awarded to exceptional students who are committed to increasing diversity and equity in science, especially for groups that are traditionally underrepresented in STEM. Williams, who grew up in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, says this representation is important.

“We’re products of our environments,” he said. “I didn’t realize what a scientist actually did until I was at John Jay. A lot of kids feel the same way. It’s really important for them to see someone in science who comes from their neighborhood. If there’s only one type of person going into the field, we’re doing a disservice to scientific community.”

Read more about Williams’ journey on Brown University’s website.


Detroit book by CCNY’s Herb Boyd is NAACP award finalist

CCNY faculty member and author Herb Boyd.

Black Detroit – A People’s History of Self-Determination,” the 25th book by City College of New York adjunct professor Herb Boyd, is a finalist for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in the nonfiction category. The winner will be announced Jan. 14 in Los Angeles.

HarperCollins Publishers describe “Black Detroit” as a “blend of memoir, love letter, history, and clear-eyed reportage that explores the city’s past, present, and future and its significance to the African American legacy and the nation’s fabric.”

Boyd moved to Detroit in 1943, as race riots were engulfing the city. Though he did not grasp their full significance at the time, this critical moment would be one of many he witnessed that would mold his political activism and exposed a city restless for change. In “Black Detroit,” he reflects on his life and this landmark place, in search of understanding why Detroit is a special place for black people.

Boyd revels how Blacks were prominent in the city’s historic, groundbreaking union movement and—when given an opportunity— tireless workers who made the automobile industry the center of American industry. Well-paying jobs on assembly lines allowed Blacks to attain middle class status and achieve financial stability, an accomplishment not often attainable in other industries.

And while many of these middle class jobs have disappeared, Detroit survives, which represents the strength of the Motor City. In addition, Boyd highlights the major figures who have defined and shaped Detroit, including abolitionist William Lambert, Motown founder Berry Gordy, the city’s first Black mayor Coleman Young, singer Aretha Franklin, Malcolm X and Nobel Peace Prize winner Ralph Bunche.

Reaction from critics includes:

  • “An inspiring, illuminating book that will interest students of urban history and the black experience” — Kirkus Reviews;
  • “The extensive coverage demonstrates the full range and influence of black citizens in Detroit…Recommended for anyone interested in Detroit or in urban history” — Library Journal;
  • “Comprehensive and compelling… We owe [Boyd] a debt of gratitude” — Washington Post;

A faculty member in City College’s Black Studies Program for 12 years, Boyd teaches African American history and culture.

The Harlem resident’s other books include “Baldwin’s Harlem: A Biography of James Baldwin,” a 2009 NAACP Image Award finalist and “The Diary of Malcolm X: 1964,” edited with Ilyasah Al-Shabazz, Malcolm X’s daughter.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Baruch College Dominates Traders@MIT Fall Intercollegiate Trading Competition

Second Consecutive Year Undergraduate Students Claim Top-Three Spots

Baruch College captured 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place for the second consecutive year at the 10th annual Traders@MIT Fall Intercollegiate Trading Competition.  A fourth Baruch College team earned 6th place in the prestigious competition with students representing such universities as Cornell, Duke, Harvard, MIT, Princeton, and Stanford.

Held on November 11, the full-day event is the largest trading competition of its kind in the country, with numerous sessions focusing on electronic trading and open outcry, also known as floor trading.

Top honors went to Sam Bouiss (Quantitative Modeling and Statistics‘19) and Nancy Tadrous (Financial Mathematics‘18) for first place; Asimina Hamakiotes (Mathematics‘20) and Yinheng Li (Financial Mathematics and Economics ‘18) for second place; and Echo Liu (Financial Mathematics and Economics‘19) and Xinyi (Catherine) Xu (Mathematics‘18) as part of the third place team. Lirek Kulik (Financial Mathematics‘18) and Yifan Hu (Financial Mathematics‘19) came in sixth place.

The Baruch students were coached by Professor Jarrod Pickens, who also led a winning team earlier this year the Rotman Trading Competition.

Competing Takes Confidence and Talent

“These wins take enormous confidence, poise, and rigorous preparation since our students are competing against teams from the very top schools in the country,” said Dan Stefanica, PhD, co-director of the Baruch Master of Financial Engineering Program. “By capturing first, second, third place, and also sixth, these victories showcase our students’ impressive trading talents and sharp skills.”

According to Stefanica, Baruch College finished in the top three during the following sessions: algorithmic options trading (2nd and 3rd place), dark pools and FX (2nd and 3rd place), and price prediction (3rd place).

Successful Competitions in 2017

Baruch College undergraduate and graduate students were victorious in several key competitions throughout the year. In September, four students in the Master of Science in Financial Engineering program won third place in Datathon. Additionally, a team claimed victory in the sixth annual International Association for Quantitative Finance competition, in a three-way tie. Four students also netted first place in the 5th annual University of Chicago Midwest Trading Competition.

 

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Hunter Student Thamara Jean Named a 2018 Rhodes Scholar, a First for Hunter

Brooklyn’s Thamara Jean, Daughter of Haitian Immigrants, Is One of 32 Americans Chosen For the Prestigious Award Hunter Student Thamara Jean Named a 2018 Rhodes Scholar, a First for Hunter

Hunter College student Thamara Jean ’18 has been named a Rhodes Scholar, the first Hunter student to receive this prestigious award. Jean, who was born in Brooklyn to Haitian immigrants and graduated from Edward R. Murrow High School, is one of only 32 Americans selected. A Rhodes Scholarship is the oldest and best known award for international study and considered the most famous academic award available to American college graduates.

“Thamara Jean is an amazing story,” said Hunter College president Jennifer J. Raab. “She is an extraordinary young scholar and activist who will make her mark as a public intellectual. She attended a New York City public high school before becoming a Macaulay Scholar at Hunter, and she represents Hunter’s commitment to making the American Dream come true.”

During her junior year, Thamara wrote a senior thesis on the Black Lives Matter movement. It was recently published in article form in the Columbia University Journal of Politics and Society. Last summer, Thamara worked as a researcher for Prof. Brandon Terry at Harvard University, who is writing a book on the intellectual history of the Black Power movement.

“We are tremendously proud of Thamara’s individual achievement, but also of this important moment for Hunter College,” said President Raab. “Hunter’s recently-created Office of Prestigious Scholarships and Fellowships, funded by privately raised money, is modeled after advising services at elite private universities that guide students through the top graduate-scholarship application processes. Hunter has an exceptional student body and with the new services this office offers, we are helping connect our talented, hardworking young people with the opportunities they deserve. Last year, Hunter had its first Marshall Scholarship winner; this year, its first Rhodes. We are truly proud to be leveling the playing field with institutional support for these budding academic stars.”

Rhodes Scholarships provide all expenses for two or three years of study at the University of Oxford in England. Thamara Jean will enter Oxford in October 2018 and study political theory.

Throughout college Thamara has been active in community service, working for organizations like the activist civics curriculum program Generation Citizen. As a “Democracy Coach,” she led a class of 12th graders in Bushwick, Brooklyn, to develop a community-based civic action plan that addresses issues such as affordable housing and gentrification. By engaging in this and other forms of community service, Thamara came to believe that positive social change could be amplified if, rather than “leading from the top,” activists like her helped empower groups of people to make a difference in their communities.

According to Thamara Jean, the Rhodes Scholarship means a great deal to her whole family and her fellow students. “Both my parents are immigrants from Haiti and seeing their kids accomplish so much just reaffirms why they came to this country in the first place. Also, being the first from Hunter to win a Rhodes is meaningful because I can play an important part in establishing a path for students who, before now, may never even have considered pursuing an opportunity like this. At the same time, because so many students at my school come from such different backgrounds, we can bring unique perspectives and experiences to Oxford, continuing the good work Oxford has been doing recently to bring in students like me, who will be at the forefront of taking on the unprecedented challenges of our future.”


New Multifaith Center for Student Organizations Opens at Hunter College

In Thomas Hunter Hall, students from six different religious groups will share space in what is a model of diversity across religious, racial, national and economic lines. New Multifaith Center for Student Organizations Opens at Hunter College The new Multi-Faith Center houses Muslim Student Association, Hillel, Hindu Student Association, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Korea Campus Crusade for Christ, and the Sikh Student Association. There is also room for Chaplains of different faiths as well as a room designated for multi-faith programming.

Hunter has a long history of providing a welcoming environment to students of all religious and spiritual backgrounds.  Nearly three quarters of a century ago, Hunter had the country’s first student space dedicated to interfaith and interracial understanding when it acquired Roosevelt House and renamed it Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial Interfaith House using the part of the home where Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt lived and raised their family.

“Today’s dedication is another milestone in Hunter’s long history as a national leader in interfaith and interracial relations,” said President Raab.

On the wall in the new center is a quote from President Roosevelt sent at the time of the dedication he couldn’t attend which was during World War II.  It reads “This place of sacred memories is to become the first college center established for the high purpose of mutual understanding between Protestant, Jewish, and Catholic students.”

“What was important then is equally if not of greater importance today,” President Raab continued. “America has acquired many more faiths than the country knew in 1943 so it is essential our new space be welcome to these new groups and all students who are part of the Hunter community.”

At a ribbon cutting dedicating the new facility, Saim Siddiqui, a Hunter senior and president of the Muslim Student Association said, “In the past, Hunter’s faith based clubs, while in this building, were dispersed.  Having this community together in a shared space will be invaluable.”

Satvinder Guru, president of the Sikh Student Association, summarized: “This Multi-Faith Center demonstrates not only our remarkable diversity as Hunter College students, but our unity.”


New Multifaith Center for Student Organizations Opens at Hunter College

In Thomas Hunter Hall, students from six different religious groups will share space in what is a model of diversity across religious, racial, national and economic lines. New Multifaith Center for Student Organizations Opens at Hunter College The new Multi-Faith Center houses Muslim Student Association, Hillel, Hindu Student Association, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Korea Campus Crusade for Christ, and the Sikh Student Association. There is also room for Chaplains of different faiths as well as a room designated for multi-faith programming.

Hunter has a long history of providing a welcoming environment to students of all religious and spiritual backgrounds.  Nearly three quarters of a century ago, Hunter had the country’s first student space dedicated to interfaith and interracial understanding when it acquired Roosevelt House and renamed it Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial Interfaith House using the part of the home where Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt lived and raised their family.

“Today’s dedication is another milestone in Hunter’s long history as a national leader in interfaith and interracial relations,” said President Raab.

On the wall in the new center is a quote from President Roosevelt sent at the time of the dedication he couldn’t attend which was during World War II.  It reads “This place of sacred memories is to become the first college center established for the high purpose of mutual understanding between Protestant, Jewish, and Catholic students.”

“What was important then is equally if not of greater importance today,” President Raab continued. “America has acquired many more faiths than the country knew in 1943 so it is essential our new space be welcome to these new groups and all students who are part of the Hunter community.”

At a ribbon cutting dedicating the new facility, Saim Siddiqui, a Hunter senior and president of the Muslim Student Association said, “In the past, Hunter’s faith based clubs, while in this building, were dispersed.  Having this community together in a shared space will be invaluable.”

Satvinder Guru, president of the Sikh Student Association, summarized: “This Multi-Faith Center demonstrates not only our remarkable diversity as Hunter College students, but our unity.”


Students Debate Opioid Crisis in Speech Class

Opioid abuse in the United States has skyrocketed, killing more than 30,000 between 2002 and 2015. Young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 are at highest risk according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

It was against this backdrop that twelve Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students in Professor Heather Miller’s Fundamentals of Speech (SPE 100) class met on November 16 to debate the causes of the nation’s soaring opioid crisis and how deeply it is impacting the New York City community.

“By the time we leave this room tonight, as many as eight people will have died from something related to opioids,” said Miller, as students shuffled data charts and scripts for their presentations. In the three weeks leading up to this debate, students had been tasked with researching and formulating evidence-based speeches about the crisis.

Fundamentals of Speech is a required course at BMCC. Typically, students in this class will present both an informative and persuasive speech, all in an effort to help them communicate more effectively in an academic setting. The course requires research, writing and evidence-based argumentation, and in this class, it apparently opened the minds of a number of students about a national epidemic.

“I really had not heard about the opioid crisis before now,” said Liberal Arts major Ivy Ofori Asantewaa, who is from Ghana.

The class was divided into teams of two, and each student made their case using Power Point images of statistics, trends and graphs. Each team argued either the pro or con of a position on the crisis—regardless of how they might feel personally.

The three propositions included: “New York City is relatively unaffected by the opioid addiction that is impacting other parts of the country”; “People who are addicted to opioids have only themselves to blame” and “Shame is a major contributing factor to the growth of opioid addiction—and we should remove the shame associated with opioid addiction in order to treat it more effectively.”

“To shame someone for their faults is to further the suppression of such faults, rather than providing a solution,” argued Psychology major Michelle Ramirez. “To fight this epidemic we must start with understanding rather than with judging.”

Citing research, to build an argument

Ramirez cited a University of Virginia study showing the nation’s opioid overdose rate was likely 24 percent higher than what The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported during a six-year period between 2008 through 2014.

She argued that the families of addicts are often too ashamed to disclose on a death certificate, that a loved one died from opioid use. In many states, those deaths go unexplained, leading to the underreporting of the magnitude of the crisis.

“At first, I didn’t agree with my proposition, that shame is a major contributing factor to addition,” said Psychology major Justin Ramsey. “Doing the research and reading about other people’s experience has helped me understand that not everyone’s situation with addiction is the same,” he said.

Crisis impacting careers

The decision to focus on as grim a topic as the nation’s opioid crisis made good sense to Miller, since a majority of her students say they hope to pursue careers in criminal justice, psychology and other health-related professions.

“The opioid crisis will likely impact many of the students in some way once they are out in the adult working world,” she said. “Also, when students are all doing research in the same area, I can spend more time teaching them research skills, than I would be able to if they were focused on 12 different topics.”

The opioid crisis is already present in many of the students’ day-to-day lives, Miller explained. Some have been exposed to open drug use in their Bronx, Staten Island or Queens neighborhoods. Others have shared stories such as that of a friend who had gotten addicted while in high school, an addict sibling who stole the family TV and another, whose father became addicted to pain pills after a work injury and months later, is struggling to get off them.

All the students agreed, that research and the incorporation of facts, statistics or other evidence adds credibility to an argument, and that is something they say they will use throughout their academic and professional careers.

“The facts surrounding the opioid crisis are the wakeup call,” said Psychology major Jamel Hamilton-Wade. “The facts tell us what’s out there, how real it is.”


Business Leaders Share Their Journeys

Rochelle Stewart, Director of Social Strategy at Conde Nast speaks with students.

The Leadership Breakfast Series at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) presents high-profile members of the business and finance community in free, informal talks with students, alumni, staff and faculty.

The series is held in the Fiterman Hall Conference Center, which was filled to capacity for both Fall 2017 events. On October 11, guest speaker David Steingard—CEO of Laughing Man Coffee & Tea, Director of the Laughing Man Foundation and BMCC Foundation Board Member—took the stage. On November 15, the guest speaker was Rochelle Stewart, Director of Digital and Social Strategy at Condé Nast.

The Leadership Breakfast Series is presented by the Office of Student Activities, BMCC Urban Male Leadership Academy, Office of College Development and BMCC Foundation.

“We want our students to see the leaders as role models; to feel inspired about what is possible for themselves, going forward,” says Doris Holz, Vice President for Development and Chief Operating Officer of the BMCC Foundation. “The speakers share their journeys—how they overcame obstacles and were able to succeed—and this encourages our students to persevere. For us, it is also important for business leaders who share BMCC’s mission, to support our students with internships, job shadowing and other opportunities, as well by supporting the BMCC Foundation Fund and our annual scholarship gala.”

Rochelle Stewart, Director of Digital and Social Strategy at Condé Nast

In her talk at BMCC on November 15, Rochelle Stewart shared her experiences in college and on Wall Street, often being the only woman, and only woman of color, in the settings she found herself part of. She graduated cum laude from Georgetown University and received an MBA from Columbia Business School. Today at Conde Nast, she has doubled online traffic and engagement for brands including VogueGQ and Vanity Fair. She serves as a member of the Diversity Task Force and champions Conde Nast’s mission to increase diversity and inclusion. She is also a board member of the non-profit All in Together, Women Leading Change.

Respected for her acumen as a data strategist, Stewart is also known as an advocate for women. “I care about supporting those who have less of a chance,” she said during her November 15 talk at BMCC, “and that includes people who look like me, as well as others.”

Accompanying Stewart at her talk were Conde Nast executives Erica Lovett, Diversity Program Manager and Recruiter; Marvin Hamilton, Vice President of Human Resources, and Krista Richardson, Recruiter.

During the question-and-answer session that followed Stewart’s talk, a student asked for her advice on negotiating an employment contract. “Ask for more,” Stewart said. “Women tend not to ask for more.” She also advised, “It’s less about the title and more about developing your skills.”

After the event, students continued their conversations with Stewart. “I’m here because I’m inspired to hear women in leadership positions, and I’m glad to see men in the audience because it impacts their perceptions, as well,” said Iva Porfirova (Communication Studies, ’17), former president of the BMCC Communications Club and a member of Out in Two who transferred to NYU through the CCTOPscholarship program.

“I related to the points she made,” said BMCC Liberal Arts major Sandra Nachfoerg, who was struck by Stewart’s advice for women to “stop apologizing,” especially in the workplace. “Women often have a reflexive need to apologize and be ‘polite’,” Stewart said, and Nachfoerg admits, “I do apologize a lot, but I’m working on it. I think we are afraid to show our real selves that don’t fit the box we are put in, as females.”

David Steingard, co-founder and CEO of Laughing Man Coffee, and Director of the Laughing Man Foundation

Having grown up in the Tribeca neighborhood of BMCC, David Steingard was already familiar with the BMCC campus when he enrolled as a freshman at age 16. After transferring to Baruch College, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in advertising and marketing, he graduated from New York Law School—but as he shared with students at his Leadership Breakfast Series talk, he was not ready to stop searching for his passion in life.

David Steingard with students

That opportunity came when Steingard was working as a criminal prosecutor in Brooklyn, and made a career change to join with actor Hugh Jackman in creating Laughing Man Coffee & Tea, a coffee shop in Tribeca, lower Manhattan. Steingard is now CEO of the coffee and tea business, and Director of the Laughing Man Foundation, which supports sustainable coffee farming in Peru, Ethiopia and other countries. He is also a member of the BMCC Foundation Board.

After Steingard’s talk on October 11, he held a question-and-answer session, and even when the event was over, students were lined up to shake his hand and introduce themselves.

According to Brian Haller, Director of Foundations and Corporate Relations at BMCC, “David shared experiences related to running a business, such as how you often don’t know exactly how to do something that is required of you, but you figure it out, because you have to. That was just one of the many points that seemed to resonate with the audience.”

Steingard agrees that students are keenly interested in the “how to” of starting a business. “Judging by the great questions they asked, it seemed they really wanted to get a sense of how I handled certain situations, such as how I started the business, and how and why I kept going,” he said. “It’s really important to demystify something as natural and wonderful as starting your own business, and hopefully our conversation gave the students more confidence to follow their paths.”


John Jay Students Participate in MSNBC’s “The Beat with Ari Melber” Thanksgiving Special

John Jay Students Participate in MSNBC’s “The Beat with Ari Melber” Thanksgiving Special

This November, Ari Melber, legal analyst and host of MSNBC’s show “The Beat with Ari Melber,” invited John Jay students from the College’s Pre-Law Institute to participate in a special Thanksgiving edition. The show, which aired on November 24, focused on Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing investigation into potential collusion between the Trump Campaign and Russia.

The special was filmed in the Moot Court of John Jay’s New Building, where a group of students served as a mock jury while Candidate for Illinois Attorney General Renato Mariotti and renowned criminal defense lawyer Alan Dershowitz acted as the prosecution and defense. After listening to opening statements and discussion, which included Executive Director of the Center for the Advancement of Public Integrity Jennifer G. Rodgers and President of the Brennan Center for Justice Michael Waldman, students were invited to share their opinions on whether they believed the Trump Campaign really colluded.

MSNBC’s show “The Beat with Ari Melber,”“At times it was challenging to make a decision,” said Jasmine Awad, a junior majoring in Criminal Justice. “Sometimes, I agreed with the defense and other times I agreed with the prosecution.”

Though “collusion” is the word most often used to describe Mueller’s investigation, students learned that collusion itself is not a federal crime. Rather, the actual legal issue is conspiracy, and what Mueller is investigating is whether or not the Trump Campaign conspired with Russians to violate federal law.

Micah Bryant, a senior majoring in Criminal Justice, said he hadn’t realized there was such a distinction. “Both sides had convincing arguments on whether collusion actually expanded into conspiracy,” he said. “It was great to have access to these great legal minds going back and forth,” he added, referring to Mariotti and Dershowitz.

Experiencing the trial exposed students to other intricacies of the Mueller investigation. Students learned about the different potential federal laws violated, the ramifications of providing false statements to federal investigators, as well as what constitutes obstruction of justice. “Now that I’m more familiar with the legal standards, I’m looking at this differently,” said Veeana Singh, a junior majoring in Political Science.

Charles Davidson, Director of the Pre-Law Institute and Center for Post-Graduate Opportunities at John Jay, said that he was unsurprised at how enthusiastic students were to learn more about the Russia investigation. “Our Pre-Law Institute students are deeply concerned about the pressing legal issues and political controversies facing our nation,” he said.The filming also provided a unique opportunity for students to learn about the inner workings of a courtroom. For Dean Estimable, a sophomore majoring in Criminal Justice, that experience is invaluable. “I had only seen trials on TV shows,” he said. “It was great to learn more about how the process actually works.”

Alondra Cuevas, a senior majoring in Political Science, agrees that seeing the moot performance helped make the investigation less abstract. “Before this, I hadn’t thought about the issue in the context of a courtroom,” she said.

Students not only enjoyed learning more about the practice of law, but also having a behind-the-scenes glimpse at how television shows are made. Cataydra Brown, a junior majoring in Law and Society, hadn’t realized so much went into filming an hour-long show. “It was interesting seeing the production of it as well as all the cameras on set,” she said. “We kept having to do certain parts over.”

After the filming, Ari Melber, whose background includes years of practicing First Amendment law as well as serving as a legislative aide in the U.S. Senate, gathered with students to answer any questions they had following the taping. Students eagerly asked about media and production, as well as additional clarification of legal processes, and Melber thanked students for participating.

“A trial isn’t made up of people who have a political axe to grind. A trial requires real people with an open mind who deliberate with each other,” Melber said. “From what I saw, you all did a good job.”

Watch the full episode on MSNBC.


CUNY Law Takes on the #CUNYTuesday Challenge

This November 28—on Giving Tuesday, recognized throughout the country as a day devoted to charitable contributions, CUNY School of Law will participate in a university wide 24-hour giving challenge to support student success called #CUNYTuesday.

Giving Tuesday is a movement started in 2012 to create an international day of giving, on the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving, as a response to the commercialization and consumerism of the holiday season.

In the fall of 2017, all incoming students were asked to answer the question “Why Are You Here?.” Students’ responses are exhibited on the second floor of the CUNY Law building. The responses included reasons such as: “fight for those who are most vulnerable,” “chip away at systems of oppression,” “work towards making the law accessible and applicable to everyone” and much more.

On Giving Tuesday, CUNY Law’s goal is to show the world why public interest law matters. All members of the CUNY Law community are encouraged to share what brought them to CUNY Law on social media, on November 28. Those who participate should use the hashtag #WhyImHereCUNYLaw.

“CUNY Law stands as a testament to the power of the dreams and determination of students and graduates who believe in the power of the law to catalyze social change, promote equality and support individuals and communities in their efforts to assert their individual rights and create civil society,” said CUNY Law Dean Mary Lu Bilek.

Two students and two alumnae (Irene Castro ‘19, Geno Nettle ‘19, Bahar Ansari ‘06 and Talia Peleg ’10) have already shared their motivations for coming to CUNY Law in a video available here.

On CUNY Tuesday, CUNY Law aims to raise $20,000 to kick off the annual fundraising campaign. Thanks to a generous donor, Marnie Berk ’96, chair of the CUNY School of Law Foundation board, all gifts will be matched up to $5,000.

“I see Giving Tuesday as an opportunity for those of you who can to signal your support for training lawyers hell-bent on using law in service of human needs, and, for all of us, as an opportunity to show our commitment to and pride in the Law School that graduates a higher percentage of public interest lawyers than any other law school in the country,” said Dean Bilek.


Baruch College Earns Tops Rankings for Finance Degree and Accounting Programs by Schools.com

Zicklin School of Business places among the top five in nationwide analysis

Baruch College placed #2 as among “Best Colleges for Finance Degree Programs” and #4 for “Best Colleges for Accounting Degree Programs” by Schools.com.

Accolades for Affordability and New York City Location

In its profiling of Baruch College as one of the best for obtaining a finance degree, Schools.com stated: “No other school on our list awarded more finance degrees than the City University of New York’s Bernard M. Baruch College. Nearly 20 percent of the degrees awarded at the Manhattan school in 2015 were in finance disciplines, at the graduate and undergraduate levels combined. Its total of 873 finance degree programs completed in 2015 topped the list as well, beating out some schools more than twice its size.”

It also noted that Baruch “was one of the few schools we surveyed to offer on-campus classes in evenings and on weekends for students who need some flexibility in their schedules.”

As part of its description as among the best for accounting degree programs, Schools.com cited the College’s location near Wall Street and Midtown as “an ideal place for business students to learn and network.”

According to Schools.com, “At its Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College offers a Bachelor of Business Administration in accounting. For those who would like to become Certified Public Accountants, there is an integrated BBA/Master of Science in Accountancy option that prepares students for that career path. Baruch College is the most selective school on this list, but it also ranks as having the most affordable tuition among these ten best schools for accounting.”

Methodology

To compile these rankings, Schools.com analyzed data from the National Center for Education Statistics, reviewing key categories including affordability, flexibility, and student success to evaluate hundreds of colleges and universities across the country.

For its methodology, Schools.com calculated on a 10-point scale every college’s in-state undergraduate tuition and fees, graduation rate, accessibility, institutional spending, student-to-faculty ratio, flexibility, and size of program. A full explanation of their methodology can be seen here.

