School/Class News





BMCC Pre-Law Program Expands to Include Mentoring Opportunity with Brooklyn Law School

 

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Pre-Law Program, offered  through the BMCC Academic Advisement and Transfer Center, has just selected 10 students to be mentored at Brooklyn Law School.

The BMCC Pre-Law program started in Fall 2017. Rick Naughton, a Senior Academic Advisor at BMCC who holds a law degree from Penn State University, developed the program after consulting with pre-law advisors at Baruch College, John Jay College of Criminal Justice and Hunter College.

“I was motivated to create the program after meeting with dozens of students who expressed an interest in attending law school but weren’t sure what steps needed to be taken to achieve that goal,” says Naughton, who is BMCC’s Pre-Law Advisor, on record with the Law School Admissions Council.

He adds that another option for students is the BMCC Pre-Law Society club, which gives students the opportunity to learn about law and legal careers in an informal social setting.

The Pre-Law Program: Networking, law fairs and other resources

Students in the Pre-Law Program at BMCC attend networking events and law fairs throughout the New York City area, among other activities.

“It’s important for students to be able to talk first-hand with law school representatives to learn about scholarships and other resources, and be able to ask questions they might have,” Naughton says.

Through these events, students will broaden their awareness of the diverse options available to a person with a law degree, he says, such as working in the public or corporate sector and in areas such as human rights, criminal law, immigration, estate planning and many others.

The Pre-Law Mentoring Program: A first-hand look at law school

Ten students in the Pre-Law Program at BMCC have been selected to be paired with a law student at Brooklyn Law School, through that college’s mentoring program.

“Participants will meet regularly with their law school mentors, sit in on actual law school classes and witness first-hand the rigors of law school,” Naughton says.

He adds that both the Pre-Law Program and mentoring program “will provide role models to underrepresented students who might not have considered the option of a legal career.”

BMCC students in both the Pre-Law Program and mentoring program will meet law students and working lawyers, as well as learn about the long-standing tradition of minority lawyers such as those who graduated from Brooklyn Law School and went on to be trailblazers in their field.

These include David Dinkins, the first African American mayor of New York City; Percy Sutton, the first African American Manhattan borough president and Dorothy Chin-Brandt, the first Asian American woman judge in New York State.

The Pre-Law Society: Learning about law in a social setting

BMCC student interest in the field of law has also resulted in a new club, the Pre-Law Society. “This club will provide a social setting through which students can focus on legal careers and the law,” Naughton says.

Events the Pre-Law Society might present could include movie nights, “with a theme surrounding the legal profession,” he says. “Or they might bring in speakers who are friends or family members who are in law school or have gone on to start a career in law.”

For more information, please contact Rick Naughton at rnaughton@bmcc.cuny.edu or prelaw@bmcc.cuny.edu.


Convergent evolution of mimetic butterflies confounds classification

David Lohman

CCNY’s biology professor David Lohman is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies.

David Lohman, associate professor of biology at The City College of New York’s Division of Science, is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies  “An illustrated checklist of the genus Elymnias Hübner, 1818 (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae).” Lohman and his colleagues from Taiwan and Indonesia revise the taxonomy of Asian palmflies in the genus Elymnias in light of a forthcoming study on the butterflies’ evolutionary history.

The scientists discovered numerous cryptic species–two or more species erroneously classified as one species–as well as single species mistakenly described as two or three. Frequently, species discriminated with genetic data are each others’ closest relatives, but can be distinguished by stark genetic differences; this suggests a lack of interbreeding—a hallmark of species distinctiveness.

However, in Elymnias, Lohman and his associates found that cryptic species were unrelated to each other and resulted from a novel cause: mimicry. Different species on different islands of the Indo-Australian Archipelago frequently evolved to resemble a single, widespread model species, and different Elymnias species therefore evolved to resemble each other. Lohman and his colleagues conducted the comprehensive phylogenetic study using DNA sequence data from over 200 specimens representing nearly every species of Elymnias.

In addition, the team visited more than a dozen museums to study and photograph hundreds of specimens, and obtained additional material from fieldwork and many private collections. More than 100 male and female specimens were dissected to assess genitalic differences and distribution information was collected from dozens of sources to provide distribution maps of every subspecies.

Lohman studies the ecology, evolution, and biogeography of insects in the Old World tropics using a combination of field ecology and molecular phylogenetic methods.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Workplace Connected

CUNY Programs Such as WiTNY and #CUNYCodes Forge Vital Relationships for Students With NYC Employers

Laisa Barros, a computer science major at City College, knew she was taking the right courses toward a career in technology – but not exactly what her destination was or how she would get there. What she needed was a clear sense of her targeted area—and guidance in building the specific skills, experience and contacts that would lead her to the promised land: a good job in a high-growth sector after graduation.

Barros found a vital step forward in CUNY’s Women in Technology and Entrepreneurship in New York, or WiTNY, a partnership with Cornell Tech that was started in 2016 to encourage, train and support more women interested in technology careers. She was among the first group to participate in WiTNY’s Career Access Program, which is overseen by the CUNY Office of Workforce Partnerships and offers an array of workshops, coaching and access to internship opportunities with major corporate partners such as Verizon/AOL, AppNexus, SquareSpace, Citibank, IBM and Xerox.

“We met every week for three hours, and it was eye-opening,” Barros said. “They helped you develop yourself for your career and prepare for the real world of job searching — building a resume that’s targeted for tech, becoming a better speaker, and being part of a community to increase the number of women in tech.” It was through WiTNY that she joined #CUNYCodes, a program in which students work in small teams for 12 weeks, developing apps under the supervision of professional mentors and presenting their products at the conclusion. It led to a summer and fall internship at Cornell Tech — “doing what I like to do, front-end development,” Barros said. It also put her in position to graduate into a good first job.

WiTNY and #CUNYCodes are important pieces of a broad, strategic effort by the University to expand and forge new relationships with New York’s most promising employment sectors to help CUNY students win the top-paying jobs and launch successful careers.

“CUNY graduates tens of thousands of highly skilled and highly motivated students every year, and the tech sector is just one example of where we’re working with businesses to customize educational programs to help fill their hiring needs, and seamlessly integrate our students into high-paying jobs,” said Associate Vice Chancellor Andrea Shapiro Davis. “We’re educating corporate leaders about CUNY, our students and our diversity, and why we are a great source for their workforce needs. Once employers meet our students, they want to hire them.”

The expanded efforts reflect CUNY’s strengthened commitment to student career development as a University-wide imperative – one of the pillars of the Connected CUNY strategic framework unveiled by Chancellor James B. Milliken earlier this year. The Career Success theme of the strategic framework is an ambitious plan to connect CUNY with partners in all sectors of the innovation economy and to send its graduates into the world with 21st-century skills and access to competitive jobs. Experiential learning, extracurricular training and targeted internship programs are all key components of the mission.

Technology is leading the way. CUNY is creating partnerships such as WiTNY and initiatives such as CUNY Tech Meetup, monthly gatherings where students engage with companies ranging from Google to Etsy to learn about the tech industry and meet people in the field, including CUNY alumni. More than 2,000 CUNY students have participated since the first meetup two years ago, and the pipeline will grow with CUNY’s commitment to increasing enrollment in STEM fields, particularly among women and underrepresented minorities.

More broadly, the University is systematically identifying the city and region’s employment drivers, and the most dynamic employers within those sectors, as a first step in facilitating relationships that yield internships and, ultimately, well-paying jobs.

“We want our 50,000 graduates each year competing and landing jobs at competitive salaries,” said Angie Kamath, who joined CUNY earlier this year in the new position of University dean for continuing education and workforce development. A former deputy commissioner of the city’s Department of Small Business Services and later the head of a national IT job-training nonprofit, Kamath has assumed a new position broadly focused on putting CUNY graduates on track for economic mobility. “We have the proof that we catapult a lot of folks into the middle class, but it’s really important to make sure our students graduate into jobs with competitive wages because that first salary sticks with you for a while and you’re always negotiating off that base.”

Kamath leads a team of 38 people collectively seeking to do a few big things to get closer to that goal. On the student side, she said, “We need more career-exploration and skill-building programs leading to internships that convert to full-time job offers. We’re creating new ways to introduce our students to the major job sectors: What do these careers look like? What do you need to do to be competitive for those jobs? What paths did CUNY alumni in these fields take? The thing that’s exciting about our challenge is that our students are strivers, they’re diverse, they’re in New York and staying. But they generally don’t have a ton of social capital, so we need to give them career development opportunities that will make them more competitive.

“On the employer side, we need to make our system easier to tap into. The employers I speak with desperately want diversity and love the idea of hiring from CUNY but often have no idea where to start. They don’t want to go to 24 different colleges, so we need to be a navigator for them to find talent across the University. We’ll be the quarterback, telling them, ‘Work with these schools if you want data scientists, work with these schools if you want RNs.’”

One example of the new partnerships is a program with Revature, a leading technology talent development company that offers CUNY students and graduates — in any major, regardless of experience — free, 12-week coding boot camps that can lead to jobs with the company. More than 3,500 CUNY students have enrolled since the program’s launch in the fall of 2016, and 250 have been hired. This summer CUNY and Revature announced an expansion that brings WiTNY into several initiatives in order to recruit more women into tech careers.

Apart from the tech push, CUNY is working to develop relationships with employers in many fields identified as well-paying and rapidly growing: finance, industrial/construction, government, transportation, hospitality, health care, life sciences and nonprofits. In some cases, partnerships grow from synergy — an alignment of an employer’s needs with CUNY’s ability to create new curriculum to match them.

A prime example is a partnership between CUNY and Community Care of Brooklyn, an entity created by Maimonides Medical Center to serve the borough’s Medicaid population. Maimonides wanted to add a staff of community health care coaches and approached Kingsborough Community College about starting a program to train them. Kingsborough developed a new curriculum for a nine-credit certification program. About 100 students have completed the program and been hired so far.

Meanwhile, the CUNY Tech Meetups are a model that the Office of Workforce Partnerships is seeking to replicate in all the employment sectors – monthly gatherings at different companies where panels of professionals give students an introduction to their fields, a sense of what the path to a job looks like, and the chance to make contacts.
“What an employer in the tech sector needs in its entry-level and midlevel workforce is very different from what the health care or hospitality sector needs,” Kamath said. “That’s why it’s important for students to have access to career exploration – to learn what these industries are, what the opportunities are, so they can make some choices about what’s interesting to them – and then give them ways to build skills with some low-stakes experiential learning: Take a class, do some field study, an internship.”
At the same time, a challenge to that ideal comes from the financial and time pressures that can make it difficult for students to take advantage of opportunities. According to University data, about 20,000 CUNY students get internships each year but only 3,000 of them are paid. “The majority of our students need to work,” Kamath said, “but of those who work only 25 percent are doing it to explore careers. Most are working for money and many can’t afford to do unpaid internships. We want to increase that group getting paid.”

The goal of the workforce partnerships office is to cultivate partnerships with 10 or so big employers in each sector that want to hire locally. “For us, it means selling the CUNY brand. Our product is our students. So we’re asking, ‘How do we become a campus recruiting entity for you? Give us some feedback on our candidates.’ There’s also a really important role for our alumni. At JPMorgan Chase there are something like 900 Baruch alumni. We want to leverage that. We’re not taking the place of the colleges that have their own relationships with employers. But there are thousands of employers out there who aren’t touching CUNY colleges because they don’t know how. There are 250,000 businesses in New York, plenty of room to bring in new partners.#CUNYCodes


A 17th-Century Champion for Women’s Autonomy Inspires Student Learning

 

Professor Sophie Marinez and her students at BMCC

 

“Students love her story,” BMCC French Professor Sophie Maríñez says of Anne-Marie-Louise Duchesse de Montpensier (1627-1693), the subject of her book, Mademoiselle de Montpensier, Writings, Châteaux, and Female Self-Construction in Early Modern France just released from Brill, a leading academic publisher in Europe. “Mademoiselle de Montpensier authored a memoir, novels and letters in which she expressed her views against marriage and in support of the autonomy of women. When I teach her in my course on early modern French women writers, students are fascinated by these women who resisted the norms thatconstrained their lives.”

Maríñez’s work on Mademoiselle de Montpensier is the culmination of her doctoral dissertation, which she completed in 2010 at The Graduate Center, CUNY, under the direction of Distinguished Professor Domna C. Stanton, and for which she received the Carolyn B. Heilbrun DissertationPrize awarded by the Women’s Studies Certificate Program.

This book, she says, has been made possible by a series of grants and fellowships she received while completing her dissertation, an NEH Summer Stipend award she received when she was a visiting faculty member at Vassar College, before she joined BMCC, and two PSC-CUNY grants she received as a CUNY faculty.

Maríñez also received a BMCC Faculty Publication Cost Grant from the Office of Provost Karrin E. Wilks, “which helped defray the cost of image reproduction fees,” she says. “Although it is based on my research, the book is also an art book in the sense that it discusses and shows the chateaux Montpensier and other women commissioned in early modern France.”

Applying research and enriching student learning

Professor Maríñez teaches all levels of French language and literature at BMCC, including a class on French women writers. “In addition to Montpensier’s writings,” she says, “I teach the works of Christine de Pizan, a medieval writerconsidered by some to be the first pro-women advocate, who lived in France and wrote The Book of the City of Ladies (1405). In class, we analyze the literature as well as gender issues, and students apply those concepts to discuss the treatment of women today.”

The range of perspectives her students bring deepens these discussions. “We have such an incredibly diverse student population at BMCC: Muslim and Christian students, recent immigrants, people who grew up in New York, and students from many different socio-economic backgrounds,” she says. “This makes our talks about the women we are studying really rich and alive, despite the distance in time.”

To Professor Maríñez, bringing her research into the classroom is vital: “It makes my class more alive when I can bring the passion that I have for my scholarly projects into the classroom,” she says. “Students like to hear when I am going to a conference or working on the book. They get a glimpse into the process of being a writer and researcher, and see that speaking another language is a valuable skill in the professional world.”

A role model for majors in Modern Languages

Now that the Modern Languages Department at BMCC offers Associate of Art degrees in French, Italianand Spanish, students are exploring career options for dual-language speakers.

Maríñez herself worked as a translator when she first arrived to New York. Today, she says, opportunities for Modern Language majors are growing beyond the academic career path that she chose herself.

“In New York and other cities, we are seeing the growth of French-speaking African immigrants who are from Senegal, Mali, Morocco, Algeria, and other countries,” she says. “These recent immigrants need human, social, paralegal, and other services in French, andpublic schools are developing more bilingual programs in French to accommodate them.”


NSF awards CCNY consortium $5.2 million to advance fluids research

The CUNY Energy Institute housed in CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering is the recipient of a $5.2 million grant from the NSF.

The City College of New York-based CUNY Energy Institute is the recipient of a five-year $5.2 million National Science Foundation PIRE grant for advanced research on complex fluids. It will fund the Institute’s “PIRE: Multi-scale, Multi-phase Phenomena in Complex Fluids for the Energy Industries” project that involves 11 international partner institutions from France, Germany and Norway.

This collaborative research is expected to advance knowledge and make transformative scientific discoveries that could result in far reaching innovations, in both experimental and modeling methods. “This could lead to improvements in energy and process efficiency in industrial systems on a global scale,” said Masahiro Kawaji, acting director of the CUNY Energy Institute.

The PIRE project will also accelerate education and training of students and early career researchers by providing them unique opportunities to participate in substantive international research experiences, taking advantage of the scope, scale, expertise, and facilities of the PIRE network, added Kawaji.

Multi-phase fluid flows involving mixtures of liquids and often solids and gases as well, play an important role in nature and in the environment. Research on multi-phase flows is of vital importance to many key energy technologies globally, including oil-gas production and processing, energy conversion and storage, refrigeration and heating/cooling systems, as well as the materials, minerals, pharmaceutical, personal care and food industries.

According to Kawaji, an important societal outcome of the project is that it will propel key energy technologies and engineering systems that are of high relevance in the industries identified above, significantly improving their energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. The research and education plans will ensure that the U.S. maintains its competitive status in the field of complex, multi-phase fluids and their applications to engineering systems.

Kawaji’s CCNY partners from the Grove School of Engineering and the Division of Science include: Sanjoy Banerjee, Joel Koplik, Taehun Lee, Robert Messinger, Jeffrey Morris,  Vincent Pauchard and Charles Watkins.

About the PIRE Program
Partnerships for International Research and Education is an NSF-wide program that supports international activities across all NSF-supported disciplines.  The primary goal of PIRE is to support high quality projects in which advances in research and education could not occur without international collaboration. PIRE seeks to catalyze a higher level of international engagement in the U.S. science and engineering community.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of September 18, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Our week ahead features three instructional days, as schools are closed on Thursday 9/21 and Friday 9/22 for Rosh Hashanah.

Principal’s Coffees
Each year the NEST+m administrative team hosts a series of Principal’s Coffees — parent outreach meetings that typically take place in the morning. In consultation with NEST+m’s PTA Co-Presidents, our September Coffee Dates have been calendared to take place on these dates and times:

  • Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee: Wednesday September 20, 2017, 8:30am to 9:30am in the Cafeteria (visitor sign-in via Main Entrance).
  • Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee: Monday September 25, 2017, 8:30am to 9:30am in the Cafeteria (visitor sign-in via Main Entrance).
  • Upper Grades Principal’s Coffee will take place during Curriculum Night, Thursday 9/28 (7:00pm to 7:45pm) in the Auditorium.

All are welcome to join our monthly Principal’s coffees which feature formal announcements and/or teaching led by our administrative, guidance and teachers teams as well as parent-generated Q&A.

CURRICULUM NIGHT
Please Save the Date for Curriculum Night, Thursday 9/28, 5pm to 8pm. Curriculum night provides the opportunity to meet your child’s teacher(s) and learn about our instructional goals for the year ahead. Specific details forthcoming.

ENTRY AND EXIT PROCEDURES
Please see these important announcements regarding our entry and exit procedures.

DOORS OPEN

  • Our doors open for students at 7:30am. Breakfast also starts at 7:30 am.
  • Students may enter between 7 – 7:30 am if they are part of a school activity supervised by a teacher or advisor such as math team, chess, tutoring or sports’ practices.

MORNING COURTYARD PLAY

  • The NEST+m Main Courtyard is reserved for K-5 students who are supervised by parents. If you are dropping off your K-5 child, they must enter the building and cannot stay in the courtyard.
  • Grades 6-8 students may also stay in the Main courtyard. Ball playing is limited to the wings on both sides

ENTERING THE BUILDING

  • Grades K-2 students who are being dropped off by parents or bus will report to the Cafeteria where they will be supervised. They will be picked up by teachers directly from the Cafeteria.
  • Grades 3-5 students who are being dropped off by parents or bus will report to the Auditorium where they will be supervised. They will be picked up by teachers directly from the Auditorium.
  • Grades 6-8 students who are being dropped off by parents or bus may be in the courtyard OR may go sit outside their homeroom.
  • Grades 9-12 students enter our building via the courtyard OR the Columbia Street Entrance. Grades 9-12 students may report directly to the 3rd floor.

All classes begin at 8:20 am. To ensure timely arrival for class, students should arrive no later than 8:10am.

DISMISSAL

  • Our school day ends at 2:40 pm.
  • Students with supervised after-school activities including After3, SONYC, PSAL, clubs, tutoring, and academic meetings with teachers, are welcome to stay at school for the duration of these activities. All other students are asked to please leave the school grounds by 3:10 pm. Students may stay in the courtyard if they have a parent or caretaker present.
  • This note is of particular import as our front courtyard is not a supervised site after school.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of September 11, 2017

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Thank you for the wonderful start to our 2017-18 school year!
It was truly exciting to connect with so many students and families during our first days of learning.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

 


Consent Matters: Decoding Consent and Boundaries at Guttman

Guttman’s Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards demonstrated the college’s commitment to Consent Education by presenting “Consent is Sexy” on September 7, 2017. Designed to be part of the Office of Student Engagement series of activities during Weeks of Welcome, the interactive discussion aimed to engage new and continuing students and celebrated the start of a new academic year. “Consent is Sexy” was designed to enable participants to identify consent, communication around it, and the danger signs of unhealthy relationships and personal boundaries that can affect campus life.

Carolee Ramsay, Guttman Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards and Sylvester Allen AccessABILITY Specialist

Carolee Ramsay, Guttman Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards and Sylvester Allen AccessABILITY Specialist, facilitated student-guided discussions through live polling and the consent game.