 

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City Tech English Professor Awarded National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship

City Tech congratulates Professor Jennifer Sears, Department of English, on her National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) 2018 Creative Writing (Prose) Fellowship of $25,000. Professor Sears’ project, Other People’s Sons, is a novel set in central Illinois during World War II when a German POW camp was erected outside of Washington, a small town surrounded by long-established Mennonite communities.

The inspiration for Other People’s Sons was prompted by Professor Sears’ father who, as a boy in 1943, remembered seeing a strangely dressed crew harvesting pumpkins next to his one room schoolhouse in central Illinois. Curious, he and his friends snuck into the fields during recess over the course of the harvest and tried to get to know these men, not realizing at first that they were German prisoners-of-war.

“The NEA grant will support my research in Washington, Peoria, Metamora, and Eureka, Illinois; in archives at the Mennonite Historical Society in Germantown, Illinois; and, if possible, area military archives,” said Sears. “I will interview local residents and family members who remember the years the German POWs lived in Camp Washington and the tensions between the Mennonites, who were largely pacifist, and other townspeople. I also hope to travel to Switzerland and Germany to deepen my knowledge of my family’s Anabaptist roots.”

Through its Creative Writing Fellowships, the NEA gives writers the freedom to create, revise, conduct research, and connect with readers. These fellowships are highly competitive, with 1,692 eligible applicants in FY 2018. Applications are reviewed by a panel through an anonymous process and are judged solely on the artistic excellence of the work sample provided. Many American recipients of the National Book Award, National Book Critics Circle Award, and Pulitzer Prize in Poetry and Fiction were recipients of NEA fellowships early in their careers.

“The National Endowment for the Arts is proud to provide crucial funding to support these individuals in their creative endeavors and to continue expanding the range of ideas and viewpoints available to readers,” said Amy Stolls, NEA director of literature.

Professor Sears writes fiction and creative non-fiction. Her work is published or forthcoming in various literary venues including the New York Public Library’s Subway Library (forthcoming), Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading Series, Witness, Fiction International, Guernica, Ninth Letter, Fence, and Mennonite Life; the anthology Lost and Found: Stories of New York; and The Boston Globe. She has received awards from the Millay Colony for the Arts, Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, the Money For Women Fund, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She has an MFA from Columbia University.

Photo Credit: AFQ Photography


CCNY’s David Unger prepares new translation of Spanish-language classic

David Unger, award-winning author and director of CCNY’s Publishing Certificate Program, will re-translate the Miguel Ángel Asturias classic “El Señor Presidente.” Photo credit: Miriam Berkley.

David Unger, director of The City College of New York’s Publishing Certificate Program and an award-winning author, saw his latest novel, “The Mastermind” translated into several major languages including Spanish, Arabic and Italian. Now Unger is tasked with re-translating “El Señor Presidente,” the most celebrated novel by Guatemalan Nobel laureate Miguel Ángel Asturias.  The project is supported by a New York State Council on the Arts grant awarded to Unger and marks the 50th anniversary of Asturias’ Nobel Prize for Literature.

Published in 1943, “El Señor Presidente” (The President) is regarded by critics as the seminal work of a key Spanish-American literary genre, the dictator novel. Banned for years in Guatemala, it was inspired by Manuel Estrada Cabrera, that country’s president in the early 20th century. Asturias employed a wealth of literary devices to explore the devastating effects of the exercise of power on society when imposed through fear and torture.

Asturias’ other notable books include “Hombres de maíz” (Men of Maize) — a defense of Mayan culture and customs – and “Maladrón,” which was set during the 16th century Spanish conquest and addresses the subject of racial mixing.

Unger is a pre-eminent translator of Spanish-language books with 14 previous titles to his credit. They include “The Popol Vuh,” Guatemala’s pre-Columbian creation myth; and works by Rigoberta Menchú, Silvia Molina, Nicanor Parra, Teresa Cárdenas and Mario Benedetti among others.

In addition to “The Mastermind,” his own books include “The Price of Escape,” “Para Mi, Eres Divina,” “Ni chicha, ni limonada,” and “Life in the Damn Tropics.”

He received Guatemala’s 2014 Miguel Angel Asturias National Literature Prize for lifetime achievement.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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JAMES B. MILLIKEN ANNOUNCES HE WILL STEP DOWN AS CUNY CHANCELLOR AT END OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR

James B. Milliken, Chancellor of the City University of New York, announced today in a letter to the University community that he plans to step down as Chancellor at the end of the academic year. Milliken, 60, was named Chancellor of CUNY, the largest urban university in the country, in January 2014.

“I will have been at the helm of this most remarkable institution for four years, and it has been among the most rewarding experiences of my life, but I have decided that it is the right time for a change,” Milliken said.

Milliken added: “CUNY is an extraordinary institution, and my time here has been fulfilling beyond measure.  The world now knows, from groundbreaking research on an unprecedented scale, that CUNY is the greatest engine of social and economic mobility in the country. I was enormously fortunate to be part of the effort to expand opportunity and success to students on a scale no university can match, and I will always be grateful for that.”  (Read the Chancellor’s full message here.)

William C. Thompson Jr., chairperson of the Board of Trustees, said: “Chancellor Milliken recently informed me of his plans to step down at the end of this academic year.  On behalf of the entire board, I want to thank Chancellor Milliken for his tireless dedication to public education and for propelling CUNY to become the greatest urban university in the world. He has been a true advocate, and we deeply appreciate everything he has done for our University system. We wish him good health and continued success in his next endeavor.”

During Milliken’s tenure at CUNY, the University has opened and expanded important academic programs, become the nationally recognized leader in improving community college graduation rates, been recognized for propelling low-income students into the middle class and beyond on an unmatched scale, launched successful new programs for a number of student groups, including CUNY’s groundbreaking foster youth initiative, and obtained private scholarships for the largest number of DACA students in the country through TheDream.US program.

Milliken led the development of the University’s new strategic plan, “Connected CUNY,” which provides a detailed set of strategies for expanding accessibility, dramatically raising graduation rates and significantly improving career success for students through private-public partnership with employers. He has led the scaling up of the ASAP initiative to dramatically boost graduation rates, the launching of a new school of medicine, among the most diverse in the country, and an independent school of public health, new initiatives to diversify the arts institutions in New York and programs to increase the number of women in technology industries.

“James B. Milliken is an extraordinary leader who has served CUNY ­— one of our nation’s pre-eminent engines of social mobility, academic excellence and community enrichment — and the entire higher education community with energy, grace and vision,” Ted Mitchell, president of the American Council on Education, said. “JB has poured his heart and soul into promoting student success and expanding access to high-quality, postsecondary education. We will all miss him every day in his role guiding CUNY, but I am excited to see where his passion and commitment will take him next.”

“I have been given one of life’s great gifts — the chance to do something I love that has a positive impact on so many,” Milliken said. “I will always be grateful for that opportunity and for the relationships I have had with the students, faculty, staff and supporters of The City University of New York.”

John B. King Jr., president of the Education Trust and former U.S. Secretary of Education, said, “Through groundbreaking research, we can see CUNY’s impact as a powerful engine of social mobility, not just for the State of New York, but for the nation. I have been very encouraged by Chancellor Milliken’s efforts to scale up the successful Accelerated Study in Associate Programs initiative. Through ASAP, the university has taken a number of critical steps to dramatically accelerate degree completion, including providing counselors to students who are struggling and assisting students with financial challenges that could block their path to graduation. Chancellor Milliken also has focused on expanding success for all students, particularly the most vulnerable, through initiatives to support foster youth and innovative scholarship programs for students receiving protections under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s my sincere hope that other colleges and universities will learn from the important work being done by CUNY under Chancellor Milliken’s leadership, and I wish Chancellor Milliken all the best going forward.”

Vartan Gregorian, president of the Carnegie Corporation of New York and former president of the New York Public Library and Brown University, said of Milliken’s contribution: “JB is an outstanding leader of higher education and a profound believer in the mission of public education in a democratic society. He took on the nearly impossible task of running CUNY with the belief that the University could be better for the city, for the state and for the country. We are extremely grateful for his commitment to this goal, especially those of us who live and work in the city.”

Prior to serving as CUNY Chancellor, Milliken served for a decade as president of the University of Nebraska, his undergraduate alma mater, and before that as senior vice president of the 16-campus University of North Carolina system.

A search for the next Chancellor is expected to begin in January.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


Precocious Entrepreneurs to Make Donation to York’s STEM Program for Children

York College, CUNY

 

 

Precocious Entrepreneurs to Make Donation to York’s STEM Program for Children

On Saturday, December 2, two young sisters, Asha Samuel, a sixth-grader and Saya Samuel, a seventh-grader will donate their young life’s savings to the STEM program they attend at York College, CUNY. The children are draining their savings account to donate to the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) MUREP (Minority University Research and Education Program) also known as the “MUREP Aerospace Academy” (MAA). The program, founded at the college in 1999, is dependent upon external funding for survival.

The girls’ parents enrolled the sisters in the York College program (formerly known as the SEMAA program (Science, Engineering Mathematics, Aerospace Academy), a Saturday and summer program for children K1-12th grades). The free opportunity, designed to cultivate an early interest in STEM education for children in Southeast Queens, was brought to York College in partnership with Congressman Gregory Meeks (D-NY 5th District). With minimal funding from NASA, the MAA program relies on corporate sponsorship via Con Edison and National Grid, and also depends on private philanthropy.

During fall 2017 orientation for Asha and Saya’s group, the director, Dr. Nazrul Khandaker, who is also a Geology professor at the college, talked about the struggle for funding to keep it running; and the role community can play to keep the program offering superior STEM education to school children in the area. Inspired, Asha and Saya told their parents, who were in the audience, that they would like to dip into their savings, accumulating since they were born, and donate it. Their goal is to help keep the program running so that many more children can get the best out of the reputed NASA opportunity at York College.  The parents agreed and the budding philanthropists will make a formal presentation of almost all of their savings — close to $3,000 to the MAA program on December 2.

To date, more than 24,000 public school children have gone through the STEM program since its inception 18 years ago. Consequently, many have chosen STEM majors in college; all have expressed the importance of their early exposure to the sciences in enriching their educational experience. The event will take place on Saturday, December 2, at 10 am in                                 Room 3D01 of the Academic Core Building.

York College, a senior college of The City University of New York (CUNY), offers baccalaureate degrees in the liberal arts and sciences, accounting and business, journalism, communications technology, computer science, social work, teacher education, various health professions including nursing and aviation management; and MS degrees in Pharmaceutical Science, Occupational Therapy and Physician Assistant Studies. Founded in 1966, the college boasts nearly 30,000 alumni succeeding in almost every professional endeavor.

 


Open School “Week” November 27th-29th

Dear NEST+m Families,

This year, Open School “Week” will be from Monday November 27th to Wednesday November 29th.

Parents, please see the following guidelines:

Open School Week provides you with the opportunity to observe your child’s learning experience in action. It also allows us to reinforce our family-school partnership and commitment to each child’s success.

During Open School Week Please Observe the Following Norms:

  • Observe your child /children only.
  • Stay for the entire instructional period.
  • Please do not use cell phones or other electronic devices including cameras.
  • Please do not bring food or drinks into the classroom.
  • Please enter the classroom as if it’s a fishbowl, a space for you to see and enjoy but that you are outside of. This will enable classroom instruction and learning to proceed as usual.
  • Thank you in advance for honoring our request that you refrain from engaging in conversation with your child, other students or your child’s teacher. A simple wave or smile will allow your child to know that you are present. Smiles are always welcomed.

Lower Grades (K-5):

We have scheduled Family Fridays throughout the year for families to learn about the classroom curriculum. The K-5 open school week will showcase our “specials” classes.

Please sign up using this link: NEST+m Lower Grades Open School Week Sign Up

Middle Grades (6-8):

For 6th grade, please click on one of the below links to sign up for one 6th grade class.

Math: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0c4ba9af2da5fa7-open
Science: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0f4aadab2aa5f58-open
ELA: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0c4babae28a0f94-sign/31650677
Social Studies: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/4090a4eaca62caaf49-open1
Theater: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0c4babae28a0f85-open

For 7th and 8th grades, observations of classes are on a first come first served basis with a limit of 5 parent observers per class. No signup is necessary.

Upper Grades (9-12):

Parents have the opportunity to observe your child’s program on one instructional day between Monday November 27th and Wednesday November 29th. Observations of classes are on a first come first served basis with a limit of 5 parent observers per class. No signup is necessary.

 

 


special education admissions

NEST+m has a growing population of “2e” or “Twice Exceptional” students, especially in grades 6-12. 

Our NEST+m ICT program has grown quickly in a few brief years. Our team of 12 Special Education Teachers, 1 English as a New Language Teacher, 6 Related Service Providers, 4 Guidance Counselors and many co-teaching General Educators are well-versed in meeting the unique needs of our diverse learners. Whether through Integrated Co-Taught classes or mandated services in speech, counseling, occupational or physical therapy, our faculty members work with students and their families to create the most individualized program possible to ensure each child’s success.

Grades K-5

Students with IEPs are integrated into all General Education classes and receive related services either in class or in pull-out sessions, as per their IEP. There is no ICT programming in K-5. For more questions, please contact Sarah Liogys, Guidance Counselor at  sliogys@schools.nyc.gov.

Grades 6-8

What started with only 1 ICT class last year will grow to a full ICT program across all Middle Grades core content classes in 2017-2018. We plan to have 2 ICT cohort classes for 6th Grade, 2 ICT cohort classes for 7th Grade, and 1 for 8th Grade. In Middle Grades, all students move with their homeroom (i.e. 6A, 6B, 6C, 6D or 6E) throughout the day for core classes such as ELA, science, social studies and math. The classes are mixed for non-core subjects such as Physical Education, World Languages and Music. For more questions, please contact Melissa Chen, Guidance Counselor at mhuangchen@schools.nyc.gov

Grades 9-12

Our Upper Grades Integrated Collaborative Teaching Program has seen the largest growth in the past four years. We now have 2-3 ICT sections of ELA, Science, Math and Social Studies at each grade level in Upper Grades as well as SETSS classes for focused academic  support as needed per students’ IEPs. While there are certain grade-specific requirements, such as ELA 9 or US History for 11th Graders, students in the Upper Grades at NEST+m take many courses across grade level depending on their interests and academic readiness. For more questions, please contact Stephanie Glickman, Guidance Counselor at sglickman6@schools.nyc.gov or Katherine Silva, Guidance Counselor at ksilva@schools.nyc.gov.


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of November 20, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Our week ahead features three full days of instruction followed by the Thanksgiving recess. Schools are closed on Thursday and Friday.

We hope that the Thanksgiving recess provides you and your family with the opportunity to pause and to connect with family, friends and other loved ones.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Congratulations to:

  • All of our Lower Grades Spelling Bee Participants!
  • Our Lower Grades Chess Team for this weekend’s NEST+m Chess Tournament and last week’s “Susan Polgar World Open Championship for Girls and Boys”
    • K-2 Girls
      • 2nd place team: KC and Arabella – it was their first major event, and these two ladies rocked!
    • K-2 Boys
      • 1st place individual: Dylan Kang
      • 6th place individual: Jack Faissal
      • 1st place team: Dylan Kang, Jack Faissal, and Liam Chan
    • 3rd – 5th Boys
      • 2nd place individual – Romir Mukherjee
      • 2nd place team – Romir Mukherjee and Rhys Black
    • 6th – 8th Girls
      • 2nd place individual – Margaret Stacey
    • K – 12 Blitz
      • 3rd place -Davis Zong

NEST+m Athletics
You can now follow NEST+m Athletics on Instagram, at  http://instagram.com/nestmeagles.  Go Eagles!


Our Week Ahead

Monday November 20th:

  • Regular Instructional Day, 8:20am to 2:40pm
  • Last day of UG photos

Tuesday November 21th:

  • Regular Instructional Day, 8:20am to 2:40pm
  • School Leadership Team meeting, 4pm, Library

Wednesday November 22th:

  • Regular Instructional Day, 8:20am to 2:40pm
  • K-5 “Forces in Motion” Physics Assembly
  • No After-school activities

Looking Ahead

  • Week of November 27th will be Open School Week at NEST+m. More information will be sent out tomorrow.
  • Principal’s Coffees will be Wednesday, November 29 (MG), Thursday, November 30 (LG) and and Friday, December 1 (UG).

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Attention high school students: Would you like to brighten a senior citizen’s day, practice performing your music (instrument or vocal), and earn volunteer service hours all at the same time?

If this sounds good to you, Concerts in Motion, a nonprofit that serves senior citizens who can’t leave their homes, is looking for student volunteers!  We are looking for students to sign up to visit a senior citizen in Chinatown for a minimum of one visit per month.  All visits will be supervised by an adult from Concerts in Motion.  Vocalists and instrumentalists of all levels are welcome – we just ask that you come ready to perform 2-4 pieces.

If you are interested in this wonderful service opportunity, please contact Melany at operationsmanager@concertsinmotion.org and she will send more information on how to sign up.  Students are asked to commit to one Monday per month but are welcome to sign up for additional Mondays, too!

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.

3T Writing Workshops
3T Writing Workshops hopes to offer a place for students to write freely about what is on their minds and have their words validated by actors bringing their words to life.

Students are invited to join their upcoming workshops on Nov 30, Dec 7 and Dec 14 at The New School for Drama 151 Bank St. from 4-6pm.

Please click here for an application. More information is found on their website.

SAT / ACT Test Prep
Class of 2019
FREE Hybrid Exams (11/18 & 12/16; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! These are the last two dates this year for the Class of 2019. (Registration closes at noon the Thursday before the event). Register Here.

March 21 SAT Prep starts by 1/27 – See all SAT prep options here
April 14 ACT Prep starts by 2/24 – See all ACT Prep options here
*Group and Small Group options attached.

Class of 2020
FREE PSAT Exam & Review Seminar (3/10; 8:30am-12:30pm) – Take a practice PSAT Exam, score it, and chat through a few tips and tricks before your PSAT exam this March! Register Here.

FREE Hybrid Exams (4/28, 5/19, & 6/2; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! Register Here.

All Students
Career Planning Seminar (5/12; 10am-1pm) – Explore YOU and find a career that fits! Complete an interest assessment profile and find careers that match your interests. Register Here.

Atlas offers Group ($399+), Small Group ($599+), and Private Tutoring ($999+) prep options to suit the various needs of your students. Don’t forget, we offer unlimited scholarships to our group courses for those who qualify for free or reduced price lunch (verbal confirmation from counselor is the only proof required).

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu


Special Education at NEST+m

NEST+m has a growing population of “2e” or “Twice Exceptional” students, especially in grades 6-12.

Our NEST+m ICT program has grown quickly in a few brief years. Our team of 12 Special Education Teachers, one English as a New Language Teacher, six Related Service Providers, four Guidance Counselors and many co-teaching General Educators are well-versed in meeting the unique needs of our diverse learners. Whether through Integrated Co-Taught classes or mandated services in speech, counseling, occupational or physical therapy, our faculty members work with students and their families to create the most individualized program possible to ensure each child’s success.

Grades K-5

Students with IEPs are integrated into all General Education classes and receive related services either in class or in pull-out sessions, as per their IEP. There is no ICT programming in K-5. For more questions, please contact Sarah Liogys, Guidance Counselor at  sliogys@schools.nyc.gov.

Grades 6-8

What started with only one ICT class last year will grow to a full ICT program across all Middle Grades core content classes in 2017-2018. We plan to have two ICT cohort classes for 6th Grade, two ICT cohort classes for 7th Grade, and one for 8th Grade. In Middle Grades, all students move with their homeroom (i.e. 6A, 6B, 6C, 6D or 6E) throughout the day for core classes such as ELA, science, social studies and math. The classes are mixed for non-core subjects such as Physical Education, World Languages and Music. For more questions, please contact Melissa Chen, Guidance Counselor at mhuangchen@schools.nyc.gov

Grades 9-12

Our Upper Grades Integrated Collaborative Teaching Program has seen the largest growth in the past four years. We now have two-three ICT sections of ELA, Science, Math and Social Studies at each grade level in Upper Grades as well as SETSS classes for focused academic  support as needed per students’ IEPs. While there are certain grade-specific requirements, such as ELA 9 or US History for 11th Graders, students in the Upper Grades at NEST+m take many courses across grade level depending on their interests and academic readiness. For more questions, please contact Stephanie Glickman, Guidance Counselor at sglickman6@schools.nyc.gov or Katherine Silva, Guidance Counselor at ksilva@schools.nyc.gov.


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON SELECTION OF CUNY STUDENT AS RHODES SCHOLAR

“To the illustrious roster of CUNY students and alumni recognized for their scholarship and contributions in myriad fields, we proudly add another name.  Congratulations to Thamara V. Jean on winning a Rhodes Scholarship,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said. “Kudos as well to Macaulay Honors College and Hunter College for providing her with support and guidance as she excelled in school.  This is one more important recognition of the opportunity and quality of CUNY.”

Jean is CUNY’s eighth Rhodes Scholar. The others are Zujaja Tauqeer, Macaulay Honors College at Brooklyn College, 2011; David L.V. Bauer, Macaulay Honors College at City College, 2009; Lev A. Sviridov, City College, 2005; Eugene Shenderov, Brooklyn College, 2005; Lisette Nieves, Brooklyn College, 1992; Raymond Paretzky, Queens College, 1983; and Robert T. Molloy, City College, 1939.

Sviridov (D. Phil. University of Oxford) is now an assistant professor of chemistry at Hunter College and director of its Macaulay Honors College program.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


CUNY WINS HECKSCHER GRANT TO ALLOW HURRICANE-DISPLACED PUERTO RICANS AND VIRGIN ISLANDERS TO STUDY TUITION-FREE

The philanthropic Heckscher Foundation for Children has committed $100,000 to cover tuition and fees at The City University of New York for students who left Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands after this year’s devastating hurricanes.

At the behest of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, the CUNY Board of Trustees voted last month to allow these students to attend at in-state tuition rates. The University then applied for the Heckscher grant to cover costs above whatever the students receive in federal Pell grants.

“The generosity of the Heckscher Foundation for Children will make a big difference for displaced students who choose to pursue their college education at CUNY,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “They are far from their homes. Their lives and their families have been disrupted. But thanks to this grant, they will be able to continue their college education tuition-free. I can’t imagine a more humane response for people who have lost so much.”

Heckscher Foundation Chairman and CEO Peter Sloane said: “We are pleased to provide this catalytic support for displaced students from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands who wish to continue their studies at CUNY. We hope that the tuition relief this grant affords will help our students from the affected territories get through this difficult period for them and their families.”

CUNY’s grant application estimated that $100,000 would cover the unmet costs of about 80 students. In addition to the grant, CUNY is also making laboratory and other space available to University of Puerto Rico faculty and is setting up a grant process for collaborative work on recovery issues. All CUNY colleges have been involved in University-wide relief efforts.

The university and New York City have close associations with the Caribbean islands. The Puerto Rican community has long been one of the most vibrant in New York, and no city in the country has more native-born citizens whose families came from the Virgin Islands. CUNY has about 16,000 current undergraduates who identify as Puerto Rican.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Report Co-Authored by Guttman Professor Released by the UCLA Civil Rights Project

Ryan Coughlan, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Ryan W. Coughlan, Assistant Professor of Sociology

Ryan W. Coughlan, Guttman Assistant Professor of Sociology, is a co-author of a report outlining the growing school segregation crisis in New Jersey. The report was released by the UCLA Civil Rights Project and picked up by news outlets.

“New Jersey’s Segregated Schools: Trends and Paths Forward,” written by Gary Orfield, UCLA, Civil Rights Project; Jongyeon Ee, UCLA, Civil Rights Project; and Ryan W. Coughlan, Guttman Community College, City University of New York, shows that New Jersey has made little, if any, progress toward reducing the segregation of Black and Hispanic students in the state’s schools.

Dr. Coughlan was interviewed by the Philadelphia Inquirer and WNYC’s All Things Considered about the report’s findings.


Facebook partners with CCNY for web security course

Chantelle Levy, CCNY Facebook Ambassador.

Students mingling at the Facebook with Cybersecurity event.

Facebook is partnering with The City College of New York to launch a web security hybrid course—the first of it’s kind on campus. The company is donating $25,000 toward scholarships and educational expenses. Spearheaded on the CCNY campus by computer science major Chantelle Levy, Facebook chose her to be CCNY’s Facebook Ambassador.

“It’s truly a pleasure to be chosen as a Security Ambassador Intern for Facebook; my interest in security stemmed from no other than the TV Show ‘Mr. Robot’,” said Levy, an undergraduate student. “Since then, I’ve been involved in anything security-related, including the web security course offered at CCNY, the BlackHat Conference and DEFCON in Vegas and a security internship with Facebook in Silicon Valley.”

Levy and other students initiated the partnership in Spring 2017 under CodePath University for those students interested in learning about cybersecurity. At that time the course offered no credits. However, Rosario Gennaro, a professor of computer science at the Grove School of Engineering and director of the Center for Algorithms and interactive Scientific Software, became involved with the student group and helped transition the course into a one-credit class.

More than 150 students and faculty attended the Cybersecurity with Facebook event on campus this month to educate students about the different perspectives of working at Facebook Cybersecurity.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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#GivingTuesday Brings the Brooklyn College Community Together to Support Student Achievement

The Nov. 28 fundraiser aims to unite faculty, staff, friends, and more than 137,000 alumni to reach the highest possible goal in attaining resources to ensure the success of Brooklyn College students.

The Brooklyn College Foundation’s Annual Fund is hoping to unite the Brooklyn College community in an effort to surpass last year’s #GivingTuesday fundraising total.

On Tuesday, Nov. 28, Brooklyn College, along with all other City University of New York (CUNY) institutions, is preparing for #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving. This global campaign takes place on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving, and was created to counterbalance the consumerism of “Black Friday” and “Cyber Monday” with a call for philanthropy and community outreach.

This is the college’s second year of participation and the goal is to surpass the $21,000 raised last year and engage and activate the #BCfamily to participate in some way during the 24-hour giving challenge. This multifaceted campaign will get the word out to faculty, staff, students, friends, and over 137,000 alumni through e-mail and social media campaigns.

Funds raised from Giving Tuesday will go to support the Annual Fund, a vital Brooklyn College Foundationprogram that is graciously sustained by thousands of donations averaging about $50. Support from the Annual Fund helps the college continue to create a complete and fulfilling college experience by providing the resources needed to immediately respond to the urgent and evolving needs of the students, faculty, and campus.

Nov. 28 is Giving Tuesday at Brooklyn College.

“Giving to the Annual Fund is an easy way to support student success,” Beth Levine, associate executive director of the Brooklyn College Foundation said. “And Giving Tuesday provides a way for us to reach an even larger audience, bringing us all together as one.”

There are many ways to support Brooklyn College beyond Giving Tuesday. Alumni and friends receive print and digital mailings from the foundation throughout the year, and may even receive a phone call from students during the annual phone-a-thon. Additionally, donors can participate by joining the Boylan Society, a monthly sustainer program; purchasing a Commemorative Brick and leave behind a lasting legacy at Brooklyn College; or making a one-time gift online.

To learn more about how to give to Brooklyn College or to learn more about the impact that giving has on our students, please visit the Brooklyn College Foundation website.

The Brooklyn College Foundation was established in 1958 to encourage and promote the academic purposes of Brooklyn College of The City University of New York and the educational welfare of students, faculty, alumni, and the community. Through a full spectrum of fundraising programs, the foundation provides resources that advance the mission of Brooklyn College.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Guttman Students Compete in National Fed Challenge

2017 Fed Challenge participantsOn November 1, 2017, six Guttman students enrolled in Professor Seth and Professor Buttet’s macroeconomics course competed in the Maiden Lane division of the Fed Challenge.

The College Fed Challenge, sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, is a competition designed to bring real world economics into the classroom. During the competition, teams play the role or policymakers by preparing and delivering a presentation on their analysis of a case study describing hypothetical economic conditions with a monetary policy recommendation based on their analysis. The case study is sent to to the teams prior to competition day, and they have four weeks to prepare their recommendations.

The Guttman team placed honorably. Students had fun and learned about central bank operations and macroeconomics in the process.


Baruch College Gets High Rankings in The Princeton Review and Entreprenuer Magazine’s “Top 25 Schools for Entreprenuership Studies” for 2018

Zicklin School of Business in the Top 10 Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Nationwide for Third Consecutive Year 

New York, NY – November 14, 2017 – Baruch College’s undergraduate and graduate programs at the College’s Zicklin School of Business were ranked in the top 10 by The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine’s survey of the “Top Schools for Entrepreneurship Studies for 2018.”

Baruch College placed #5 in “Top 25 Undergraduate Schools” – the highest ranking to date in this category – and ranked #10 among the “Top 25 Graduate Schools.”

These rankings mark the third consecutive year that Baruch College has placed in the top 10 for both undergraduate and graduate programs, and the 10th consecutive year Baruch College has been included in one or both of the undergraduate and graduate lists since the annual ranking began in 2006.

The rankings are based on surveys by The Princeton Review, in partnership with Entrepreneur magazine, of more than 300 colleges and business schools across the country offering entrepreneurship programs.

“We’re very proud to once again be nationally recognized for our entrepreneurship programs,” said H. Fenwick Huss, PhD, Willem Kooyker Dean of the Zicklin School of Business. “Zicklin embodies the entrepreneurial spirit with real-world experiential learning taught by experienced faculty and industry experts.”

“These top rankings demonstrate the Field Center’s unwavering commitment to a robust entrepreneurship education that fully equips our students with the latest tools, experiences, and support essential for success in today’s economy,” said Scott Newbert, PhD, academic director of the Lawrence N. Field Programs in Entrepreneurship.

A Specialty in Entrepreneurship

At Baruch College, The Lawrence N. Field Center for Entrepreneurship plays a crucial role in establishing the Zicklin School of Business as a leading business school with a specialty in entrepreneurship. Zicklin’s faculty and students, Baruch’s Small Business Development Center advisors, as well as alumni, entrepreneurs, and consultants come together at the Field Center to support the entrepreneurial endeavors of start-ups, established businesses, and the College’s constituents.

Each year, the Field Center holds entrepreneurship-focused events, MakerHub workshops, co-working opportunities to exchange ideas in a supportive environment, and partnerships with such high-profile companies as AT&T and IBM to host student entrepreneurship competitions.

A model of entrepreneurship education, the Field Center is built around the collaboration of an institution of higher education, government, and the private sector.

New York City‒Based with a Global Reach

A college of The City University of New York, Baruch has a more-than-160-year history of excellence in public higher education, with its Zicklin School of Business being the largest of its schools. With a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak 129 languages, the College continually receives among the top rankings for academic quality and best value from such prominent organizations as U.S. News & World Report, Princeton Review, Forbes, and Money magazine.

With its graduates known to be New York smart and world-class ready, the Zicklin School of Business is a recognized leader in providing undergraduate and graduate business and executive education for the 21st century. Consistently rated by rankings experts among the top performers in areas relevant to today’s students—such as academic excellence, diversity, and value—Zicklin offers a wide range of part-time and full-time business degree programs that are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business and taught by faculty who are thought leaders, active researchers, and practitioners in their fields. Integrated both physically and philosophically into the fabric of New York City, the world’s financial capital, the Zicklin School is committed to delivering relevant, affordable, academically rigorous business education globally that is world-class in quality and worldwide in its impact.

For media inquiries contact:

Suzanne Bronski, (646) 660-6093, suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

 

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$500K boost for CCNY’s Zahn Center from Manhattan Borough President

Matthew Washington, deputy Manhattan Borough president, at a Zahn Demo Day at CCNY.

Hobby-sized printers in the Zahn Center’s MakerLab.

The City College of New York’s Zahn Innovation Center is the recipient of $500,000 in capital funds from the Manhattan Borough President’s Office. The award will enable the   Center, a startup incubator, to dramatically improve its manufacturing offerings by adding short run manufacturing capabilities to the equipment in its MakerLab. The MakerLab is a rapid prototyping facility designed for student entrepreneurs and the hardware startup community. The new equipment and improvements will bring lasting impact to City College and Harlem community startups, both benefitting from the upgrade.

“I am thrilled to support the Zahn Innovation Center and assist in the creation of a prototyping hub in Harlem, led by student innovators” said Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer. “I am proud to invest in a diverse group of students and local entrepreneurs as they build their startups and test their ideas in this lab of the future.”

Lindsay Siegel, executive director of the Zahn Center, hailed Brewer and Deputy Borough President Matthew Washington. “Their generosity will enable our student startups to realize their visions sooner,” she said.

The Center helps CCNY student startups:

  • Build prototypes;
  • Develop products and refine their features;
  • Improve sales pitches; and
  • Negotiate the complicated realms of financing and intellectual property law.

Since its founding, the Center has graduated 155 startups. Collectively, these startups have raised and earned more than $32 million in capital, and filed more than 75 provisional and full patents for their concepts.

The new funds will be a major boost for student entrepreneurs at an institution, where according to the latest available figures, 60% of whom are from homes with an annual family income of $30,000 or less.

In addition, the improved MakerLab is expected to expedite the entire production process for both student and Harlem community startups.

“This enables students to fulfill a Kickstarter campaign months ahead of the typical production schedule associated with most crowdfunded hardware startups,” said Devin Voorsanger, the Zahn Center’s technology program director. “This rapid fulfillment of orders and the drastically reduced costs will allow student startups to proudly manufacture in the U.S. and get their businesses off the ground.”

The new services will also be available to community startups. This will make it significantly easier for startups in Harlem to launch and iterate their own hardware startups as they have a homegrown manufacturing and prototyping facility available to help them, said Siegel.

About the Zahn Innovation Center
The Zahn Innovation Center was established by the City College Fund in 2012, with support from the Moxie Foundation and the Manhattan Borough President’s Office, as an incubator at the City College of New York (CCNY). The Zahn Center empowers students to develop entrepreneurial skills while incubating the most promising technology startups and social impact ventures. We provide co-working space, a campus-wide speaker series, and four entrepreneurship competitions with prize money.

About The City College Fund
The City College Fund is a tax-exempt 501c(3) non-profit fundraising organization, established in 1946 to support The City College of New York in its mission to provide access and excellence in higher education, particularly to students who might not otherwise be able to afford to go to college. Gifts to The City College Fund directly benefit City College’s extraordinary students, renowned faculty, innovative programs and schools.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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CUNY STUDENTS SHINE AT UNDERGRADUATE BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE FOR MINORITY STUDENTS

Twenty students from seven CUNY campuses won honors for presentations of their original research at the American Society for Microbiology’s Annual Biological Research Conference for Minority Students.? More than1,800 students presented their research and some 300 received awards for their oral or poster presentations to the 4,300 students who attended the event, which was held Nov. 1-4 in Phoenix.

“The breadth of undergraduate research at CUNY that was recognized at this national conference – from cancer biology to neuroscience to social and behavioral sciences and beyond – shows the vitality of CUNY’s efforts to engage minority students in fields where they have not traditionally been found,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “This is just one way that The City University of New York helps so many of our students follow their dreams and launch rewarding careers.”

Irene Hulede, manager of student programs at the American Society for Microbiology, said the research and presentations build students’ confidence and help propel them “from one level to the next, with the next logical step being graduate school and a Ph.D. in the STEM fields” of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. “They also attend professional development workshops, where we provide them with resources needed to be successful in graduate school. They talk with leaders in the field and receive a lot of mentoring and one-on-one coaching.”

CUNY’s winners included seven from Hunter College, six from City College, two each from Brooklyn College and Queensborough Community College, and one each from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Kingsborough Community College and Medgar Evers College. There were five winners in cancer biology; three in cell biology; three in social and behavioral sciences and public health; two in neuroscience; and one each in chemistry, developmental biology and genetics, engineering, physics and mathematics, immunology, microbiology and physiology.

For City College senior Geneva Hidalgo, the conference meant an anxiety-laced 15 minutes of lecture and Q&A. “Last year I did a poster. This year I wanted the challenge of oral presentation,” she said. “You have to know your research really well and prepare for questions from people who don’t know anything about your research.”

Working with City College assistant psychology professor Sarah O’Neill, she analyzed parent- and teacher-provided data on children who have symptoms that typically develop in youngsters who are later diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); the data were collected by professor Jeffrey Halperin’s lab at Queens College. Hidalgo wanted to see whether the apparent link between ADHD and obesity in adolescents and adults held true for children.

“Our study was the first to compare the body mass indexes of preschoolers at age 4 and at age 7,” she said. She found no significant association between body mass index and neuropsychological deficits, like processing speed and executive function (the mental skills that let you do things), but did note a significant association in preschoolers showing inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity.

Now in her third year in the National Institutes of Health-funded Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) program, Hidalgo intends to seek a post-graduation National Institute of Mental Health fellowship before applying for a Ph.D. program in clinical psychology.

Queensborough Community College spring 2017 graduate Rawlric Sumner won for a poster presentation in chemistry that demonstrated a way of optimizing a type of photovoltaic solar cell that is dye-sensitized; his method uses ionic liquids with single-walled carbon nanotubes as electrolytes. He now studies chemistry at Queens College, with his eyes set on an eventual Ph.D.

Sumner credits his Queensborough mentors – professors Tirandai Hemraj-Benny and Sharon Lall-Ramnarine – as well as senior chemist James Wishart at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he continued this research last summer. He said they guided him on “matters pertaining to academics, personal issues and even planning for my future. All of my current and future success can be attributed to the foundation established through my undergraduate research experience and the mentorship by these outstanding individuals. It has given me ambition and a strong work ethic while looking toward my future.”

At Medgar Evers College, junior Jaleel Shepherd, who immigrated from Guyana six years ago, was recognized for work in signaling pathways that enable cancer cells to survive. His poster described the three-dimensional structure of ACK (a protein kinase, or enzyme that modifies other proteins by chemically adding phosphate groups) and how he screened for specific cancer inhibitors and showed their effects on cancer cells.

Shepherd praised his two mentors at Medgar Evers – biology professors Alam Nur-E-Kamal and Ijaz Ahmed – and Raj Rajnaraynan, a pharmacology and toxicology professor at the University of Buffalo, where he conducted research last summer. He also insisted that credit is due to his lab mates, Ruth Opoku, Nadia Patterson and Vimal Arora, who contributed scholarship and support. He said Medgar Evers pushed him to think, to explore and to ask questions. “I’m interested in the underlying specifics of diseases. I’d like to find cures and not just for cancer. Ever since I was young I’ve wanted to understand how things work, for the purpose of helping others.”

Here are all the winners:

 2017 Presentation Awardees at

Annual Biological Research Conference for Minority Students

COLLEGE FIRST NAME LAST NAME YEAR CATEGORY AWARD TYPE
Brooklyn College Sierra Louis-Gene Junior Developmental Biology and Genetics Poster
Brooklyn College Janai Williams Senior Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health Poster
City College of New York Geneva Hidalgo Senior Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health Oral
City College of New York Mariya Mayer Senior Cancer Biology Poster
City College of New York Courtney Ogando Junior Cell Biology Poster
City College of New York Kailey Singh Sophomore Physiology Oral
City College of New York Fathema Uddin Senior Cell Biology Poster
City College of New York Jacqueline Weng Sophomore Social and Behavioral Sciences and Public Health Poster
Hunter College Camille Derderian Senior Cancer Biology Oral
Hunter College Rochel Hecht Senior Engineering, Physics and Mathematics Poster
Hunter College Marysol Finkenberg Senior Chemistry Poster
Hunter College Tiffany Merlinsky Junior Cancer Biology Oral
Hunter College Micaela Millan Sophomore Cell Biology Poster
Hunter College Stephanie Tepan Senior Cancer Biology Poster
Hunter College Olga Vafaeva Senior Neuroscience Oral
John Jay College Dee-Anne Cush Senior Immunology Poster
Kingsborough Community College Hakim Thomas Community College Student Microbiology Poster
Medgar Evers College Jaleel Shepherd Junior Cancer Biology Poster
Queensborough Community Gabriel Palencia Serna Community College Student Neuroscience Poster
Queensborough Community College Rawlric Sumner Community College Student Chemistry Poster

 

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of November 13, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Thank you for joining our November Parent-Teacher Conferences. Your presence and participation, in person and at home, are central to our students’ success.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

This week is School Photo Week!

  • LG: Mon-Tues, November 13-14
  • MG: Wed-Thur, November 15-16
  • UG: Fri- Mon, November 17, 20

Please click here for schedules and more information.

Tuesday, November 14

  • AMC 8 Math Competition in the Cafeteria at 8:30 am
  • Spelling Bee in the auditorium at 4 pm

Thursday, November 16

  • PTA meeting in cafeteria at 8:30 am
  • MG open house in auditorium at 5:30 pm

Friday, November 17

  • 9th grade Potluck Dinner in Cafeteria at 6 pm

Looking Ahead

  • Week of November 20th will have three school days, due to Thanksgiving Break on November 23rd and 24th. Also, there will be a rapid dismissal with no afterschool programs on Wednesday, November 22nd.
  • Week of November 27th will be Open School Week at NEST+m. More information will be sent out this coming week.

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Ascend Educational Fund Scholarships
The  Ascend Educational Fund scholarship offers between $2500  – $20,000 to immigrant students or children of immigrants.  New York City Seniors who will attend public or private colleges or universities.  It is irregardless of ethnicity, national origin or immigration status. The requirements are to complete the application, send copy of SAT/ACT, 2 letters of recommendations and write 2 essays.  The application period began Nov 1 and closes February 2, 2018.  The winners must maintain a 2.5 GPA at college.and participate in mentoring from Ascent Educational Fund.

If you have any more questions they can be addressed to info@ascendfundny.org.

3T Writing Workshops
3T Writing Workshops hopes to offer a place for students to write freely about what is on their minds and have their words validated by actors bringing their words to life.

Students are invited to join their upcoming workshops on Nov 30, Dec 7 and Dec 14 at The New School for Drama 151 Bank St. from 4-6pm.

Please click here for an application. More information is found on their website.

SAT / ACT Test Prep
Class of 2019
FREE Hybrid Exams (11/18 & 12/16; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! These are the last two dates this year for the Class of 2019. (Registration closes at noon the Thursday before the event). Register Here.

March 21 SAT Prep starts by 1/27 – See all SAT prep options here
April 14 ACT Prep starts by 2/24 – See all ACT Prep options here
*Group and Small Group options attached.

Class of 2020
FREE PSAT Exam & Review Seminar (3/10; 8:30am-12:30pm) – Take a practice PSAT Exam, score it, and chat through a few tips and tricks before your PSAT exam this March! Register Here.

FREE Hybrid Exams (4/28, 5/19, & 6/2; 8:30am-1pm) – Try out a little of both SAT & ACT Exams and see which is best for you! Register Here.

All Students
Career Planning Seminar (5/12; 10am-1pm) – Explore YOU and find a career that fits! Complete an interest assessment profile and find careers that match your interests. Register Here.

Atlas offers Group ($399+), Small Group ($599+), and Private Tutoring ($999+) prep options to suit the various needs of your students. Don’t forget, we offer unlimited scholarships to our group courses for those who qualify for free or reduced price lunch (verbal confirmation from counselor is the only proof required).

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu

NYU School of Medicine STEP Program
Is your child a 10th or 11th grader interested in science education, SAT prep, or health professions? The STEP Program at the New York University School of Medicine has begun actively accepting New York State 10th and 11th grade high school students into their program.
Deadline: November 15, 2017 — click here for more information.


Letter To NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, Week Of November 6, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Please Join me in congratulating Coach Jackie O’Connor and the NEST+m Girls Varsity Soccer Team. They have made it to the B-Division Semifinals and will be playing on Tuesday November 7! For more information please see this playoff bracket here.

This week, on Monday November 6, NEST+m’ s current 5th grade students & families and 8th grade students & families will be able to attend tours of our Middle Grades (8:30 am start) and Upper Grades (10:49 am start).

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

Tuesday November 7

  • Election Day: No School for students.

Wednesday November 8

  • 10 am – Red Hawk Dancers – 3rd grade Assembly
  • 5:30 pm  – MG Open House

Thursday November 9

  • 10 am – 4th grade Author Visit, Jean Merill and Doug Bygott – The Wild Life of Limericks
  • Parent Teacher Conferences, 4:45pm to 7:45pm

Friday November 10

  • Half Day for students. School ends at 11:30am. No After School activities.
  • Parent Teacher Conferences, 12:40pm to 2:40pm

Looking Ahead

  • Week of November 13-20. School Photos, all week long!
    • LG: Mon-Tues, November 13-14
    • MG: Wed-Thur, November 15-16
    • UG: Fri- Mon, November 17, 20
  • Tuesday, November 14
    • AMC 8 Math Competition, 8:30 in the Cafeteria
    • 4 pm, Spelling Bee in the Auditorium

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

ACCELERATED LEARNING ACADEMY {ALA) 
The ALA prepares high-achieving 10th and 11th graders for professional careers in Medical Science, Biomedical Engineering & Technology, and Applied Mathematics over 3 weekends of interactive workshops at Princeton University. Students will explore new STEM content with group activities, lectures, hands-on demonstrations and real world applications taught by experienced scientists. Please click here for more information.

Pathways to An Inclusive Future
Hear a panel of professionals, youth advocates, parents and educators with different perspectives tackle the complexities of inclusion- what it is, why it is, and what it could look like in the future.
Monday, November 6, 2017 6-8pm
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
West 46th Street and 12th Avenue
New York, NY 10036
Click here for more information.

Shape Up NYC
Shape Up NYC is a free citywide fitness program operated by NYC Parks that provides more than 350 free group exercise classes each week at 200 locations across the five boroughs.  Please see our website for a class near you: https://www.nycgovparks.org/programs/recreation/shape-up-nyc

Parent Center Information Workshops
Free Winter 2018 Parenting Groups!  Structured parent and parent/child groups and activities provide parents the education, support and resources needed to strengthen their families.
All groups are held at:  The Parent Center @ Henry Street Settlement 281 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002. Registration is required. Please click here for the Winter Schedule and registration information.

Family Resource Centers
The Family Resource Centers provide free and confidential services for parents and caregivers of children and adolescence with emotional challenges in Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx.
For info call 212-964-5253.

Tutoring
FREE one-on-one tutoring to children and adolescents with IEPs twice per week for a full year at Hunter College. Contact info – Carol Deere at HCLEARN@hunter.cuny.edu

Paid Intership 
The Family Art Project at Wave Hill is hiring additional 2017-2018 interns this fall for students who have an interest and enthusiasm for the arts and/or science. $9 per hour – 12 month position on weekends from 9am to 4pm. Send cover letter and resume to fapinternship@wavehill.org.

Promise Project
PROMISE at Columbia University is committed to being the most effective, all-encompassing program to help children with learning disabilities get the support they need to succeed. Children receive state-of-the-art neuropsychological assessments, clinical recommendations and the follow-up necessary to get the services they need to learn . Call Ana Garcia, at Promise Project’s main number, at 212-342-1600.

Community Service
There are community service opportunities available for 11th and 12th graders with the SONYC after-school program at NEST+m. Please email Scott Percelay at spercelay@grandsettlement.org or stop by room 257 if interested.

NYU School of Medicine STEP Program
Is your child a 10th or 11th grader interested in science education, SAT prep, or health professions? The STEP Program at the New York University School of Medicine has begun actively accepting New York State 10th and 11th grade high school students into their program.
Deadline: November 15, 2017 — click here for more information.


Student Travelers Share Their Research from Ecuador During “Global Guttman Presents: A Night in the Chocó”

In July 2017, eight Guttman Community College students accompanied by Professor Derek Tesser traveled throughout Ecuador to explore the Itapoa Reserve as part of the Global Guttman initiative. On November 9th, students presented their multifaceted research on deforestation, endemic/new species and conservation, and shared memories of the unforgettable trip at a special evening event–Global Guttman Presents: A Night in the Chocó.

Professor Tesser and his students explained that the Itapoa Reserve and Project is located in one of the few remaining patches of primary forest in the Chocó, a biodiversity hotspot on the west side of the Andes Mountains. The Chocó is the most bio-diverse region on the planet by area and home to numerous endemic species, including many birds and amphibians. The area is also one of the most threatened by deforestation.

The Itapoa Reserve is a rain forest research and conservation project located within the Chocó in the northwest of Ecuador that aims to prevent and reverse deforestation by educating the public, planting new trees and buying neighboring land to promote sustainability.

During their seventeen-day trip, Guttman students visited various sites around Ecuador but their focus was hiking through the rain forest to explore the region and get a closer look at its amazing biodiversity. They spent five days in jungle conditions with no luxuries of modern life at hand – no hotels or cells phones – but plenty of new experiences. They brought back and presented findings on five topics: the monkeys of the Itapoa Reserve, glass frogs and serpents of the region, the African Palm plantations prevalent in the area, and the hope of Cacao plantations.

Students Giorby Suero and Tatiana Paulino told the audience about the endangered monkey species present in the Reserve: the Ecuadorian White Fronted Capuchins, Ecuadorian Mantled Howler monkeys, and the Brown-Headed Spider monkeys. Daniella Acosta and Gabrielle Blevins presented their research on the glass frogs of the Itapoa Reserve.  The region is home to 10 glass frog species – more than any other location on the planet. While each species faces its own survival challenges, the students stressed that the common factor is the need for preservation of their environment.

Alex Granowsky and Jay Bravo explained how the changing climate of the Chocó region influences the distribution of its viper populations. Itapoa is home to five different species of vipers. During their trek through the rain forest, the Guttman group was lucky to encounter and document two unusual sightings: the Rainforest Hog-Nosed Pit Viper, a species previously not seen in the region, and the Eyelash Viper, which had not been seen in the area for over two decades.

Sasha Delaquis’ segment on the plantation of the African Palm shed light on the problem of deforestation for the mass production of cheap palm oil harvested from these plants. Yesenia Galindo concluded the student presentations by offering the audience a more hopeful outlook – the growing practice of planting and harvesting the sustainable Cacao plant that doesn’t harm the environment and provides multiple benefits to the farmers.

Global Guttman Presents: A Night in the Chocó concluded with a Q&A with the audience. The expedition to Ecuador had a tremendous effect on the students. They called it “transformational,” “impactful” and “unforgettable.” They came out of the jungle more open-minded and aware of the world outside their homes. The gallery of photos displayed around the room showed beautiful snapshots of their awe-inspiring experiences, and the video they presented drew a lot of applause.

This year’s trip was not Guttman’s first visit to the Itapoa Reserve. Professor Tesser has led the expedition twice before. Last year’s exploration of the Ecuadorian jungle were aided by a drone designed by Guttman students and developed in collaboration with a lab at City College of New York. The students and Professor Tesser thanked the Guttman Foundation for making this year’s trip possible. Students who participate in the Global Guttman program don’t incur out-of-pocket travel costs–the program is fully funded by the Foundation and has become a major part of the Guttman curriculum. Students who traveled to Ecuador received credit for the Introduction to Biology course and a chance at unsurpassed experiential learning.

View photo gallery.

Watch video.


Moms and Dads, Put Down Your Mobile Phones! Hunter Study Shows That Parents’ Distraction by Mobile Devices May Hinder Infant Social-Emotional Development

The journal Developmental Science has just published a cautionary new study led by Hunter’s Tracy Dennis-Tiwary, professor of psychology. Moms and Dads, Put Down Your Mobile Phones! Hunter Study Shows That Parents’ Distraction by Mobile Devices May Hinder Infant Social-Emotional Development

Professor Dennis-Tiwary and her colleagues examined the impact of parents’ mobile-device use on infants aged 7 to 24 months. The researchers focused on three periods of mother-child interaction:  (1) playful contact between a mother and her baby, (2) the mother’s mobile device time, (3) the “reunion,” when the mother’s attention returned to the baby.

“We found that infants expressed more distress, and explored less, during maternal device use compared to the free play and reunion periods. Moreover, greater habitual use of mobile devices by mothers outside the lab predicted less emotional recovery in infants during the reunion period,” Professor Dennis-Tiwary said. “Results suggest that, like other forms of maternal withdrawal and unresponsiveness, mobile-device use can have a negative impact on infant social-emotional functioning and parent-child interactions.”

Hunter graduate student Sarah Myruski and research assistant Olga Gulyayeva ’14, both members of Professor Dennis-Tiwary’s lab team, were among the Developmental Science article’s five co-authors.


Hunter Professor Victor Bobetsky to Deliver Talk on “We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song”

On Tuesday, November 7 at 4:30 p.m, Victor Bobetsky, Professor of MusicHunter Professor Victor Bobetsky to Deliver Talk on "We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song" and Director of the Teacher Education Program in Music at Hunter College and six of his students from the music education program will present a book talk at NYU. Professor Bobetsky will discuss the research and academic activities that led to the creation and publication of his book, We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song (2015). The students joining him in this presentation will perform excerpts of several antecedent songs, discussed in the book, that may have influenced the music and/or text of the current version of “We Shall Overcome,” the anthem we know and sing today.