The program was also part of a broader campaign aimed towards Affirmative Consent that will continue with online trainings for special groups of students, in-person trainings and activities by the Office of Student Conduct and Title IX Office, and more activities during Women’s History and Sexual Assault Awareness months. Affirmative Consent is a paradigmatic shift away from the “No Means No” approach, which is seen as more negative and places too much angst on the receiver to say no. “Consent is Sexy” was a deliberate attempt to get participants to understand that when the burden is shifted from the survivors to the initiators, it’s simple: consent is consent.

The main focus of “Consent is Sexy” revolves around the idea that consent must be given knowingly, voluntarily, affirmatively and continuously. Students were introduced to videos of other college students and their definitions of consent, scenarios from which volunteers played the consent game and participated in live, anonymous polling to determine fundamental myths and assumptions about consent and personal boundaries. Most participants understood the definitions of consent, but when it came to practical applications personal biases and traditions emerged. There was no universal definition of consent and boundaries, but most agreed that all parties in any given situation must be willing participants. For instance, 89% of the respondents agreed that a person cannot give consent when incapacitated or drunk.

The outcomes demonstrated the need for more conversations and programming around these areas. Dominick Hull, a junior, remarked that prior to this program, he never understood that consent had to be given each time. The polls indicated that many students had anxiety about behaviors that might get them accused of sexual assault while others had trouble creating personal boundaries out of fear of being accused of being selfish. The lines became even more blurred when participants began to distinguish verbal and non-verbal cues as a means of achieving consent and to learn that consent in the past does not determine consent in the present/future. 70% of students polled indicated that because someone didn’t resist doesn’t mean he/she has consented — a clear understanding of Affirmative Consent. However, 33% of these same respondents stated that consenting to some sexual activity, such as touching, can indicate consent to other activities, especially when we take non-verbal communication into consideration. The challenge here lies in the nuances of consent and students’ assumptions that nonverbal cues add more ambiguity to obtaining consent.

Students playing the Consent Game

Students played the “Consent Game” and indicated their responses about presented scenarios with traffic signals.

From the perspective of the Office of Student Conduct, it’s another piece of evidence that when we explain affirmative consent to college students, they are likely to embrace it and students can negate cultural myths and underlying assumptions that their needs and boundaries matter. Guttman and The City University of New York recognize the significant impact of all experiences of sexual assault and violence and are committed to promoting a culture in which these issues are not tolerated and that the campus is responsive and accountable to its constituents. While continuous education is necessary, students left “Consent is Sexy” with a greater awareness that meaningful consent is a voluntary, mutual, honest and verbal agreement which can never be implied and assumed. Most participants said they now have a greater awareness of the concept of consent, sexual assault and boundaries.

For more information on programs presented by the Office of Student Conduct, contact Carolee Ramsay at carolee.ramsay@guttman.cuny.edu or visit the Student Conduct page. Students can also join the campaigns or the conversation on social media @GuttmanOSC and #GCCWOW

 


CCNY-led research team identifies new organelle in parasitic wasp venom

A CCNY-led research team has identified new organelle in parasitic wasp venom.

City College of New York biologist Shubha Govind and her research team have identified the composition of “virus-like particles” (VLPs) found in the venom of a wasp that is a parasite of fruit flies. Invisible to the eye, wasp VLPs suppress the flies’ immune responses by killing their blood cells.

Wasps lay their eggs along with spiked VLP particles into the worm-like immature bodies of Drosophila melanogaster, the long-venerated genetic model of human disease and development. In the wild, parasitic wasps attack insects and are used to naturally control crop damage by insect pests. The Govind lab has developed a model to study this host/parasite interaction in the laboratory. While the particles were originally termed “virus like” due to their size and structure, this work has shifted that view.

The new study reports that VLPs have a profile of “extracellular microvesicles” that are microscopic, membrane-bound transport structures most animal cells use to package and traffic proteins to the outside. Strikingly, VLPs also have proteins that resemble bacterial proteins, found on their needle-shaped “injectisome” used to invade animal cells. The VLP proteins are similarly located on their surfaces/spikes, suggesting parallel mechanisms of invading hosts’ blood cells.

Given the VLP particles’ mixed prokaryotic/eukaryotic properties, the researchers have renamed them MSEVs for “Mixed Strategy Extracellular Vesicles.”

Govind’s team included CCNY Division of Science graduate students, Mary Ellen Heavner and Johnny Ramroop, and collaborators Shaneen Singh (Brooklyn College) and Rong Wang (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai).

The research, which appears in the journal Current Biology, was co-funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and NASA.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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BMCC Student Entrepreneurs Visit Ghana: Looking Back, to See Ahead

  

Birthright AFRICA /BMI Scholars with Entrepreneurs at ImpactHub Accra that shared their stories and career paths in innovation in Ghana.

 

Five Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students — Christiana Agyepomaa, Brittany Broderick, Kasson Colon-Mangin and Tredesha Howard — as well as BMCC alumnus Milton Henriquez and two other CUNY undergraduates, traveled together to the Republic of Ghana for ten days in August 2017.

The trip, co-sponsored by the CUNY Black Male Initiative (CUNY BMI) and Birthright AFRICA, was led by Shawn Best, University Associate Director of CUNY BMI, along with Birthright AFRICA’s Founder and Chief Umoja (Unity) Officer, Walla Elsheikh, and its Founding Fellow and Program Director, Ashley Johnson.

Before leaving for Ghana, the students met with entrepreneurs who are part of the African diaspora in New York, and visited cultural sites in both New York and Washington, D.C.

In the Ghanaian cities of Accra and Kumasi, they met with business leaders and innovators, as well as visiting university campuses and other sites.

Six weeks of cultural, historical and personal preparation

“The Birthright AFRICA Scholars were transformed as they explored their cultural roots and legacy of innovation in New York and Washington D.C., and experienced the culminating 10-day, life-changing trip to Ghana,” said Birthright AFRICA Founder Elsheikh.

Overall, the students “gained an in-depth knowledge of historic figures and present-day leaders and entrepreneurs of African descent that have paved the path for them to fulfill their aspirations,” she adds. “To see them experience a country on the African continent for the first time and be affirmed in their resilience and brilliance as people of African descent was a major highlight. They fully embraced the people and culture of Ghana with plans to stay connected and revisit, which is truly inspiring.”

In New York, the students visited the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Weeksville Heritage Center, the African Burial Ground and National Monument, Apt Deco, WeWork HarlemThe Brooklyn Commons and The National Black Theatre.

In Washington D.C., they toured the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial and Innovation Partners such as The Human Diagnosis Project. They also visited the African American Studies department at Howard University, kicking off a series of campus tours that would continue in Ghana, where they also met with business leaders at the African Center for Economic Transformation (ACET), Ostec and Airtel Ghana, as well as meeting with entrepreneurs at Impact Hub Accra.

“Know your history, to know where you are going”

The experience of being in two cities in Ghana — Accra and Kumasi — “opened the students’ eyes to the possibility of who they could be in the world,” says Birthright AFRICA Founder Elsheikh.

CUNY BMI Associate Director Best describes the benefit of the trip by referencing the Sankofa principle that Birthright AFRICA is based on: “Know your history to know where you are going.”

Birthright AFRICA, he says, “not only held trainings for six weeks straight, they gave the students MetroCards and fed them. Walla connected us with thought leaders in New York who are Senegalese, Nigerian, Ghanaian and also African Americans, the entire diaspora. We would meet and have conversations, and then the students would map out their own plans for innovation.”

Finding community, inspiration and truth

For BMCC Business major Tredesha Howard, a highlight of the trip was meeting Lucy Quist, an international business leader and CEO of Airtel Ghana, which provides telecommunications services to 15 African countries.

“She was a strong, fearless and bold black woman who was extremely graceful and humble,” Howard says. “Her knowledge and experience were truly an encouragement; despite what stands before you, push through.”

Another impactful segment of the trip was visiting one of the Slave Castles along the Ghanaian Cape Coast, fortresses that held an estimated six million enslaved Africans before they were shipped to other countries.

Physically being in the site “was extremely heavy for me and probably the hardest part of my trip,” Howard says. “Learning the truth about what my people went through in slavery was emotional and at times very tough to digest. However, I have an indescribable gratitude for my ancestors who survived the unspeakable.”

The Ghanaian cities of Accra and Kumasi feel similar to the neighborhoods in Barbados, where she grew up, Howard realized. In Ghana, she says, “There was always this sense of community. Though many people are on the streets selling the same things, there are no traffic lights and very little police presence; everyone for the most part is respectful and peaceful. I would even say they live harmoniously. Yes, Ghana has its issues but it is far from the picture that has been painted about it. I barely even saw one mosquito in my 10 days there. Just like in America there are good parts as well as bad parts.”

The inspiration of the African diaspora

Kasson Colon-Mangin, a Liberal Arts major at BMCC, was impressed by the group’s visits to Asheshi University and the University of Ghana in Accra, as well as to Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Kumasi.

“We also visited several corporations, organizations and black-owned businesses, where we were able to connect with leaders from the African diaspora,” he says.

That concept of an African diaspora was an important thread connecting the students’ meetings with entrepreneurs in both New York and Ghana.

For example, says CUNY BMI Associate Director Best, “We met a Jamaican gentlemen working out of Impact Hub Accra,” which provides assistance to innovators as they develop and deliver a viable product. “In our tour of the space, we met leaders and entrepreneurs within Impact Hub who were from around the world, showing there are more than Ghanaian people in Ghana. That was eye-opening for our students.”

To process the impact of those experiences, each student on the trip to Ghana completed an assignment, describing the innovators and projects they found most inspiring.

“My research topic is focused on visual communications, such as the Adinkra symbols that people in West Africa used to communicate, and on the first topographical map of the world, which was created in Africa,” says Colon-Mangin, who is also investigating “origin stories of the cosmos, Afrikan fighting sciences, proverbs and art.”

One individual who stood out for him on the trip was Dr. Obadele Kambon from the University of Ghana.

“He was able to explain the Bakongo cosmograms and the Adinkra symbols,” says Colon-Mangin. “He also showed the connection between the origins of the universe and the fighting style Capoeira. I was able to receive a one-on-one training session in the Capoeira fighting science of which he is a master. He gave a lecture comparing the Eurocentric teachings we have been mis-educated with, to what our African ancestors created — clearly showing how the ideas were stolen.”

Helping students build their own legacy, and academic success

Looking back on the trip to Ghana, Birthright AFRICA Founder Elsheikh describes it as being “full of affirming, life-changing moments,” for both students and staff.

As Tredesha Howard puts it, the experience “has reaffirmed my staying on track with my goals for the future, because in order to bring about change, you must be in a position to make or influence change. Thus, the only way I can do that is to get my degrees.”

CUNY BMI Associate Director Best takes that analysis a step further, relating the trip’s impact to long-term student success.

“Students felt energized, inspired to be creators of their own legacy in their own field,” he says. “The trip inspired the students to achieve and bring back to the BMI community that keen sense of belonging that keeps them connected to each other, to Africa and to BMI — and in the long run, that sense of belonging is a significant factor in building retention in college.”

 

For more information about the CUNY Black Male Initiative at BMCC, contact Ashtian Holmes, Director of the BMCC Urban Male Academy: (212) 220-8000, x7276 or aholmes@bmcc.cuny.edu.


BMCC to Partner in New Groundbreaking Library Study

A. Philip Randolph/BMCC Library

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) will partner with nonprofit research service Ithaka S+R and Northern Virginia Community College in an 18-month study that seeks to assess and improve library support systems within community colleges.

In addition to BMCC and lead investigator Northern Virginia Community College, five other community colleges, including three CUNY schools, will participate in the study.  The project is funded by a $449,388 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services’ Laura Bush 21st Century Library Program.

The project will explore how community college student success can be defined in a way that is inclusive of both policy priorities and students’ own needs. Project participants will also explore what services academic libraries can offer to most effectively help students attain success.

Ithaka S+R will publish two public research reports over the course of the project: one on community college student perspectives, practices, and needs; and a second report that will provide specific assessments of library service offerings that will be developed over the 18 months of the project.

BMCC together with the other study participants will also publish a toolkit that can be further adopted by both community colleges and community college systems to test these and other service concepts that are relevant to their student populations.

“We are very excited about this project as it seeks to assess and demonstrate the impact of library services on student success, said Kathleen Dreyer, chief librarian, BMCC. “Ultimately the grant will allow us to articulate the important role libraries have in student success and our role in the community,” she says.

On an even broader scale, this project seeks to strengthen the position of the nation’s community college libraries as an anchor in the campus community. It will also help libraries collaborate more effectively with their partners and increase library contributions to student success.


Directors Bring Experience in the Art of Assessment and the Curating of Art

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) welcomes Bryan Dowling, Director of Assessment in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analytics, and Lisa Panzera, Director of the Shirley Fiterman Art Center.

Bryan Dowling, Director of Assessment

Applying more than a decade of experience streamlining data collection, analyzing institutional self-studies, strategizing around Middle States reports and more, Bryan Dowling assumes his role as Director of Assessment in the BMCC Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analytics.

Brian Dowling

“I look forward to joining the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analytics, and working with students, faculty and administration to ensure our students step out into the world with everything they need to succeed,” says Dowling, who comes to BMCC from the Psychology Department at Hunter College, where he served as Research Programs Manager. In that role, he maintained departmental data, coordinated courses serving up to 500 students and managed budgets slated for faculty research.

Dowling earned a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from SUNY Plattsburgh. He earned a Master of Science in Psychology with a concentration in Animal Behavior at Hunter College, CUNY, and a Ph.D. in Psychology — with concentrations in Biopsychology, Behavioral Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology — at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

“I’ve spent 21 years at public institutions, starting my higher education at a community college, moving on to SUNY for my bachelors degree, and ending up at CUNY — first as a graduate student and then as an employee,” he says. “I’m delighted to continue my career with CUNY and help carry out the mission of our public colleges to provide a quality education for all our students. I’ve heard nothing but the best about BMCC and am excited to join the team.”

Lisa Panzera, Director of Shirley Fiterman Art Center

In her former role as Senior Director of Fergus McCaffrey, a contemporary art gallery in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, Lisa Panzera organized 10 to 12 exhibitions and art fairs a year. When Fergus McCaffrey moved from its 1,400-square-foot space on the Upper East Side to its current 9,000-square-foot space in Chelsea, she oversaw the gallery’s expansion. She served as General Editor of catalogues the gallery produced, secured relationships with artists, and fostered affiliations with museums, institutions and collections.

Lisa Panzera

Panzera started her career as a curatorial intern at the Smith College Museum of Art in Northampton, Massachusetts. Later roles included curator of the Levy Gallery for the Arts in Philadelphia, and associate curator at both The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Fondazione Prada in New York.

Overall, she brings more than 30 years experience working in galleries and internationally renowned museums to her new position directing the Shirley Fiterman Art Center at BMCC.

“I greatly look forward to joining the BMCC community,” Panzera says. “I am very excited at the prospect of building the Shirley Fiterman Art Center’s exhibition program and to cultivating both existing and new relationships to raise awareness of the Art Center.”

After earning a Bachelor of Arts in Art History at Smith College, Panzera went on to earn both an M.Phil. and Ph.D. in Art History at the Graduate Center, CUNY. At Hunter College, she taught graduate courses in Modern Art, Special Topics in 20th Century Art, and Theory and Criticism. She has lectured at the Museum of Modern Art, the School of Professional Studies in the Continuing Education department at New York University, the Whitney Museum of Art, and Marymount College. She has also published widely in journals including ARTnews and Art in America.


To Govern For The Good

CUNY Institute Seeks Ways to Enhance
State and Local Public Service Nationwide

AT TIME OF DEEPLY POLARIZED NATIONAL POLITICS, a rare point of bipartisan agreement is the need to change decades of poli- cies that have made the United States the most incarcerated country in the world. Too many nonviolent offenders and too many young men of color go to prison for too long, experts and elected o@cials say. But while most of the attention tends to focus on state and federal prisons, the problem starts at the gateway of the criminal justice system – the 3,200 local jails where mil- lions of nonviolent offenders wait for their cases to be adjudicated.
The search for solutions to over-incarceration has led to CUNY, where the University’s four-year-old Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG) has quickly established itself as a thoughtful and forceful pioneer of programs to help governments serve the public more effectively. Helping to lead a $100 million initiative funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the institute is working with 20 cities and counties across the country to reduce the populations and racial disparities of their jails — and create models for localities across the country.
The incarceration initiative is a prime example of how ISLG is forging strong partnerships that produce innovative, evidence-based public policy. “We wanted to create a place where data-driven
approaches could be developed to make government fairer, more humane and more e@cient,” said Michael Jacobson, ISLG’s founding director. “The focus is on the local and state levels because that’s where most of government is, and it’s where the action is in the push for reform.”
The institute works on an array of initiatives that put in practice one facet of the University’s Connected CUNY strategic vision — using cutting-edge research to design programs that improve our communities and cities, often in collaboration with other research institutions. Along with CUNY centers and programs that focus on important public issues such as sustainable energy, HIV prevention and immi- grants’ rights, ISLG is an exemplar of the University’s civic impact in New York and far beyond.
“Our new strategies are highly collaborative and partner the great resources of our faculty and our colleges to provide richer educational experiences that also have a real impact on the well being of our communities,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “We don’t just create knowledge through our research; we put it to use, making sure that the people who invest in us benefit from the insights we develop at CUNY.”
The Institute for State and Local Governance was founded in 2013 by two veterans of New York City government who had long imagined starting a research and policy institute to help governments across the country deliver more equitable and e@cient public service. Jacobson was a deputy budget director, as well as a commissioner of the city’s correction and probation departments. His co-founder, Marc Shaw, is a for- mer first deputy mayor who is now the University’s interim chief operating o@cer. He chairs ISLG’s advisory board.
Since its inception, the institute has grown to a staff of 40 policy researchers, ana- lysts and managers. The ISLG team has built partnerships with major foundations, nonprofits and government entities to initiate more than a dozen ambitious and well-funded projects. Several are making their mark as incubators of new ideas for addressing entrenched social problems.
A project called Equality Indicators, for instance, provides cities with tools to mea- sure and understand the inequities that disadvantaged people in their communities struggle with daily – a first step in closing the gaps. In another major endeavor, ISLG was selected by the Manhattan district attorney’s o@ce to spearhead a $250 million program of criminal justice initiatives funded by forfeitures from financial crime prosecutions. And when a federal monitor overseeing NYPD policy reforms wanted to study whether police body cameras change community experiences and perceptions, he reached out to the institute to help create a citywide research survey that would be conducted by CUNY students.
“State and local governments are good at the basic services they have to deliver,”

Jacobson said, “but they don’t have a lot of time or capacity to think about how to do things differently or to look at what others are doing around the country. An institute like ours can bring that capacity – the research, the analysis, the tech- nical assistance and training – whether it’s about thinking differently about tax policy or reducing the size of your jails.”
Jacobson has deep roots at CUNY and said he long thought it would be the right place for the institute. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and later spent seven years on the faculty of John Jay College of Criminal Justice before leaving to run the Vera Institute of Justice. He returned to CUNY when Shaw recruited him to start the institute.
“I always felt that as the biggest urban public university CUNY could and should have a real presence in the whole world of working with governments and training students and faculty for government, not just in New York City but nationally,” Jacobson said. To that end, he has put together a team of high-level researchers and policy specialists with experience in government, academic study and the foundation world.
“We have a unique sta„,” said Reagan Daly, the institute’s research director, a former assistant commissioner for research and planning in the city’s probation department who has a Ph.D. in criminology. “We place value not just on the technical research and being able to run sophisticated analysis but also on putting it in the larger context of knowing how government systems work. So we’re good at translating research into recommendations and boiling it down to the three or four things that are really important, not just giving people a lot of dense findings and tables.”
The institute has also worked to tap the resources of the University, collaborating on projects with a growing number of colleges and schools in ways that further CUNY’s drive to be a more integrated and collaborative university. Among those working with the institute are John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College, the Department of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter and Graduate Center entities including the Center for Urban Research and the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality.
“One of our goals is to partner with as many CUNY schools and faculty within those schools as we can,” Jacobson said. “We see ourselves as a version of a not-for-profit in the context of a huge public university, which we love because it gives us access to all sorts of resources.”
It also provides a unique teaching opportunity. With an academic appointment as a professor of sociology at the Graduate Center, Jacobson teaches a capstone course in which Ph.D. and master’s students are paired with institute projects and work closely with senior sta„. (This summer Jacobson also began hosting “The Wonk,” a new show on CUNY TV that focuses on key public policy issues in the city.)
“Nurturing future government leaders and people interested in careers in policymaking is central to our mission,” said Siobhán Carney, the institute’s policy director. “We want to see a pipeline of CUNY students come through our doors because exposure to real-life projects really makes a di„erence.”
Here is a look at a few of the institute’s major projects:

REDUCING LOCAL JAIL POPULATIONS

There are more jails than colleges in the United States — a strong indicator of the mass incarceration that drives support for criminal justice reform. But what gets too little attention, say advocates of penal reform, is the overuse of local jails to house people accused of nonviolent offenses while their cases make their way through the system, including many who are incarcerated for weeks or months only because they are too poor to post bail.
“Eleven million people a year are going to jail – nearly triple the number 30 years ago. That’s an astounding number,” said Jacobson. “City and county jails have the same overcrowding and racial disparities as large prisons but often don’t have the resources or expertise to do anything about it.”
In 2014, ISLG helped the MacArthur Foundation launch a $100 million initiative called the Safety and Justice Challenge, an open call to local jurisdictions across the country to compete for grants of up to $2 million a year to help them change the way they use their jails and make their local justice systems more fair and effective. “We got 190 applications, so clearly there was a sense that people were ready for reform,” Jacobson said. “It’s obviously a very complicated thing, but there are two simple goals: Shrink your system and improve your racial and ethnic disparities within your system.”
Twenty jurisdictions were selected, and since 2015 ISLG has been working with local o@cials on their goals, their strategies and methods for reaching them, and their benchmarks for measuring progress. The project, directed by Daly, has a team of eight ISLG staff members, including six who regularly visit the sites to work with local o@cials.
“These 20 counties have determined that there are too many people in their jails and too many people who don’t belong there – people who can’t pay small amounts of bail, people there for low-level offenses who don’t pose a risk,” Daly said. “They are looking at all the decision points in criminal justice that drive jail populations, from arrest through sentencing. Case-processing time is an area that can have a big impact and a lot of our sites are working on ways of reducing it in their systems.”
The Safety and Justice Challenge will continue for several years, and ISLG hopes it will yield reforms and practices that are adopted beyond the 20 jurisdictions. “We want this to have an impact nationally,” Jacobson said.