The book was inspired by a symposium on the origins and history of “We Shall Overcome” which Professor Bobetsky hosted at Hunter College in 2013. The symposium celebrated the song’s origins and history featuring guest speakers from academia and choirs from the New York City Schools who performed the antecedent songs.

The book, which contains eight essays, two of which were written by Bobetsky, has been purchased by over 196 college, university and public libraries and is a useful tool for music teachers. The collection was described by Music Educators Journal as “a valuable resource to be used not just in the music appreciation or general music classroom but in any class that seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the African-American civil rights movement.” Professor Bobetsky commented, ” I am thrilled to be able to involve Hunter music education students in this upcoming event and I want to thank Hunter President Jennifer J. Raab for her generous support which helped to make the research, the symposium, and the creation of this book a reality.”

Date: Tuesday, November 7, 2017
Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Taminent Library at New York Unviersity, 70 Washington Square South, NY, 10012
RSVP: Please email taminent.events@nyu.edu with guest name(s) and the title of the event: Book Talk: Victor Bobetsky on We Shall Overcome: Essays on a Great American Song


Stunning Exhibit of Magnum Photos by Hunter’s First Curatorial Certificate Cohort

How can a camera capture a moment of seismic political shift, and how canStunning Exhibit of Magnum Photos by Hunter's First Curatorial Certificate Cohort the person behind the camera use their perspective to effect change? These questions and more are tackled by the 17 works on display in the Leubsdorf’s Gallery’s new exhibition, Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947-Present. This exhibition is part of a city-wide celebration of the 70th anniversary of Magnum, a cooperative photo agency founded to give humanist photographers more agency, both in their careers and in the activist world.

“We are so privileged to have one of our nation’s leading historians of photography, the extraordinary Maria Antonella Pelizzari, bring this kind of exceptional work to Hunter’s galleries and into the lives of Hunter students,” said Hunter President Jennifer J. Raab.

Curated by Professor Pelizzari, this exhibition about community represents the work of a newly formed community: the graduate students enrolled in Professor Pelizzari’s Advanced Curatorial Certificate seminar. While the theme of the exhibition was selected by the professor, the students chose the featured artworks themselves, wrote all the accompanying materials, including the accompanying catalogue, and were responsible for the show’s design and execution.

The Advanced Curatorial Certificate program, open to art students who are currently pursuing or recently earned their MA or MFA from Hunter, offers a two-semester overview of all facets of the curatorial process, from theory to execution. This seminar, which has long been offered by the Department of Art and Art History, was recently approved as a Certificate-granting program, and Finding Community represents the first exhibition-culmination of the program.

This year’s cohort dove into the background of the Magnum movement, researching the development of photojournalism and the surrounding cultural phenomena. They read about curatorial history and process and embarked on a deep exploration of the legacy of the Magnum photography community. They decided to group the artworks into four sections that each dealt with the concept of community differently: Longing for Community, Shifting Community, Contested Territories, and Displaced Community. The pieces depict families, refugees, civil war, protest, and quiet moments of calm amidst political instability. Spanning Magnum’s 70-year history,  the exhibition includes pieces by some very young artists, and some long deceased.

The students found that the images — Professor Antonella referred to the pictures as “little poems” — had taken on new resonance; images of refugees in the ’70s, they realized, could just as easily be taken from last week’s newspaper. “My relationship to this work changed dramatically over the past year, which speaks to the power of a group like Magnum, which can take on renewed relevance and import in a shifting political structure,” said Ella Hall, a student and member of the cohort.

The exhibition runs Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm until November 26, 2017.


BMCC Announces 2018 Leadership Fellows

Professor Don Wei (center), one of 15 faculty selected for the 2018 Faculty Leadership Fellows Program

The 2018 cohort of the Faculty Leadership Fellows Program at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has been announced. Fifteen full-time faculty from 11 departments were nominated by department chairs, past faculty fellows or cabinet members, and selected for criteria including their demonstrated leadership, years of service at BMCC and application statement.

The goal of the Faculty Leadership Fellows Program is to recognize and develop faculty leadership through formal and informal roles across departments. The program is also designed to advance departmental and college priorities and promote the role of community colleges more broadly in society.

“Leadership rests with people, not just with a position,” said Jim Berg, Associate Dean of Faculty. “This program emphasizes the capacity in each person to make a positive difference to the college.”

The Leadership Fellows Program begins with an intensive seminar, January 8-12, 2018. Participants will engage with nationally recognized experts on major challenges facing community colleges. These exemplary leaders include current and former college presidents, as well as prominent experts in the field of higher education teaching and learning, organizational development and equity.

A series of workshops will follow throughout Spring 2018. These will focus on topics identified in the January seminars and could include topics such as mentoring and coaching, planning for student success, dealing with conflict, program planning and budget development, and effective communications.

“BMCC cannot realize our vision to become a premier community college without strong, visible and pervasive faculty leadership. Adding to our first cohort of fellows, we are building a strong coalition of faculty leaders essential to improving student success and advancing equity,” said Karrin Wilks, Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs at BMCC.

The following faculty fellows were selected from 27 applications:

Heather Finn, Academic Literacy & Linguistics; Rosario Torres-Guevara, Academic Literacy and Linguistics; Joel Barker, Accounting; Andrea Garraway, Business Management; Don Wei, Computer Information Systems; Chamutal Noiman, English; Jason Schneiderman, English; Jean Amaral, Library; Eda Henao, Modern Languages; Michael Morford, Music and Art; Edna Asknes, Nursing; Catarina Mata, Science; Christopher Jackson, Speech; Mark Janis, Speech; Kirsten Cole, Teacher Education and Janice Walters, Teacher Education.


Open Forum Presents Donald Generals, Middle States Team Chair for BMCC

 

As part of the ongoing accreditation process through the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) for Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), students, faculty and staff attended a Middle States Open Forum on November 6 at 199 Chambers Street.

The forum was hosted by BMCC President Antonio Pérez and featured Donald Generals, President of the Community College of Philadelphia and Middle States team chair for BMCC.

Dr. Generals provided information about Middle States reaffirmation and opened the floor to audience comments related to BMCC’s MSCHE Self-Study Report 2017-2018.

This report documents the college’s efforts to strengthen students’ college readiness, facilitate their timely degree completion and other priorities. It is part of BMCC’s decennial self-study process launched in February 2016, when more than 100 faculty and staff formed working groups to address the seven Middle States standards.

A focus on transparency

The culmination of the MSCHE reaffirmation process will be a peer-reviewed visit from a Middle States Evaluation Team in March 2018.

“My purpose for being here today is simply to see if the institution is ready for that visit,” said Dr. Generals. “My job is to see if the self-study process has been transparent, with widespread inclusion of students, faculty and staff. It’s not about getting high marks, it’s about the process of continual improvement.”

In other words, said President Pérez, “The Middle States visit isn’t about showcasing who we are—it’s about sharing who we are and clarifying the directions we have chosen in our institutional self-study, ensuring that the college community has had a part in its creation.”

The Self-Study Report 2017-2018 is available online.

 


Hispanic Heritage Month Highlights Paths to Empowerment

 

Hispanic Heritage Month, Paths to Empowerment opened November 1 at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), with a presentation by award-winning poet Cristina Rivera Garza, author of The Iliac Crest, “an excavation of forgotten Mexican women writers.” Other events that day included the opening of the Altar del Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead Altar as well as an exhibit in the BMCC Library that features works from the Hispanic diaspora.

“We wanted to have a more academic focus that would provide our students with the tools to raise critical awareness about our current social issues,” says Professor Rosario Torres of the Academic Literacy and Linguistics Department at BMCC. “Transformative events such as the Third Cross Cultural Approaches to Latin Studies (CCALS) Biennial Conference: School as an Immigrant and the Moth Storytelling Workshops are the highlights of this Hispanic Heritage Month.”

The events “will emphasize storytelling, experience sharing and collective wisdom in order to build paths to empowerment,” says Professor Torres, who is co-chair of the Hispanic Heritage Committee with Professor David Caicedo. “Events will range from academic workshops on narrative construction, to storytelling podcasts, to legal advisement on immigration.

Hispanic Heritage Month will run through December 7. For more information, contact Professor Rosario Torres at rtorres@bmcc.cuny.edu.


Message from the President: Terror Attack in Lower Manhattan

BMCC has a unique history of resilience when faced with tragedies, including the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and their impact on our campus. We are a strong community that knows the importance of looking out for ourselves and each other. Our resiliency underlies our response to yesterday’s senseless terror attack that killed eight innocent people who were out enjoying our city’s beautiful recreational sights along West Street.

President Perez

This horrific event is a reminder to be vigilant of our surroundings and safety. At BMCC, our response to crises is a priority. We continue to improve our strategies to protect our college community. We stand firmly in support of all our students, faculty and staff, and reinforce our commitment to provide a safe and nurturing working and learning environment. We have several services in place for any members of our community who need help dealing with the aftereffects of yesterday’s attack.

The Office of Student Affairs, located in room S-350, is available to answer questions and direct students, faculty and staff to get help through the BMCC Counseling Center, located in room S-343.

BMCC will continue to work with NYPD and other city agencies as they investigate yesterday’s attack. Our Public Safety officers are on hand to assist in providing access to our Main Campus at 199 Chambers Street. We will continue to update the BMCC community through social media and other communication platforms.

Our hearts go out to the families and loved ones of everyone affected by yesterday’s tragedy.

Sincerely,

President Perez

Antonio Pérez

BMCC President


BMCC Offers Opportunity for Students Displaced by Natural Disasters

 

Efforts are being made to help displaced students who were affected by hurricanes in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The CUNY Board of Trustees recently made a decision to allow affected full-time students to pay tuition at the in-state rate and now BMCC is providing more opportunities for displaced students to earn an education through select programs.

“At BMCC we take pride in our global community, and many of our students are from areas affected by recent natural disasters, such as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands,” says Sunil Gupta, Dean of the BMCC Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development.

To help those students out, particularly those whose incoming CUNY Assessment Test scores indicate they need support with college-level mathematics, “We are waiving all application and enrollment fees for eligible students with dislocated status due to natural disasters who are seeking to attend our BMCC Math Start program,” Dean Gupta said. “Gaining an education is a critical part of the recovery process for individuals affected by these devastating events, and we want them to know we are there for them.”

Providing services to disaster-affected students is also a priority for Diane K. Walleser, Vice President for Enrollment Management.

“BMCC has a strong relationship with the Puerto Rican and Caribbean communities and we hope to help students whose education has been disrupted, or who have been displaced from the workplace and are looking for a fresh start,” she says. “The CUNY Board of Trustees vote to allow affected full-time students to pay tuition at the in-state rate will enable affected students at BMCC to save over $10,000 intuition.”

Additionally, she says, “Our BMCC Admissions and Financial Aid teams will match students to the right programs, as well as help them access tuition assistance grants and scholarships. We stand ready to support our Puerto Rican and Caribbean friends and family, as they seek educational goals and rebuild their lives.”

BMCC students come from more than 160 countries around the world, including those devastated by recent natural disasters. To assist in relief efforts, BMCC students set up tables throughout the College and collected a total of $1,788 so far. This effort, which includes the collection of non-perishable goods, is being led by the BMCC Office of Student Affairs in collaboration with the Caribbean Student Club at BMCC. Donations are still being accepted and can be made by contacting the Office of Student Activities at (212) 220-8160 or osa@bmcc.cuny.edu.

Full-time students displaced by recent natural disasters and interested in entering the BMCC Math Start program through the BMCC Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development may call LaShallah Burgess, (212) 346-8897.

Students displaced by recent natural disasters who want more information on paying tuition at the in-state level, applying for grants or other assistance, may contact the BMCC Office of Admissions: admissions@bmcc.cuny.edu.


BMCC Veteran Students Share Challenges with Service Organizations

The Veterans Resource Center at BMCC, welcomed representatives from the New York City Department of Veterans’ Services (DVS) to meet with student veterans on Oct. 18. The session provided BMCC student veterans with an opportunity to share their stories and ask questions about acquiring assistance for services including housing and health benefits. The event was part of the ongoing DVS Veterans on Campus Listening tour.

BMCC President Antonio Pérez welcomed everyone and shared the college’s ongoing efforts to support its student veterans. DVS representatives Jamal Othman, Assistant Commissioner of Education, Employment and Entrepreneurship and Cassandra Alvarez, Senior Adviser and Director of Public Private Partnerships, attended the session to unveil a new program called, Veterans on Campus-NYC, and to learn about some of the challenges student veterans are experiencing.

The most common topic discussed was the need for housing assistance. “Homelessness and housing are the biggest issues that we are trying to help resolve,” Otham said. “This issue is even more challenging in New York City.”

Deborah Harte, Director of Single Stop at BMCC, attended the session to provide insight regarding the services offered by Single Stop and to learn how the Commissioner’s office is helping veterans with housing. “It’s an area we would love to partner with you,” said Harte to the DVS representatives. “We know how challenging it is to help our students with housing.”

BMCC student veterans

The Veterans on Campus Program is designed to provide assistance to colleges in identifying and adopting best practices for serving veterans at their campuses. Otham said, he is hopeful that colleges, like BMCC, will partner with DVS to ensure a successful transition to college, careers and purpose-driven civilian lives.

In addition, Joshua Chrisman, Senior Operations Associate with American Corporate Partners, attended the session to inform BMCC student veterans about the Veteran Mentor Program, which connects veterans with professionals from a variety of public and private corporations through yearlong mentorships. The program offers veterans with skills including resume building, interviewing, networking and leadership.

For more information about the Veterans Resource Center at BMCC, call (212) 220-8000, Ext. 5363.


Kowald Legacy Series at CCNY features poet Kimiko Hahn, Nov. 14

Poet Kimiko Hahn

Poet Kimiko Hahn, award-winning author of nine books of verse, presents two readings in The City College of New York’s Rifkind Center, NAC room 6/316, on Nov. 14. “Craft Talk,” 2 – 3 p.m.  and “Reading,” 5 – 6 p.m., to conclude this semester’s Kowald Legacy Series. Both are free and open to the public.

The readings are supported by the Kenneth Kowald Fund for Advancing American Literature and the Rifkind Center for the Humanities in City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts.

Hahn’s critically acclaimed work includes the books “The Artist’s Daughter: Poems,” “The Narrow Road to the Interior,” “Toxic Flora” and “Brain Fever.”

She’s the winner of the PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry, the American Book Award, and the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. She has also been awarded fellowships by the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hahn is a distinguished professor at Queens College. In 2016, she was elected president of the Poetry Society of America.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Photonics interns advance

Matthew Shao Chen, Karen Wu Photonics Interns & Siemens Competition Semifinalists

2017 CCNY Photonics Interns with Dr. Robert Alfano and Dr. Kestutis Sutkus

Most high school students spend their summer hanging out at the mall or chilling at the shore. But each year a handful of students from NYC high schools spend their break peering through fancy microscopes at The Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers (IUSL) of the City University of New York at The City College of New York.

Why do these kids bypass the beach to be part of the Photonics Internship program? “They’re passionate about science and eager to learn about optics and physics,” says Dr. Robert Alfano, a scientific innovator whose work unites the divergent fields of medicine, biology and high-speed laser physics. Alfano, a Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering at The City College of New York, is the Director of the IUSL and has led the internship program since its inception.

Over the years, more than 100 high school students who were trained using the state of art methods at IUSL have gone on to some of the best colleges and universities. So it’s no wonder the competition for the intern spots is fierce. Alfano says being smart is a given. He looks for kids who understand that “The only way to make, build and do great things in science is to get your hands dirty in the lab.”

Interns learn how to be optical scientists. They work on real projects with teams of undergrad and PhD students studying photonic and laser technologies for scientific, engineering, medical, and industrial applications. Some lucky interns get their names on published papers. All interns enter the premier national science research competition for high school students, the Siemens Competition. One year a CCNY intern, David Bauer, won the prestigious competition and a $100,000 prize (part of which he used to fund his CCNY undergrad degree).

This year two interns were selected to be Siemens Semifinalists: Matthew Shao Chen of Great Neck South High School and Karen Wu of Brooklyn Technical High School.

Students participating in the 2017 Photonics Internship program came from many NYC area high schools including Riverdale Country School, Brooklyn Tech, and the Bronx School of Science.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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CCNY’s Jennifer Morton wins inaugural national Israel Scheffler Prize

CCNY philosophy professor Jennifer Morton is winner of the inaugural Israel Scheffler Prize in Philosophy of Education.

For her unique insights into student and teacher behavior, City College of New York philosophy professor Jennifer Morton is the winner of the American Philosophical Association’s inaugural Israel Scheffler Prize in Philosophy of Education.

APA cited five of Morton’s connected set of papers on topics in the philosophy of education for presenting her its new award established in memory of the late Israel Scheffler, an influential philosopher of education globally.

Morton’s insightful papers that caught APA’s attention are:

  • “The Non-Cognitive Challenge to a Liberal Egalitarian Education;”
  •  “Cultural Code-Switching: Straddling the Achievement Gap;”
  • “Molding Conscientious, Hard-Working, and Perseverant Students;”
  •  “Unequal Classrooms: Higher Education and Online Learning;” and
  •  “The Educator’s Dual Role: Expressing Ideals While Educating in Non-Ideal Conditions.”

The Scheffler Prize will be awarded every third year for either a book or a connected set of three or more papers on a topic in philosophy of education, broadly construed.

An assistant professor of philosophy in City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts, Morton’s areas of research are philosophy of action, moral philosophy, philosophy of education, and political philosophy.

She has published papers in the European Journal of Philosophy, the Journal of Political Philosophy, Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Research and Theory in Education, among others. She has been awarded a Spencer Foundation grant for her work in Philosophy of Education.

Morton is a graduate of Stanford University (PhD) and Princeton University (A.B.).

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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PRISM Students Earn Awards for Their Research at National STEM Conferences

PRISM Students Earn Awards For Their Research At National STEM Conferences

Two John Jay students have earned national awards for their undergraduate research in science at national conferences that promote diversity and inclusion in STEM.

Senior and Macaulay Honors College student Lisset Duran, who attended the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) conference with a travel grant, won an award for her outstanding presentation of her research on the genetics of breast cancer. Dee-Anne Cush, who is a senior majoring in Cellular and Molecular Biology, won an award at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) on her presentation of immunology research she completed as part of Albert Einstein College of Medicine’s Summer Undergraduate Research Program.

“It was amazing to win,” said Cush. “It made me appreciate my capabilities and it enlightened me to how far I can go and how much I can achieve if I set my mind to it.”

John Jay’s Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math (PRISM) is committed to creating opportunities for students to learn science outside of the classroom. In November, Cush was one of seven students who attended ABRCMS in Phoenix, and Duran was one of six students to fly out to Salt Lake City in October for the 2017 SACNAS National Diversity in STEM Conference. In addition to gaining direct research experience under a faculty mentor, PRISM students like Duran and Cush also receive “bootcamp” style training to help them craft effective messaging for their presentations at the conferences.

PRISM students at John Jay
      John Jay PRISM students in Salt Lake City for the 2017 SACNAS National Diversity in STEM Conference

“Being a scientist is being able to communicate well,” said Duran, who works closely with her faculty mentor Professor Lissette Delgado-Cruzata. “I used to get up to present and I literally would shake. Now I go up there and I do my presentation with a lot of confidence. Without PRISM, I wouldn’t have had that.”

“When I first started working with faculty mentor Dr. Angelique Cortals, I wasn’t familiar with scientific jargon—it was all new to me. But I’ve been in PRISM for three years and I have improved tremendously in communicating and understanding science,” said Cush.

Because SACNAS and ABRCMS have a specific emphasis on increasing diversity in science, they are or particular importance to John Jay’s students, many of whom come from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in STEM.

“SACNAS is very different from other conferences in that it’s focused on minorities, and it’s refreshing to be in a place where everyone looks like you,” said Duran, who spent her summer at Brown University conducting research as part of a paid internship with The Leadership Alliance.

“As a black student in a predominantly white-male dominated field, it shows that there are opportunities for us out there,” said Cush.

Dr. Edgardo Sanabria-Valentín, Associate Program Director of PRISM, agrees that diversity in STEM is a priority for John Jay’s community, especially since the College is a federally designated Hispanic-Serving Institution with 49% of its students identifying as Hispanic. “We at PRISM believe that science should represent the diversity that we see both in our beautiful city and across the world,” he said.

Another important feature of the conferences is that both ABRCMS and SACNAS offer its participants preparation for graduate school. The SACNAS conference featured representatives from 400 different graduate schools as well as mentoring opportunities and workshops to receive individualized resume advice. For Duran, who is pursuing a PhD in biomedical science, and Cush, who has just applied to medical school, that information is crucial.

“All of our students should know what their options are and have opportunities to pursue advanced careers and degrees in science,” said Dr. Sanabria-Valentín. “That’s one of PRISM’s goals.”


Family Palooza Brings Families to John Jay for a Day of Campus Fun

Family Palooza Brings Families to John Jay For a Day of Campus Fun

Families flocked to campus on October 21st for Family Palooza, a daylong carnival-style event hosted by the Office of Student Transition Programs. Formerly known as Family Weekend, the event allowed families to learn about the College’s myriad offerings while spending a Saturday afternoon having fun together.

“This year, families saw the program and got excited,” said Renee Toney, a Senior majoring in Law and Society who has helped organize Family Weekends over the past three years as a Peer Ambassador. “In the past, it was conference-style, but parents didn’t want to be lectured. This time, we made it inclusive for kids by having balloons, basketball, and games.”

Jazmin Letamendi, Associate Director of the Office of Student Transition Programs, agrees that in addition to being more inclusive, the programming was made more accessible this year by hosting it on-site at the campus gym. “As a result, attendance skyrocketed from 140 to 300 people.”

Jazmin Letamendi
Jazmin Letamendi

For the first time ever, the planning for the event involved a committee of students from John Jay’s Peer Ambassador Program under Letamendi’s guidance. Family Palooza, which featured 21 student clubs, a photo booth, a workshop led by Professor Jennifer Rosati on Forensic Science, a talent show, a volunteer project with the Office of Community Outreach and Service Learning, and an off-campus New York Islanders game, required a great deal of effort that paid off in the end.

“It’s the students who know what the community wants, because they’re the voice of the College,” Letamendi said. “We were really satisfied with all the work we put into planning the event.”

Mercedes Talley, who tabled at Family Palooza as the Treasurer of the All-Inclusive Club at John Jay, said that the new format allowed her to teach students and their families about her club’s mission through the use of fun games like trivia. “Family Palooza gave our club an opportunity for promotion,” she said. “It let students know that there is a club that tries to advocate for students with disabilities seen and unseen.”

Toney agrees that the event exposed families to the various opportunities the College offers: “Because of the student tabling, families saw what clubs on campus actually do. Later, when we had the talent show with students singing and dancing, families were excited to see what John Jay had to showcase.”

Letamendi says that involving families in students’ lives is a priority for the College, and especially for the Office of Student Transition Programs, which also plans Parent and Family Orientation. “John Jay sets the bar high for family programs because we know that families are instrumental to students’ lives,” she said. “A lot of our families love John Jay, and we see many sending their third or fourth student here. They have a proud devotion to the College.”

At the Office of Student Transition Programs, family is so important that its dynamics are often replicated in its programs. As part of the Peer Ambassadorship Program, students help organize and volunteer at campus events, but they also build strong bonds with one another and the larger John Jay community.

“As Peer Ambassadors, we tell each other about internship opportunities and elevate each other,” said Toney. “It’s like a big family.”

Family Palooza photobooth photos


For Veteran’s Day, John Jay College Honors its Veteran Students

For Veterans Day, John Jay College Honors its Veteran Students

For Veterans Day, John Jay College is celebrating its student veteran population. With 530 veterans currently enrolled, the College takes pride in honoring its many veteran students who have served in various military branches and have made tremendous sacrifices for the nation and the greater good.

Recognized as a Best for Vets and Veteran Friendly higher education institution, John Jay offers extensive programming, services, and career opportunities to prepare its student veterans for life after the military. Richard Pusateri, Manager of the Military and Veteran’s Services Office, says that with an 80% graduation rate and with an average GPA last year of 3.3, veteran students are characteristically successful at John Jay.

One of those exceptional students is Sade Thomas, who will sing the National Anthem at the Mayor’s Breakfast on November 11, with Mayor de Blasio, First Lady Chirlane McCray, and other prominent city leaders in attendance. Thomas served as an administrative specialist in the US Marine Corps at Camp Pendleton, CA from 2006-2010, where she achieved the rank of Corporal. A native of Brooklyn, she graduated with a Criminal Justice BS from John Jay in 2014, and is currently enrolled in the MPA Oversight and Inspection program from which she will graduate in May.

As the President of the student-led John Jay Veterans Association, a peer mentorship group for veteran students, Thomas is committed to fostering community among veterans on campus.

“I’ve been a member of the Veterans Association since 2014, so I know the people well here and I love being around them,” she said. “I make sure student veterans get the best academic experience they can.”

 

               Sade Thomas

Another veteran student John Jay is proud to recognize is Kyle Grant. When Grant retired from the military in 2014, he was more motivated than ever to complete his education. He immediately started taking classes at Kingsborough College, where he completed his Associate Degree, and then transferred to John Jay for his Bachelor’s in Security Management. Only a few months after earning his BS in the spring, he is now pursuing a dual-degree in Protection Management and Public Administration and plans to graduate this December.

During the day, Kyle works a full-time job as a Security Manager at First Data, one of the nation’s leading credit card processing companies. At night, Kyle returns to campus, where he is currently enrolled in five courses. “What I’m doing is not for everybody,” he said. “But it’s because of my dedication that I’m finding a way to get it done.”

Former Marine and Forensic Psychology major Eugene Marmontov shares a similar commitment to his education. Throughout his eight years on active duty as a Marine – in Afghanistan and Iraq, Guantanamo Bay and Europe – he envisioned coming home one day and going to college, and specifically, to John Jay.

“I always wanted to go into public service in the justice field,” he said, “and I knew that was the place I wanted to be.”

Marmontov, 35, was born in Moscow and emigrated to Brooklyn with his mother when he was 18. After enlisting in the Marines at 24, he ended his active duty career in 2015, and enrolled at John Jay. Marmontov now has a 3.95 GPA and will graduate in December with hopes to begin his career in law enforcement either with a federal agency such as the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Agency or Secret Service, or with the NYPD.

On November 9 during community hour, the Office of Military and Veterans Services and the Veterans Association will host a Veterans Day observance and Marine Birthday celebration where community members are invited to contribute hygiene items to a month-long collection drive for homeless veterans. On November 28th, a ceremony and banquet featuring keynote speaker Rear Admiral Steven D. Poulin will be held for new inductees into the John Jay chapter of the SALUTE National Veterans Honor Society, which was initiated on campus last year.

“John Jay is committed to honoring its veteran students,” said Pusateri. “For veterans, that acceptance in this community means a lot.”


John Jay Research & Evaluation Center Presents Findings on Program to Eliminate Violence at DeNormalizing Violence Conference

John Jay Research & Evaluation Center Presents Findings on Program To Eliminate Violence At Denormalizing Violence Conference

On October 26, the John Jay Research & Evaluation Center (JohnJayREC) hosted the Denormalizing Violence Conference, where they presented results from a study that evaluated the ground-breaking CURE Violence program. CURE Violence reduces violence by understanding and treating it as a public health issue, and for four years, JohnJayREC has received funds from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) of Princeton, New Jersey, the New York City Council, and the New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice to conduct evaluation of the program.

Jeffrey Butts, Director of JohnJayREC, opened the conference by pointing out favorable findings that show that CURE Violence has contributed to reducing violence, increasing the adoption of non-violent norms in place of violent ones, and fostering community trust and cooperation with law enforcement.

Additionally, CURE Violence staff who are trained to anticipate and deter violent conflicts as well as provide counseling, spoke at length about the experience of implementing the CURE Violence model. One of the primary reasons they say its works is because the model is community-centered and is facilitated by trusted community members.

“The program works because it’s an inside job,” said David Caba, Program Director with Bronx Rises Against Gun Violence, a CURE Violence site. “The Violence Interrupter needs to live in the catchment where they work. You can’t bring someone from the suburbs to the South Bronx to do this work.”

Shanduke McPhatter, Executive Director of Gangstas Makin’ Astronomical Community Changes, which uses the CURE Violence model in Brooklyn, said that as someone who was formerly incarcerated and affiliated with a gang, he’s uniquely positioned as a credible messenger to change the way individuals think about violence. “Instead of telling somebody what to do, I show them what to do,” he said.

The benefits tend to be beneficial for everyone involved. “Once you start changing other people’s lives, you have the shot to change your own life,” said Marcus McAllister, from the National CURE Violence team. “This work transforms the workers.”

But while the evidence is strong that CURE Violence is effective, the research did not always fully convey the transformative impact that the program had on the lives of participant and staff members.

“We went out and surveyed over 5,000 young men in New York City, but you couldn’t necessarily measure everything,” said Sheyla Delgado, JohnJayREC Deputy Director for Analytics. “We can become more creative about how we measure these things,” she added, mentioning that program recognition may be another effective way to measure CURE Violence’s impact.

Charlie Ransford, Director of Science and Policy at CURE Violence, says that despite these challenges, the research that JohnJayREC has done is invaluable to making sure that the program continues to improve. “Our approach is within the community and to get rid of violence, 100 percent,” he said. “Research helps us figure out that if we have the right perspective and ask, how can we make the model better? How can we make it work to the 100 percent level?”

New York City Council Member Jumaane Williams echoed that CURE Violence’s community-centered approach is exactly what’s needed to counter mass incarceration, which has been discredited as ineffective in reducing both violence and crime. “Crime prevention right now is to lock up as many black and brown people as possible, but we know that doesn’t work,” he said. “We’re using an acute solution for a chronic problem.”

As “a chronic problem” that has the potential to be stopped by looking at long-term policy solutions is exactly how Robin L. Holmes Myers, Operations Director of CURE Violence at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), thinks violence should be approached. “There is structural violence happening in these neighborhoods,” she said. “How do we change policies that are causing this violence? How do people receive services that are needed like housing or mental health services?”

Aletha Maybank, Deputy Commissioner of DOHMH, said that framing violence as a public health issue will help us see the real cost violence has on our communities.

“The larger goal is not just to stop violence,” she said. “It’s about stopping premature death.”

View all the photos from the conference.


John Jay is Among the Most Diverse Colleges in the Northeast According to Wall Street Journal Ranking

John Jay is Among the Most Diverse Colleges in the Northeast According to Wall Street Journal Ranking

John Jay College has been ranked among the top five multicultural and inclusive colleges in New York City in the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education (THE) College Rankings. The  list is based on an environment metric which includes the racial and financial backgrounds of student populations. John Jay is #10 for diversity among colleges in the entire Northeast.

According to the publication, the WSJ/THE rankings measure school environment factors such as the number of students that are the first in their families to attend college and the share of the student body that comes from abroad. This metric also accounts for the percentage of Pell Grant recipients and the racial and ethnic diversity of the faculty. Four other City University of New York colleges also made the top 10 list.

With a student body that represents more than 130 nationalities, John Jay’s diverse community is evident beyond the rankings. The College’s inclusive campus fosters a rich environment for learning about important topics, engaging in hands-on research and working towards solutions to major national and global issues.

As a Hispanic-Serving Institution, with membership in the Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities (HACU) and the Hispanic Education Technology Services consortium (HETS), John Jay supports student success with programs such as Adelante!, the Pre-Law Institute, the Ronald H. Brown Law School Prep Program, and the Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math (PRISM), which is contributing to increased diversity in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. This year, a report by the Education Trust also ranked John Jay College #3 for the graduation rates of Black students among top-performing colleges and universities.

 

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations.  In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.


The National Society of Leadership and Success at John Jay Brings Sir Richard Branson to Campus

The National Society of Leadership and Success at John Jay Brings Sir Richard Branson to Campus

On October 17, Sir Richard Branson visited John Jay College to speak about the role of social good in business as part of a live national broadcast organized by the National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS).

“Your idea must make a positive impact in people’s lives,” Branson said in front of an audience that included students, staff, faculty, and President Karol V. Mason. “Otherwise what’s the point?”

As part of their goal to develop the leadership potential of students, NSLS, which has over 500 chapters on campuses nationwide, offers students the opportunity to hear from influential leaders from a variety of fields. In addition to Branson, NSLS has hosted talks with Trevor Noah, Anderson Cooper, Arianna Huffington, and many more. Because they are broadcast nationally as well as recorded for later viewing, each talk is accessible to students regardless of where they are based.

Richard Branson with the National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS)Allison O’Hagan, a Forensic Psychology major who is graduating next May, is the President of John Jay’s NSLS chapter and says that becoming involved with the Society is something all students can benefit from, regardless of their area of study. “There’s something for everyone to take from the program,” she said. “For example, I’m currently trying to be a police officer and leadership is something they stress.”

At John Jay, the NSLS chapter is relatively new at only three years old, but the chapter’s future has been promising since its inception in 2015 when former student and Forensic Psychology major Angelica Puente-Soto approached Danielle Officer, Director of the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership, with the idea to start the chapter on campus. Once approved, the program quickly grew.

“Our goal was to have 50 students, but in that first year, we had nearly 600. We ended up having induction in the school gymnasium, and the President of the Society attended,” said Officer.

After that first massive success, the John Jay College chapter has grown and has continued to gain attention from NSLS executive leadership. After hosting a regional leadership retreat hosted over the summer, John Jay was selected to host a speaker broadcast with Sir Richard Branson, which is an opportunity that is only extended to strong NSLS chapters. The College is the first CUNY campus to host a live broadcast.

Students in the audience watching the National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS) interview with Sir Richard BransonAt the heart of NSLS is the development of leadership skills so that students can reach their dreams in college and beyond. To that aim, students must complete three components to be inducted into the Society. In addition to viewing at least three speaker broadcasts, students also must attend a Leadership Training Day as well as join a Success Networking Team (SNT). Within their SNT, which is comprised of a small group of peers, students set action plans using the SMART model—a model used to set and achieve attainable goals.

“It’s one thing to set a goal on your own but when you share a goal, you feel responsibility to complete it,” said Officer. “In their SNTs, students can set any goal they want, but the peers in the group hold them accountable and help guide them through it.”

After completing their goals, some students become even more involved with the Society by joining the Executive Board. O’Hagan thinks that the students that gain the most are those who take advantage of these various opportunities. “When you’re first invited, you might look at the requirements and think it doesn’t work,” she said. “But we find that students who put in time and effort are more successful, and they end up doing successful things in all aspects of their involvement in campus.”

Richard Branson with President Karol Mason

Ultimately, the goal of NSLS is aligned with the goal of all of John Jay’s programs housed out of CSIL’s office: to develop professional leaders who will become fierce advocates for justice.

“Like Branson said, when you fall, you get back up,” said Officer. “Our goal is that students learn to overcome obstacles and develop perseverance so that they can pay it forward in society.”

 

View all the photos from the event.


Alumni Achieving Graduate School Dreams: Celebrating 25 Years of the McNair Scholars Program at John Jay

Alumni Achieving Graduate School Dreams: Celebrating 25 Years of the McNair Scholars Program at John Jay

This year, the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program is celebrating its 25th year at John Jay College. Allura Casanova, who graduated from John Jay in 2016 with a major in Forensic Psychology and Global History, and is now completing a joint PhD in Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, may not have ever considered pursuing her doctorate without the help of McNair.

“I’m a first generation college student,” said Casanova. “Before the McNair program, I didn’t know what graduate school could mean for me.”

Tannuja Rozario, who graduated from John Jay in 2016 with a major in Law and Society, and is currently pursuing her PhD in Sociology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, agrees that the program opened her eyes to what was possible.

“The McNair program pushed me beyond what I thought my limits were,” said Rozario.

The objective of the McNair Scholars Program is to encourage low-income and first generation students to pursue graduate study. As part of the program, students have the opportunity to work with a faculty mentor on a two year research project, receive graduate school admission guidance including GRE preparation, and attend several workshops and activities to learn the personal and professional skills needed to succeed in graduate school.

“McNair gave us tools we wouldn’t have access to otherwise,” said Casanova.

One of the most important tools that McNair equips students with is the ability to conduct research—a skill that can seem daunting to undergraduate students.

“I knew I wanted to conduct research projects when I came to John Jay, but I felt so overwhelmed at first,” said Rozario. “I applied to the McNair program, and my mentor who guided me through my research paper also guided me through my two years in the program and beyond.”

“I began working in Professor Daryl Wout’s lab, and he encouraged me to apply for McNair,” said Casanova. “Under his mentorship, I learned what my own research interests were.”

The program is also committed to eliminating financial barriers to applying for graduate school, which is important for McNair Scholars, many of whom chose John Jay specifically because of its affordability.

“John Jay is low cost, but I had to pay out of pocket for my education,” said Casanova. “The application fees and costs related to the GRE wouldn’t have been possible without McNair’s help.”

But the program offers more than academic and financial support—it also prepares students for unexpected social challenges they may face in their graduate programs, many of which require students to travel out-of-state and out of their comfort zones.

“Transitioning from New York to Massachusetts was not easy,” said Rozario. “But it is such a great experience.”

Casanova agrees. “Michigan is not as diverse as John Jay,” she said. “But the McNair program helped me adjust to a place where faculty and mentors have a different racial and socioeconomic background than mine.”

Both Rozario and Casanova feel uniquely positioned for success in graduate school because of their experience at John Jay.

“John Jay was an unforgettable experience, and I am so grateful for the opportunities that I was provided with,” Rozario said.

“At John Jay, I knew that faculty members really cared about me,” said Casanova. “Dr. Ernest Lee still reaches out to see how I’m doing.”

It is partly because of her positive experience at John Jay that Casanova is so enthusiastically pursuing her PhD.

“This may sound cheesy,” she said, “but my goal is to become a professor because I want to be the same mentor for young scholars that my mentor was for me.”


Doctoral Student Mawia Khogali Wins Fellowship From National Institute of Justice to Complete Her Dissertation in Justice

Doctoral Student Mawia Khogali Wins Fellowship from National Institute of Justice to Complete her Dissertation in Justice

Mawia Khogali is two years away from graduating with her PhD in Psychology and Law from John Jay College, a highly competitive program that only admits five people per year, and enables her to look at justice from the lens of psychology.

Now, three years into her program, Mawia has been awarded a fellowship from the National Institute of Justice for the completion of her dissertation, which will look at the perception of force between police and civilians. Mawia says the fellowship will open up new possibilities for her career.

“Getting this award from the NIJ is the best thing that could have happened,” she said. “My ability to move forward as a researcher has shifted because the fellowship recognizes that what I’m doing is worthy in the field.”

Mawia was a strong applicant for the award, especially given her extensive research experience. As part of her doctoral program, she’s worked on a variety of research projects, including a study in which she reached out to 1,500 attorneys in order to analyze how racial stereotypes influence the way plea bargains are negotiated.  “It’s a learning experience,” she said. “It’s been a lot of research but it helps me see where I want to go in my career trajectory.”

That trajectory is already starting to take form as Mawia has also accepted a fellowship at the Vera Institute’s policing program, where she looks at community policing, a method of policing that focuses on how communities can collaborate with law enforcement for innovative justice solutions. Mawia loves her work at Vera because she can see how it makes a difference on the ground. “We’re using applied research to work hand in hand with police officers to see how we can address issues without the use of enforcement,” she said.

Having these research experiences – both with the faculty at John Jay and her mentors at Vera – has enriched Mawia’s doctoral journey. “I’m still learning a lot, but I can’t imagine having the knowledge I have if it weren’t for both the academic research I’ve done at John Jay and the applied research I’m doing at Vera.”

As a graduate of Medgar Evers, and now as a doctoral student at John Jay, Mawia considers herself a lifelong CUNY supporter. She already gives back to the CUNY family by working as a Teaching Assistant  in Psychology and Law at John Jay. “One of my passions is teaching,” she said. “I love my students here. They have a personal relationship with you, and they rely on you both for knowledge and life skills.”

It’s because of Mawia’s commitment to justice, both in the criminal justice system and elsewhere, that she is considering becoming a full-time professor at CUNY one day. At CUNY, where there are high rates of students of color, Mawia feels she can make the most impact. “I’ve noticed how white the academy is, and I’ve been able to see the lack of resources for students of color. I’m the only black person in my program and I want to share the knowledge I’ve gained with those who look like me.”

“I promote justice, especially racial justice, in all the classes I teach,” she said. “CUNY students want that.”


John Jay and CUNY Push for DACA Renewal

John Jay and CUNY Push For DACA Renewal

There has been an outpouring of criticism in academic circles across the U.S., and especially at CUNY and John Jay, in reaction to efforts to rescind DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The Obama administration put DACA in place to protect young immigrants from deportation if they were brought to the U.S. illegally as children and have remained here ever since.

John Jay president Karol Mason has been vocal in her support of undocumented students, often called “Dreamers.” In a statement on the subject, she said, “we are committed at John Jay to doing everything we can to support and protect our students, regardless of immigration status.” It is estimated that there are between 500 and 1,000 undocumented students at John Jay College.

The College is adhering to guidelines in place whereby the institution will not disclose any immigration information about students unless legally required. These protections are consistent with the policy outlined by CUNY and Chancellor James Milliken.  In a statement of his own, Milliken said, “We are fully committed to the thousands of CUNY DACA students and will do all we can to support them. They represent some of the most talented and creative voices in the CUNY community and our city. We will do everything we can to help persuade Congress to shore up support for the DACA community, not undermine it, and CUNY will provide counseling and guidance to help our DACA students with their needs and questions.”

On September 6, Milliken made an appearance at John Jay College alongside Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who announced that he was filing a lawsuit on behalf of New York State (along with 14 additional states and the District of Columbia) challenging the Trump administration’s decision to rescind DACA. In a statement issued the following day, President Mason said, “Yesterday, we all witnessed what it means to be a Fierce Advocate for Justice… We will join with the overwhelming chorus of voices speaking out against the decision to rescind DACA, and leverage our resources to persuade Congress to right this obvious wrong.”

Faculty, staff, and students around campus have been organizing to provide additional resources and support for undocumented students.  These include: advertising free renewals of DACA applications; the creation of community safe spaces such as “Pizza Mondays,” an event put together by the Latino/a Studies department that takes place each Monday where undocumented students can get together to talk and discuss immigration issues; confidential counseling support offered by the Wellness Center; and other legal and financial resources.

Isabel Martinez and Nancy Yang are two of the many John Jay faculty and staff members deeply involved in the movement to protect Dreamers on campus. They help run the DREAMers Club and organized Pizza Mondays. According to Martinez, “My classrooms have been very upfront about teaching about undocumented students.” She meets with her students individually so she can offer support.

Martinez has also been raising awareness about different scholarship opportunities (most undocumented students aren’t eligible for financial aid) and additional legal protections that might be available such as Special Juvenile Immigrant Status.

To learn more about the resources available to undocumented students at John Jay, click here: http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/undocumentedstudents


John Jay Mobilizes To Support Disaster Relief and Recovery Efforts

John Jay Mobilizes to Support Disaster Relief and Recovery Efforts

In the wake of four natural disasters, which tragically struck within weeks of each other, the John Jay community has mobilized to support those affected by these tragic events.

“We are all reeling from so many tragedies over the past few weeks. We witnessed three hurricanes in a row devastate Texas, Florida, the Caribbean and Puerto Rico, and a major earthquake severely impact Mexico City. On Monday morning, we woke to the news of the mass shootings in Las Vegas. I struggled to find the words to address the pain that so many of us are feeling in the wake of these events,” said President Karol Mason.

Mason said that community members can help in a wide variety of ways including donating household items, volunteering, joining an event, or contributing funds.

To maximize the impact of those who want to help, John Jay set up a webpage – Unmet Needs – to serve as a resource for the community members who wish to donate or support the affected populations.  John Jay is following the Unmet needs Roundtable Model, a model that has proven to be effective in coordinating long-term recovery efforts. The model utilizes a “coordinating agency” to bring together different partner organizations, provide training, help distribute funds, and provide reports on the progress of recovery efforts.

Those who want to volunteer can sign up with the Unmet Needs Roundtable. Donations are being collected and sent to international and domestic areas impacted by the hurricanes, and several events have also been organized including Arts for Healing, which took place in Hound Square from October 16 – 20, and a bake sale scheduled for October 25 in the Atrium.

In a letter to the John Jay community, Jose Luis Morin, chair of the Latino/a studies department, said, “Many in our community – including students, faculty and staff – with roots in Mexico and Puerto Rico have been deeply shaken, are concerned with the wellbeing of loved ones, and are looking for ways to assist in relief efforts.” He identified several specific organizations that people can donate to including Fundacion Loyola to support Mexico and The Hurricane Maria Relief and Recovery Fund to support Puerto Rico, among several other reputable organizations.

Chancellor James Milliken acknowledged that many in the CUNY community are directly affected by the hurricane that struck Puerto Rico. “This disaster has special meaning in New York and at The City University of New York,” he said. “So many in our communities trace their heritage to Puerto Rico, and thousands of CUNY students, faculty and staff have family and friends directly impacted by this disaster. Our thoughts and prayers are with our friends, families and colleagues in Puerto Rico, and we want to do all we can to assist them at this time.”

One John Jay graduate student, Layla Vasquez, started a Go Fund Me campaign that has already raised $1,445 to support recovery efforts in Guayama, Puerto Rico, an area that was hit especially hard.  In an article in Yonkers Daily Voice about her campaign, she is quoted as saying, “This is a human necessity, this is human survival… it’s necessary that the government steps in to help people.”

Check in with the Unmet Needs webpage to stay up to date on how you can aid in the recovery efforts.


At Otisville, Prison-to-College Pipeline is Expanding Educational Opportunity for Students Inside and Out

At Otisville, the Prison-To-College Pipeline Is Expanding Educational Opportunity for Students Both Inside And Out

At the Otisville Correctional Facility, students enrolled in the Prison-To-College-Pipeline (P2CP) anxiously waited to greet a group of visitors who had traveled to the prison specifically to meet them.

“This is a special event,” said Dylan Knapp, a current P2CP student who was scheduled to speak on a panel later in the afternoon. “We’ve spent a lot of time preparing for this.”

The visit was hosted by the Prisoner Reentry Institute (PRI) at John Jay College and by the NYS Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS) as an opportunity for various stakeholders—including John Jay College President Karol Mason, city and state officials, corrections professionals, educators, students, and funders—to learn more about the impact of the ground-breaking P2CP program, which allows incarcerated people to begin their college careers while still incarcerated and finish them upon release. Since its beginning in 2011, the program has garnered the support of various foundations including the David Rockefeller Fund, the Ford Foundation, JM Kaplan Fund, the Teagle Foundation, the Pinkerton Foundation, and more.

“It has not been easy but today is a milestone, and we take pleasure in what we have achieved,” said Otisville Superintendent Kathleen Gerbing.

“It takes a community to pull this off,” added Ann Jacobs, Director of PRI.

That community effort begins with a recruitment process that extends to five prisons across the state. Applicants who pass the CUNY admissions tests in reading and writing submit an essay and are interviewed. Once accepted, students are transferred to Otisville, and begin the three-part program: credit-bearing classes taught by professors that travel to Otisville on a weekly basis, a monthly learning exchange with John Jay students who come to the prison for seminars with the incarcerated students, and a workshop series in which P2CP students receive academic advisement and practice skills for success in college and beyond.

“We want students to have a rich campus experience like all other CUNY students,” said Bianca Van Heydoorn, Director of Educational Initiatives at PRI.

As a result, P2CP students gain access to a comprehensive set of resources and myriad opportunities to learn. That learning extends not just to the students inside, but also to those who participate in the exchange program, who often have an equally life-altering experience.

“I grew up believing that people deserved to be put away,” said Nino Pereira, a John Jay student who participated in the learning exchange program in 2016. “This program showed me that I had biases against incarcerated people, and forced me to face them.”

P2CP’s impact extends well after students complete the program. After graduation, students have access to the College Initiative (CI) program, which provides outreach, academic counseling, financial aid and enrollment assistance, peer mentoring, and supportive workshops. Both P2CP and CI are committed to providing support at each step of the way.

“I’ve gotten support through this program to keep being resilient,” said Dino Solorzano, a second year student of P2CP.  “John Jay and the professors who teach us are here to say this is not just school—this is family.”

That sense of family was clear throughout the visit as returning graduates of P2CP took turns greeting friends they’d met through the program, some of whom were still incarcerated. Deivy Tauzard, who was seeing the prison for the first time since his release, turned to Knapp with advice. “Take advantage of these opportunities,” he said. “This program is hope.”

Fortunately, the program continues to grow. In 2016, an experimental pilot program called the Second Chance Pell was launched to give incarcerated people the opportunity to receive Pell grants to fund their college education. John Jay College was selected as the lead institution for CUNY, and became one of 67 universities nationwide to participate in the program.

“Under the Obama administration, we started the Second Chance Pell,” said John Jay President Karol Mason, recalling her experience as former U.S. Assistant Attorney General. “The Prison-to-College-Pipeline is confirming that what we thought was important in theory is important in practice.”

With the federal Second Chance Pell Pilot expansion, the P2CP academic program has grown to 52 students this fall, and is slated to expand to 100 students in the fall of 2018, and to 150 students in fall 2019.

Theron Smith, who was part of the program’s first cohort in 2011, is excited to see it expand. “From 15 students to 30 to 40, I’ve already seen the program grow so much,” he said.

Dr. Baz Dreisinger, the Founding Academic Director of the program, thinks there’s a good reason that the program continues to grow—it’s because the model works. At the time of this visit, she was in Taiwan to talk about replicating the innovative P2CP model in that country, but her presence was still felt.

“Six years ago, we couldn’t have imagined how powerful the program would become—not just here—but internationally,” Dreisinger stated. “We should all be vastly proud.”

View all the photos from the Otisville Spotlight on P2CP.


For Purple Day, John Jay Students Speak Out Against Domestic Violence

For Purple Day, John Jay Students Speak Out Against Domestic Violence

This October, the Women’s Center for Gender Justice is hosting a series of events for Domestic Violence Awareness Month in order to spread awareness about intimate partner violence (IPV). Included in the Center’s programming were workshops held on October 18 and 19 where students received purple t-shirts to wear the following day for Purple Day — National Domestic Violence Awareness Day.

“Our efforts to bring awareness to this issue on campus are so important,” said Christina Manuel, a senior student at John Jay majoring in Gender Studies and International Criminal Justice. “We’re letting students who have experienced violence know they have a support group.”

Students will also be tabling in the atrium throughout the month, where John Jay community members can decorate t-shirts for inclusion in The Clothesline Project – a national initiative designed to spark campus-wide conversations about violence. The t-shirts will later be displayed in an opening ceremony on November 2nd in the hopes that the exhibit will serve as a visual symbol of support for survivors.

Manuel is one of several students who have been trained by Jessica Greenfield, counselor and clinical social worker at the Women’s Center for Gender Justice, about Title IX, the national law that prohibits sex discrimination and sexual misconduct in schools and colleges. The goal of training students is that they can pass this knowledge on to their peers, who may not realize there are support mechanisms on campus.

“Many students don’t know that John Jay has a policy on sexual misconduct, or that they can speak to me confidentially,” Greenfield said. “As a counselor, I give students as much information as I can so they can make informed decisions, including whether they want to file a report.”

The center offers counseling services for those who have survived any form of gender-based violence, including short-term advocacy or ongoing counseling, as well as information and resources. Still, Greenfield recognizes that not all students may feel comfortable seeking out this support.

“There is still so much stigma around this issue,” Greenfield said. “That’s why the Clothesline Project is impactful, so that students can see that may not be alone in their experiences.”

Furthermore, the language used to describe experiences of violence can sometimes be alienating for students.

“Not everyone relates to the term ‘domestic violence’,” Greenfield said. “But when we talk about healthy relationships and healthy communication, it meets people on a different level.”

The Women’s Center for Gender Justice’s focus on healthy relationships includes all aspects of sexuality, including reproductive and sexual health.  In November, the Center hosts a birth control clinic and sexual health fair where students can meet with physicians and get information about testing as well as prescriptions for birth control for up to a year.
The Women’s Center also runs the Gender Justice Advocates Program, a professional development program that trains students on how to engage in activism and lead effective campaigns for gender justice.

Christina Manuel, whose hometown is in Virginia, said that it is this commitment to justice that makes her most proud to be a student at John Jay.

“It’s so cool to be in a community that is focused on social justice and change,” she said. “That passion for activism from both students and professors is what really drew me here.”