EQUALITY INDICATORS

How do you measure inequality? And how do you change it? These broad and deeply complex social questions are at the heart of one of the most significant initiatives undertaken by ISLG.
The project, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, uses hard data on six themes — economy, education, health, housing, justice and services. It breaks down the multi-dimensional nature of inequalities into 96 “proxy indicators” – disparities in misdemean- or arrest rates as a measure of fairness of the justice system, for instance, or Common Core data as an indicator of educational performance — to tease out the drivers of inequality and whether a city’s policies are a contributing or mitigating factor.
“It’s not news to anyone that there are disparities in, say, math performance, but it’s important to track how those disparities are changing as a city makes efforts to address them,” said Victoria Lawson, the Equality Indicators project director. “We want to see whether they’re improving or whether this is an area where more attention is needed.”
ISLG developed Equality Indicators first for New York City and began expanding it earlier this year to five other cities: Pittsburgh; Tulsa, Okla.; Dallas; St. Louis; and Oakland, Calif. “The idea is to be more than an academic exercise — we want this to be about how data can be used to drive change and move the needle,” Lawson said. “The first step is knowing who is most disadvantaged and what the disparities are. Then we can make rec- ommendations based on where we see things changing and where they’re not.”
Jacobson said the project’s real value, ultimately, is in helping local o@cials and leaders in cities throughout the country adopt evidence-based policies. “It’s important for juris- dictions to look closely at the data they have to really understand what’s going on, what’s working, and where improvement needs to be made,” he said.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE INVESTMENT INITIATIVE

spend hundreds of millions of dollars on programs to improve public safety, prevent crime and promote a fair and effective justice system. The fund came from penalties levied against three international banks prosecuted by his o@ce and the U.S. Justice Department for violating federal sanctions. Vance designated $250 million for a project he named the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative (CJII) and put out a request for proposals to create a blueprint for investing the money and carrying it out. ISLG got the job.
“The DA’s o@ce is the biggest criminal justice funder in the world right now and $250 million moves through CUNY,” Jacobson said. “We’ve done all the analytic work to create the portfolio of projects, we run all the competitions to give out the money and we oversee the grantees. So in some ways, we’re like a mini-operating foundation.”
ISLG spent two years developing a far-reaching program that involves nonprofit and community-based organizations throughout New York City and beyond. “We went out and asked experts, ‘Where are the big gaps?’ ” said Siobhan Carney, who oversees the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative on behalf of ISLG. The result of the answers they got is a host of programs that have engaged more than 100 nonprofit organizations so far.
“ISLG’s extraordinary research empowered us with the information we needed to make unique investments that would have lasting impact,” said Vance.
One initiative announced earlier this year is a $46 million program to create and con- struct five “Youth Opportunity Hubs” in targeted Manhattan neighborhoods, part of the CJII’s overall mission to help young people with life issues such as education, employment and housing, and reduce the likelihood of their involvement in the justice system.
Another area of the CJII is developing new approaches for serving victims of crime, while a third is focused on options to divert people from the criminal justice system at var- ious points and reducing recidivism. This includes a statewide College-in-Prison Reentry Program announced in August by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and District Attorney Vance.
ISLG will oversee the $7.3 million program, which will create 2,500 slots for incarcerated individuals in 17 New York State prisons with college-level instruction leading to degrees or certificates.

TAPPING CUNY STUDENTS

A federal monitor was appointed as part of the 2013 court finding that the New York
Police Department’s stop-and-frisk practices were unconstitutional. Last year, the mon- itor asked ISLG to help conduct a study of a pilot program to outfit police with body cameras in communities with the highest incidence of stop-and-frisk. “What the monitor wanted was our ability to use CUNY students to do interviews in and around public housing to supplement their polling,” Jacobson said. “Fifteen thousand CUNY students live in public housing so we jumped at that project. It was a way to get students involved and give them an experience they could use in their classes.”
ISLG partnered with the CUNY Service Corps, which provides students with paid work experiences on projects with community-based organizations and government agencies. In April, under the direction of Neal Palmer, an ISLG senior research associate, 39 stu- dents were trained and then sent out to 10 police precincts to interview hundreds of resi- dents. About half the surveys were conducted in precincts where body cameras were going to be implemented first and the other half were conducted in neighborhoods where police would not yet have body cameras. A follow-up survey will be conducted later to determine if the cameras have an impact on police practices and residents’ experiences and percep- tions of the police.

REDUCING LOCAL JAIL POPULATIONS

There are more jails than colleges in the United States — a strong indicator of the mass incarceration that drives support for criminal justice reform. But what gets too little attention, say advocates of penal reform, is the overuse of local jails to house peo- ple accused of nonviolent offenses while their cases make their way through the system, including many who are incarcerated for weeks or months only because they are too poor to post bail.
“Eleven million people a year are going to jail – nearly triple the number 30 years ago. That’s an astounding number,” said Jacobson. “City and county jails have the same overcrowding and racial dispari- ties as large prisons but often don’t have the resources or expertise to do anything about it.”
In 2014, ISLG helped the MacArthur Foundation launch a $100 million initiative called the Safety and Justice Challenge, an open call to local jurisdictions across the country to compete for grants of up to $2 million a year to help them change the way they use their jails and make their local justice systems more fair and effective. “We got 190 applications, so clearly there was a sense that people were ready for reform,” Jacobson said. “It’s obviously a very complicated thing,
but there are two simple goals: Shrink your system and improve your racial and ethnic disparities within your system.”
Twenty jurisdictions were selected, and since 2015 ISLG has been working with local o@cials on their goals, their strategies and methods for reaching them, and their benchmarks for measuring progress. The project, directed by Daly, has a team of eight ISLG staff members, including six who regularly visit the sites to work with local o@cials.
“These 20 counties have determined that there are too many people in their jails and too many people who don’t belong there – people who can’t pay small amounts of bail, people there for low-level offenses who don’t pose a risk,” Daly said. “They are looking at all the decision points in criminal justice that drive jail populations, from arrest through sentencing. Case-processing time is an area that can have a big impact and a lot of our sites are working on ways of reducing it in their systems.”
The Safety and Justice Challenge will continue for several years, and ISLG hopes it will yield reforms and practices that are adopted beyond the 20 jurisdictions. “We want this to have an impact nationally,” Jacobson said.

EQUALITY INDICATORS

How do you measure inequality? And how do you change it? These broad and deeply complex social questions are at the heart of one of the most significant initiatives undertaken by ISLG.
The project, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, uses hard data on six themes — economy, education, health, housing, justice and services. It breaks down the multi-dimensional nature of inequalities into 96 “proxy indicators” – disparities in misdemean- or arrest rates as a measure of fairness of the justice system, for instance, or Common Core data as an indicator of educational performance — to tease out the drivers of inequality and whether a city’s policies are a contributing or mitigating factor.
“It’s not news to anyone that there are disparities in, say, math performance, but it’s important to track how those disparities are changing as a city makes efforts to address them,” said Victoria Lawson, the Equality Indicators project director. “We want to see whether they’re improving or whether this is an area where more attention is needed.”
ISLG developed Equality Indicators first for New York City and began expanding it earlier this year to five other cities: Pittsburgh; Tulsa, Okla.; Dallas; St. Louis; and Oakland, Calif. “The idea is to be more than an academic exercise — we want this to be about how data can be used to drive change and move the needle,” Lawson said. “The first step is knowing who is most disadvantaged and what the disparities are. Then we can make rec- ommendations based on where we see things changing and where they’re not.”
Jacobson said the project’s real value, ultimately, is in helping local o@cials and leaders in cities throughout the country adopt evidence-based policies. “It’s important for juris- dictions to look closely at the data they have to really understand what’s going on, what’s working, and where improvement needs to be made,” he said.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE INVESTMENT INITIATIVE

spend hundreds of millions of dollars on programs to improve public safety, prevent crime and promote a fair and effective justice system. The fund came from penalties levied against three international banks prosecuted by his o@ce and the U.S. Justice Department for violating federal sanctions. Vance designated $250 million for a project he named the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative (CJII) and put out a request for proposals to create a blueprint for investing the money and carrying it out. ISLG got the job.
“The DA’s o@ce is the biggest criminal justice funder in the world right now and $250 million moves through CUNY,” Jacobson said. “We’ve done all the analytic work to create the portfolio of projects, we run all the competitions to give out the money and we oversee the grantees. So in some ways, we’re like a mini-operating foundation.”
ISLG spent two years developing a far-reaching program that involves nonprofit and community-based organizations throughout New York City and beyond. “We went out and asked experts, ‘Where are the big gaps?’ ” said Siobhan Carney, who oversees the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative on behalf of ISLG. The result of the answers they got is a host of programs that have engaged more than 100 nonprofit organizations so far.
“ISLG’s extraordinary research empowered us with the information we needed to make unique investments that would have lasting impact,” said Vance.
One initiative announced earlier this year is a $46 million program to create and con- struct five “Youth Opportunity Hubs” in targeted Manhattan neighborhoods, part of the CJII’s overall mission to help young people with life issues such as education, employment and housing, and reduce the likelihood of their involvement in the justice system.
Another area of the CJII is developing new approaches for serving victims of crime, while a third is focused on options to divert people from the criminal justice system at var- ious points and reducing recidivism. This includes a statewide College-in-Prison Reentry Program announced in August by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and District Attorney Vance.
ISLG will oversee the $7.3 million program, which will create 2,500 slots for incarcerated individuals in 17 New York State prisons with college-level instruction leading to degrees or certificates.

TAPPING CUNY STUDENTS

A federal monitor was appointed as part of the 2013 court finding that the New York Police Department’s stop-and-frisk practices were unconstitutional. Last year, the monitor asked ISLG to help conduct a study of a pilot program to outfit police with body cameras in communities with the highest incidence of stop-and-frisk. “What the monitor wanted was our ability to use CUNY students to do interviews in and around public hous- ing to supplement their polling,” Jacobson said. “Fifteen thousand CUNY students live in public housing so we jumped at that project. It was a way to get students involved and give them an experience they could use in their classes.”
ISLG partnered with the CUNY Service Corps, which provides students with paid work experiences on projects with community-based organizations and government agencies. In April, under the direction of Neal Palmer, an ISLG senior research associate, 39 stu- dents were trained and then sent out to 10 police precincts to interview hundreds of resi- dents. About half the surveys were conducted in precincts where body cameras were going to be implemented first and the other half were conducted in neighborhoods where police would not yet have body cameras. A follow-up survey will be conducted later to determine if the cameras have an impact on police practices and residents’ experiences and percep- tions of the police.


Kupferberg Center for the Arts Celebrates 10th Anniversary Season with Top Performers for Every Taste

— Grammy-Winner Gladys Knight, Folk Singer Peter Yarrow, The TEN Tenors and Sweet Honey in the Rock Are Among the Artists Who Will Appear —

Queens, NY, September 13, 2017— The Kupferberg Center for the Arts (KCA) will mark the milestone of its 10th Anniversary with a special roster of world-class artists who reflect the diverse borough of Queens—aptly called “the world’s borough” by Queens BP Melinda Katz. Tickets are on sale now.

“It is very gratifying that the Kupferberg Center for the Arts has grown and thrived since its founding in 2007,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Providing our neighbors in Queens and the greater metropolitan area first-rate, culturally diverse entertainment will continue to be the KCA mission in the years and decades to come.”

Kupferberg Presents, the entertainment hub of the Center, kicks off its 2017-18 season, sponsored by New York Community Bank, on Saturday, October 28 at 8 pm with singer-songwriter Peter Yarrow of the legendary folk group Peter, Paul and Mary. The musicians earned great fame with “Puff the Magic Dragon” and their versions of “If I Had a Hammer” and “Blowin’ in the Wind.” Their first album, which sold more than two million copies, reflected the group’s political and social activism. Yarrow has continued this lifelong commitment, creating a nonprofit, Operation Respect, to combat school bullying, and offering his audiences inspiring performances that stress our shared humanity, especially in difficult times.

“An Evening with Gladys Knight” on November 9 features the singer-songwriter-actress known as the “Empress of Soul.” The seven-time Grammy winner has enjoyed number-one hits in Pop, Gospel, R&B, and Adult Contemporary music categories. Among her Grammy winners are “Midnight Train to Georgia,” “You’re the Best Thing that Ever Happened to Me,” and “Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye).” Both as leader of Gladys Knight and the Pips and later as a solo artist, Knight has triumphed in her long career, releasing more than 30 albums and ranking #18 on the VH1 network’s list of the 100 Greatest Women of Rock.

The globe-trotting Australian group The TEN Tenors performs a “Home for the Holidays” show on December 10 that will feature their signature combination of classical and contemporary music. Following 17 years of sold-out performances across the globe, including more than 2,000 of their own headline concerts, The TEN Tenors have cemented their place as one of the world’s most-loved music groups. The group’s appearance gives New Yorkers the chance to experience the charm and vocal power that has been shared to date with an audience of 90 million.

Sweet Honey in the Rock, the all-women African American a capella ensemble, has won a Grammy for its unique expression of female African American history through song and dance. Dedicated to empowerment, education, and entertainment, the collective (Carol Maillard, Louise Robinson, Nitanju Bolade Casel, Aisha Kahlil, and featured musician Romeir Mendez on upright acoustic bass and electric bass) is a powerful ensemble that performs with great flair and attracts an avid audience of fans.

Sums up KCA Executive Director Jeff Rosenstock: “In this 10th anniversary year, we thank the extraordinary artists of our new season and the many talented performers such as Johnny Mathis, Carol Burnett and New Shanghai Circus who have graced our stages. We also thank our wonderful supporters: the Kupferberg family, New York Community Bank, and the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, to name a few, as well as our Arts Advisory Board and staff. And most of all, we thank our patrons from many communities throughout Queens, Long Island, and the rest of the metropolitan area who come to enjoy Kupferberg Presents entertainment.”

Please see below for details on all the upcoming performances, including the rest of the 2017-18 lineup: Inti-Illimani, New York Philharmonic Ensembles, and a glittering production of Sleeping Beauty by the State Ballet Theatre of Russia, known internationally as one of Russia’s leading ballet companies.

Visit www.kupferbergcenter.org or call the Box Office at 718-793-8080 for tickets and detailed information. Kupferberg Center for the Arts offers free parking, easy access to the Long Island Expressway, and excellent dining options on the campus of Queens College.

The Kupferberg Presents 2017-2018 Season

An Evening with Peter Yarrow (of Peter, Paul & Mary)
Saturday, October 28, 20178:00 p.m.
LeFrak Concert Hall
Tickets: $35 – $45

Inti-Illimani
Celebrating 50 Years of Music, Education and Activism
Sunday, October 29, 2017
3:00 p.m.
LeFrak Concert Hall
Tickets: $25 – $40

New York Philharmonic Ensembles
Sunday, November 5, 2017
3:00 p.m.
LeFrak Concert Hall
Tickets: $25 – $40

An Evening with Gladys Knight
Thursday, November 9, 2017
8:00 p.m.
Colden Auditorium
Tickets: $39 – $115

R&B Holiday Bash
K-Ci and JoJo, Ginuwine and 112
Friday November 24, 2017
8:00 p.m.
Colden Auditorium
Tickets: $59-$109

Sleeping Beauty Performed by The State Ballet Theatre of Russia
Sunday, December 3, 2017
2:00 p.m.
Colden Auditorium
Tickets: $23 – $42

The TEN Tenors
Home for the Holidays
Sunday, December 10, 2017
3:00 p.m.
Colden Auditorium
Tickets: $30 – $45

Sweet Honey in the Rock
Sunday, January 14, 2018
4:00 p.m.
Colden Auditorium
Tickets: $35

*Tickets for Sweet Honey in the Rock go on sale September 21.

ABOUT KUPFERBERG CENTER FOR THE ARTS AT QUEENS COLLEGE:
The Kupferberg Presents 2017-2018 Season, sponsored by New York Community Bank, features a vibrant lineup of world-class cultural events, concerts, and family programs at Colden Auditorium, LeFrak Concert Hall, Goldstein Theatre, and select off-campus locations for the 2.2 million residents of New York City’s most diverse borough. Since 1961, Kupferberg Center for the Arts has provided accessible and affordable world-class cultural entertainment to the NYC region. From classical and pop performances, to concerts and school residencies, to a wide range of family events, over 350,000 individuals attend events at Kupferberg Center for the Arts each year. For tickets and information, visit www.kupferbergcenter.org. Box office: (718) 793-8080; Tuesdays through Fridays from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and up to one hour prior to all performances.

Press Contract
Jennifer Zanca
Jennifer.zanca@qc.cuny.edu
718-997-0395


CCNY surges in 2018 U.S. News Best Regional Universities rankings

CCNY is among the top 100 schools in the North, according to U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 rankings.

The City College of New York remains among the top 100 Best Regional Universities in the North and a Top Public School in the North, according to the U.S. News & World Report 2018 rankings.

Celebrating its 170th anniversary this year, City College climbed 10 places in the Top Public Schools rankings in the North from 2017. CCNY is now #16 among 51 schools that made U.S. News’ stringent ranking.  It was #26 last year.

CCNY also made a considerable jump in the Best Regional Universities rankings. It is #56 among 196 universities – a leap of 29 places from #85 in 2017.

There is also a discernible increase in the average freshman retention rate, an indicator of student satisfaction. It has climbed to 87 %, a one percent increase from last year’s 86%.

U.S. News defines regional universities as those providing a full range of undergraduate majors and master’s programs and a few doctoral programs. Regional universities are in four categories—North, South, Midwest, and West—because they generally attract students from the surrounding states.
The U.S. News ranking system rests on two pillars. The formula uses exclusively statistical quantitative and qualitative measures that education experts have proposed as reliable indicators of academic quality, and it is based on U.S. News’ researched view of what matters in education.

To calculate the rankings, U.S. News gathers data from each college on up to 15 indicators of academic excellence.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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CUNY in the Heights Executive Director Launches Community Program

Seny Taveras, Executive Director for CUNY in the Heights of Hostos’ Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development, has launched her own community program, Tu Comunidad Con Seny Taveras (Your Community With Seny Taveras).

This exciting talk show is hosted by Taveras, a lawyer and leader within her own community, and will air weekly on both Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) and BronxNet. The show aims to inform the Latino communities about public policy, political platform and a variety of educational topics. All interviews are in Spanish.

Every Sunday, Tu Comunidad Con Seny Taveras will be broadcast at 5:00 p.m. in MNN 5 HD and it will be repeated the following Thursday on MNN 1. MNN 5 HD can be tuned in Spectrum 1993 (Manhattan only) MNN 1 can be tuned to FiOS 33; RCN 82 and Spectrum 34 and 1995 (Manhattan only). In addition, the channels can be viewed through on the web at: www.mnn.org.

Tu Comunidad con Seny Taveras will start airing every Wednesday on BronxNet channel 69 at 8:00 p.m., and it will be repeated through the week.

Don’t forget to tune in and watch the exclusive interviews with influential elected officials in the Bronx and Manhattan. Also, Dr. Eric Diaz will offer tips on important health issues during each program.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Hostos Expanding Its Open Educational Resources (OER)

Expanding on its efforts to save students money on expensive textbooks, increase their exposure to high-tech learning tools, and improve graduation rates, Hostos Community College is offering Open Educational Resources in more classes for the 2017-2018 school year.

Last year, Hostos shared a $300,000 Open Educational Resources (OER) grant that provided these free educational resources for the College’s Early-Childhood Education associate degree program. The funding offered substantial savings to students, as well as enhance classroom curriculum. This year, Hostos has been awarded additional funding from the state to expand these materials to other disciplines. The expansion of OER will include 14 new courses in the Humanities, Sciences, and Social Sciences, which will replace expensive textbooks with free, mainly online, learning materials. The program will save approximately 1,000 students between $150 and $300 per course.

Studies show that the annual cost of textbooks is about $1,300 per year for a full-time community college student and amounts to about one-third of the cost of an associate degree. This cost is a significant barrier to college completion. Students who don’t complete college are over 50 percent more likely to cite textbook costs as a major financial barrier, according to a study by the research firm Public Agenda.

Equally important, using digital and interactive OER, such as open courseware, will encourage faculty to teach students in more engaging and dynamic ways and invite students to become more actively involved in their own learning.

Christine Hutchins, an Associate Professor of English at Hostos, is utilizing OER exclusively in her classes, including Shakespeare, English 101, and Writing Skills and Composition.

After surveying her students, she found they overwhelmingly favored using OER over textbooks, due to the savings and convenience.

Hostos student Corey Richards is majoring in Electrical Engineering and took advantage of OER materials.
“The online materials are great, not just because they are free but also because they are very convenient,” Richards said. “It is easier to carry than books, so I can read the materials on the go, like on trains or in my spare time. They are also always available and impossible to lose.”

The overall CUNY-wide effort was made possible thanks to a $4 million grant from the state. The CUNY Office of Library Services, including Hostos’ Chief Librarian Madeline Ford, helped secure the grant and expand the effort to all CUNY campuses.

Ann Mester, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Hostos, said the benefits go beyond monetary savings.

“Textbook costs are notoriously high, and these courses will be attractive to students for economic reasons,” Mester said. “However, we also intend to bring added value to our course materials through the use of virtual labs, animations, and other materials that go beyond what a print textbook can provide.”

The effort began with the formation of the CUNY OER Consortium in 2016, comprised of Hostos, Borough of Manhattan Community College and Bronx Community College. It was spearheaded by Achieving the Dream, Inc., and was designed to help remove financial roadblocks that derail students’ progress and spur improvements that will increase the likelihood of degree and certificate completion.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Hostos Center For Bronx Nonprofits Receives Boost From Booth Ferris Foundation

Since its inception in 2012, Hostos’ Center for Bronx Nonprofits (CBNP) has worked toward building a better Bronx by assisting and supporting the numerous organizations in the borough who are committed to the same mission.

Thanks to a generous $150,000 grant from the Booth Ferris Foundation, which runs over two years, CBNP will expand on two pilot leadership programs serving Bronx nonprofit middle managers and executive directors, so they can work more efficiently for their communities. Hostos is proud to work with Booth Ferris, a prominent New York City-focused funder of public education, arts and culture, and other life-changing initiatives, on supporting these critical organizations. The two CBNP Leadership Development Programs have served two cohorts to date, to further the successful development of Bronx nonprofit leadership. More than 50 percent work in the fields of human services or health, and about 67 percent have been at their nonprofits for more than three years.

Eileen Newman, who became CBNP’s first Executive Director in May 2013, said (something like this, which I stole from the narrative, would be great:

“While the Bronx nonprofit sector is critically important in terms of employment and provision of essential services, many nonprofits lack the skilled personnel or organizational capacity to bring about the positive changes they seek,” Newman said. “Our goal is to assist these nonprofit leaders, who are often under-resourced.”

Specifically, the grant funding will support:

  1. The Executive Management Certificate Program, a 10-month training program for rising executives, will run from May 2017 to February 2018. During the first six months, these managers attend monthly, three-hour sessions to increase their skills base. The program builds incrementally to develop skills crucial to a leader’s success, covering topics such as collaboration and team building, managing up, managing staff, and maximizing influence and impact. CBNP designed the interactive training curriculum in conjunction with Community Resource Exchange (CRE), who facilitated the sessions. During the final four months, students participate in a monthly Peer Learning Network. These four-hour interactive training sessions allow them to continue to learn from and network with their nonprofit peers. Participants who complete the program earn a certificate from Hostos Community College.

 

  1. The Executive Director’s Peer Learning Network (PLN), which meets monthly for six, 3.5-hour peer-to-peer interactive sessions, will run from September 2017 to February 2018. PLNs are considered a valuable approach to building nonprofit capacity, as participants learn necessary lessons and build skills that support their leadership success while strengthening their capacity to address specific issues. Facilitated PLNs help peers learn to problem solve from each other on issues of mutual concern. ED PLNs are highly focused, addressing specific organizational challenges that each participant brings to the group. As such, groups are intentionally kept small. After program completion, alumni have opportunities for in-person or web check-ins with CBNP to continue peer learning.

With the help of generous funders, including Booth Ferris, CBNP has created a much needed capacity building resource in an under-resourced community, where none existed before, to bolster the success of nonprofits and their current and future leadership. To date, CBNP has trained 20-25 nonprofit middle managers and 10-15 executive directors per cohort, totaling 70-80 participants across cohorts.

More about the Center for Bronx Nonprofits (CBNP)
The mission of CBNP is to impact the Bronx community’s quality of life by strengthening the capacity of the borough’s nonprofits. CBNP strengthens Bronx nonprofits’ individual and collective effectiveness by facilitating opportunities for leadership and organizational development, technical skills training, and networking and knowledge resource sharing. It provides nonprofit leaders with capacity building programming, focusing on topics such as succession planning, leadership development and evaluation and data analysis. Additionally, it hosts public conversations and forums on topics of importance to both the borough and the city at large. Since CBNP was established in 2012 within the Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development at Hostos Community College, it has served as a vital support organization to Bronx-based and Bronx-serving nonprofits, with more than 1,400 nonprofit staff members participating in its events to date. CBNP is now well-positioned to expand its two pilot Leadership Programs serving Bronx nonprofit middle managers and executive directors, and so requests the support of the Booth Ferris Foundation.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Sorensen Center to Host Events on Racial Discrimination, Socially Conscious Art, Corruption

The Sorensen Center for International Peace and Justice kicked off the semester with a Critical Voices: From Local to Global event featuring advisory board member Gay McDougall on September 7, 2017. McDougall is a member of the UN Committee on Racial Discrimination which recently issued an “early warning” to the U.S. regarding its response to the events in Charlottesville. McDougall engaged in a conversation with Professor Victor Goode. The event was co-sponsored by the CUNY Black Law Students Association (BLSA). Find out more

Along with a handful of other organizations, the Sorensen Center organized a conversation with Commissioner Mary Bassett of the New York City Department of Mental Hygiene about discrimination as a public health threat to take place on September 12, 2017. Find out more

On Thursday, September 14, 2017 the Sorensen Center will officially launch 1001 Voices, the public window installation by Queens-based artists Judith Sloan and Warren Lehrer celebrating CUNY Law’s commitment to support and protect immigrants through clinics, community partnerships, scholarship, student groups, and work of our alumni.  Find out more

Preet Bharara, former U.S. attorney for the Southern District will join David Hoffman and Juliet Sorensen to discuss public corruption and the rule of law on September 19, 2017. The conversation will be moderated by WNYC’s Brian Lehrer. Find out more


Queens College Marks the Start of Academic Year 2017-18 with Residence Hall Enhancements and Expanded Academic Offerings

Flushing, Queens, September 11, 2017—“Each year, The Summit Apartments at Queens College focuses on renewing and/or replacing various amenities to maintain a quality living experience,” says Sean Pierce, director of the eight-year-old residence hall, which provides housing for Queens College students and others enrolled at CUNY colleges. “This summer, we completed a $100,000 common-area upgrade that includes new lounge furniture throughout the building and a new ping-pong table. We installed new flooring and air conditioning in the fitness center, engaged a new laundry service vendor, and added a print station to the lobby. Living on campus increases in popularity each year; The Summit has had a waiting list for two years.”

Whether they live on campus or commute, all Queens College students will have even more academic options this semester. “Queens College has for eighty years provided high-quality educational opportunities for the people of our City and State. We are especially pleased to build upon our attractive academic offerings with more new and exciting programs that will prepare our students for success in continuing their education or embarking on a career,” said President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

  • Long a leader in teacher training, Queens College has introduced an MS in Science         Education. The only graduate program of its kind in New York State, this degree prepares secondary school teachers to teach both math and computer science.
  • Building on its innovative graduate program in Data Analytics and Applied Social Research, the college has launched a dual Sociology BA/MA in Data Analytics, as well as a minor in Data Analytics. Knowledge of this field is excellent preparation for careers in business and management.
  • A BS in Economics is now being offered for students planning to go to graduate school in economics.
  • Queens College’s new Social Medicine minor, created by the Urban Studies Department, explores an area that is destined to become increasingly important in the future: the economic, social, environmental, and political factors that shape the health of individuals and communities.
  • A new Media Studies course, Technology Development Lab—led by digital pioneer Douglas Rushkoff—will help participants develop their own technology concepts from the idea to prototype stage. Guest industry experts will help students explore precedents and influences, choose platforms, develop user scenarios, determine market fit, write wireframes, evaluate social, economic, and environmental impact, prepare and rehearse proposals, build prototypes, and then participate in a live pitch before a panel of funders and technologists. Up to three projects will be identified as promising ventures and those students will be invited to participate as members of the college’s Tech Incubator, the first of its kind in the borough.
  • The college’s Graduate School of Library and Information Studies has revamped its certificate program in Archives and Preservation of Cultural Materials. This certificate complements dual master’s degree programs offered in conjunction with the History Department.
  • One more certificate program making its debut, Italian Culture for the 21st Century, examines all things made in Italy, and will serve as a gateway for the study of Italian in contemporary and international contexts. Internships with the Italian Trade Commission will be available through the program.

In addition to The Summit Apartments improvements, students will benefit from a newly renovated on-campus television studio as part of their Media Studies courses; classroom, lab, and lecture hall upgrades; and extensive building upgrades.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its eighty years of service to the City and State through its outstanding liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its 19,000+ students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report’s Best College and a Forbes magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact: Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


MACAULAY HONORS COLLEGE AND THE GRADUATE CENTER, CUNY OFFER A NEW BACHELOR’S TO MASTER’S PIPELINE PROGRAM

Students Will Have the Opportunity to Begin CUNY Master’s Degree Studies
As They Complete Their Macaulay Bachelor’s Degree

Macaulay Honors College and the Graduate Center, CUNY announce the launch of a unique new pathway to a Master’s degree in liberal arts for eligible Macaulay students. Motivated Juniors and Seniors in good standing who are interested in graduate study in the humanities or social sciences may earn up to 12 credits in the Graduate Center’s MA in Liberal Studies (MALS) program as they complete their Bachelor’s degree.

 

Macaulay students may, in their junior year, apply to the MALS program. If provisionally accepted, these students will be permitted to take up to 12 credits toward the MA degree during their last three semesters at Macaulay. They may then complete the remaining 18 credits—and the MA degree—in just one year after the BA degree.

According to Dr. Joseph Ugoretz, Macaulay’s Chief Academic Officer, “The Macaulay curriculum, with its emphasis on experiential learning, interdisciplinary exploration and deep critical analysis, provides our students the perfect platform to begin a graduate education. We’re glad to partner with our colleagues in the MALS program to create a smooth pathway for our students to move ahead with their educations.”

Macaulay students have already expressed a great deal of interest in the new program. “Being able to enroll in graduate-level courses is very appealing to our motivated, high-achieving students,” explains Dr. Ugoretz. “But they will also have the chance to reduce the cost of Master’s study.”

The new pipeline program provides CUNY with a way to retain some of its most promising students. “We are very excited to have created a formalized pipeline program between Macaulay Honors College and the MALS program,” adds Dr. Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis, the program’s Acting Executive Officer. “It is a wonderful opportunity for Macaulay students to get a taste of interdisciplinary graduate study.”

 

About Macaulay Honors College

 

Ranked as one of the top ten honors colleges in the nation, Macaulay provides exceptional students with a rigorous education drawing on the vast academic resources of the nation’s largest urban university and the rich, cultural diversity of New York City. Our students represent the top 4% of the 13,000+ incoming freshmen on eight CUNY campuses, including Brooklyn, City, Hunter, John Jay, Lehman, and Queens Colleges, and the College of Staten Island. For more information, see macaulay.cuny.edu

 

About CUNY Master’s in Liberal Studies Program

The MA in Liberal Studies Program is a thirty-credit interdisciplinary degree program that allows students to design and pursue individual courses of study at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The program offers more than 20 different tracks of study. http://bit.ly/2f16heu


CCNY announces consolidated department of Anthropology, Gender Studies and International Studies

Anthropology, Gender and International Studies department chair Irina Carlota “Lotti” Silber, left, joined by International Studies director Sarah Muir, center, and Gender Studies director Asale Angel-Ajani.

The City College of New York is proud to announce the merger of the Anthropology department with two programs, International Studies and Women’s Studies, into one integrated department within the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership.

While each area of study will retain its defined majors and minors, the union of three disciplines recognizes existing synergies and offers increased resources. “One of the motivating aspects is that there are so many productive intersections between gender, anthropology and international studies,” said Sarah Muir, Ph.D., director of International Studies. “We anticipate students will see new possibilities in classes and in interests, both in college and afterwards.”
“It’s an exciting time to heighten the organic relationship between disciplines and to thoughtfully, and with integrity, build community,” said Irina Carlota ‘Lotti’ Silber, Ph.D., anthropology chair and chair of the new department encompassing all three areas of study.
“As a campus consistently addressing issues such as inequality, migration, social justice, globalization and diversity, we are incredibly unique,” said Asale Angel-Ajani, Ph.D., director of Women’s Studies. “We are broadly connected across different backgrounds, cross cultural perspectives, and fields of study.”
“We were looking for a departmental home for International Studies and the Women’s and Gender Studies,” said CCNY Interim President Vince Boudreau. “These programs had existed outside of departmental structures and that meant they were often under-resourced. At the same time, the emphasis on culture in the Anthropology department aligned well with some of the major theoretical themes in International Studies and Women and Gender Studies. As a fairly small department, Anthropology seemed likely to benefit from the infusion of these two programs. It was a decision that made sense both in terms of the programs’ substantive focus and its management.”
“Teaching and mentoring our amazing students is our priority,” said Silber. “As AGIS [Anthropology, Gender and International Studies], we are poised to bring together student and faculty interests and perspectives on critical global issues and create a welcoming space for scholarship and action.”
Faculty members in the newly created department include professors Asha Samad-Matías, Matthew Reilly, Ph.D., and Stanley Thangaraj, Ph.D.
Irina Carlota ‘Lotti’ Silber, Ph.D., will chair the new department encompassing all three disciplines. Her book, Everyday Revolutionaries: Gender, Violence and Disillusionment in Postwar El Salvador (2011) received the 2013 International Latino Book Award in the category of Best First Book, Nonfiction.
Sarah Muir, Ph.D., examines the practical logics of economic investment, ethical evaluation, and political critique, with a particular focus on social class and financial crisis. She is currently finishing a book entitled Exhaustion: The Politics of Routinized Crisis, which examines the everyday politics of the Argentine middle class in the wake of a century of financial crises.
Asale Angel-Ajani, Ph.D., has traveled from West Africa to South America witnessing the impact of drug trafficking and civil war on the lives of women. She has worked with a variety of human rights organizations, including the United Nations Human Rights Commission and Amnesty International. She is the author of Strange Trade: the Story of Two Women Who Risked Everything in the International Drug Trade.
About the Colin Powell School 
Inaugurated in 2013, the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership comprises the five departments of anthropology, economics, political science, psychology and sociology, and dynamic interdisciplinary programs. The School offers a wide variety of traditional and interdisciplinary undergraduate and graduate degrees and houses the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology offered by the CUNY Graduate Center. The Colin Powell School’s hallmark values of service and leadership permeate every aspect of its work and animate City College’s unflagging and historic commitment to access and excellence.
About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Borough President honors CCNY educator Terri N. Watson

Terri Watson (center) holds her citation. Left is Maurizio Trevisan, Dean of the CUNY School of Medicine at CCNY, and Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer.

In an effort increase the number of health professionals from Harlem and to improvehealth outcomes in the community, Terri N. Watson, a City College of New York educator,co-created the CCNY-based Growing Our Own Doctor’s Project. For that, the Harlemnative is an honoree at the 48th Annual African-American Day Parade on Sept. 17. Healthcare is this year’s theme.

“As part of our Parade celebration we are recognizing and honoring the contributions of African American leaders in health care, including doctors, innovators, administrators and community leaders,” said Gale A. Brewer, Borough President of Manhattan, who presented Watson with a citation.

Brewer, Watson, Borough of Manhattan staff and volunteers will march in the parade starting at 1 p.m. at 111th Street and traveling up to Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. to 136th Street and Malcom X Blvd.

An assistant professor in the City College School of Education’s Department of Leadership and Special Education, Watson and Erica Friedman, deputy dean and medical professor in the CUNY School of Medicine at CCNY, obtained the grant that established the G.O.O.D. Project.

The project seeks to increase the number of students who graduate from the CCNY-based A. Philip Randolph Campus High School and choose health professional careers. Another objective is to improve the health outcomes of Harlem residents. The G.O.O.D. Project is modeled after the Sophie Davis Health Professions Mentorship Program, a health professions pipeline program at City College.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN COMMEMORATING ANNIVERSARY OF 9/11

“The City University of New York remembers with sadness those we lost September 11, 2001, including cherished members of our CUNY community.

“As we keep those we lost in our hearts, let us also honor the firefighters and police officers who raced into danger that terrible day and saved countless lives. And we pay tribute to the courage, commitment and sacrifice of the men and women of the United States armed forces who have fought to preserve our freedoms and liberty in the wake of those horrific terrorist attacks.”

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Conservatory of Music Professor Malcolm Merriweather Sees Choral Training as a Step Toward Preparing Global Citizens

By AUDREY M. PETERSON

When Malcolm Merriweather entered the Pope Paul VI Hall at the Vatican this past August with 60 young choir members from Haiti, he expected it to be hushed, reverent. “It was like a rock concert,” he says. “Everyone was shouting and waving flags from their countries and chanting the pope’s name in their own languages. It was moving to see.” The choristers, ranging in ages from 9 to 15, sang back up as renowned tenor Andrea Bocelli performed for Pope Francis I.

Merriweather, who began teaching at Brooklyn College in 2015, joined the faculty full-time this fall as an assistant professor, and director of choruses and coordinator of voice studies in the Conservatory of Music. He is also the creative director of “Voices of Haiti,”  a program that offers 60 promising students from the capital city of Port-au-Prince training in choral singing. He conceived of the project after being approached by the president of the Andrea Bocelli Foundation to create program that would align with a foundation initiative aimed at exposing children from underserved communities to cultures outside of their own. Having worked with Bocelli training adult choirs to sing with the tenor, Merriweather was tapped as the best man for the job.

Brooklyn College Assistant Professor Malcolm Merriweather says that the opportunity to mentor and impact the lives of students both here and abroad makes his work as an artist and scholar even more rewarding.

“The curriculum has singing at its foundation, but there is much more,” says Merriweather of the program, which is housed in a Port-au-Prince school. “Before we went to Italy, we brought Voices of Haiti to New York. Last September, they performed at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center and for Tony Bennett’s 90th birthday concert at Radio City Music Hall, which included stars like Stevie Wonder and Lady Gaga.” The choir also sang at the Childhood Foundation Conference at the United Nations. For the young Haitians, the visit to New York City was the first time they had traveled outside their homeland. “The program is about learning discipline, camaraderie, and self-expression.” It can also be a stepping stone to future success for the students.

Perhaps not a small part of Merriweather’s motivation in creating the program has come from the support and opportunities he himself received as a youth. The oldest of three children, he grew up in the suburbs of Grand Island, situated in the Niagara River, just outside of Buffalo, New York. He first sang in the high school choir, then in the Men and Boys choir at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Buffalo. His parents ferried him to rehearsals three times a week. “My family was not musical themselves, but very supportive” he says. Merriweather went on to earn a bachelor of music in music education from Syracuse University and a master’s degree in choral conducting, and voice performance and literature at Eastman School of Music. He holds a doctor of musical arts in conducting from the Manhattan School of Music.