In the Anthropology Department, Students Are Building a Creative Community Inclusive of All

In the Anthropology Department, Students are Building a Creative Community Inclusive of All

Students looking for a creative home at John Jay College need look no further than the Anthropology Department, where the student collective and magazine known as A Home @ The End of the World will celebrate its one year anniversary this November.

“We started because students wanted to write outside of the academic setting, and without an explicit focus on justice,” said Atiba Rougier, Professor of Anthropology and head of the magazine. “Students were asking: how do I want to engage in the world through my writing?”

“The zine gives me the ability to express myself creatively,” said Connor Gilligan, a founding member of the magazine and sophomore majoring in Anthropology.

Every month, A Home @ The End of the World publishes articles from “zinesters” on topics that include everything from history and literature to health and happiness. Before publication, articles are reviewed by an Executive Editorial Board that includes several John Jay faculty, including President of the American Anthropological Association Alisse Waterston.

“A Home @ The End of the World gives students space to write, but it’s also a way for students to learn things like meeting deadlines and expressing themselves in an article,” said Rougier. “That’s important for a career.”

In addition to building professional skills, senior Joey Butts says the magazine builds community: “The zine has given me a family at John Jay.”

That emphasis on community is why A Home @ The End of the World also hosts a monthly discussion series called the Anthropology Café, where students can come together to learn how anthropology can help them find solutions to real-world problems.

“Take the topic of drug addiction,” said Kevin Garcia, a freshman studying English. “Anthropology helps us see it as more than a disease and understand its cultural aspects as well.”

The next Anthropology Café will be on Domestic Violence Awareness Day on October 19, and will be led by Dr. Edward Snajdr on gender-based violence in Asia. Like every event the magazine hosts, it is open to all students, regardless of what they’re studying.

“A cop that has taken anthropology is a different cop than one who hasn’t,” said Rougier.

Irene Agyemang, a Criminal Justice major, agrees. “Anthropology allows me to see the world from other points of view and therefore teaches me tolerance,” she said. “We need tolerance, especially in this political climate.”

Other students see anthropology’s potential to impact their careers in different ways.

“I plan to go to medical school and use what I learned in anthropology to work for Doctors Without Borders,” said Dafhnee Jimenez, a junior who majors in Anthropology and minors in Biology.

In the same way that A Home @ The End of the World welcomes students with various career goals, it also welcomes students with various creative abilities, not just writing.

Michelle Bukhari became a photographer for the zine after her sister Amerra recommended she join. “Now, I have a place to display my work,” she said.

Students can also help manage the zine’s robust Instagram presence. This month, Philosophy student Debbie Chan will be working with Sarah Morgano, Social Media Manager for the college, to plan a @AHomeAtTheEndoftheWorld week-long takeover of the College’s official Instagram account.

“The zine allows me to meet people I would’ve never had the chance to meet before,” Chan said of her work with Morgano.

The takeover, which starts October 16th, will bring greater awareness of anthropology to the John Jay community as well as the opportunities offered by the Department. For example, a group of students will be traveling to DC this December for the American Anthropological Association’s annual conference.  Next March, A Home @ The End of the World will also host its second annual conference featuring student and faculty work.

Freshman Frank Davila is grateful he was introduced to the zine. “I love this group,” he said. “The more we know about different cultures, the more we’ll be able to get along.”


Celebrating the Latinx Community With A Series of Month-Long Events

Celebrating the Latinx Community At John Jay With a Series of Month-long EventsJavier Avila’s experience moving from Puerto Rico to Pennsylvania when he was thirty-one inspired him to resist discrimination with art in the form of a one-man show that he recently performed as part of an event hosted by the SEEK Department at John Jay. “In the show, I explore what is wrong with prejudice and what’s at the root of it—fear,” said Avila in one of his videos. “But I also explore how positive it is to embrace diversity.”

Avila’s performance, which SEEK Department organized as part of their Freshman Seminar, was one of several events that also celebrated diversity during Latinx Heritage Month, and specifically the diversity of experience that makes up the Latinx community. On September 14, poet and novelist Elizabeth Acevedo kicked off the month-long series of events with a reading from her book. Acevedo, who is the daughter of Dominican immigrants and whose forthcoming novel features a teenage Afro-Latina protagonist, captivated the crowd.

“Acevedo was able to connect with students,” said Communications and Marketing Manager of Student Affairs Mark Travis Rivera, who also read at the event from his book DRAFTS, which explores the intersection of race and disability. “She was talking about being from New York City and about her hair, and it really resonated with folks.”

That all of the events in honor of Latinx Heritage Month resonate with John Jay students is important for the College. With 43% of its student population identifying as Hispanic/Latino, John Jay is federally recognized as a Hispanic-serving institution.

Included in the roster of events was also a talk that featured Ana M. Bermudez, the first Latina to be appointed Commissioner of the Department of Probation in New York City. Bermudez spoke to John Jay students about overcoming social bias as a Latina woman and member of the LGBTQ community, as well as what it means to be an effective leader for justice.

“Ana M. Bermudez is a living, breathing example of change in our society,” said student Uroosa Malik, who is completing a dual-degree program in Public Administration and Inspection and Oversight.  “Her fierce persona and diligence in committing to her vision inspired everyone in the room to stand up for what they believe in.”

Bermudez also emphasized the importance of embracing all facets of one’s identity—both ethnic and otherwise.

“Through the words of her mother, Commissioner Bermudez shared that the key to happiness and success is to praise one’s unique sense of self,” said student Gina Ortiz, who is completing a Master’s program in Inspection and Oversight.

For the culminating event on October 12, everyone in the John Jay community was invited to celebrate their unique sense of self by contributing to a collective art project at Hound Square. With assistance from The InterRelations Collaborative, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building cross-cultural understanding through art, John Jay students, faculty, and staff helped construct a community quilt.

“Everything from The Trouble with My Name to the quilting project centered Latinx communities and families,” said Rivera. “We hope to continue to center our Latinx students and their lived experiences.”

 


National Academy of Medicine Elects Historian Gerald Markowitz

National Academy Of Medicine Elects Historian Gerald Markowitz

The National Academy of Medicine – the independent branch of the National Academy of Sciences that advises the nation on critical medical and health issues – today announced that Distinguished Professor Gerald E. Markowitz of John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the CUNY Graduate Center has been elected a member of the academy. This is among the highest honors in the field, granted to people with exceptional professional achievements and a commitment to service.

“I’m thrilled,” Markowitz said. “As a historian, I feel incredibly honored to be recognized by the National Academy of Medicine. It is a recognition that the story of great doctors is not the whole story of medicine, and that the extraordinary contributions of people in the field are enhanced by the fact that workers and community activists have really pushed the medical professionals and the public health profession to recognize dangers that might have escaped their notice or not gotten the attention they deserve.”

CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken praised Markowitz’s lifetime of achievement. “His impressive body of work on critical aspects of public health – particularly occupational safety and environmental health – without question merits his election to the National Academy of Medicine. His scholarship, his activism and his passion have long enriched the education of students at John Jay and the CUNY Graduate Center,” the Chancellor said.

The National Academy of Medicine is charged with providing unbiased, evidence-based information and advice on health and science policy to policymakers, professionals and the public at large on a wide range of biomedical issues, medicine and health. “At a time when science is being denigrated and undermined in some quarters, the vital role our national academies is more important than ever,” the Chancellor added.

Markowitz began teaching at John Jay in 1970. He has received numerous federal and private grants, including from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Milbank Memorial Fund. The American Public Health Association awarded him its 2000 Arthur J. Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Work in the History of the Public Health.

He is well known for books and papers on occupational safety and health, particularly for those co-written with David Rosner, a former CUNY Distinguished Professor who is now at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and previously was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. Rosner trained as a medical historian and Markowitz trained as a political economist and social historian. They write sitting side-by-side at the computer, “sentence by sentence, paragraph by paragraph,” Markowitz says.

Their books include Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children (University of California Press/ Milbank Memorial Fund, 2013); The Contested Boundaries of American Public Health (Rutgers University Press, 2008); Are We Ready?: Public Health since 9/11 (University of California Press/Milbank Books on Health and the Public, 2006); Children, Race, and Power: Kenneth and Mamie Clark’s Northside Center (University Press of Virginia, 1996); Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Disease in Twentieth Century America (Princeton University Press, 1991; paperback 1994; noted as “Outstanding Academic Book of 1991” by Choice); Dying for Work (edited essays, Indiana University Press, 1989); and Slaves of the Depression: Workers’ Letters about Life on the Job (Cornell University Press, 1987).

Reviewing Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution (University of California Press/Milbank Books on Health and the Public, 2002), the New England Journal of Medicine wrote: “Markowitz and Rosner show that the lead industry in the United States was well aware of the hazard decades before the publication of … [a 1943 journal] article by Byers and Lord but chose to respond to it primarily as a public-relations problem.”

That book led to Markowitz and Rosner spending three days on the witness stand in a 2013 in a lawsuit which resulted in a landmark $1.1 billion judgment against three major companies, which were ordered to remove lead paint from 4.7 million older homes in a number of California cities. Lead paint was banned in 1978, but still remains a threat to children, who tend to eat the sweet-tasting paint chips in countless buildings across the country.

“How is it that a problem for children that is totally preventable has not been prevented in the U.S.?” Markowitz asks. “The shorthand answer is: We don’t value some lives as much as we value others. Because lead poisoning is perceived as a problem of poverty and children of color, it does not achieve the kind of attention it should, despite the fact that childhood lead poisoning is an equal opportunity danger to all children and affects all children.”

Markowitz says that he and Rosner are now writing Building the Worlds That Kill Us, which examines how the physical, social and economic worlds we have built since the 19th-century “produce the kinds of diseases that are the predominant diseases of the era.” Take, for example, the trail of infectious diseases in the 19th century that followed the routes of an increasing number of commercial travelers, or the explosion of tuberculosis in jam-packed, urban areas in the early 20th century. “Today, with the extraordinary amount of environment pollution and the development of new chemicals and techniques, you have diseases of long latency. We have new endocrine disruptions [such as from artificial estrogens], even from the paper receipts from the cash register receipts that we handle every day.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


The Ninth Annual Johnny Pacheco Latin Music and Jazz Festival on November 14-17

Lehman College is presenting the Ninth Annual Johnny Pacheco Latin Music and Jazz Festival on Tuesday, November 14 through Friday, November 17. This year’s festival, which takes place in the Studio Theatre in the Speech and Theater Building on the Lehman campus, will include performances by New York City-area professional and student ensembles, workshops for musicians, and a jazz musical. The event, which is open to the public and free of charge, will be simulcast on BronxNet television and streamed live. Onsite festival seating is provided on a first-come, first-served basis.

The Johnny Pacheco Latin Music and Jazz Festival, named for the legendary musical superstar who led the salsa music and dance explosion in the 1960s, provides bandstand and learning opportunities for more than 250 talented young musicians studying music in New York City schools. The entire festival is being promoted as part of the Jazz Education Network Virtual Outreach Series to help foster interest in “the improviser’s art” around the world.

Additionally, the 2017 Pacheco Festival is serving as a fundraiser to provide disaster relief for the people of Puerto Rico. Online donations can be made at lehman.edu/givetojazz.

“Each year, this festival brings together more and more musical artists, students, and community members in a celebration of the Latin musical genres that are now part of a global soundtrack,” said Allan Molnar, a music lecturer at Lehman College and the festival’s producer and artistic director. “Many renowned musical icons, like Johnny Pacheco, have lived and worked in the Bronx, so presenting this gathering here at Lehman makes total sense. The impact of this event is easy to appreciate when you realize that some of our first students are now professional musicians. I’m pleased to know that we have become part of the rich cultural life here in the Bronx.”

The schedule:

On Tuesday, November 14, there will be two featured performances of Holding the Torch for Liberty, a jazz musical by Eli Yamin and Clifford Carlson, about the fight for women’s suffrage. The shows are at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. and will feature students from the Celia Cruz Bronx High School of Music.

On Thursday, November 16 at 7:30 p.m., two Latin jazz ensembles will perform—Los Mas Valientes, directed by Jessica Valientes, and the Paul Carlton Trio.

On Friday, November 17 at 7:30 p.m., there will performances by the Lehman College Jazz Ensemble, featuring saxophonist Jim Mair and percussionist Aldo Mazza as guests; the Lehman College Guitar Ensemble, directed by Robert Windbiel; and the Higher Level Band, directed by Lehman College music student Anthony Puentes.

On Wednesday through Friday, November 15-17 at 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., there will be workshops and performances by various student jazz and Latin jazz ensembles.

For more information, visit lehman.edu/jazzfest. To watch the festival “live” online, visit lehman.edu/jazzfeststream.

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


Men’s Soccer Wins Second-Straight CUNYAC Championship

For just the third time in school history—and for the second-straight season—the Lehman College men’s soccer team earned a spot in the upcoming NCAA Championship, after winning the CUNYAC Championship 3-1 against the John Jay Bloodhounds on Saturday (November 4) in Staten Island.

It was a familiar combination that put Lehman on the board in the 12th minute. CUNYAC All-Star Shevante Scott took a cross from CUNYAC Player of the Year and leading goal scorer Salh Alzubidi and blasted a shot that knuckled through the defense and went inside the far post for a goal. The marker was just the second of the year for the sophomore from Mount Vernon. The score stayed at 1-0 into halftime.

Then, barely four minutes into the second half, the Lightning went up 2-0. Lehman pressed the attack into the box and the Bloodhounds committed a penalty, which resulted in a penalty kick for the Lightning. Another CUNYAC All-Star, Nabi Ben Bangoura, calmly drilled the ball into the back of the net.

In the final ten minutes of action, John Jay started to press the attack and were rewarded for their diligence with a goal in the 85th minute that made the score 2-1. From there, Alzubidi, who was named Player of the Year in his inaugural season at Lehman, scored his conference-best 18th goal of the year after the John Jay goalie kicked the ball directly to him after making the save. The final score was 3-1.

“I’m just speechless,” said Scott. “We’ve been highly motivated all year. We had one mission and one mission only, which was to play our best and win. It was a good game. The guys [from] John jay came on really hard. The pressure was on, but we stayed composed, made sure to keep the momentum up and that’s why we won.”

With the win, the team secured its place in the upcoming NCAA Championship. They currently have a 13-4-1 overall mark, including a perfect, 8-0 conference ledger. The Lighting will learn who their opponent is and where they will travel after the NCAA selection show on Monday, November 6, at 1:30 PM. More information on the NCAA championship

Earlier that day, the Lehman College women’s soccer team lost a hard-fought game, 2-0, to the College of Staten Island in the CUNYAC Championship on the same field.

“I’m really proud of our seniors and the rest of the team,” said head coach Casey Melilli. “We played well in the first half. CSI came out in the second half very determined and we had a problem responding.”


Lehman Receives $2 Million to Double the Number of Grads with Tech Degrees

Lehman College will be one of the first City University of New York colleges to receive a $2 million grant as part of an initiative by Mayor Bill de Blasio to double the number of CUNY students graduating annually with a tech-related bachelor’s degree by 2022.

The five-year, $20 million CUNY 2x Tech Initiative will bring together CUNY colleges and major employers to expand access to quality tech careers and meet industry needs. The initiative will help build a world-class public higher education pipeline by enhancing classroom instruction, promoting tech-specific advising, and providing tech majors with valuable on-the-job experiences to prepare students for post-graduation careers.

“Lehman College is proud to participate in the CUNY 2x Tech Initiative, which will help us to increase our computer science majors, provide new educational opportunities for our students, and prepare them for careers in the growing tech sector in this great city,” said Lehman College President José Luis Cruz. “The CUNY 2x Tech effort also perfectly aligns with Lehman’s 90×30 initiative, to double the number of marketable degrees and certificates we will grant by the year 2030. I thank the Mayor and all those involved at CUNY and Small Business Services for making this happen.”

“Our students from CUNY have every bit as much to offer the tech industry as students coming out of Stanford and MIT,” said Mayor de Blasio. “We are adding classrooms and staff, building a bigger pipeline so more New Yorkers can land the jobs of the future.”

The CUNY Tech 2x Initiative will build on the success of the Talent Tech Pipeline program, launched in 2014; a program that has had impressive results at Lehman College. Alumni of the program have launched tech careers at companies such as: Spotify, Google, Thrillist, Cablevision, Litify, Soundcloud, TripleLyft, Intrepid Pursuits, Accenture, ExpressScripts, JPMC, Viacom, Infor, NBC, and IBM, among others.

About the NYC Tech Talent Pipeline

Launched by Mayor de Blasio in 2014, the NYC Tech Talent Pipeline is the City’s tech Industry Partnership, designed to support the inclusive growth of the NYC tech sector and prepare New Yorkers for 21st century jobs. The Tech Talent Pipeline works with 175 companies, 16 local colleges, and additional public and private partners to define employer needs, develop training and education models to meet these needs, and scale solutions throughout the City, delivering quality talent for the City’s businesses and quality jobs for New Yorkers.


Lehman Professor Honored by American Institute of CPAs Leadership Academy

Sean Stein Smith, a professor in Lehman College’s Business and Economics department, has been recognized by the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) for attending their 2017 Leadership Academy. He was among 38 members selected to attend the prestitigious Leadership Academy conference held last month in Durham, North Carolina.

Professor Stein Smith’s research at Lehman focuses on two main areas. “I study the utilization and implementation of stakeholder reporting, for example, how organizations report all of the information that is not covered in the financial statements, but still is important for decision-making,” he said.

Stein Smith, who also researches the intersection of technology, strategic planning, and accounting, writes a weekly column for Inc.com called “Common Sense Finance.” Prior to joining Lehman this year, he taught at Rutgers and Farleigh Dickenson universities and worked in corporate financial planning and accounting.

The AICPA recognition is just the latest in Stein Smith’s professional and academic career. Last year, he was awarded the Institute of Management Accountants Young Professional of the Year Award and in 2015 he received a New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants 30 Under 30 Award.

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


City College undergrads star at national biomed research conference

Five of CCNY’s 2017 ABRCMS winners in Phoenix, (from left) Fathema Uddin, Geneva Hidalgo, Kailey Singh, Mariya Mayer and Jacqueline Weng.

Six students from The City College of New York were winners at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students in Phoenix, Arizona. The undergraduates from the Division of Science, the CUNY Medical School at CCNY, the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership and the Grove School of Engineering excelled in both poster and oral presentations.

The students, their majors, topics and presentation categories, are:

  • Geneva Hidalgo, psychology, social/behavioral sciences and public health (oral);
  • Mariya Mayer, music, cancer biology (poster);
  • Courtney Ogando, biomedical engineering, cell biology (poster);
  • Kailey  Singh, biomedical science, physiology (oral);
  • Fathema Uddin, biology, cell biology (poster); and
  • Jacqueline Weng, biomedical science, social/behavioral sciences and public health (poster).

Hidalgo, a senior in CCNY’s RISE Program, summed up the team’s winning formula: “You have to know your research really well and prepare for questions from people from other fields who don’t know anything about your research.”

ABRCMS is one of the largest, professional conferences for underrepresented minority students, military veterans, and persons with disabilities to pursue advanced training in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. ABRCMS attracts more than 4,000 individuals, including 2,150 undergraduate and post baccalaureate students, 400 graduate students and postdoctoral scientists and 450 faculty, program directors and administrators. Students come from more than 350 U.S. colleges and universities.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Three Lehman Researchers Contribute to Kilonova Discovery

It was one of the most cosmic events ever.

On August 17, a kilonova explosion—a collision of two dead neutron stars—produced a rare intergalactic fireworks display that was detected by astrophysicists around the world. And three Lehman College scientists are among the elite group of researchers credited with documenting the phenomena.

Professor Luis Anchordoqui, a professor in the Physics and Astronomy department, research associate Tom Paul, and graduate student Jorge Fernandez Soriano are among the thousands of authors who contributed to the article “Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger,” published in the October 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. The discovery generated worldwide interest and a front-page story in The New York Times.

The August 17 event was the first time in history that such an explosion was heard. The kilonova triggered sensors around the earth and in space, producing what the Times called “a loud chirp in antennas designed to study ripples in the cosmic fabric.”

“Up until now, we were only able to see events after the explosion,” said Anchordoqui. “We’ve never seen this type of event, where you can see and hear things, as it happens. I feel lucky that I can witness something like this. Scientists will be studying this event for years to come for some further clue into the origins of the universe.”

Anchordoqui and Paul are also both researchers at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Pampa Amarilla, Argentina. It is the largest cosmic ray observatory in the world and was among the facilities to report on the kilonova phenomena that scientists believe took place 130 million years ago in the southern constellation of Hydra.

“The kilonova is a breakthrough development in astronomy and physics,” said Daniel Kabat, the chair of Lehman’s Physics and Astronomy department. “By combining all these different types of observation, gamma rays, radio waves, you get a more complete picture of what’s going on in the universe.”

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


NEW COURT-INTERPRETER INTERNSHIP HARNESSES CUNY STUDENTS’ LANGUAGE SKILLS

Facing an exponentially growing need for qualified language interpreters, New York State’s court system is teaming up with The City University of New York to prepare multilingual students for the state’s court-interpreter screening exams, the first step in qualifying for well-paid full- and part-time jobs as court interpreters.

The Unified Court System Internship Program in Court Interpreting, piloted at LaGuardia Community College last spring with 42 students, officially launches this semester with 37 students from LaGuardia, Hunter College and John Jay College for Criminal Justice – all schools with language interpretation and translation programs. The internship program will expand to more campuses in Spring 2018.

The program offers 20- and 100-hour internships. The greatest growth is expected in the 100-hour program, which this semester has four Hunter Russian-language speakers and four John Jay Spanish-language speakers; in the spring, it is expected to draw 25 to 30 students.

“Thirty-nine percent of our students speak a native language other than English,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Their ancestries trace back to more than 200 countries and regions, and they speak an astounding total of 174 languages. These internships offer an exciting way for our students to capitalize on their language skills and to benefit the city and state.”

Hunter’s Nadzeya Aryfullina, far right, stands next to staff court interpreter Yuri Orozco, who assists defendant in Hon. Rachel Freier’s courtroom

Ann Ryan, New York State coordinator for the courts’ Office of Language Access, agreed: “The students see that interpreters are really helping people. When they find someone who speaks the same language, it is almost like helping a kindred spirit,” she said.

In 2009, courts in New York provided interpreters in 95 languages. In 2013, that grew to 108 languages and in the past 12 months to 119 languages among all the courts in the state. Many CUNY students could help meet the need for interpreters because they speak a language other than English as either their first language or heritage language. At LaGuardia Community College alone, students speak languages including Spanish, Polish, Pashtu, Urdu, Thai, Bengali, Nepali, Korean, Japanese and Chinese.

New York’s court system requires the provision of interpreting services in court proceedings of all types, and to all court users, including witnesses and crime victims, not only in courtrooms, but also in clerical offices and other points of contact. Yet, as the court’s 2017 “Ensuring Language Access: A Strategic Plan for the New York State Courts” makes clear, the challenge is great. Five million New York state residents speak one or more of 150 languages other than English, 2 million of whom are not fluent in English.

The greatest strain is in suburban and rural areas, the plan says, where interpreters are far less available than in cities. The CUNY internship program could help bridge the gap.

“With the New York State court system’s ever-growing need for qualified court interpreters, this unique CUNY-court system partnership offers multilingual college students supervised, hands-on interpreting experience in a court setting, serving as a gateway to rewarding career opportunities as an interpreter in the New York State courts,” said Lawrence K. Marks, Chief Administrative Judge of New York State.

The internship is offered as a 20-hour introductory program and a more comprehensive full-semester 100-hour program. It provides students with a unique opportunity to observe actual proceedings in Family, Civil and Criminal Courts while learning about the vital role court interpreters play. Interns shadow a court interpreter-mentor to learn about each court. With supervision, they may assist with interpreting in noncourtroom settings such as Help Centers and information windows. They also help in record rooms, clerks’ offices and petition rooms. In the classroom, interns also learn legal terminology, theory, protocol and the ethical responsibilities and boundaries of a court interpreter.

Interns will be encouraged to apply for the interpreting exams, the first step in qualifying to provide language services to the New York State courts. Those who pass the rigorous state exams could qualify for up to $170 for a half day and $300 for a full day translating in the courts. Click here for the state application and examination information.

CUNY’s interns are enthusiastic.

Aziza Babaeva, one of four students from Hunter College’s Russian translation program taking part in the internship, was born in Uzbekistan and came to the United States at age 9. English is her third language after Tajik and Russian. She is studying for a bachelor’s degree in Russian translation. “Interpreting is a whole new skill,” she said. “You have to listen, think and speak at the same time.” She plans to go to medical school, but nonetheless she intends to take the Russian interpreting exam to qualify for the per diem court jobs. The internship was key to her decision. “This is an amazing program, and the mentors are amazing. They are willing to share so much of what they know.

Brandon Martinez, a John Jay College student majoring in criminal justice and Spanish, was in the 20-hour internship program and liked it so much he enrolled in the 100-hour internship. Although his goal is still to be a police officer, “I would also like to be a per diem Spanish-to-English translator in Criminal Court.” Born in the U.S. and raised in the Dominican Republic, he is fluent in both languages.

Maria Vanessa Maldonado, who came from Argentina when she was 16, is finishing a certificate program in legal translation at John Jay this semester after graduating in May as a law and society major with a minor in anthropology. “I never knew this could be a career, and I love it,” she said. In order to pay for college, she has been running a small cleaning business. “Now when I get dressed up to go to court, my 12-year-old daughter brags about it.”

Each year, the New York State courts provide interpreters in more than 100 languages. To ensure that everyone has equal access to the legal proceedings, the court system offers foreign and sign language interpreters regardless of the type of case or the economic status of the person in need of interpreting services. The courts hire interpreters to provide language services for trials, conferences and interviews in the courtroom and in other settings. Interpreters may also be called upon to translate medical and legal documents, certificates, letters and other written materials.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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Co-creator of #SAYHERNAME Spotlights Police Violence Against Black Women and LGBTQ People at Brooklyn College Event

Activist, attorney, and author Andrea J. Ritchie led a talk about the daunting challenges faced in the quest to center women of color, and queer and transgender people as victims in discussions of state violence.

Activist, attorney, and author Andrea J. Ritchie discusses the salient points of her new book, Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color.

Shantel Davis. Aiyana Stanley-Jones. Renee Davis. Sandra Bland. Tanisha Anderson. Rekia Boyd. Korryn Gaines. Charleena Chavon Lyles. Mya Hall. Kiwi Herring. Duanna Johnson. These are just a few of the names of women and girls who have been the victims of police violence. The names may sound unfamiliar, but that is something that activist, attorney, and author Andrea J. Ritchie is hoping to change with her new book, Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color (Beacon Press 2017).

Ritchie captivated a standing-room-only audience in the Brooklyn College Library‘s Woody Tanger Auditorium on Nov. 1, speaking at an event organized in her honor by poet and Associate Professor of English Rosamond S. King and the Brooklyn College Women’s Center. Co-sponsors included the Ethyle R. Wolfe Institute for the Humanities, the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, the LGBTQ Resource Center, the Division of Student Affairs, the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Office of Diversity and Equity Programs, among others.

Ritchie might be best known for her role as lead counsel in Tikkun v. City of New York, described as “groundbreaking impact litigation challenging unlawful searches of transgender people in police custody, contributing to sweeping changes to the NYPD’s policies for interactions with LGBTQ New Yorkers.”

“There’s an intractable narrative in this country that state violence is only committed against cisgender, heterosexual, black men,” says Ritchie, co-founder, with Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, of the #SAYHERNAMEhashtag and phrase. “That ‘private’ violence is what happens to white women, and, as Barbara Smith says, ‘and some of us are brave,'” referencing the classic black feminist work, But Some of Us Are Brave: All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men: Black Women’s Studies, which outlines how black women and their experiences are often omitted from larger feminist and racial justice narratives. “If we confront the kinds of violence that police officers visit on black female/queer/transgender bodies, then black communities would have to confront the violence that black communities perpetrate against black female/queer/trans bodies. And that’s something that people don’t want to do.”

To drive home her point, Ritchie brought up the case of Duanna Johnson, a black transgender woman who was brutalized by police in Memphis, Tennessee. The vicious attack was caught on video, but failed to ignite the level of community outrage and response as cases where the victim was a black cisgender (or non-transgender) heterosexual male.

“The local NAACP said, essentially, as an explanation for their inaction, ‘We don’t condone what happened to her, but we don’t condone her lifestyle either,” Ritchie said.

Poet and Associate Professor of English Rosamond S. King introduces Ritchie and her work to an eager Brooklyn College audience.

“We have a lot of activists on campus—and people who want to be activists,” said King. “And I wanted to bring Andrea J. Ritchie to Brooklyn College because she’s someone who has the scholarly chops and is well-published, but who also has been in the streets, organized with different communities, and who knows how to bridge those divides.”

Rapt audience members were eager to discuss strategies to combat both the violence and the erasure, after Ritichie’s talk, and asked her what she thought might be some solutions.

“The way to fight despair is to take action,” Ritchie responded. “Take a piece [of justice-oriented action], any piece, in your immediate community. Talk to one person.  Try to figure out just one way that you can effect change. Write one letter to an editor of a magazine. Write one article for your student newspaper. Go to one meeting. Go to one rally. Look at other examples of resistance. You can unravel the giant web if you pull on the right threads.”

 

Andrea Ritchie is a Black lesbian immigrant, police misconduct attorney, and organizer who has engaged in extensive research, writing, and advocacy around criminalization of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people of color over the past two decades. She recently published Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color now available from Beacon Press.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Center for Ethnic, Racial & Religious Understanding Hosts November 15 Discussion on Immigration Policy During Trump’s First Year

— This Sixth Annual Presentation is Being Introduced as the Susheel Kirpalani Innovation Exchange, Named for Alumnus and New Sponsor Kirpalani —

Queens, NY, November 7, 2017— The challenges to immigration and immigration reform that have developed in the first year of the Trump presidency will be the focus when the Center for Ethnic, Racial and Religious Understanding (CERRU) holds its sixth annual Innovation Exchange. It will take place Wednesday, November 15, from 4:30–9 pm in the Dining Hall Patio Room at Queens College.

This marks the first year the Innovation Exchange will be presented as the Susheel Kirpalani Innovation Exchange, in honor of Queens College alumnus Susheel Kirpalani, who now provides funding for the event. It is open to the public with a suggested donation of $10 per ticket. Dinner will be served. Those who RSVP through Eventbrite by November 8 will be entered into a $25 gift card raffle (attendance at the Innovation Exchange required to win).

Among the topics in discussion for this year’s presentation, Trump’s First Year: Impressions on Immigration from Across the Political Spectrum, are the proposed U.S.–Mexico border wall; the travel ban affecting individuals from six predominantly Muslim countries; and the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which enabled children brought here as immigrants to study, pay taxes, and work legally in this country.

Participants include individuals lobbying, advocating, and engaging in bipartisan work on the issue of immigration reform, who will examine legislation pending in the House and Senate. There will also be a “walkabout” featuring displays of various immigration-related narratives from the community. Participants will have a chance to work together to develop their own innovative approaches to addressing the evening’s topics.

Each year CERRU engages in an evening of discussion, debate, and dialogue on a challenging social issue, interacting with experts working to transform and transcend the issue by examining it from different perspectives. This year’s Innovation Exchange will also serve as the kick-off event for CERRU’s “Political Leaps of Faith” project, which will bring students together from across the political spectrum to work toward collaborative legislative campaigning.

Directions: http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/directions/Pages/default.aspx
Campus Map: http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/directions/2d/Pages/default.aspx

About CERRU
CERRU is a diversity training and education center on the Queens College campus devoted to building relationships across differences and creating opportunities for respectful but honest conversations around difficult and divisive issues in the belief that cultivating the ability to understand inequality and the biases that underwrite it is crucial to creating a more inclusive society.

CERRU works with students, faculty, and staff to co-create a safe, vibrant, and inclusive space for communication. It offers fellowships, dialogues, and open trainings on the Queens College campus and other college campuses that enable participants to become leaders equipped to navigate an increasingly multicultural society. It also hosts events exploring multiple perspectives on controversial issues, providing context and opportunity for dialogue.

About Queens College

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Contact:
Yael Rosenstock
Associate Director
CERRU
yrosenstock@cerru.org
718-570-0482


Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez named Board Chair of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities

Queens, NY, November 6 2017 – Queens College of the City University of New York president Félix V. Matos Rodríguez was elected as board chair of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), the HACU Governing Board announced on November 2. Matos Rodríguez replaced William V. Flores, former president of the University of Houston, Downtown, in the position.

“The work HACU does each and every day has had beneficial impact on Hispanic students both in the United States and abroad,” said Matos Rodríguez. “From the internships and scholarships they provide for career development programs that help ensure students are prepared to enter the workforce, HACU’s vital support for Hispanic students has never been more necessary. I am truly humbled to have the opportunity to serve as board chair as we continue to advocate for students around the world.”

Matos Rodríguez has served as president of Queens College since 2014 and has been a member of HACU’s Governing Board since 2012. His distinguished career spans both academia and the public sector. Previously the president of Eugenio María de Hostos Community College/CUNY prior to Queens College, Matos Rodríguez is one of the few educators in the country who has served as president of both baccalaureate and community college institutions. He also served as Puerto Rico’s cabinet secretary of the Department of Family Services where he formulated public policy and administered service delivery in programs such as Child Support Enforcement, Adoption and Foster Care, and Child and Elderly Protection.

Matos Rodríguez is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is an Aspen Institute Ascend Fellow. He serves on the boards of Phipps Houses, the United Way of New York City, the TIAA Hispanic Advisory Council, and the Research Alliance for New York City Schools. He is a graduate of Yale University and he received his PhD from Columbia University.

“We are honored to have Félix Matos Rodríguez serve as chair of HACU’s Governing Board,” said HACU President and CEO Antonio R. Flores. “We are also very grateful for the extraordinary leadership and contributions made by our outgoing board members.”

Established in 1986 and currently representing more than 470 colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and Spain, HACU seeks to promote the development of member colleges and universities, improve access to and the quality of postsecondary education opportunities for Hispanic students, and meet the needs of the business, industry, and government communities through the development and sharing of resources, information, and expertise.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.​
The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth in the nation by the Chronicle of Higher Education among public U.S. colleges for upward social and economic mobility and globally, by the Center for World University Rankings, in the top 3.5% of schools on such factors as quality of education and faculty, and alumni employment. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.​​

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY’s “Sulfurious” bags international Chem-E-Car award

CCNY’s Chem-E-Car team with “Sulfurious” [center] at the 2017 AIChE finals.

Team CCNY, comprising undergraduates from The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, is the 2017 AIChE Chem-E-Car finals’ Spirit of Competition Award winner for the third year running. In addition, “Sulfurious,” the CCNY entry, placed 11th out of 41 domestic and international qualifiers in the competition in Minneapolis.

Sulfurious won the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Mid-Atlantic competition last spring to advance to the AIChE finals.  The objective of the Chem-E-Car competition is for students to build a car, the size of a shoebox, which runs and stops at a precise distance via one or more chemical reactions.

Sulfurious runs on a manganese-zinc battery, developed in partnership with the CCNY-based CUNY Energy Institute. The car’s name is derived from the “Too Fast, Too Furious” movie franchise and the main element in the stopping mechanism, sulfur.

In Minneapolis, Sulfurious performed well, coming within 90 cm [35.43 inches] from the target of 23.5 m [77.08 feet] while carrying a load of 157 ml water. “The competition was stiff with the top team being 2 cm [0.787 inches] from the target,” said Elizabeth Biddinger, assistant professor of chemical engineering and the CCNY team faculty advisor.

Indonesia’s ITS University won the Chem-E-Car Trophy.

Sulfurious’ trip to Minneapolis was the fifth straight by a CCNY team to the AIChE finals. Their honors include a second place finish in 2013 with “REAKTER,” and Spirit of Competition awards in 2015 with “RuSTi” and 2016 with “Iodonator.”

This year’s team comprised (all chemical engineering unless indicated):

  • Captain Oswald Shakir Julien, senior;
  • Co-captain Nannette Hernandez, senior;
  • Co-Captain Karlas Christoper, sophomore;
  • Hamad Haider, senior;
  • Yash Patel, senior;
  • Sujana Shifon, sophomore;
  • Adebambo Shomoye, senior;
  • Stephan Smith, senior;
  • Leo Strauss, senior, electrical engineering; and
  • Keith Williams, senior, mechanical engineering.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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CUNY School of Professional Studies Partners with the Central Park Conservancy to Create Professional Education Programs

New York, NY — November 8, 2017 — After a rigorous selection process, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is pleased to announce a partnership with the Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks.  CUNY SPS and the Institute will collaborate to develop an Urban Park Leadership Program, geared toward executives and leaders of public-private park partnerships, and a non-credit Urban Park Professional Certificate Program for current and aspiring urban park management personnel. This program is made possible by the generous support of The JPB Foundation.

The partnership will draw on the Conservancy’s 37-year management of Central Park and the expertise of the larger CUNY system to create the two programs over the next two years. The New York City Labor Market Information Service (LMIS) at the CUNY Graduate Center will play an integral role in market research and assessment prior to program development. CUNY faculty and practitioners will join Institute staff to contribute subject matter expertise to develop the programs, which will be evaluated by the Office of Research, Evaluation & Program Support (REPS) in the Office of the Senior University Dean for Academic Affairs.

The new professional education programs will facilitate hands-on guidance and capacity building to urban park leaders and executives and standardize, professionalize, and assess skills for current or aspiring urban park professionals. The program will also explore the feasibility of a degree program for those wishing to enter the field, while also promoting occupations in urban parks as a viable career path for youth.

“The Central Park Conservancy and CUNY share many of the same goals, and are both embedded in and committed to our City,” said CUNY SPS Dean John Mogulescu. “The competition for this grant opportunity was formidable: proposals were submitted by several distinguished academic institutions from across the country. As you can imagine, I am delighted that we were selected as the Institute’s partner from among such a renowned field of competitors. I am happy that we will be working together to support the field of Urban Park Management and I look forward to the implementation of this new project at CUNY SPS.”

The Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks was created in 2013 to more effectively share what we’ve learned since 1980 with other parks,” adds Douglas Blonsky, President & CEO of the Central Park Conservancy and Central Park Administrator. “It took us 37 years of learning to get to where we are. We hope that by sharing our knowledge through case studies, peer exchange, and CUNY’s academic strength and faculty, other parks can experience the same success more efficiently.”

“Partnering with the City University of New York is the most logical choice to me,” said Ira M. Millstein, Chair of the Institute Advisory Board and Life Trustee of the Central Park Conservancy. “This is the first executive program dedicated to urban parks. What could provide a more urban experience than a partnership between two leading New York organizations?”

“I’ve personally witnessed the benefits that a well-managed urban park provides, socially, economically, and environmentally. Central Park is a prime example of that. This program will help other urban parks, here in New York City and elsewhere, thrive in the same way as Central Park,” said NYC Parks Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver, FAICP.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Large crowd expected at next CCNY Mini-Medical School session

Mini-Medical School Diet Health Activity
Community members working together for a healthier Harlem
Dr. Gilbert Brovar
Dr. Gilbert Brovar

The Harlem community spoke and the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York listened. Community members were asked if they’d like free health information sessions on topics of their choosing and the answer was a resounding YES! Thus the Mini-Medical school was born.

60 people showed up to the first Mini-Medical School event on Oct 18th to talk about diet, physical activity and health. The presentations were engaging as was the Q & A. Afterward, many attendees said they’d be back for more. In fact, they promised to bring a friend or family member the next time. Which is why an even larger crowd is expected at the second Mini-Medical School on Nov 15th when the topic will be Diabetes and Health: Management and Prevention.

Hazeezat Shittu, who leads the team of medical students behind the program, will MC the evening. The speaker will be Dr. Gilbert Brovar, the Medical Director of the St. Barnabas Hospital Diabetes Clinic and an Affiliate Associate Medical Professor in the Department of Clinical Medicine at the CUNY School of Medicine.

Don’t miss this free event where you can learn how to actively take part in your and your family’s healthcare on Wednesday Nov 15th from 5:30-7PM in the North Academic Center, Room 1/201 of CCNY. Mini-Medical School is open to all members of the Harlem Community. Light refreshments will be served.

Click here to RSVP.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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Flagship Technology Lab at Baruch College Opens with Fanfare

Baruch College President, and City Government and CUNY Officials Preside Over Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony Marking First Renovation of Center Since Opening in 1994

PresidentWallersteinGuestsCutRibbonforNewTechLab

 L to R: Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, CUNY Vice Chancellor Judith Bergtraum, Lawrence Kaplan, Laurie Kaplan, Borough President Gale Brewer, Douglas Kaplan, Council Members Rosie Mendez and James Vacca

 

NEW YORK, NY- October 20, 2017– To celebrate the grand opening of a flagship technology lab that will serve thousands of students, Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, City Council Member Rosie Mendez, and City Council Member James Vacca presided over a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Oct. 13, 2017.

The renovated lab, named the Martin E (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center, is equipped to keep pace with ever-shifting and emerging technologies, giving students the vital tools to compete globally in their chosen fields. Occupying more than 11,000 square-feet with views of the Empire State Building, the lab is named in honor of Laura Kaplan and her late husband, alumnus Martin Kaplan, generous benefactors to the College. Mrs. Kaplan participated in the ceremony along with members of their family.

Also part of the ribbon-cutting were Judith Bergtraum, vice chancellor for facilities planning, construction and management at The City University of New York (CUNY), and Isabel Arias, president of Baruch College’s Undergraduate Student Government.

City, State, and Donor Support Made Lab Possible

In his opening remarks, College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD., expressed appreciation for the generous financial support of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito (MPA ’95), Borough President Gale Brewer, and Council Members Rosie Mendez and James Vacca, which made upgrades to the lab possible.

Dr. Wallerstein added, “I want to thank and acknowledge a number of special guests, starting with Laurie Kaplan and her family. She and her late husband, Martin Kaplan, who was a member of the class of 1959, have been generous benefactors of the Baruch College.” President Wallerstein then voiced appreciation to the Office of Vice Chancellor Judith Bergtraum, which handles CUNY’s Facilities Planning, Construction and Management, for managing the renovation of the space.

The ribbon-cutting ceremony marks the first renovation of the space since it opened to students in 1994. More than $2.5 million in state and city capital funds supported the lab’s major upgrades, and the student technology fee financed the purchase of all the new equipment.

Designed as a one-stop, state-of-the-art technology resource for Baruch College’s existing and growing student population, the approximate 400-seat lab features a wide range of upgrades from 4k monitors to a help desk modeled after the Apple Genius Bar to collaborative, flexible work spaces. It was designed with full attention to accessibility for users with disabilities

Congratulations from Public Officials

During the ceremony, Borough President Gale Brewer said “The public’s money couldn’t go for a better cause. Congratulation to Baruch College on this amazing lab.”

Council Member Rosie Mendez added, “It has been an incredible 12 years representing Council District 2, but also representing Baruch College, an incredible institution that reaches beyond my district, throughout the entire city. With the support of my colleagues Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Councilmember Jimmy Vacca, I am excited to be a part of the opening of the Martin E. (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center.”

“I’m elated to celebrate the completion of six multimedia rooms at Baruch College,” said Council Member James Vacca. “These rooms are equipped with state-of-the-art technology. I allocated $150,000 towards renovating the space, with the goal of creating a dynamic learning environment, where students can come together to collaborate on projects and coursework.”

Although unable to attend the event, New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito sent along her best wishes.  “Baruch College is an integral component of our city’s education system, having shaped the lives of millions of New Yorkers. As a proud Baruch alum, it has been remarkable to witness Baruch’s growth over the years and I am excited to see Baruch College grow with the Martin E. (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center. As Council Speaker, it is with great pride that funds allocated by the New York City Council were able to make this center a reality.”

 Renovated Lab Center: Latest Addition to Major Campus Improvements

 The Martin E (’59) and Laurie Kaplan Computing and Technology Center is the latest in campus improvements that have been underway at Baruch College during the last few years.

In September 2016, an upgraded Subotnick Financial Services Center/Wasserman Trading Floor opened, providing experiential learning opportunities for students studying economics, finance, journalism, and technology.

In 2012, the College’s campus gained a transformative outdoor space by opening the 25th Street Interim Pedestrian Plaza. Now known as the Clivner Field Plaza, the car-free block is under construction for a redesign that will create a permanent public space,

Additionally, Baruch College is moving ahead with the Allen G. and Mary E. Aaronson Student Center, which will be located in a currently unused portion of the Madison Square Station Post Office.

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Media Contact:  Suzanne Bronski:  646-660-6095 / Suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu


Baruch College Earns Two National #1 Rankings for Social Mobility

Third Consecutive Year in Top Spot on CollegeNET’s Social Mobility Index

NEW YORK, NY – October 24, 2017 – CollegeNET and The Chronicle of Higher Education both named Baruch College top in the nation on their respective social mobility analyses.

In College NET’s 2017 Social Mobility Index (SMI), released today, Baruch was listed #1 for the third consecutive year among more than 1,300 colleges nationwide. Last week, The Chronicle released its ranking of colleges with the highest student-mobility rates, placing Baruch College #1 among four-year public institutions in the U.S.

CollegeNET: Economic Opportunity a Top Priority

CollegeNET’s SMI is a data-driven analysis that ranks four-year colleges and universities “according to how effective they enroll students from low-income backgrounds and graduate them into good-paying jobs.” The annual index was designed to help redirect the attribution of “prestige” in the nation’s higher education system toward colleges that are solving the major problems of our time.

“Unlike other college rankings that are aimed primarily at helping students select a college, the SMI helps policymakers determine which colleges are addressing the national problem of economic mobility,” said Jim Wolfston, CEO of CollegeNET, who added that advancing economic opportunity is more pressing than any other social, political, or economic problem in the nation.

Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein said “Institutions of higher education need to consider the whole student and offer personalized training in soft skills, workplace dynamics, internship and job hunting, follow-up protocols, and professional correspondence. Baruch has had such career services and mentorship opportunities in place for decades, and they truly do help propel students into their first jobs and beyond.”

For more information about CollegeNET, the purpose of the SMI, and its methodology, go here.

WATCH: Video clip of Baruch’s third consecutive #1 ranking.

In March 2017, CollegeNET named Baruch College a Social Mobility Innovator for 2017. In its widely publicized announcement, CollegeNET noted that “Baruch offers low-income students a supportive start-to-finish program that makes college affordable, advances economic opportunity and helps restoring the promise of the American Dream.”

Read more about CollegeNET’s recognition for Baruch College here.

The Chronicle’s List: Data from the Equality of Opportunity Program

To name Baruch #1 among four-year public institutions in the United States, The Chronicle analyzed data from the Equality of Opportunity Project’s comprehensive study on college graduate outcomes. The most in-depth research of its kind to date, the project amassed data from numerous sources to produce the data warehouse called Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility. The Chronicle used this extensive material—which included anonymous tax filings and financial aid records—to derive its current rankings.

Learn about The Chronicle’s list here.

National Recognition Continues to Expand

Baruch College’s #1 rankings in social mobility by CollegeNET and The Chronicle of Higher Education add to the College’s expanding roster of national rankings and recognitions that focus on value, student debt, and return on investment.

See below for coverage of Baruch College’s most recent recognitions:

U.S. News & World Report Ranks Baruch College among the Best in the North

Princeton Review Names Baruch College as One of the Country’s Best

Forbes Ranks Baruch College among “Best Value Colleges 2017: 300 Schools Worth the Investment

Money Magazine Ranks Baruch College #1 among “Best Public Colleges” and #2 for “Best Colleges for Your Money”

Excelling in Access to Affordable Education and Student Success (U.S. Department of Education)

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Healthcare Industry Leaders and Advocates to Discuss the State of the Industry and What Comes After the Affordable Care Act

Business Forum Breakfast
Friday, November 17, 8–10 am

WHAT:
Panel discussion with President & CEO of Public Health Solutions Lisa David, President & CEO of Emblem Health Karen Ignagni, New York State Senator Gustavo Rivera, and VP of New York-Presbyterian Hospital System Kate Spaziani on what comes next for healthcare after the Affordable Care Act. Moderated by Distinguished Lecturer of Journalism at Queens College Sheryl McCarthy, with opening remarks by Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. Breakfast will be served.

Free and open to the public, but seating is limited.
Public RSVP deadline is November 14:
Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5252, or register online here.

Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background:
Lisa David is the President and CEO of Public Health Solutions, an organization working to improve health outcomes in New York City’s most vulnerable communities. She leads the organization in successfully providing public health services to underserved families and children, offering grants and management assistance to over 200 community-based organizations, and guiding public health research and program evaluation. She also provides leadership in executing long-term strategies to address the public health needs of low-income communities throughout New York City.

Lisa has over 30 years of experience in the public health and healthcare sectors. Prior to joining Public Health Solutions, Lisa held positions as the Interim CEO of Medicines360, the EVP and COO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and the Vice Chair for Administration of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Columbia School
of Physicians and Surgeons. Lisa currently serves on the Health and Mental Health Advisory Committee for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and is a member of the United Hospital Fund Policy Forum. She also serves on the Board of Directors of Medicines360, and on two committees of the Human Services Council: the Value Based Payment Commission and the Priority and Strategy Council.

Senator Gustavo Rivera represents the 33rd Senate District in the Bronx, which includes the neighborhoods of Kingsbridge Heights, Belmont, Fordham, University Heights, Van Nest, East Tremont, Crotona and Mount Hope.

Since his election in 2010, Senator Gustavo has dedicated his efforts to changing the way business is done in the legislature and ensuring that the families of the 33rd Senate District have a voice in Albany.

In January 2013, Senator Rivera became the ranking member of the New York Senate’s Health Committee. Since then, Senator Rivera has championed legislation that addresses issues of health inequity, such banning smoking within 100 feet from schools and afterschool programs. Since March 2017, he became the main sponsor of the “New York Health Act,” a bill that will create an innovative single payer health care system in New York State.

In 2011, Senator Rivera launched the Bronx CAN (Changing Attitudes Now) Health Initiative. The goal of this community oriented health initiative is not only to encourage Bronx residents to develop healthy behaviors, but to shape policies that will help tear down some of the institutional barriers that stand in the way of Bronxites having a healthier lifestyle.

Senator Rivera also worked as a community organizer on New York State campaigns, as well as on President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign. He was also employed as a professor and a staff member for U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand.

Karen Ignagni serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of EmblemHealth, a New York City-based not-for-profit health insurance company. EmblemHealth was formed through the merger of two New York legacy insurance plans, Group Health Incorporated (GHI) and Health Plan of New York (HIP), and today provides quality, affordable health care coverage and administrative services to approximately 3.1 million people.

Prior to joining EmblemHealth in September 2015, Ignagni was President and CEO of America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), the insurance industry association that represents providers of health and supplemental benefits to more than 200 million Americans. At AHIP, Ms. Ignagni was active in working with the White House and congressional leadership on the development of health reform legislation, including the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). She also led two mergers with other organizations to form AHIP, and made it the leading voice for the health plan community in America. During her tenure, AHIP was ranked by Washington Insiders as the second most effective trade association in Washington.

Ms. Ignagni also directed the AFL-CIO’s Department of Employee Benefits. She was a Professional Staff Member on the U.S. Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee and worked at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Ms. Ignagni has won many accolades for her leadership in the health care industry, earning recognition by leading publications including the New York Times, National Journal, The Hill, Time Magazine, The Washingtonian, Fortune Magazine, and Modern Healthcare, for her extensive health policy background and intrinsic feel for politics.
In 2017, Ms. Ignagni received the Heritage Healthcare Leadership Award and was named one of Crain’s 50 Most Powerful Women in New York.

Kate Spaziani is Vice President of External Affairs for the NewYork-Presbyterian Regional Hospital Network. In this role, she oversees and coordinates communications, marketing, and community affairs for NYP’s four regional hospitals and physician services division. Ms. Spaziani previously served as Vice President of Grants and Federal Relations for NYP, managing the Hospital’s federal government affairs strategy and overseeing its grant applications for programs such as the New York State Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Program.

Ms. Spaziani joined NewYork-Presbyterian in 2012 with over thirteen years of legislative, legal, and government affairs experience. As Senior Policy Advisor to U.S. Senator Kent Conrad (D-ND), former Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee and senior member of the Senate Finance Committee, she worked on the drafting and passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act, the development of annual budget resolutions, and federal deficit reduction policy. Ms. Spaziani also has held positions in the U.S. House of Representatives, serving as Legislative Director to Representative Ron Kind (D-WI) and Legislative Assistant to Representative Marion Berry and has practiced law at Powell Goldstein LLP on health law and election law matters.