Since coming to Brooklyn College, Merriweather has been teaching and conducting. He is artistic director for the Conservatory Singers, comprised of 16 members performing works from the Renaissance through the present; the glee club, a group of 30 students “singing everything from Bach to Beatles;” and a 60-member Symphonic Choir made up of students, faculty, and staff. “We perform the great choral orchestra masterworks like Handel’s Messiah,” says Merriweather.

Next semester, he will be teaching a course called Voice Production, which focuses on group vocal techniques and conducting gesture. When not conducting or instructing, he also observes the conservatory’s music education students in their student teaching placements. The baritone also finds himself on the other side of the conductor’s baton performing solo engagements.

His enthusiasm for being a part of a campus that prepares engaged, global citizens is clear, as is his love of mentoring, both in Haiti and at Brooklyn College.

“I’m training two Haitian conductors—Wenson Delice and Johanne Francois,” says Merriweather. “They rehearse the Voices of Haiti choir when I cannot be in Port-au-Prince during the regular school year. I brought them to Brooklyn College this past May and they performed with the Conservatory Singers at the Cornel West Concerto, conducted by Professor Arturo O’Farrill, director of jazz ensembles and jazz studiesat the conservatory. “Wenson and Johanne shadowed me the entire time they were on campus. They love being here and want very much to come back.”

For a schedule of conservatory performances, visit the Brooklyn College events calendar and click on “Performances.”

Click here for more on Merriweather’s future events and performances, including his role as baritone soloist for the world premiere of Paul Moravec’s Sanctuary Road, an oratorio about the Underground Railroad.

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Professor Tracy Dennis-Tiwary Receives Major Grant to Study Adolescent Anxiety

Hunter psychology professor Dr. Tracy Dennis-Tiwary has been awarded a $1.59 millionProfessor Tracy Dennis-Tiwary Receives Major Grant to Study Adolescent Anxiety grant to study adolescent anxiety. Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the research will be jointly conducted at Hunter and the New York University Langone Health’s Child Study Center.

For many people, adolescence is a time when anxiety emerges at its fullest throttle; this developmental period, which comes with its own stressors and difficulties, can be particularly difficult for people prone to anxiety. The study will examine a novel target of intervention for anxious youth, the anxiety-related attention bias, which is the propensity to over-focus attention on fear-based thoughts and potential threats in the environment. Using an innovative combination of brain-based and behavioral methods, the primary aim is to establish core subtypes of attention bias in anxious adolescents, and test links with specific anxiety symptoms. Once these subtypes are better understood and more easily identified, early detection and treatment of anxiety for this vulnerable population and prevention of adult mental health problems will be strengthened.

Professor Dennis-Tiwary will collaborate with researchers from NYU and Fordham University, and her research team will include both Master’s and undergraduate students from Hunter’s psychology department. For more information about Professor Dennis-Tiwary’s work, visit her website: http://www.dennis-tiwary.com


CUNY CULTURAL CORPS EXPANDS IN ITS SECOND YEAR, NEARLY DOUBLING THE NUMBER OF PAID STUDENT INTERNSHIPS WITH NYC CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS  

Over 127 CUNY students will begin paid internships with 62 partner organizations

More than 220 students have participated in the program since it launched in 2016

New York – Today the City University of New York (CUNY), the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA), and the Rockefeller Foundation announced the launch of the second year of the CUNY Cultural Corps. The Cultural Corps places students in paid internship positions with New York City nonprofit cultural institutions – exposing students to opportunities and future careers in the arts and expanding the cultural community’s engagement with CUNY’s diverse pool of talent.

“CUNY students are the future of this city, the cultural center of the world, and it is critical that they have the opportunity to experience and pursue careers with New York’s renowned cultural institutions,” said CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken. “These institutions can only benefit from the multifaceted talents, diverse perspectives, energy and commitment that our students bring.  And internships are increasingly important as part of the educational experience and as a leg up in a competitive market. This program is a win for everyone.”

“Cultural organizations are the cornerstones of neighborhoods in all five boroughs, and it’s essential that cultural staff and programming reflect and engage with the communities that are the source of their strength,” said Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl. “The CUNY Cultural Corps is an extraordinary program that connects our cultural sector with an amazing group of students. I’ve watched the program grow over the first year, and meeting with Corps members has given me enormous confidence in the future of our city and cultural sector. I look forward to watching this new group of students grow into their new roles at institutions across the city.”

The kickoff celebration is Sept. 8 from 1 to 4 p.m. at Borough of Manhattan Community College’s Tribeca Performing Arts Center. The event also marks the fifth year of the CUNY Service Corps, which provides students paid internships and work experience at government agencies and not-for-profit organizations.

The Cultural Corps began in 2016 as a response to the city’s demographic survey of the DCLA’s grantees. The survey found that the staffs of cultural organizations fail to reflect the diversity of the city itself: 38 percent of cultural organization employees identified as people of color compared with 67 percent of city residents. Similar patterns hold for other categories such as gender identity and disability.

The Cultural Corps aims to be a strong student pipeline for successful alumni into New York City’s arts and culture institutions, expanding the pool of talented students that have access to employment opportunities in these organizations. These institutions include nonprofit cultural organizations involved in the visual, literary and performing arts as well as public-oriented science and humanities institutions including zoos, botanical gardens and historic and preservation societies. The CUNY Cultural Corps is supported with funds from The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the Rockefeller Foundation totaling $1,500,000 over both years.

Continued support for the CUNY Cultural Corps is a key recommendation of CreateNYC, the City’s first comprehensive cultural plan, published in July 2017. The Cultural Corps is one of the primary initiatives in the plan aimed at increasing the inclusiveness of cultural workforce, expanding groups’ access to new talent and helping to ensure that cultural programming connects with all New Yorkers.

“New York is the world’s greatest college campus, our cultural institutions are the world’s greatest classrooms, and this program allows young New Yorkers to take advantage of these unbelievable resources,” said Patrick Brennan, chief of staff of the Rockefeller Foundation. “CUNY has always been a launching pad for talented New Yorkers, and this program helps to give them the fuel they need to succeed.”

This academic year, 127 students representing 16 CUNY colleges – 13 senior and comprehensive colleges and three community colleges – will be placed in internships with 62 cultural partners in all five boroughs, ranging from the American Museum of Natural History, New York City Ballet and Brooklyn Botanic Garden to the Academy of American Poets, Socrates Sculpture Park, Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling, Thalia Spanish Theatre, Staten Island Museum and Bronx Museum of the Arts.

Last year, 67 Cultural Corps members completed one-year part-time internships with 31 institutions participating. Eleven students stayed on for additional paid internship positions or were hired as part-time and full-time employees.  Additionally, the CUNY Cultural Corps Summer Intensive program provided 22 CUNY alumni interested in pursuing a career in arts and culture with two-month, full-time paid internships at 16 cultural venues. So far, four have been offered extended engagements.

Participant Stories

According to participants, the internships can be life changing.

Katarina Rodriguez, who graduated last spring from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, interned at Carnegie Hall as a Social Impact Programs Fellow. The experience has sparked an interest in teaching. As “a teacher of the arts,” she wants to “engage with different forms of creative expression whether it be songwriting, or poetry or looking at how creative expression allows people to heal and to embrace themselves and come out stronger.”

The partnering cultural institutions have also seen the energy, talent, and new perspectives that Corps members bring to their work. At the Public Theater, Ciara Murphy, director of strategic research and planning, praised recent City Tech graduate Olesea Galusca, who contributed to audience research as a Research and Planning intern.

“The quality of Olesea’s work and enthusiasm is second to none,” Murphy said. “Olesea is making the invaluable contribution of helping The Public to better understand those we serve by making sure their stories are shared with our current staff, and archived for future researchers. Many thanks to everyone at CUNY Cultural Corps for matching us with such gifted students.”

About CUNY

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

About NYC Department of Cultural Affairs

The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is dedicated to supporting and strengthening New York City’s vibrant cultural life. Among our primary missions is to ensure adequate public funding for non-profit cultural organizations, both large and small, throughout the five boroughs.

DCLA also works to promote and advocate for quality arts programming and to articulate the contribution made by the cultural community to the City’s economic vitality. The Department represents and serves non-profit cultural organizations involved in the visual, literary and performing arts; public-oriented science and humanities institutions including zoos, botanical gardens and historic and preservation societies; and creative artists at all skill levels who live and work within the City’s five boroughs.

Contacts:          Frank Sobrino, (646) 664-9300 (CUNY)

Ryan Max, publicaffairs@culture.nyc.gov, 212-513-9323 (Cultural Affairs)

Erissa Scalera, escalera@rockfound.org, 212-852-8430 (Rockefeller Foundation)

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ICYMI: Don’t shut the door on promise

New York Amsterdam News
by Chancellor Milliken & Board Chairperson Thompson

Throughout its history the City University of New York has delivered remarkably well on a straightforward promise to all New Yorkers – regardless of wealth, race or national origin, if you give us your best efforts, we will give you the opportunity to reach your dreams. The real genius behind CUNY’s mission is not simply the high-quality education we provide, at a cost far below other universities, but it’s what our remarkable students accomplish with this opportunity. Our graduates, most of whom are from immigrant, low-income and minority groups, have won 13 Nobel Prizes; more MacArthur genius awards than any other public university except Berkeley, Rhodes and Truman; and Fulbright scholarships by the dozen. Even more importantly, CUNY graduates, including the newest Americans, have become successful New Yorkers, supporting families, communities and this nation.

The experience at CUNY and other universities is one of the reasons why so many Americans are objecting, in the strongest possible terms, to President Trump’s badly misguided decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which exemplifies much of what is right about our country. The program allows foreign-born Americans who were brought to this country as children to defer action on their undocumented status and work and study – and contribute – to their communities. The strength of the program is what talented, ambitious young people do with their opportunities.

We see it every day at CUNY. Our university, with the backing of TheDream.US scholarship program, has been the leader in providing private financial support to DACA students—720 current students have received these scholarships These students have proven among the most creative and talented voices in the CUNY community, exhibiting the kind of drive we need to keep New York competitive in the challenging 21st century economy.

What is particularly troubling is that the political calculations behind the president’s decision are contrary to the spirit that has brought our country so much prosperity and success. America’s greatness is a product of unwavering optimism – but the president’s decision embraces a dark, pessimistic view that there’s only so much success to go around and so we should not be willing to share it. American history and CUNY’s record of achievement have proven over and over that such shortsighted thinking is wrong. Great new Americans create even greater wealth and opportunity.

The reality is that America thrives when we are open to, nurture and embrace innovation and new ideas—when we question old ways of doing things and empower our best thinkers to come up with better solutions. Businesses grow when they seek out new markets, promote ambitious leaders and reward risk takers. Communities grow stronger when they welcome newcomers who bring fresh cultures and new perspectives.

We will continue to stand up for the values and principles that provide the backbone of American success, not simply because it is the right thing to do—which it is—but because it is the key to a more prosperous and harmonious future. CUNY is fully committed to our thousands of DACA students and will do all it can to support them, including counseling and legal guidance and financial aid.

The welcome we offer to DACA students, and the contributions they make in return as neighbors, co-workers and proud Americans, represent the best of our country’s values and traditions. We hope Congress will embrace the time-tested values of openness and opportunity, not slam the door shut on the promise of a better future for all of us.

James B. Milliken is the chancellor of the City University of New York. William C. Thompson, Jr., is the chairperson of the board of trustees of the City University of New York.


CCNY engineering professor Michel Ghosn wins international award

CCNY civil engineering professor Michel Ghosn is the winner of the 2017 IASSAR Research Award.

Michel Ghosn, a civil engineering professor in The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, is the winner of the 2017 IASSAR Research Award. The award is presented every four years by the International Association on Structural Safety and Reliability at its quadrennial meeting.

IASSAR promotes the study, research, and applications of scientific principles of safety, risk and reliability in the analysis, design, construction, maintenance and operations of structures and other engineering systems.

Ghosn is an expert in the areas of structural reliability and system safety with a particular emphasis on bridge structures. This includes analysis and quantification of structural redundancy and robustness of bridge systems; development of load and resistance factor specifications and development of advanced techniques for the reliability assessment of bridge structural systems.

The IASSAR Research Award is the latest honor for his outstanding research.

Some of Ghosn’s previous accolades include the 2013 IABSE Prize for best scientific paper from the International Association of Bridge and Structural Engineers; and the 2010 IABMAS Prize from the International Association for Bridge Management and Safety.

He is currently the chairman of the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Technical Council on Life-Cycle Performance, Safety, Reliability and Risk of Structural Systems.

Ghosn received the CCNY President’s 2016 Award for Outstanding Faculty Service in the Grove School of Engineering.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center Presents “Person Place Thing”

The BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center is proud to partner with host Randy Cohen for his “Person Place Thing” podcast and radio show. The first featured guest is Jack Kleinsinger on Friday, October 20 at 7 p.m. Tickets to the recording are $10 and available online, at the door and by phone at (212) 220-1460.

Upcoming shows in this series include Woody King, Jr. (March 6, 2018) and Randy Weston (April 3, 2018).

“Person Place Thing” is an interview show recorded around New York and based on this idea: People are particularly engaging when they speak not about themselves, but about something they care about. Guests talk about one person, one place and one thing that is important to them. The result? Surprising stories from great talkers. This show is taped and will broadcast at a later date on public radio throughout the Northeast (WNYE, 91.5 FM in NYC), as well made available online.

Randy Cohen, creator and host of “Person Place Thing” began his career writing humor pieces, essays and stories for newspapers and magazines such as The New Yorker, Harpers and The Atlantic. He won three Emmys for his writing on “Late Night With David Letterman” and a fourth Emmy for his work on Michael Moore’s TV Nation. For 12 years he wrote “The Ethicist,” a weekly column for the New York Times Magazine. In 2010, his first play, “The Punishing Blow,” ran at New York’s Clurman Theater. His most recent book, “Be Good: How to Navigate the Ethics of Everything,” was published by Chronicle.

Jazz impresario Jack Kleinsinger was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters from the University of North Florida and is a former Assistant Attorney General of the State of New York. Kleinsinger started producing “Highlights in Jazz” — the longest-running, continuous jazz series in the history of New York City — 45 years ago. He has produced many concerts in New York City schools, colleges and prisons, and co-produced programs for the Newport and New York Jazz festivals as well as for the Jazz Festival in Nice, France. His honors and awards include the 1997 JVC Jazz Festival concert, “Thanks to Jack Kleinsinger for 25 Years of Highlights in Jazz,” the Charlie Parker Memorial Award presented at the 52nd Street Americana Festival, and a proclamation by Manhattan Borough President C. Viginia Fields designating February 5 as Jack Kleinsinger Day in the borough.

BMCC Tribeca PAC is Downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families and audiences of all ages. BMCC Tribeca PAC strives to present a broad global perspective through the presentation of high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. Located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue and West Street, the theatre is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R/W subway lines and the New Jersey Path Train. For more information visit www.tribecapac.org.


Vice President Bergmann Honored as a National Trailblazer in Digital Education

Ronald Bergmann, Lehman’s Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer, has been named as one of the nation’s Top 30 Technologists, Transformers and Trailblazers by the Center for Digital Education (CDE). The award recognizes education and technology leaders in the United States who are transforming the educational landscape through the use of digital tools.

Bergmann was selected along with the other winners based on their “efforts to improve education through the effective implementation of technology-rich solutions, their impact on student outcomes, and their overall initiative, creativity and leadership skills,” according to the CDE’s statement.

“Our winners have shown an immense amount of passion and courage as they take on education in an era that encompasses rapid changes, said Dr. Kecia Ray, the CDE’s executive director. “I am thrilled to recognize this outstanding group for their work, and wish them the best as they continue to push the field forward with education technology.”

Among his many accomplishments at Lehman, Bergmann played a key role in establishing the College’s new Virtual Reality Training Academy and Development Lab with the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. The Lab began classes in May 2017, and is a first of a kind facility in the region. The lab was recently awarded a grant from the New York City Economic Development Corporation and will partner with NYU’s Media Lab to support workforce development in the burgeoning fields of virtual and augmented reality. Bergmann and his staff are also about to pilot a new platform, called Lehman 360, that will provide enhanced information to students, faculty, and advisors.

The Center for Digital Education is a California-based national research and advisory institute that focuses on K-12 and higher education technology trends, policy and funding.

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013
joseph.tirella@lehman.cuny.edu


Rommi Smith, British Parliament’s Writer-in-Residence, performs at CCNY

Renowned British poet and playwright Rommi Smith performs at CCNY.

City College of New York’s MFA in Creative Writing Program, whose mentors have ranged from literary great Donald Barthelme to distinguished poet Marilyn Hacker, welcomes British playwright, poet and the U.K. Parliament’s inaugural Writer-in-Residence Rommi Smith for a talk and reading. Her talk, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 12, in the Rifkind Room (NAC 6/316) is entitled “Our Voices, Ourselves.” On Wednesday, Sept. 13, Smith will give a reading and performance from 5 p.m. in Shepard Hall room 250. Both events are free and open to the public.

In addition to her parliamentary residence, Smith has held other notable residencies. They include Inaugural Poet-in-Residence at Keats House and British Council Poet-in-Residence at California State University in Los Angeles.

Smith featured in Melvyn Bragg’s landmark BBC Radio 4 series, “The Matter of the North.” She was interviewed by Lord Melvyn Bragg about the life and travels of Frederick Douglass, the famed abolitionist, orator and writer.

Her honors include a Hedgebrook Fellowship in the United States; the Elizabeth George Award for women funded by the crime writer, Elizabeth George, and a John Barnard Scholarship at the University of Leeds.

Rommi is a librettist for a feminist reworking of Schubert’s “Die Schone Mullerin,” a collaboration with celebrated British Baritone Roderick Williams OBE, and composer Emily Levy. The piece premieres in Stratford-Upon-Avon, William Shakespeare’s birthplace in England, on September 27.

Smith’s MFA talk and reading/performances are sponsored by CCNY’s Rifkind Center for the Humanities and Arts and the Kenneth Kowald Fund for Advancing American Literature. For more information on the events,  please email mvalladares@ccny.cuny.edu.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Legendary Art Director Celebrated, Works Exhibited at City College

Original sketch by George Lois

Esquire cover designed by George Lois

The work of groundbreaking art director George Lois will be on display at The City College of New York and celebrated with an opening reception on Tuesday, September 12.

Lois, considered the original “Mad Man” of advertising, donated a portion of his archive, a collection reflecting 60 years of American culture and social evolution, to City College (CCNY) in 2016. He chose the college as the home of his archive in recognition of CCNY’s media arts program and its history in helping talented students from diverse backgrounds succeed. This collection contains original layout sketches for 27 of the most iconic Esquire covers, which have never been available.
The exhibition of the collection will be celebrated with an opening reception and talk on September 12 in the college’s Great Hall in Shepard Hall at 5:30 PM. Lois and the renowned photographer Platon will discuss their use of creativity to make jarring and prescient statements that address the issues of our times -civil rights, war, feminism, the role of art- at the crossroads of creativity, commerce and morality.
George Lois’ Esquire covers, part of the permanent collection of MoMA, represent the visual face of “New Journalism.” The unique archive at CCNY includes several Esquire covers, their draft forms, recording sessions, correspondences, and other materials.
“These works open up the opaque world of the creative process in advertising,” said City College’s Dean of Humanities Erec Koch. “The collection’s new home at CCNY introduces commercial art and the advertising profession to a student body that consists predominantly of historically underrepresented minorities.”
Lois also attended the former High School of Music and Art located on CCNY’s campus. “What better place for my work to reside than here,” George Lois said. “For me, I am coming home.”
The opening reception and talk as well as the month-long exhibition are free and open to the public. Find out more here.
About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.
City College is grateful to the Phillip and Edith Leonian Foundation and the 21st Century Foundation of The City College of New York for their support of students working on the George Lois Archive.

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Guttman Holds Sixth Summer Bridge Program and Convocation

Guttman Community College held its sixth Summer Bridge Program for incoming students August 21-September 1, 2017. Approximately 460 new students completed the required 10-day program and matriculated to begin classes in the Fall I 2017 session. Three groups of students took Bridge classes in the morning and three groups in the afternoon, corresponding to the six Houses in which first-year students are grouped in the fall. Danielle Insalaco-Egan, Director of Student Support and Academic Achievement, and Tashana Samuel, Assistant Professor of Psychology, were the 2017 Summer Bridge Program coordinators.

Summer Bridge helps incoming students transition to their first year at Guttman. During Summer Bridge, they learn what is expected of them academically and explore their strengths and challenges as learners. Students work with faculty, staff, and Peer Mentors to develop strategies for success and gain practice completing assignments similar to those that will be required during the first-year program. Summer Bridge is also a time of self-discovery as students develop relationships with faculty, staff, and fellow classmates while engaging in academic and co-curricular activities.

The common read book for this year’s program was The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie.

Among the activities held during the 2017 Bridge program:

  • A co-curricular common hour for students focusing on Guttman values, college student ideals and getting involved.
  • A field experience in Times Square where students posted photos to Instagram representing Poverty and Privilege.
  • A second off-campus field experience where students investigated poverty and privilege in a particular New York City neighborhood for their final research assignments.
  • Integrated student group project presentations from the voice of an assigned character from Sherman Alexie’s book made to the instructional teams and peers.

Summer Bridge concluded on September 1 with Convocation, when the College officially welcomed its sixth incoming class of 460 students.  The event began with an introduction from the Master of Ceremony and Dean of Student Engagement Charles H. Pryor, II, who welcomed the 2017 entering cohort to their new college journey. President Scott E. Evenbeck congratulated the 2017 entering cohort for completing its first College milestone: Summer Bridge. The 2017 Summer Bridge coordinators Danielle Insalaco-Egan and Tashana Samuel and Howard M. Wach, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost gave additional greetings.

Alia Tyner-Mullings, Assistant Professor of Sociology, gave the faculty address. Professor Tyner-Mullings advised students to manage their time and work efficiently by using a calendar, and to “get to know the College you.”

Arva Rice, President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York Urban League, gave the keynote address. She inspired students with her own story of perseverance and ambition. She encouraged everyone to make education a priority and “seize and seek opportunity.’ “Success is the best revenge. Ignore the nay-sayers,” she said.

Arva Rice giving the keynote address at the 2017 Convocation.

Arva Rice, President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York Urban League, gave the keynote address.

Student Government Association President Onasis Cirineo greeted the students on behalf of the SGA and lead the pinning ceremony, when students helped one other with their Guttman pins, symbolizing they are officially Guttman students (“This means I am Guttman, and Guttman is me.”). The event concluded with closing remarks by Amanda Webb, Class of 2014, and President Scott E. Evenbeck. The Door provided the musical accompaniment.


City Tech AIR Director Publishes Book on Enhancing Assessment in Higher Education

City Tech congratulates Dr. Tammie Cumming, director of the College’s Office of Assessment and Institutional Research, on the publication of her book, Enhancing Assessment in Higher Education​: Putting Psychometrics to Work, (Stylus Publishing), co-published with the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) and the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U), co-edited with M. David Miller, and Foreword by Michael J. Kolen.

Assessment and accountability are now inescapable features of the landscape of higher education, and ensuring that these assessments are psychometrically sound has become a high priority for accrediting agencies and, therefore, also for higher education institutions.

“My work with assessment of learning at City Tech has been inspired by the faculty commitment to quality assessments. They have worked hard to ensure the assessment process considers the important concepts of reliability, validity and fairness. It is very exciting—and rewarding—to have the opportunity to work with such talented faculty devoted to utilizing the data to improve student outcomes and help City Tech students reach their educational goals,” said Cumming.

Enhancing Assessment in Higher Education​ is guided by the core purpose of assessment—to provide faculty, administrators, and student affairs professionals with the information they need to increase student learning by making changes in policies, curricula, and other programs. It provides valuable tools and approaches for assessing student learning outcomes in higher education. The book is divided into three sections: overview, assessment in higher education, and case studies, and includes a glossary of key terms in the field.

Enhancing Assessment in Higher Education has already earned the endorsement of leaders in the assessment field:
“Good decision making at every level – classroom, program, institution – is advantaged by high quality, actionable data. The stellar cast of contributors to this timely volume offer a treasure trove of measurement principles, practices and applications that both assessment experts and those new to documenting student learning will find instructive and useful,” said George D. Kuh,
Chancellor’s Professor of Higher Education Emeritus, Indiana University.

Enhancing Assessment in Higher Education is a unique collection that marries contextually situated treatments of higher education assessment with in-depth examinations of reliability and validity. Cumming and Miller have assembled a valuable resource for both assessment practice and graduate training,” said Alexander C. McCormick, Director, National Survey of Student Engagement, and Associate Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Enhancing Assessment in Higher Education is a valuable addition to assessment practitioners’ bookshelves, especially for those who want a deeper understanding of the vocabulary and methods for evaluating the validity and reliability of their assessments of student learning,” 
said Linda Suskie, Assessment and Accreditation Consultant.

Dr. Tammie Cumming is a leading international figure in educational assessment and has recently served as a U.S. delegate for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes task force. In addition, she holds an adjunct appointment at The City University of New York Graduate Center in Educational Psychology and at Hunter College in Educational Foundations and Counseling. Dr. Cumming earned her PhD in Applied Statistics and Psychometrics from The University of Iowa.

About AAC&U: AAC&U is the leading national association concerned with the quality, vitality, and public standing of undergraduate liberal education. Its members are committed to extending the advantages of a liberal education to all students, regardless of academic specialization or intended career. Founded in 1915, the organization now comprises nearly 1,400 member institutions – including accredited public and private colleges, community colleges, research universities, and comprehensive universities of every type and size. For more information, visit www.aacu.org.


Top materials science award for CCNY’s Maria Tamargo

CCNY chemistry professor Maria Tamargo is the 2017 MBE Innovator Award winner.

Chemistry professor Maria Tamargo’s molecular beam epitaxy research at The City College of New York ranks among the most innovative in the field. The North American Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) Advisory Board has just recognized her stature in the field by selecting Tamargo its 2017 MBE Innovator Award recipient.  She will receive the honor at the North American MBE Conference (NAMBE) in Galveston, Texas, in October.

Established in 2004, this international award recognizes individuals whose innovative work has significantly advanced the field of molecular beam epitaxy. Recipients are highly distinguished scientists whose inventive work must have had/or continue to have a significant impact on the advancement of MBE technology.

Tamargo will receive a $3,000 prize, a plaque and the opportunity to give an invited talk at the NAMBE Conference.

Her citation reads:

“For advancing the growth of wide bandgap II-VI semiconductors by molecular beam epitaxy and demonstrating their unique physical properties and potential novel device applications.”

In addition to her faculty position in City College’s Division of Science, Tamargo is director of the National Science Foundation’s CREST Center for Interface Design and Engineered Assembly of Low-dimensional Systems, known by the acronym IDEALS.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Citi Foundation Renews Grant to Help BMCC Students Save for Success

The Citi Foundation has awarded BMCC a $60,000 grant for renewal of the Save for Success program, which was launched in Fall 2015. Save for Success is a financial education program that encourages students to save a portion of their financial aid and begin forming positive savings habits.

The 50 participating students will work with a financial counselor and program coordinator as they set up strategies to save money, design an educational plan and connect with offices at the college that can support their efforts. If participants successfully save for a full course ($600), they will receive a free, for-credit course during the BMCC winter or summer sessions.

The Save for Success program serves students from households with low to moderate income and who have at least a 2.5 GPA. They must be registered full-time for the Fall 2017 semester, and have completed close to 30 credits.

Strategies that build lifelong skills

“BMCC believes Save for Success impacts students’ financial behaviors in an important way,” says BMCC Dean of Student Affairs, Michael Hutmaker.

He explains that not only does the program provide skills and knowledge about saving, investing and spending, “It helps students learn ways to stretch their dollars. Students learn strategies to save and maximize their funds, such as reducing their spending or taking advantage of coupons, discounts, campus events and other programs. These are lifelong skills that will benefit them well beyond their time as a student.”

“BMCC is especially grateful to the Citi Foundation for its continued support of Save for Success,” says Brian C. Haller, Director of Foundation and Corporate Relations at BMCC.

The program offers students the opportunity “to look at their lives as a living financial model,” he says, “through which they can learn how to be more creative and effective in managing their financial resources. Dean Hutmaker and his team have been creative and successful in tweaking this program, so that participating students find countless teachable financial moments and lessons which will empower them financially throughout their lives.”

For more information about the Save for Success program at BMCC, contact Fausto Heredia, Program Coordinator at save@bmcc.cuny.edu or (212) 220-8000, x5093.


A STATEMENT FROM THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

The City University of New York was founded on the principal of equal access and opportunity for all.  For 170 years, we have represented the ideals of a nation built on aspiration, educating generations of children and grandchildren of immigrants who have achieved their dreams and advanced the nation’s essential values.  Our nation, like CUNY, has served as a beacon of hope for all people trying to make a better life for themselves and their families and any effort to deny such access should be strongly opposed.  The CUNY Board of Trustees fully supports any and all efforts to block the President’s misguided actions to wind down DACA.  We remain steadfastly committed to protecting and educating students in their pursuit of the American Dream, regardless of their status.  The hopes and aspirations of CUNY’s DACA students cannot be rescinded, extinguished or otherwise ended by political cynicism.

William C. Thompson, Jr., Chairman
Barry F. Schwartz, Vice Chairman
Michael Arvanites
Henry Berger
Una S. T-Clarke
Lorraine A. Cortes-Vazquez
Fernando Ferrer
Mayra Linares-Garcia
Kevin Kim
Robert F. Mujica, Jr.
Jill O’Donnell-Tormey
Brian Obergfell
Charles A. Shorter
Ken Sunshine
Sandra Wilkin
Katherine Conway
Chika Onyejiukwa

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Grades 6-12 Welcome Letter and Opening Procedures, 2017-2018

Dear NEST+m Grades 6-12 Students and Families,

We hope this message finds you well and enjoying the final days of summer.

As we approach the opening of our school year on Thursday, September 7, we want to inform you of some key elements of our opening procedures for the 2017-18 School Year:

Our school day begins at 8:20am and concludes at 2:40pm. Click here to see the 2017-2018 Bell Schedule.

Students in Grades 6-8 enter our school building through the courtyard ramp and swipe their ID Card at one of the CAASS machines in the lobby upon entry to the school building. Students in Grades 6-8 must be in their homeroom by 8:20am.

Students in Grades 9-12 enter our school building through the Columbia Street Entrance or Courtyard Ramp and swipe their ID Card at one of our CAASS machines next to the entrances. Students in Grades 9-12 must be in their first period class for attendance by 8:20am.

Any student that does not have a school issued ID may sign-in on a clip board next to any CAASS Machine. ID’s will be distributed to our new students during the school day.

All students may view and print their academic schedule via PupilPath. For incoming students, new to NEST+m, your PupilPath Registration letters have been mailed home and should be arriving to your homes soon. Please follow the directions on the letter to register and note that both students and parents need to register for this system as it will be our Gradebook of record as well as the site where students and families may check all grades, including report card grades, academic transcripts, attendance etc. Registration also enables the school Administration and Faculty to contact you by email. Please note all students and parents need separate PupilPath accounts.

Students: please be sure to print out or write down your schedule of classes and have it with you for the first day of school.

  • Grades 6-8: AP Hernon and Guidance Counselor Chen will be on the 3rd floor to help you find your homeroom
  • Grades 9-12: Any student who has trouble accessing their schedule or forgets to bring a copy of it on day one, may pick up a printout of their schedule between 8:00 am and 8:20 am from the Guidance Office (245). Please see either Stephanie Glickman or Katherine Silva for assistance.
  • For more information regarding student schedules and information on how to access PupilPath please click this link.

 

On the first days of school we will be distributing to students the following: Metrocards, School ID cards, Locker Agreements (Students need to have a master combination lock in hand to be assigned a hall locker– key locks are not acceptable), lunch forms, and Course Curriculum Letters. Please note, students may not take a locker without first completing a locker agreement form in their first period class. Additionally, 10th Grade students will not be permitted to go out to lunch until they have submitted the out of building lunch permission slip. These will be distributed and collected in your Social Studies/History classes the first week of school.

Supplies:

  • Students in Grades 6-8 can access their supply lists here.
  • All students in Grades 9-12 should come to school on day one with a bookbag, notebook, two combination locks, their summer reading assignments, and pens / pencils. Please note that as supplies needed for high school vary by class, we ask that families wait to purchase most supplies until in receipt of the course curriculum letters for each class.

We look forward to welcoming all students back to NEST+m on Thursday, September 7th.

 

Families: Save the Date—September 28th is our annual Curriculum Night, 4:45pm – 7:45pm.

 


Grades K-5 Welcome Letter and Opening Procedures, 2017-2018

August 2017

Dear Parents & Families:

The 2017-2018 school year begins on Thursday September 7, at 8:20AM. The entire faculty and staff at NEST+m is hard at work getting ready to kick off another great year! This letter contains important information regarding arrival and dismissal procedures for the first days of school.

Kindergarten Students

Our first day of school is a half day for all kindergarten students. Kindergarten students will be greeted by their teachers in the courtyard and then escorted into their classrooms. Parents are invited into their child’s classroom at 10:30 AM (morning session) and 1:45 PM (afternoon session) where your child will show you around his/her kindergarten class. Dismissal will take place in the courtyard immediately following.

  • Session I: Student last name A – L, 9:15 – 10:45 AM (courtyard line up beginning 9:00 AM)
  • Session II: Student last name M – Z, 12:30 – 2:00 PM (courtyard line up beginning 12:15PM)

Lunch is not served on the first half day of school for Kindergarten students. Lunch service for Kindergarten students begins on Friday, September 8. We recommend that Kindergarten students bring lunch from home on this day to alleviate some of the potential anxiety and ease transitions.

On Friday, September 8th, your child will again be greeted in the courtyard by their teacher. Beginning on Monday, September 11 Kindergarten students will enter our building through the Columbia Street entrance and proceed to the cafeteria. There will be school staff at the door to escort students into the cafeteria.

 

First – Fifth Grade Students

Our first day of school is a full day and lunch will be served. The school day runs from 8:20 AM – 2:40 PM. Please arrive in the courtyard between 8:00 and 8:20 AM. There will be clearly marked signs along the perimeter of the courtyard directing you to your designated line-up spot. There, your child will be met by their teacher and then escorted into the building. If your child is taking the public/private bus to school on the first day, they will be welcomed into the building and escorted to the cafeteria (1 – 2)/Auditorium (3-5). Students will then be brought to their classrooms.

On Friday, September 8th, grades 1 -2 will proceed to the cafeteria for line-up through the Columbia Street entrance and grades 3 – 5 will proceed to the auditorium for line-up. (As always breakfast is available for all students beginning at 7:30 AM in the cafeteria.)

DISMISSAL: Please fill out this dismissal form and bring to school the first day so that your child’s teacher knows how each student will be dismissed during the first week, Thursday-Friday. Also please fill out this September-January dismissal form, for Monday-Friday. On Thursday, dismissal will take place at your child’s line-up spot in the courtyard at the end of the day. If your child is taking the bus home, they will be brought to their designated bus line-up spot for dismissal. If your child is taking the private bus, we encourage you to add a tag to their backpack with the name and number of the private bus.

The value placed upon shared ownership of your child’s success in school is the foundation of our work.

Looking forward to a great year!

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz, Principal

 

 

 

 

 


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON PRESIDENT’S DECISION TO RESCIND DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS (DACA)

“The president’s decision on DACA threatens to push hundreds of thousands of undocumented Americans to the shadows of our society, leaving them at risk of deportation from what is, in most instances, the only country they know and the one they love and contribute to every day.   Unless Congress acts to remedy this disaster, it will crush dreams and tear apart families.

“We are fully committed to the thousands of CUNY DACA students and will do all we can to support them. They represent some of the most talented and creative voices in the CUNY community and our city. We will do everything we can to help persuade Congress to shore up support for the DACA community, not undermine it, and CUNY will provide counseling and guidance to help our DACA students with their needs and questions.

“CUNY, with the backing of TheDream.US, has been the leader in providing private support to DACA students, and we will continue to provide the financial support they need to succeed in college.  CUNY Citizenship Now! provides the nation’s most extensive university-based legal support program for immigrants and its experts are ready to advise our DACA students.

“The welcome we offer to these students – and the contributions they make in return as neighbors, co-workers and proud Americans – represent the best of our country’s values and traditions and should be supported.”

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JOSEPH UGORETZ NAMED CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER OF MACAULAY HONORS COLLEGE

 

Dean Mary C. Pearl today announced the appointment of Joseph Ugoretz, Ph.D., as Chief Academic Officer of Macaulay Honors College. In this role, Dr. Ugoretz will oversee the college’s academic mission and lead Macaulay in delivering instructional excellence.

“It is a pleasure to appoint Dr. Ugoretz to this important position at Macaulay,” says Dean Pearl. “He brings a proven track record of fostering new approaches to Macaulay’s core seminars in critical thinking, developing new upper-level courses, and leading our unique Instructional Technology Fellows program. His leadership ensures that our students will continue to be challenged by innovative teaching and learning methods. Dr. Ugoretz applies a special passion to his work, and has a richly varied instructional experience that includes students of highly diverse backgrounds.”

Dr. Ugoretz will direct a number of new initiatives, including launching a community college transfer program; enhancing experiential education opportunities for students; and expanding the college’s roster of fulltime faculty.

Dr. Ugoretz is eager to take on this new role. “Throughout my career,” he said, “my goal has been to provide opportunities for students to think deeply, describe accurately, question widely, argue persuasively and be open to new ideas that connect to and enrich their lived experience. I look forward to expanding Macaulay’s academic initiatives in these ways as the Chief Academic Officer.”

Since joining the staff in 2007 as Director of Teaching, Learning and Technology, Dr. Ugoretz has played a critical role in Macaulay’s growth. Prior to Macaulay, Dr. Ugoretz served as Deputy Chair of the English Department and as Director of Technology and Learning at Borough of Manhattan Community College, where he began his career as a professor of English. Dr. Ugoretz is also currently an adjunct faculty member of the CUNY Graduate Center’s Certificate Program in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.

Dr. Ugoretz earned his Masters degree in the Teaching of English at Columbia University Teachers College, and his Doctorate in English at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

 

 

Contact: Geoffrey Glick
VP, External Affairs
geoffrey.glick@mhc.cuny.edu
212.729.2939


From Soccer to Special Ed: Meldryck Parraga Awarded Full Tuition for Graduate Study at Queens College

— QC Grad, of Dominican and Ecuadorian Heritage, Will Teach in Home Neighborhood of South Richmond Hill While Earning Master’s in Special Education —

QUEENS, NY, August 25, 2017 – Growing up in a Spanish-speaking home in Queens, Parraga had the values of perseverance and hard work instilled in him from a young age. His father, a native of Ecuador, worked as a painter, and his mother, born in the Dominican Republic, was a hairdresser who cleaned houses to earn extra money. But Parraga also had a passion for soccer and worked hard at the sport from the age of 13, playing with clubs in Flushing and competing against leagues throughout the borough. At Bronx Community College where he earned his Associate’s degree, Parraga demonstrated his talent on the soccer team and received its Sportsman of the Year Award.

As a realistic young man, Parraga was also attracted to a career in education, especially the prospect of teaching students with disabilities. At Queens College, he pursued this goal by earning a BA in Social Studies Education (grades 7-12), with a minor in political science. Now as the recipient of the Peter Greeman Scholarship, the tuition and fees for his graduate work at QC will be paid in full.

“This means the world to me–I never expected to receive a scholarship,” said Parraga. “It will provide me with the means to further my education while also allowing me to help out my parents. It definitely relieves the financial strain.” The first in his family to earn a college diploma, Parraga has two younger brothers. The middle brother, Kevin, will be graduating from York College-CUNY this year.

“Like so many of our students who are immigrants or the children of immigrants, Meldryck took advantage of the opportunities that college offers and focused 100 percent on achieving his goals,” said Félix Matos Rodriguez, president of Queens College. “We’re very proud that he has received this scholarship and glad that he will be putting his education to work at a high school in his home borough.”

The Peter Greeman Scholarship for graduate study, funded by Community Teachers Initiative, Inc., was first offered at Queens College in 2015. It is awarded to outstanding students with financial need who have demonstrated an interest in teaching, tutoring or otherwise helping students in the metro New York area, and have participated in activities that benefit the community. Parraga, the third Greeman Scholar at Queens College, will be joining a Division of Education that is one of the largest producers of teachers and educational leaders for New York City schools. By focusing on “transforming educational practices,” the division expands its impact on the well-being of students and families and conducts research and scholarship to promote equity, excellence and ethics in teaching.