Ms. Spaziani received an A.B. magna cum laude from Duke University in Public Policy Studies and her J.D. cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Baruch College Fund Raises a Record-Setting $21 Million for Its First Dedicated Scholarship Campaign

              

More than 300 Additional Students to Receive Assistance

https://photos.smugmug.com/Events/2017/BaruchLex102617-All/n-GCmCQM/i-HVhPQxw/0/a5a3a29b/X3/i-HVhPQxw-X3.jpg

(R to L) Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein offers thanks to Pamela and Kim Baptiste, Brenner Family Foundation’s executive director and president respectively, for their generous contribution to the scholarship campaign and their ongoing support.

 

New York, NY- November 1, 2017- The Baruch College Fund (BCF) celebrated the successful completion of its first dedicated scholarship campaign—named “Be in the Life-Changing Business”—at the 11th annual 17 Lex Society reception held at the New York Historical Society on Oct. 26.

The campaign raised a record-setting $21 million—more than $6 million over the fundraising goal—that will provide financial assistance to at least 300 additional students. A total of 1,297 people made donations, with 120 donors contributing leadership gifts of $25,000 or more.

At the reception, Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, acknowledged the generosity of all the donors whose gifts made the campaign a tremendous success as well as all leadership donors.

“Every member of the 17 Lex Society has made Baruch the engine of social mobility that we are,” President Wallerstein said. “As a publicly funded institution, we truly couldn’t do it without your ongoing support. I thank you personally, and on behalf of the College, for helping to make Baruch as great as it is.”

Special Recognition

Campaign chairman Jay Berman ’59 announced that a large gift from the Brenner Family Foundation (established by the late Max Brenner ’21) propelled the total fundraising amount to over $21 million. Since 1986, the Brenner Family Foundation has aided more than 48 students who major in accounting.

“On behalf of Baruch College, I am thrilled to thank the Brenner Family Foundation for their generous contribution to our scholarship campaign,” Berman said. “This recent gift joins the Foundation’s legacy of support to Baruch.”

To recognize their generosity, President Wallerstein presented a bronze maquette, a replica of the College’s iconic Bernard Baruch statue located in the lobby of the Newman Vertical Campus. Additionally, President Wallerstein awarded Berman with a Tiffany clock for working tirelessly over the past few years organizing this scholarship campaign.

The 17 Lex Society

The College’s leadership giving society is comprised of donors, trustees, recent graduates, and current students who provide an annual contribution to the Baruch College Fund.  Society members are invited to signature Baruch events, VIP alumni events, and have the opportunity to network with prestigious alumni and friends.

For more information about the 17 Lex Society, please go here.

 

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Stanford selects CCNY quartet for global fellowship program

The second cohort of Stanford Innovation Fellows from CCNY. From left: Raneem Elsayed, Ariel Obando, Nathaly Camila Ardiles and Khandker Ahamed.

There’s no question that generations of university students want to change the world, starting with where they are. But how? Four undergraduates from The City College of New York are among 229 students from 10 countries named 2017 University Innovation Fellows by Stanford University’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design. The program empowers students to become agents of change at their schools. Fellows work to ensure that their peers gain the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to compete in the economy of the future and make a positive impact on the world.

Selected from City College (the only CUNY school represented) are:

  • Khandker Ahamed, economics (Brooklyn);
  • Nathaly Camila Ardiles, electrical engineering (New Rochelle);
  • Raneem Elsayed, history/political science (Brooklyn); and
  • Ariel Obando, electrical engineering (Queens).

In addition to six-weeks of online training designed by Stanford, they will attend a “Silicon Valley Meetup,” Nov. 16 – 20, with the other 225 Fellows. They will take part in immersive experiences at Stanford’s d.school and Google, and work with leaders in education and industry.

“We’ll also participate in experiential workshops and exercises focused on such topics as   building a movement, creating spaces for innovation, designing of learning experiences, and creating new models for change in higher education,” said Ahamed.

The team will embark on their CCNY mission in the spring semester, titled, according to   Elsayed, “Fostering and Implementing Innovation, Inspiring and Bringing Students Together.” Ardiles summed it up as an effort, led by students for students, to promote entrepreneurship and innovation.

“Our goal is to help students that may have the knowledge and skills but don’t know to implement their ideas,” added Obando.

This is the second cohort of UI Fellows. Like their predecessors last year, the four were mentored and sponsored by CCNY’s Zahn Innovation Center.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.


Brooklyn District Attorney Organizes Campus Sexual Assault Prevention Symposium at Brooklyn College

Acting District Attorney Eric Gonzalez organized this series of workshops hosted by the college, designed to raise awareness, support survivors, and share solutions.

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson (right) and Acting District Attorney for Brooklyn Eric Gonzalez share a commitment to creating safer campus spaces.

 

In the wake of the headlines detailing survivor accounts of rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment, Brooklyn College hosted “A Symposium on Campus Sexual Assault,” organized by Acting Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez and his office. Over 100 students, educators, government staffers, and law enforcement officials attended the daylong event held on Friday, October 27 in the Brooklyn College Student Center.

“Brooklyn College is a leading voice in the fight against sexual assault on campuses,” said District Attorney Gonzalez, the first Latinx to serve the borough in this capacity. “And one of the things we have to ensure is that when we get our students into college, they are treated fairly and given opportunities to be successful. The traumas caused by sexual assault can take students off their successful track. So, I’m committed to this work and to making sure that we provide the resources and the information to ensure that anyone who steps foot on a college campus is not deprived of their education because of sexual harassment or sexual assault.”

“There’s really no better time to have a conversation about these topics than now,” said Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson. Anderson, a lawyer and leading scholar on rape law who has been a vocal critic of attempts to roll back advances and protections in these areas, announced the convening of a new task force, a coalition of Brooklyn College faculty and students working together to address these matters on campus. “As you know, the statistics are deeply troubling. The National Sexual Violence Resource Centerreports that one in five females and one in 16 males are sexually assaulted while in college. More than 90 percent of these victims do not report to the police; most of them do not report their victimization to any authority figure. And there’s tremendous silence around this issue because, too often, the victims are blamed.”

The symposium’s keynote speaker Bea Hanson—former principal deputy director of the United States Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) and current executive director of the NYC Domestic Violence Task Force—discussed the ways in which policy continues to affect outcomes, and how education is key to intervention, prevention, and supporting survivors.

“One of the areas that we can look forward to and continue to work on—and I’m glad that Brooklyn College is really talking about this, too—is prevention and how we can really, really support victims, regardless of what happens to the offender,” Hanson said. “Some of the groundbreaking work we were able to do in the Obama administration to address a whole number of issues cannot be easily changed. One of the more prominent aspects of the work we accomplished is broadening how rape is defined and how the FBI counts incidences of the crime.”

The previous definition of rape did not account for victims who were unconscious, incapacitated, under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or those otherwise coerced into non-consensual sexual situations; nor did it consider or count male victims.

“Brooklyn has very strong leadership in this arena through Michelle Kaminsky’s Domestic Violence Bureauand the Brooklyn Family Justice Center—making sure we’re addressing people that are most marginalized because of their sexual orientation, gender identity, immigration status , race, ethnicity, or disability status. So, I’m hopeful and excited that the city is taking the lead in this ongoing commitment to doing as much as we can to reduce sexual violence.”

Brooklyn College takes a strong stance against sexual assault and sexual harassment. To learn more about these issues, to report incidences, or to find support resources, please visit the college’s Sexual Harassment, Assault, and Rape site.

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Dr. Patricia Broderick aka “the dynamite stick” on CUTV News Radio

Dr. Patricia Broderick, CUNY Medical Professor and Founder of Eazysense

They call Dr. Patricia Broderick the “dynamite stick” because nothing stops her. She is the first person to marry the brain with sensors and has invented, patented and trademarked a revolutionary technology, THE BRODERICK PROBE® that some medical doctors say will change the face of science and medicine.

Broderick is so dynamic that CUTV News Radio has asked her to talk about her work on air twice – on Monday November 6th at 1pm EDT and again Monday November 13th at 1pm EDT.

Dr. Broderick is a Medical Professor in Molecular Cellular and Biomedical science at the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York and Professor in Neurology at NYU-Langone Medical Center. She is also Founder of Eazysense Nanotechnologies Inc.

Broderick believes the brain is a living miracle, but we’re getting closer to understanding it biologically and chemically. She has spent her career working on neurodegenerative diseases like epilepsy, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, as well as biopsychiatric conditions like anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorders.

Click here to find out how to call in on Nov 6th and 13th at 1PM EDT to speak with Dr. Broderick and the CUTV News Radio hosts Jim Masters and Doug Llewellyn.

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VETERANS DAY AT CUNY: A TRIBUTE TO 3,000 STRONG

University Recognizes Veterans Excelling in Classroom

More than 3,000 military veterans are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs on CUNY’s 24 campuses, a 50 percent increase since 2010 due in part to the University’s reputation for welcoming veterans and providing them with services that help them succeed.

Every year since 2009, CUNY campuses have earned recognition for being among the country’s most “military friendly” colleges, according to Victory Media, a respected veterans’ advocacy organization that uses strong data-based measures to assess resources, services and outreach that colleges provide student veterans.

In advance of Veterans Day, CUNY’s Office of Veterans Affairs this week is honoring student veterans who have maintained grade point averages of 3.5 or above. For the fifth year, the Veterans Affairs office presented the awards at a breakfast on Monday at The Graduate Center, prior to a networking-and-resource fair to which all 3,000 CUNY student veterans were invited.

“CUNY is proud to be a university that welcomes veterans and reservists not only in words but in actions – with programs, services and resources that help ease their transitions and support their pursuit of success,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “And we’re proud of our veterans – proud of the academic excellence, diversity and life experience they bring to all our campuses.”

CUNY student vets have served in every branch of the military and in every part of the world. Many fought in Afghanistan and Iraq and in other areas of post-9/11 conflict, while some served prior to the years of large-school deployments to the Middle East. Like CUNY students in general, they are diverse in every way and come from a range of backgrounds and personal histories. They are a distinct group of CUNY’s “nontraditional” students.

Here’s a look at a few of the CUNY veterans being honored for their academic achievement:

Throughout his eight years on active duty as a Marine – in Afghanistan and Iraq, Guantanamo Bay and Europe – Eugene Marmontov envisioned coming home one day and going to college. Specifically, to John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “I always wanted to go into public service in the justice field,” he said, “and I knew that was the place I wanted to be.”

Marmontov, 35, was born in Moscow and emigrated to Brooklyn with his mother when he was 18. “I spent the first few years trying to assimilate, learn the language, learn the culture, working random jobs,” he says. “I became a citizen.” At 24, and alone after his mother was killed in a car accident, he decided to enlist in the Marine Corps. He served tours in Afghanistan and Iraq as part of a scout sniper team, followed by a deployment with security forces at Guantanamo Bay and then assignments in Europe, Israel and Libya training with forces from those countries.

Marmontov ended his active duty career in 2015, when he decided it was time to “explore myself and go to college.” He headed straight to John Jay as he’d long planned and found it as welcoming a place for veterans as he’d heard. “People there are phenomenal in helping with GI benefits, picking classes, employment, mentorship with other veterans. I got an internship with the U.S. Marshals.”

A forensic psychology major with a 3.95 GPA, Marmontov will graduate in December and hopes to begin his career in law enforcement either with a federal agency such as the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Agency or Secret Service, or with the NYPD. He also plans to continue his education, studying part time in John Jay’s graduate program in public administration. Meanwhile, he hasn’t completely separated from the service: He remains a Marine reservist.

Samantha Ruiz grew up in East Harlem and enlisted in the Navy in the spring of 2001. “I was in basic training when 9/11 happened,” she says. She was 18 and planned to spend four years in the service, taking advantage of the Navy College Fund to pursue her education. But two years in, plans changed. She became a parent while stationed in Virginia and school had to wait. She wound up staying in the service for 14 years, the last few stationed in Japan.

“I trained first as a mechanical engineer, but eventually I segued into career counseling and drug and alcohol counseling,” Ruiz, now 35, said. “I worked one-on-one helping sailors with career goals and transitioning out of the Navy.” It was a skill that came in handy when the time came for her own transition in 2015: “My oldest was 14 and going into high school and I felt it was more important to be with him so I decided to come home to East Harlem and go back to school at CUNY.”

Ruiz completed an associate degree at Borough of Manhattan Community College, then transferred to Hunter College as a sociology major. She’s maintained a 3.8 GPA and will graduate next spring. “Going back to school was definitely a culture shock,” she says. “I was a lot older and had a lot of life experiences. I’ve been in 21 countries and have a more global perspective about how things work than typical college students. But it was really beneficial being a sociology major.”

Ruiz works part time on Hunter’s student veteran services team, helping fellow veterans make their own transitions to school and life after the service. Not the least of it is helping them navigate the paperwork for VA education benefits – things she herself got help with when she returned. After graduation, Ruiz hopes to continue on to a master’s at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter. She knows exactly who her clients will be: “I want to work with vets.”

Though most student vets served in the post-2001 era and arrived on CUNY campuses soon after their discharges, some are veterans of earlier wars and took different routes to college. “You know, I’m an old man,” joked Edgardo Cedeno, a 69-year-old Vietnam veteran who graduated from Lehman College this summer and is now working on a master’s.

His story begins long before most of his fellow student vets were even born. Raised in the Bronx, Cedeno was drafted into the Army in 1968 and served a year in Vietnam. Like many returning vets in those years, he struggled for a few years after his discharge. “Veterans weren’t welcomed home as they are now,” he says ¬– but he eventually straightened his life out and got a job with Con Edison through the federal CETA program. It turned into a 34-year career.

Retiring in 2013, Cedeno decided to go to college, at Lehman, where his wife, Cordia, had earned an undergraduate and a master’s degree. “We used to tell our kids about the value of education,” Cedeno said, adding with a laugh, “I was the only dummy in the family.”

He majored in political science, a longtime interest. “Going back to school was a little intimidating at first. I was older than everyone, even the professors. But I took to the work and I graduated cum laude.” He wasn’t finished: A few weeks later he began Lehman’s master’s program in organizational leadership. His studies are aligned with his passion for service: A deacon at Mount Carmel Baptist Church, Cedeno leads the church’s social service ministry at Taconic Correctional Facility, a women’s prison. He’s also thinking about becoming a member of his local community board. “I went back to school for the education itself, but also for my community work,” he said. “If you don’t have credentials you’re not taken seriously, even at my age.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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2017 School Photos

School photos will be taken the week of November 13-November 20. Individual portraits as well as class photos will be taken. Senior portraits will be in December.

Please click here for the LG Schedule.

Please click here for the MG and UG Schedule.


WABC-TV anchors, seven distinguished alumni, receive CCNY honors

Bill Ritter

Sade Baderinwa

 

 

Eyewitness News co-anchors Bill Ritter and Sade Baderinwa are this year’s John H. Finley Award recipients. The award is given out by the Alumni Association of The City College of New York for exemplary and dedicated service to the City of New York.

In addition, the association has honored seven City College alumni for outstanding post-graduate achievement. They received the Townsend Harris Medal at CCNY’s 137th annual alumni dinner in Manhattan.

The seven are:

  • Bernard S. Cohen, Esq. ’56B, the renowned lawyer who successfully argued the landmark civil rights case Loving vs. Virginia before the U.S. Supreme Court;
  • Jacob (Jack) Feinstein ’65EE, a retired VP for Consolidated Edison and prominent energy consultant;
  • Judge Stuart S. Levy ’72, a retired administrative patent judge and expert in patent law, practice and procedure;
  • Dr. Naomi Conn Liebler ’66, a distinguished scholar, author and one of America’s pre-eminent experts on Shakespeare;
  • Dolores Allen Littles ’59, a trailblazing photography editor for Life Magazine and Time Life Books;
  • Dr. Augustine L. Moscatello ’69, the award-winning Chair of the Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery at Westchester Medical Center; and
  • Dr. Stanley I. Sandler ’62ChE, a world renowned chemical engineer and researcher in applied thermodynamics.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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A Soldier’s Story

Senior Isiah James, a decorated veteran, finds community and support on the Brooklyn College campus thanks to the college’s Veteran and Military Program.

Senior and political science major Isiah James during his 12-month, third deployment in Maiwand, Afghanistan, as a member of the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment.

Out of the corner of his eye, senior Isiah James saw the grenade coming toward him.

It was 2009, the day before Valentine’s Day, 10:30 in the morning, and he and his unit were on patrol, their first mission for the U.S. Army in Kirkuk, Iraq. This was second of James’s three deployments—the first in Baghdad, Iraq, and the third in Maiwand, Afghanistan.

The mission began three hours late and the streets of Kirkuk were already bustling. This worried James because a dangerous situation was made even more so as Iraqi civilians could get caught in crossfire between U.S. soldiers and insurgents. James was positioned in the last of a convoy of four armored trucks, each outfitted with machine gun turrets. As a gunner and trained sniper, James was charged with protecting the convoy from any danger that might come from behind. His weapon allowed him to spot and respond to potential attacks from a 180-degree radius.

“I’m standing there behind my 50-caliber machine gun. One hundred armor-piercing incendiary rounds,” James recalls. “The turret is electric, so you move a little joystick and it turns. I’m scanning high. I’m looking at windows and building rooftops because they like to shoot at you from there. My turret is off to the right-hand side. The turret doesn’t move as fast as my head. And to my left, I see movement.”

That is when he saw two men running, one of whom had a Russian RKG-3 anti-tank grenade in his hand. As James tried to turn his turret around to address the imminent threat, the man threw the grenade directly toward James.

“I’ll never forget it. Just like in movies, everything proceeded in slow motion. I thought, ‘#^$%! He got me. I’m dead.'”

The grenade hit James’ turret, bounced into the air, and exploded. The concussive force of the explosion knocked him unconscious and pushed him deeper into the belly of the vehicle. He isn’t certain how long he was out, but he awoke to an Army medic standing over him, asking if he was okay. Instinctively, James removed his gloves and stuck his finger into his left ear. When he removed his finger, there was blood.

As a result of the blast, James experienced a mild traumatic brain injury. He had to relearn how to speak; he has permanent hearing loss in his left ear; he experiences chronic migraines and pains in his joints; and he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)—leaving him, among other things, unable to enter his home without first checking behind doors, inside closets, and under beds to ensure no one is lurking, waiting to do him further harm.

“I’m 31 years old and I’m 90 percent disabled,” he says.

For his service during three tours of duty, James was the recipient of 25 medals, ribbons, and badges, including the Presidential Unit Citation for “gallantry, determination  . . .  in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions” and the Valorous Unit Award for “extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States.”

It took some time for James to manage these obstacles, some of which he continues to deal with, but his healing journey led him into academia to study the very causes of human conflict, and to learn ways to resolve these differences nonviolently. The Florida native came to Brooklyn College after his spouse, Damaris Rosado-James ’10, who studied art history at the college, and whom he married on September 30 of this year, recommended it to him. He enrolled and decided to devote the entirety of his intellectual energy to the study of political science in an attempt to understand how to solve some of the problems in the world he saw firsthand.

The highly decorated James, in full regalia, and his wife Damaris Rosado-James ’10, use his saber to cut their wedding cake at a ceremony that took place on September 30.

“I’ve definitely noticed the influence of Isiah’s service in the classroom,” said Sara Hassani, adjunct lecturer of political science, who teaches James in her “Politics of Incarceration” course. “Not only does he have a wealth of experience to draw from in relation to the topics we discuss, but he also demonstrates a passionate commitment to social justice. His dedication to service shines through his vocal concerns over abuses of power, as well as the problem-solving approach that inspires many of his interventions. He’s not usually satisfied with simply identifying the underlying causes of social issues. Rather, he often emphasizes the ways in which we can strive to overcome them. It’s refreshing to see.”

These success stories are par for the course thanks to the support the college offers vets. The Brooklyn College Veteran and Military Program—whose motto is “Thank you for your service; now let us serve you!”—aids veterans in their transition from military to civilian to academic life.

“The primary goal of the program is to actively engage all veterans, active duty members, their dependents, and survivors in campus-wide programs and activities that will enhance their college experience,” said Claudette Guinn, the program coordinator. “Our services include assisting veterans in applying for the G.I. Bill; certifying and validating their benefits in compliance with current Veterans Administration regulations; mentoring incoming veterans; and providing updated information regarding changes in educational benefits, federal laws, support services, additional entitlements, special scholarships for dependents of deceased and disabled veterans, and the special book cost program for veterans. The program also provides referrals for on- and off-campus services when necessary, such as the Center for Disability Services, immigration, pro bono legal services, internships, and career opportunities.”

In addition to the program, the Veteran Students’ Organization (VSO), founded in 1974 by Vietnam War-era soldiers, is also a place where Brooklyn College students who served in the military find community. And the college has a sizable population of veterans. Each year, it tracks the enrollment of students with military service. In fall 2017, 200 students identified as veterans, the largest cohort in the last five years.

“You know there are other people who are like you, who have similar combat experiences to your own.” James said of the Veteran and Military Program, for which he sometimes serves as mentor and tutor. “It’s what we in the military call ‘espirit de corps,’ that sense of a shared value system shaped by our service.”

He recommends that other student veterans utilize the program’s services as well.

“Find someone you can trust and talk to them,” he advises. “It will help tremendously.”

James will be graduating at the end of the fall semester. He is planning to take the LSAT in December, and says he will pursue a career in public policy after he finishes law school.


All Ears: NYC Department of Veterans Services brings listening tour to Kingsborough Exploring ways to provide more resources for NYC active military and veterans at CUNY

Commissioner Loree Sutton and Senior Advisor and Director of Public Private Partnerships Cassandra Alvarez of the NYC Department of Veterans Services visited Kingsborough as part of a city-wide listening tour being conducted by the newly created Veterans on Campus NYC coalition.  The coalition of NYC colleges, universities, and private entities is dedicated to better supporting and understanding the student veteran and family member experience.

The initiative was launched by Mayor Bill de Blasio as a means of providing pathways to opportunity for tens of thousands of the city’s diverse student veterans. Over 12,000 students are currently using their GI Bill to pursue higher education in New York City.

The two guests met with Interim President Peter M. Cohen, Dean Brian Mitra, KCC’s Veteran Program Specialist/Certifying Official Tara Yarczower, and student veterans and active military personnel; toured our Veterans Lounge in room T7-220; and learned how KCC’s Military and Veteran Affairs Office (MAVA) works closely with many campus departments to serve the needs of prospective and enrolled active military personnel, veterans, their dependents and survivors.

MAVA has identified liaisons in Access-Ability Services, Admissions Services, the Bursar’s Office, Career Development, Counseling and Health Services, Financial Aid, Freshman Services, the Men’s Resource Center, the Registrar’s Office, Student Affairs, the Transfer Success Office, and the Women’s Center, whom veterans can contact directly.

The City is exploring ways to partner with CUNY in order to provide more resources for the active military/veteran population.

Students wishing to explore what benefits they may qualify for at Kingsborough can visit room C-106 or call 718-368-5472.

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BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE HONORED FOR INCREASING LATINO GRADUATION RATES “Accelerated Study in Associate Programs” is Named a “2017 Example of Excelencia”

October 10, 2017 – The Latino student advocacy group Excelencia in Education has announced its 2017 “Examples of Excelencia.” Bronx Community College’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) was cited for its outstanding, evidence-based results of improved Latino student success. The announcement was made October 5 at the annual Celebración de Excelencia held at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C.  Leaders from across the country attended the event — including BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe and Dean Francisco Legasa, who has been with the ASAP program since it was launched in 2007.

“BCC is thrilled by this recognition of our commitment to a learning community of diversity and excellence,” observed President Isekenegbe.

Over 1,200 Latino students at BCC have participated in ASAP, which has increased its students’ semester-to-semesterCelebración de Excelencia to 93%, while maintaining a 54% three-year completion rate among enrolled students. This is compared to a three-year graduation rate of 18% among the rest of the student body.

“While angry voices attempt to minimize Latinos’ contributions to our nation, Excelencia in Education brings national recognition and celebrates our contributions,” said Sarita Brown, President of Excelencia in Education.

This year, the Examples of Excelencia were selected from among more than 160 nominations from 25 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.


York College English Professor Publishes New Book on Georgia O’Keeffe

Dr. Linda M. Grasso has published her second book, Equal Under The Sky: Georgia O’Keeffe and Twentieth-Century Feminism (University of New Mexico Press, 2017), the first historical study of Georgia O’Keeffe’s complex relationship to US feminism from the 1910s to the 1970s. Utilizing understudies sources such as fan letters and archives of women’s organizations and colleges, Grasso shows how and why feminism and O’Keeffe are inextricably connected to popular culture and scholarship. The women’s movements that impacted the creation and reception of O’Keeffe’s art, Grasso argues, explain why she is a national icon who is valued for more than her artistic practice. Information about the book and the author’s related activities can be found at www.okeeffefeminism.com. 

Dr. Linda Grasso is a professor of English at York College, CUNY.

  • U.S. Literature
  • U.S. Women’s Literature and Culture
  • African American Literature
  • U.S. Women’s History
  • Asian American Studies
  • Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum
Linda M. Grasso holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Studies from Brown University and specializes in U.S. Literature and Culture, Women’s Literature, and Women’s and Gender Studies. She teaches courses in American Literature, African American Literature, Women’s and Gender Studies, American Studies, and Writing. Professor Grasso’s most recent book Equal under the Sky: Georgia O’Keeffe and Twentieth-Century Feminism (University of New Mexico Press, Fall 2017) situates the artist in U.S. feminist history and explores what feminism meant to O’Keeffe and her audiences over several generations. She is also the author of The Artistry of Anger: Black and White Women’s Literature in America, 1820-1860 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002)—which was a finalist for the 2003 MLA First Book Prize–and numerous essays on nineteenth and twentieth-century U.S. women’s literature and culture.
Education: PhD, Brown University
            MA, Brown University
             BA City University of New York

 


Grove School’s Jeffrey Morris, Rosemarie Wesson earn AIChE honors

 

CCNY Grove School’s Jeff Morris and Rosemarie Wesson.

Jeffrey Morris, Professor of Chemical Engineering in The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering is the AIChE 2017 Shell Thomas Baron Award recipient. He received the award today at the organization’s annual meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he delivered the award’s eponymous lecture. His talk was entitled: “Exploring Complex Colloidal Dispersions by Simulation.”

Also at the annual gathering,