Parraga entered QC as a student in SEEK, a state-funded program designed to help promising but economically disadvantaged students who may need academic support to reach their full potential. He is also one of the charter participants in the QC NYC MEN TEACH program. NYC MEN TEACH is a collaboration between Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Young Men’s Initiative, CUNY, and other city agencies to engage and recruit men of color to teach in New York City public schools, leading to a more diverse teaching culture and perspective in classrooms.

“Queens College was an amazing experience,” said Parraga. “I joined one of the best campus clubs, the Alliance of Latin American Students (ALAS), which I served for a year as treasurer.” ALAS, Parraga explained, not only helps spread Latino culture both campus- and community-wide, but also holds fundraising events for charities. One event’s proceeds went to a nonprofit that provides supplies to inner-city schools. Other funds raised were donated to the QC club Students Helping Hondurans, which helps build schools in that country.

“And at ALAS I met my girlfriend Lisbel Diaz, the club president and a Macaulay Honors student who’s now a teacher,” added Parraga.

This summer, Parraga taught summer school for students enrolled in The Facing History School in Harlem. This opportunity, along with teacher test preparation and other support, was made possible through his involvement with NYC Men Teach at Queens College led by program director William A. Anders, which has an office located within the Dean of Education’s suite in the Division of Education.

Recently Parraga began course work towards his next objective: a Master’s of Science in Education-Teaching Students with Disabilities (grades 7-12). Guided by Craig A. Michaels, dean of the Division of Education, Parraga recognized the value of taking the courses needed to add a “Bilingual Extension” to his degree.

“As children of parents who don’t speak English as their native tongue, my brothers and I would teach them words and phrases,” said Parraga. “We had soccer teammates who were immigrants and over time, we would give them help with the language, too. So being able to teach Spanish-speaking students means a lot to me.”

Now, as Parraga starts his graduate study, he will also begin his first full-time teaching job at August Martin High School in South Richmond Hill, the neighborhood where he grew up and still lives.

What motivated him to focus on teaching special education students, which some might consider particularly demanding?

“To me, teaching students with disabilities means providing the best education for people from all walks of life,” he answered. “Too often it happens that students with disabilities aren’t held to the same standards, which isn’t fair to them because they can achieve just as much as anyone can.”

The same positive, can-do spirit in the face of challenges also applies to Meldryck Parraga.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY Newswire 2017-09-01 14:15:20

The Involvement Fair took over the campus to both educate new students about the resources available to them, and make them feel right at home.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

The rain didn’t stop the Brooklyn College community from celebrating over 3,700 incoming students during the annual Involvement Fair (formerly Club Fair), held on August 29 on the East and West quads. Amongst a sea of umbrellas, hundreds of incoming freshmen and transfer students showed up to get better acquainted with their new academic home and learn about student clubs, civic engagement opportunities, community resources, and the services offered by the college’s departments and offices. The event was hosted by the Student Activities, Involvement, and Leadership (SAIL) Center.

With dozens of tables set up and staffed to answer questions about everything from the Accounting Societyto Veterans Services, and more, the new students had the opportunity to meet new people, and chat about common interests.

Air Force veteran Christopher Robin Thompson is looking to refine his purpose at Brooklyn College.

Christopher Robin Thompson is a transfer student from the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC), majoring in television and radio, and the first person in his family to attend college. Originally from Virginia and raised in Wenatchee, Washington, Thompson is also an Air Force veteran who served a tour in Afghanistan and one in Djibouti. He says that his military experience exposed him to a wider variety of peoples and cultures than he had ever been exposed to. He came to New York, and to Brooklyn College, to immerse himself in the diversity that opened up his worldview.

“New York was somewhere I always wanted to be,” Thompson says. “I remember being in choir in ninth or 10th grade, and we started singing a lot of Frank Sinatra songs, and hearing ‘New York, New York’—honestly, that’s what triggered it. If I can make it here, I can make it anywhere. I’m striving to live by those words.”

Though it is something he had always been interested in, Thompson is hoping that Brooklyn College will help him discover precisely what it is that he would like to focus on in the television and radio industry.

“I never really thought TV/radio was something you could make a career out of. It seemed like an unobtainable goal. I went through a life change two years ago and asked myself what I really wanted to do and thought why not try something new? Maybe sports media or newsroom operations? I’m here to expand on that vision. That’s what I’m hoping to learn over the next two years at Brooklyn College.”

Transfer student Nachum Sash is pursuing his dream of becoming an actuary by learning the industry in the college’s Murray Koppelman School of Business.

Nachum Sash is a transfer student from Touro College, where he studied Judaic studies. At Brooklyn College, he is majoring in math and minoring in finance. Born and raised in Brooklyn, not too far from the college, Sash appreciates the college’s proximity to his own community. He is one of six children, and has a twin brother who is studying graphic design at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT). Sash had a great time at the Involvement Fair, finding that the Table Tennis Club piqued his interest.

Currently, Sash’s goal is to become an actuary.

“I heard a lot of great things about Brooklyn College’s Murray Koppelman School of Business and what it can offer students looking to go into fields like accounting and finance. That made the decision to transfer here pretty easy.”

A rainy day could not dampen the spirits of the Brooklyn College Medical Brigades!

Brooklyn College’s celebration of its incoming class is just beginning. See below for a list of upcoming events in honor the newest members of the #BCFamily, as well as some quick facts about the incoming class. For more information about these and other events, please contact the SAIL Center, located in the Brooklyn College Student Center, at 718.951.5712. And remember to connect with Brooklyn College on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Upcoming Events

Bulldog Pride

August 31
12:15–2:15 p.m.
East Quad

Meet the Greeks

September 5
12:15–2:15 p.m.
West Quad

National PanHellenic Conference (NPC) Universal Night

September 5
6-9 p.m.
Bedford Lounge, Student Center, second floor

Diversity Fair

September 7
12:15–2:15 p.m.
West Quad

Constitution Day

September 14
12:15–2:15 p.m.
East Quad

These Hands Don’t Haze

September 19
12:15–2:15 p.m.
Whitehead Hall

Interesting Facts About the Incoming Class of 2017

Population

Freshmen: 1,671
Transfers: 2,108
Total: 3,779

Gender

Female 55%
Male: 45%

Ethnicity

American Indian or Alaskan Native: 0.1%
Asian: 19%
Black or African American: 17%
Hispanic: 24%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander: 0.1%
White: 24%
Two or more ethnicities: 1.8%
Unknown: 14%

Top Five Majors for Freshman

Biology
Psychology
Computer Science
Film
Business Administration

Top Five Majors for Transfers

Computer Science
Psychology
Accounting
Biology
Childhood Education

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Hunter College’s Iconic Sky Bridges Across Lexington Avenue Will Be Transformed By Conceptual Artist Robert Longo As Part of His American Bridge Project

(New York, NY – August 29, 2017) – The Hunter College Art Galleries and Department of Art & Art History presentsHunter College’s Iconic Sky Bridges Across Lexington Avenue Will Be Transformed By Conceptual Artist Robert Longo As Part of His American Bridge Project the American Bridge Project, a monumental, political work by the legendary conceptual artist Robert Longo. Robert Longo is Hunter College’s Zabar Visiting Artist this Fall, where he’ll be working with MFA students and delivering a public lecture.

The project will be installed on Thursday, August 31st, beginning at 9:00 a.m. and continuing throughout the day, on Hunter College’s iconic sky bridges across Lexington Avenue at 68th Street. American Bridge Project will coat the windows of Hunter’s third and seventh floor sky bridges, resulting in an immersive experience for viewers passing through, but also a powerful billboard-sized image visible from Lexington Avenue, both north and south of 68th Street.

Open from September 1 to December 1, 2017, this project will comprise Longo’s largest public artwork to date and will feature a reproduction on vinyl of two of Longo’s recent charcoal on mounted paper drawings.

“It is an honor to have an artist of Robert Longo’s stature as our visiting artist this semester,” said Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab. “We are excited that as part of his residency, he’s created his largest public piece at Hunter College.”

Longo’s installation of the third floor sky bridge is based on his 2017 charcoal on paper drawing, Untitled (First Amendment, September 25, 1789), a portrayal of the handwritten First Amendment. The rights to protest, to freedom of religion, and to freedom of speech are once again at the forefront of many of today’s American debates.  An enlarged handwritten text of the First Amendment reinstates humanity into the law, a reminder that a human hand wrote it.  Longo’s seventh floor sky bridge installation presents a cropped image of a charcoal on paper American flag drawing, Untitled (Berlin Flag, 2012), and was created by the artist in a dark, seductive chiaroscuro.

“Drawing has a unique intimacy of notation, which I have amplified to an Epic scale,” said artist Robert Longo.  “I hope to slow down images through the medium of drawing, to urge the viewer to consume the full power of each image. I am presenting images we see in media, images the viewer could easily scroll through on a phone. Rather, I am asking for the viewer to spend time, to really look.”

“Hunter College is one of New York’s most ethnically and economically diverse schools, and positioned at the gateway to the Upper East Side,” said guest curator Jill Brienza. “Since the beginning of my career, I’ve striven to organize shows that spur conversation, and I think in today’s political climate, Robert’s works will certainly do that.”

Robert Longo, American Bridge Project is made possible by Artnet, Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg, Metro Pictures, Barbara Nessim and Jules Demchick.

About the Artist
Robert Longo (American, b. 1953) is a New York-based artist, filmmaker, and musician. Longo moved to New York in 1977. The same year, Longo participated in a five-person show entitled Pictures—curated by Douglas Crimp at Artists Space in New York— the first exhibition to contextualize a young group of artists who were turning away from Minimalism and Conceptualism and instead towards image-making, inspired by newspapers, advertisements, film, and television. Over the next decade Longo became known as a leading protagonist of the “Pictures Generation,” working across drawing, photography, painting, sculpture, performance, and film to make provocative critiques of the anaesthetizing and seductive effects of capitalism, mediatized wars, and the cult of history in the US. Longo has been represented by Metro Pictures—the first New York commercial gallery to establish a market for the Pictures Generation artists—since they opened in 1980. He presented the Men in the Cities drawings that were to establish his name at his first solo show at Metro, in 1981. Since the 1990s, Longo has been pushing the limits of the charcoal medium, producing monumental, hyper-real charcoal on paper drawings on a scale that competes with that of sculpture.


Two Hunter Seniors Win Gilman International Scholarships

Hunter proudly congratulates Omar Albert ’18 and Kelly Liang ’18, two Two Hunter Seniors Win Gilman International Scholarshipsof the star students in the College’s Chinese Flagship Program. This summer, as they prepared for the Flagship program’s capstone year of study in China, they were both awarded Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships. With these scholarships, Albert and Liang won’t have to worry about the costs of their capstone year.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, the Gilman provides high-achieving economically disadvantaged students with ample funding for study abroad. Its intent is to help promising young Americans gain a deeper understanding of foreign cultures, countries, languages and economies – an understanding that will prepare them for leadership roles in government or the private sector.

Queens-born Omar Albert is also in his final year of the SEEK and Thomas Hunter Honors programs and completing the requirements of two challenging majors: Chinese and economics. He’s taken full advantage of the Thomas Hunter program’s interdisciplinary approach, and because he’s been self-supporting since his parents died, has benefited greatly from the SEEK program’s tuition aid, special advising, and close, empathetic community of low-income students. Beyond excelling academically, he’s been very active in Hunter’s Undergraduate Student Government.

Albert previously won the State Department’s Critical Language Scholarship, which financed his summer 2016 studies at Northeast Normal University in Changhun, China, and Hunter’s Leon Cooperman Scholarship, which recognized his outstanding leadership potential. After graduating, if all goes according to plan, this indefatigable scholar will pursue an accelerated master’s in global economics at Beijing’s prestigious Tsinghua University.

Brooklyn-born Kelly Liang is the daughter of Chinese immigrants who arrived in New York without college degrees or proficiency in English. While helping her parents navigate life in the U.S., Liang excelled in school and chose Hunter for its proximity to home and high standing in the CUNY system.

Not long into her college studies, Liang discovered her fascination and aptitude for economics and decided to major in economics and Chinese. Like Albert, she became active in Undergraduate Student Government, and for two consecutive years, classmates elected her to leading USG posts: first, college associate, and then, junior senator. Meanwhile, working with a Vietnamese friend and looking beyond her own ethnicity, Liang saw an unmet need among Vietnamese students, co-founded Hunter’s Vietnamese Students Association, and served as its vice president.

A Leon Cooperman Scholarship recognized her leadership potential, and now the Gilman will cover her 2017-2018 year abroad – both her capstone studies at Nanjing University and a hoped-for marketing internship at a tech company in China. Then, she says, she’ll see where it all takes her. She does have an idea that with the Mandarin proficiency she’s gained as a Flagship student, the knowledge and experience she’ll gain in China, and the entrepreneurial bent she’s always had, she’ll start her own business – probably in the food industry.

Plus, there’s a good chance she’ll earn a master’s in economics along the way.


Hunter College Brings Social Work Education Expertise to Afghanistan’s Public Universities

 

Hunter College Brings Social Work Education Expertise to Afghanistan’s Public Universities Hunter College’s Silberman School of Social Work has received a $2.3 million contract from the U.S. Agency for International Development to strengthen the counseling psychology department of Kabul and Herat Universities, Afghanistan’s flagship schools in its public university system.
According to Martha Bragin, Associate Professor at Hunter’s Silberman School of Social Work and the chair of the Global Social Work and Practice with Immigrants and Refugees, the new program will seek to help people experiencing the results of decades of uninterrupted warfare.

“Public health officials reported that 80% of people who came in to mental health clinics were not mentally ill nor substance abusers—they were people who had been impacted by the 40 years of war,” said Professor Bragin.

In Professor Bragin’s earlier work with New York City’s government as well as those in countries such as Vietnam, Uganda, and Nepal, she sought to support the building of institutions that could address the needs of populations affected by armed conflict, poverty and natural disaster by professionalizing social welfare services, from child welfare and child protection to community based counseling.

From these experiences, and a 2010 challenge to support Afghanistan’s Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs in developing social work as a profession and as an academic discipline so that both government and non-government organizations could provide transparent and effective social services to Afghan communities, families and children, this new program was conceived.

Bragin and other Hunter and Afghan colleagues toured the country to get a better understanding of what existed and what would be accepted.  From there, they developed a uniquely Afghan version of social work which included competency standards, curricula and syllabi for different academic degree levels.  In 2014, Kabul University opened its first ever Social Work department and the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs entered social work as a qualified profession in Afghanistan.

“While this was a big accomplishment, there were still great needs for services to communities, families and individuals,” said Professor Bragin.

“Everyday, the faculty, students and alumni of Hunter’s Silberman School of Social Work can be found helping fellow New Yorkers,” said Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab.  “I couldn’t be more proud of the work of Professor Bragin, who is bringing this same care and expertise to Afghanistan, and in doing so showing the world the best of Hunter College.”

The newly funded program will be based on national research including one study designed to learn how counseling is understood in the Afghan context and the competencies needed to be an Afghan counselor.  Another study will develop a baseline for understanding psychological and social well-being for adults and children in the Afghan context.  Additionally, there will be onsite support to develop Afghan materials such as training videos and assessment tools, faculty development activities and three study tours to learn how other countries in the region have implemented counseling programs.  The program will also support the development of a model counseling center at each university, to support the development of best practice, and provide a model for care.

“Perhaps most important, the counseling center will help a new generation of conflict-affected students to stay in school, graduate and serve their country as its future leaders and healers,” said Professor Bragin.
On a visit arranged by Hunter/Silberman, Bragin recently joined faculty from Herat and Kabul universities on a trip to Mumbai, India, to study with professors of the School of Human Ecology at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences.

“The work of these brave and innovative Afghan professors to build an institution that will study ways to heal the wounds of war, and contribute to the education of a new generation of Afghan professionals can be transformative.  It is an honor and a privilege to accompany them in that work,” said Professor Bragin.


Zadie Smith wins CCNY’s Langston Hughes Medal

Novelist Zadie Smith is CCNY’s 2017 Langston Hughes Medalist

Zadie Smith, the award-winning British-born novelist, is the recipient of this year’s City College of New York’s Langston Hughes Medal. She joins a list of literary luminaries, including James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou and Walter Mosley, who have received the honor.  The award will be presented at City College’s annual Langston Hughes Festival on November 16.

Smith is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and has twice been listed as one of Granta’s 20 Best Young British Novelists.

Her first novel, “White Teeth”(Random House, 2000) was the winner of The Whitbread First Novel Award, The Guardian First Book Award, The James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction, and The Commonwealth Writers’ First Book Award. Her second novel, “The Autograph Man” (Vintage Books / Random House, 2002), won The Jewish Quarterly Wingate Literary Prize.

Smith’s third novel, “On Beauty” (Penguin Books, 2005) received the Orange Prize for Fiction, The Commonwealth Writers’ Best Book Award (Eurasia Section) and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Her fourth novel, “NW” (Penguin Press, 2012) was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature Ondaatje Prize and the Women’s Prize for Fiction.

Swing Time” (Penguin Books, 2016), Smith’s most recent book, has been shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. In addition, she published an essay collection, “Changing My Mind” (Penguin Books) in 2009.

Smith writes regularly for the New Yorker magazine and the New York Review of Books. She is a tenured professor of creative writing at New York University.

About the Langston Hughes Medal
The Langston Hughes Medal is awarded to highly distinguished writers from throughout the African American diaspora for their impressive works of poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography and critical essays that help to celebrate the memory and tradition of Langston Hughes. Past award winners include James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Morrison, August Wilson, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Octavia Butler, and Edwidge Danticat.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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NEW EDUCATION SCHOOL, NEW HONORS TRACKS AND 21ST-CENTURY DEGREE PROGRAMS OPEN AS 2017-2018 ACADEMIC YEAR BEGINS

A new School of Education at Medgar Evers College focusing on underserved city students, new honors programs and forward-looking degrees embracing emerging science, technology and arts careers are being launched across The City University of New York this fall as students begin the 2017-18 academic year.

“In keeping with our commitment to expand access to a high-quality college education, CUNY continues to meet the needs of the city, the state and students at every academic level, offering proven initiatives to boost college readiness and graduation rates, new honors programs, world-class faculty and innovative courses of study that prepare our graduates for success,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken.

Some of the initiatives include:

  • Medgar Evers’ School of Education, which will focus on underserved, diverse students; research economic, cultural and other variables that affect learning, and offer education students and faculty opportunities as part of the college’s ongoing partnerships and exchanges with Caribbean educators.
  • An M.S. in computer engineering that City College offers in response to high demand in the tri-state area for expertise in the combined application of hardware and software for telecommunications, medicine and other fields.
  • A cybersecurity program at Queensborough Community College that allows students who complete it to pursue a bachelor’s in the specialization at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.
  • A degree program available only at CUNY: a B.S. in the business and technology of fashion at New York City College of Technology.
  • The only degree of its kind in New York State for teaching both math and computer science will be offered at Queens College.
  • A groundbreaking three-year doctoral degree program in business at Baruch College that’s designed for people who are already executives.
  • Associate degree programs at Borough of Manhattan Community College in music, public health and gender and women’s studies that articulate with bachelor’s programs at Lehman, York, Brooklyn and John Jay Colleges.
  • Online master’s of science programs in nursing education and nursing organizational leadership at the CUNY School of Professional Studies.
  • M.F.A. degree programs in scoring, sonic arts and digital animation at Brooklyn College’s Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema.

Medgar Evers College’s new School of Education aims to transform urban education by meeting the challenges of educating and counseling underserved New York City school children. “Education continues to be the source of growth and justice redistributed through quality schooling,” said President Rudolph F. Crew. “The School of Education is devoted to this outcome.”

The school comprises several departments and initiatives. Its Department of Developmental and Special Education oversees teacher training in remediation and special education pedagogy. In addition to granting special education degrees, the department will research brain-related disorders and their impact on learning and development, to address challenges students may face, and increase retention and graduation rates. The school’s second academic department, the Department of Multicultural Early Childhood and Elementary Education, will prepare educators through associate and bachelor’s degree programs, as well as respond to a growing need for culturally and linguistically diverse teachers.

Other programs under the auspices of the new School of Education include the Medgar Evers College Pipeline initiative, a college readiness program that guides Central Brooklyn students through grades K-12 and into college, and provides professional opportunities; the Parent Academy, offering education and resources to parents of city public school students, and the Ella Baker/Charles Romain Child Development Center, a preschool and afterschool program located on the Medgar Evers campus.

Here are highlights of other new programs on CUNY campuses this fall:

Baruch College

Executive Doctorate in Business (E.D.B.): Baruch’s Zicklin School of Business is launching a groundbreaking three-year doctoral degree program that will provide highly motivated business executives the means to differentiate themselves in today’s complex, competitive business environment. The highest university degree available in business, the E.D.B. provides a top-level, integrated view of all facets of business and commerce. The interdisciplinary program is designed for senior executives with seven to 10 years of extensive business and managerial experience who seek the knowledge and skills necessary to thrive in the C-suite.

Master of International Affairs (M.I.A.): Globalization, climate change, trade, migration, resource management, public health, food security – many of today’s most urgent problems and greatest opportunities – transcend national borders. To address these demanding issues, Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs created the M.I.A. program to prepare students to become successful, globally focused leaders in the public and private sectors. This program, which takes two years of full-time study or can be taken part time, is designed for students committed to responsible leadership in government, global institutions, international nongovernmental organizations and business.

Confucius Institute of Global Finance: The Confucius Institute of Global Finance at Baruch College opens this fall in collaboration with Shanghai International Studies University (SISU). Initially, it will provide Baruch students with no-cost, non-degree language and cultural classes; eventually it will offer its programs to the New York City community. The institute’s mission is to develop top business talent who are fluent in Chinese, well versed in diversified cultures and knowledgeable about Chinese and American financial systems and markets. Given its focus on global finance, Baruch College and SISU believe that this Confucius Institute will be the first of its kind in New York City and, perhaps, the nation.

Borough of Manhattan Community College

A.S. in Music: Offered by BMCC’s Music and Art Department, this associate degree program nurturesspecializations in Music Studies and Music Performance that articulate with the B.S. in Music program at Lehman College. Also new this fall is a specialization in Music Education.

A.S. in Public Health: Students enrolling through the BMCC Health Education Department will be on track to enter York College’s B.S. in Public Health program.

A.A. in Gender and Women’s Studies: This degree was created by two departments: Speech, Communications and Theatre Arts, and Social Sciences, Criminal Justice and Human Services. The program articulates with the B.A. in Gender Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the B.A. in Women’s and Gender Studies at Brooklyn College.

Brooklyn College

M.F.A. in Media Scoring: The college’s Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema offers students advanced knowledge and practical experience in the composition and production of music scores for cinema, television, video games, animation and other commercial applications. The intended audience includes composers with a bachelor’s in music (or demonstrated equivalency) who wish to pursue a career in scoring or related positions. The program places a premium on teaching media scoring techniques to students who have demonstrated success as composers. Most of the courses focus on developing knowledge directly related to scoring as it exists today, along with traditional film-scoring skills such as orchestration, conducting and composition.

M.F.A. in Sonic Arts: Aimed at electroacoustic and electronic music composers, sound artists and sound designers, this Feirstein program offers advanced training in the production of artistic and commercial works of sound. Its primary goal is to develop historically and theoretically informed and technically skilled composers and artists working in the medium of sound. Graduates will be capable of pursuing successful careers in the arts and commercial media industry.

M.F.A. in Digital Animation: The Feirstein School’s Digital Animation & VFX Program is at the leading edge of ongoing digital technology advances that have transformed the media and cinematic landscapes. Emphasizing experimentation and imagination and a foundation in narrative structure, the program bridges the worlds of technology-based innovation and cinematic storytelling. Courses and workshops are taught by industry professionals, culminating in the completion of a portfolio.

City College of New York

M.S. in Computer Engineering: The Grove School of Engineering’s 30-credit degree program responds to the demand in the tri-state area for expertise in the combined application of hardware and software for telecommunications, medicine and other fields. Computer Engineering integrates concepts and methods from electrical engineering and computer science to develop hardware and software. The program encompasses design, development, testing and evaluation of components, systems and networks.

Beyond Identity: A Gendered Platform for Scholar-Activists: CCNY’s Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative and the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership are collaborating on a campus-wide initiative, Beyond Identity: A Gendered Platform for Scholar-Activists. The program will train young women of color from immigrant and U.S.-based minority communities in identity-driven research, allowing them to draw on lived experiences of discrimination to inform unique research agendas. It combines teaching, writing, activism and public engagement to, the official description says, “support a more thoughtful resistance to the challenges faced by young women of color, allowing them to develop a portfolio of work to establish their own, unique, political platforms.”

Community Change Studies: The Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership introduces this minor to connect students with the skills and organizations at the forefront of change in New York City and prepares them for public service careers. The minor includes required courses in community organizing and community-based research, taught by experienced practitioners; internships with leading social justice organizations; and possibly, funded summer internships.

CUNY School of Professional Studies

M.S. in Nursing Education – Online Degree Program: This program prepares nurses to develop curricula focused on our changing health care systems; adapt and teach education strategies for diverse learners; develop clinical and classroom evaluation strategies; and adopt effective evidence-based practices in academic and clinical health care settings. It will help address the shortage of full-time nursing faculty by increasing the number of nurse educators and, ultimately, help to produce an adequate supply of nurses, which would improve patient access to affordable, high-quality health care. Program graduates will be qualified to serve as educators in institutions ranging from community colleges to major universities, as well as in academic health centers and community-based health facilities. They also could pursue doctoral education in Nursing Education, Nursing Science and Nursing Research.

M.S. in Nursing Organizational Leadership – Online Program: This degree prepares nurses to contribute to the health, education and social structure of communities by assuming leadership positions. It creates a landscape for nurses to promote innovative change and quality outcomes, translate evidence-based research into practice, build collaborative interprofessional, health care teams to coordinate care, and employ advocacy strategies to influence health care policy across the health care spectrum. Graduates will be qualified to serve as directors of nursing, chief nursing officers, nurse managers, accountable care coordinators and wellness program directors. Potential workplaces for these roles include hospitals, outpatient care clinics, medical centers, home health care agencies, long-term care facilities and academic health systems.

Guttman Community College

A.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences – Science Track: This curriculum adds an alternate set of degree requirements for the Liberal Arts and Sciences (LASC) degree, geared toward students who wish to enter science or math programs when they transfer to four-year colleges. Currently, such transferring Guttman students have not yet fulfilled their prerequisites, since Guttman has not offered the necessary four-credit, lab-based science courses. Creating this new set of courses as part of the LASC program allows students to complete their first two years of science courses at Guttman, making them program-eligible when they transfer. That will save them valuable tuition dollars and time toward graduation with a bachelor’s degree. This curriculum also fulfills minimum requirements for students to begin careers as research technicians and research assistants.

Hunter College

M.S. in Applied Behavior Analysis: The Hunter College School of Education is augmenting its Applied Behavior Analysis program by offering this M.S. degree in addition to the Advanced Certificate. The M.S. program provides intensive training in behavior-analytic intervention to professionals seeking to work or currently working with children, youth and adults with autism spectrum disorder, as well as to the supervisors and administrators of the programs in which they work. Applied behavior analysts work with individuals from infancy through adulthood in settings that include schools, homes, day programs, communities, residential care settings, businesses and research laboratories. The program will prepare students to develop, deliver and evaluate the effectiveness of applied behavior analytic intervention for learners with autism. It also will increase the availability of professionals who have the appropriate training and experience to provide behavior-analytic services to children, adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders. Students who complete the program will have the graduate training necessary to sit for the national Board Certified Behavior Analyst® (BCBA) exam. Upon passing the BCBA exam, graduates will be eligible for New York State’s new license in behavior analysis.

M.S. in GeoInformatics: One of only two GeoInformatics master’s in the country, this novel program delves into areas that are not covered by Hunter’s existing certificate program. This interdisciplinary degree features courses in GeoInformatics, GIScience, and GIS application areas and prepares students for management and advanced research-level employment positions. Training includes computational aspects of spatial data science, such as modeling and programming, remote sensing, visualization, databases, spatial ontologies, spatial statistics, big data and complexity. Students have opportunities to explore links with both Geography and Computer Science faculty at Hunter, as well as with employers and the tech community in the New York metropolitan area. Part-time study is permitted. In addition to traditional courses, students can participate in technology and research seminars, field trips to local private and public sector GIS groups and research sites, and contribute to real-world GIS projects through mentorship programs.

RN to B.S. Program: New Hybrid Program: This Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing program is designed for students with an associate degree in nursing and a New York State RN license who are interested in earning a bachelor’s degree in nursing.  The 120-credit baccalaureate degree requires courses in the liberal arts and sciences and in professional nursing, including associate-level credits. Sixty of those credits must be earned at Hunter College. Non-nursing courses are offered at the 68th Street Hunter campus and vary in format from face-to-face (in-person) to hybrid to fully online. Students must complete non-nursing courses before enrolling in nursing courses.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

M.A. in Economics: This program offers a comprehensive and rigorous education in applied, pluralist economics. It is one of a handful of graduate programs in the country that focuses primarily on issues of economic justice, such as economic democracy, diversity, inequality, sustainability and community development. Students will study the history of economics and economic thought; the economics of gender, environmental sustainability, local and international economic development; and global inequalities of income and wealth. They also will acquire expertise in data analysis and writing, which are valued by practitioners in the field.

Accelerated M.P.A./J.D. in Law and Public Accountability: Offered jointly with the CUNY School of Law, this program brings together the greatest strengths of each institution, combining the law school’s nationally renowned expertise in public interest law with John Jay College’s incomparable M.P.A. program in investigating waste, fraud and abuse in public services. The program will graduate lawyers who are uniquely qualified to be leaders in inspection and oversight functions as practitioners, policy makers, or legal scholars for federal, state and local agencies, as well as independent and private sector organizations.

Accelerated M.A./J.D. in Forensic Psychology and Law: John Jay also partners with CUNY School of Law on this dual-degree program. As a premier public interest law school, it educates outstanding attorneys committed to representing underserved populations and promoting social justice and to educate and support individuals from communities historically denied access to the legal profession. John Jay is committed to educating for justice, and the college’s M.A. Program in Forensic Psychology specializes in psychology as it relates to law and the courts. Graduates will be prepared to advocate for clients with psychological concerns, to work with relevant service providers, and to serve as mental health and legal policymakers and administrators. The program design facilitates earning both degrees in four years instead of the five it would typically take if the programs were pursued independently.

Lehman College

M.S. in Organizational Leadership: The only CUNY graduate program of its kind aims to prepare students to assume leadership positions in the nonprofit, corporate, government, and health care fields. Lehman Director of Graduate Studies Richard Finger calls the program “ideally suited to the Bronx,” home to several hospitals, city agencies, and social service organizations.

Macaulay Honors College

Combined Bachelor/Master’s in Liberal Studies: Macaulay Honors College and the CUNY Graduate Center are launching a combined degree program as a pipeline for eligible Macaulay students to take up to 12 semester hours of graduate coursework with the Graduate Center’s M.A. Program in Liberal Studies (MALS) during their final two or three semesters as undergraduates. Macaulay undergraduates must maintain a 3.5 GPA and earn at least a B in any MALS course. Those completing the program will receive a Master of Liberal Studies from the Graduate Center.

New York City College of Technology

B.S. in the Business and Technology of Fashion (B.T.F.): Fashion has always been defined by the latest technologies – from the sewing needle to laser-etched fabrics. To keep pace with industry demand for a workforce trained in the business and technology of fashion, City Tech’s Business Department offers this degree, which is unique to CUNY. Supporting New York City’s role as the world’s center of fashion media, marketing and retailing, it weaves core business competencies with fashion industry-specific coursework. Emphasis is placed on the development of technology-based proficiencies and on exploring the rapid changes in business practices as they adjust to new technology in the fashion industry.

B.S. in Applied Computational Physics: This degree places a unique emphasis on task-oriented, rather than theoretical or formal aspects, of physical sciences, and on the use of advanced computational techniques to solve problems. Graduates will be equipped with a solid foundation in physics, computer science and mathematics, enabling them to pursue careers in STEM disciplines like aerospace engineering, applied mathematics and computer science, finance, environmental science, chemistry, biomedicine and research in academia, industry or national laboratories. Graduates will gain access to employment opportunities in the private and public sector, as well as to advanced degree programs.

Queens College

M.S. in Science Education: The only degree of its kind in New York State for teaching both math and computer science, this program will provide secondary school teachers with the specialized knowledge and skills in computer science that they need to teach the subject, including AP courses in computer science.

Dual Sociology B.A./M.A. in Data Analytics: Both programs will enhance the data literacy of students and position them well for today’s job market. The Sociology Department also introduces a minor in Data Analytics.

Social Medicine Minor: The Urban Studies Department offers a minor in Social Medicine, which focuses on the economic, social, environmental and political factors that shape the health of individuals and communities.

B.S. in Quantitative Economics: Offered by the Economics Department, this degree is tailored for students who wish to pursue advanced graduate study in economics.

Graduate Certificate in Archives and Preservation of Cultural Materials: This revamped certificate program from the college’s Graduate School of Library Science and Information Studies complements its successful dual master’s degree programs offered with the History Department.

Italian Culture for the 21st Century: This certificate program focuses on the study of “made in Italy,” a phenomenon resulting from the intersection of art and culture with technology and industry. It will serve as a gateway for students to study Italian in contemporary and international contexts. Opportunities for students include internships with the Italian Trade Commission.

Queensborough Community College

A.S./B.S. Computer Science and Information Security: The program offers students a curriculum in Computer Science with a specialization in Information Security. Students will complete their associate degree at Queensborough and progress to John Jay College of Criminal Justice for their bachelor’s in this dual/joint degree program. Cybersecurity represents a broad, well-compensated set of new and emerging occupational areas, offering opportunities in New York City as one of the fastest-growing professions. It includes instruction in the latest technologies, making students optimally ready for cybersecurity careers. It provides academic pathways leading to careers in Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Forensic Science and Forensic Financial Analysis.

A.S. in Music: This prepares students to meet national requirements in the field of music. The Music Department is seeking accreditation of its A.S. degree program by the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM), which requires at least four semesters of individual instruction in a musical instrument or voice. The revised curriculum of the individual study in music performance component aligns with other instruction, including music theory, history, and performance ensembles. Students will develop an understanding and ability to perform the techniques, styles and repertoire on their musical instrument or voice, obtain a fluency in music notation(s) for their instrument or voice demonstrating general musicianship, and a skill level relevant to professional standards. This program will transfer easily into many baccalaureate music programs.

The College of Staten Island

Advanced Certificate in Public History: The program will train post-baccalaureate students to be historians who are intellectually, as well as professionally, qualified to apply historical content and method to a public history context. Public history is a growing field in institutions like museums, historical societies and sites and archives; cultural institutions need staff with academic expertise and practical experience in the field. This includes lectures, in-class discussions and internships.

M.S. in Engineering in Electrical Engineering (M.E.E.E.): CSI’s first graduate engineering program will prepare graduates to excel in communications, photonics, signal and information processing, electronics and related fields. Internationally recognized faculty offer special focus areas in Photonic Systems and Networks and in Information Processing and Transmission. Alternatively, students can design their own focus, including research and thesis options. For those who decide on further study, the degree is designed to mesh smoothly with the Ph.D. program at City College.

New Disability Studies Track: The Department of Social Work has introduced a macro track within the Disability Studies concentration, preparing for licensing at the LMSW level. The track contains these advanced practice courses: Social Work Macro Practice in Organizations; Social Work Macro Practice: Program Planning and Evaluation; Social Work Macro Practice: Community Organizing and Development; and Financial Management. Students also take Introduction to Disability Studies for Social Work, and Social Work and Disability Studies Policy Practice. Advanced standing students take two electives and two semesters of field internships.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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New Directors Enhance Student Experience and Cultivate Donors

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) welcomes Kristin Albright Waters, Director of Enrollment Management and Phillip A. Keefe, Director of Major Gifts and Planned Giving in the Office of Development.

Kristin Albright Waters, Director of Enrollment Management

Waters will provide administrative leadership to the One-Stop Student Services center scheduled to open in 2018. “I will be working with members of the Office of the Registrar, Financial Aid, Testing and Admissions to implement and manage the center,” she says, and plans to improve enrollment services through “timely responses to inquiries and emails, decreased wait times for office transactions and implementation of technology services for students both on and off campus.”

Kristen Albright Waters

Before joining BMCC, Waters served as Associate Director of Operations, and prior to that, Assistant Registrar at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). She earned an Ed.D. in Higher Education Administration from Frostburg (Maryland) State University, an MBA in Business Administration and Management from Capitol College of Capitol Technology University in Laurel, Maryland, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from Virginia Tech. Waters also earned a B.S. in Psychology from Millersville University in Pennsylvania. She has presented three times at the Middle States Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, published articles on higher education in the national journal “C&U” (College & University), been selected as a featured speaker for Baker Leadership and served on the Professional Staff Senate at UMBC.

“Living in New York City has been a dream of mine for many years,” says Waters. “I identify with the mission statement and strategic goals of the college, and know that the work that I do will have a direct impact on the students of BMCC.”

Phillip A. Keefe, Director of Major Gifts and Planned Giving

“My role is to find additional sources of revenue for the college,” Keefe says. “One way to start this process is by building relationships with alumni and friends of the college, finding links between their priorities and values, and BMCC’s mission to provide a quality education to all students.”

Keefe has gained more than 30 years of experience in client service and charitable and estate planning. Prior to joining BMCRoderick Snipes_DSC7670.jpgC, he was Director of Planned and Major Gifts at Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, New York. In 2002, he started working with nonprofit organizations, taking on the role of Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of The Bank of New York Charitable Services Group. Other positions have included being Vice President of Wealth Management at BNY Mellon, JP Morgan Chase and Lakeland Bank.

Keefe earned an A.S. in Criminal Justice from Nassau Community College and a B.S. in Finance and Marketing from Manhattan College. “What attracted me to BMCC is the fact that it is a community college and I am an alumnus of a community college,” he says. “I also have a daughter who went to a community college. We both benefited from the support and environment a community college provides, and went on to four-year schools with more confidence and academic skills than when we entered.”

Keefe starts his new role at BMCC as students begin the Fall 2017 semester. “It’s a new beginning for us all,” he says. “I’m looking forward to reaching out to alumni and supporters to hear their stories; reaching out to our constituents and learning what interests them. I look forward to getting to know the BMCC community inside and outside the college, growing our existing relationships and building new ones.”


CHANCELLOR MILLIKEN: ENDING DACA WOULD HARM OUR COUNTRY

“For five years the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program has made a difference in the lives of thousands of young people and has been a benefit to their communities and the nation. DACA has brought hope to 800,000 dreamers who have grown up in this country, contributed to it, and who demonstrate their commitment to our communities and country every day. Ending this program would be a great tragedy, not only for the students who directly benefit, but also for the country.

“DACA beneficiaries across the country have excelled as students and advanced to careers and graduate degrees. There are hundreds of DACA dreamers on CUNY campuses whose lives would be profoundly disrupted, their futures thrown into doubt, should the program be ended.

“With 40 percent of our undergraduates born in another country and hosting the nation’s most extensive university-based legal assistance program for immigrants, CUNY remains fully committed to serving our outstanding immigrant students who are pursuing their dreams in New York — including, of course, the DACA students on our campuses. We stand ready to offer them counseling and other support with needs like housing and food, and to do all we can to help them continue their educations with of private scholarships. But we certainly hope it doesn’t come to that.

“Our nation should make our institutions, communities and nation stronger by maintaining the indispensable DACA program. It represents the best of our traditions and values.”

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Kurz Family Foundation Gift Supports BLMI Inaugural Cultural Immersion Trip to Jamaica

Students in the Brooklyn College Black and Latino Male Initiative (BLMI) took part in a cultural immersion program in Jamaica that took them to prominent historic and cultural sites on the island.

Thanks to the generosity of the family of Herbert Kurz ’41, 17 students of the Brooklyn College Black and Latino Male Initiative (BLMI) participated in the program’s first-ever cultural immersion trip abroad this past summer to the beautiful island of Jamaica. The Jamaica Cultural Immersion Program took place from June 7–14 and included a great many activities designed to expose students to the culture, history, and politics of the Caribbean nation. This included touring museums and art galleries, attending history lectures and film screenings, visiting sites of slavery and emancipation, stopping at the home of music legend Bob Marley, and staying overnight in Jamaica’s Maroon community–all of which students were required to write about in reflective research papers due upon their return to the United States.

Financial constrictions often prevent students from participating in international education programs, but with support from the $1 million endowment from the Kurz Family Foundation, directed by Brooklyn College Foundation Trustee Leonard Kurz, the vast majority of the $2,100 (including airfare) per student cost was paid for by the grant, leaving students to cover a nominal $12 insurance fee.

“Research has proven that study abroad opportunities are beneficial to college students, particularly students of color, for many reasons—enabling them to see the world and improve their career opportunities, which leads to personal development and the enhancement of graduate school admission opportunities,” says BLMI program director Nicole St. Clair ’04, ’08 M.A.

St. Clair spearheaded the trip, created its curriculum, and partnered with Our Story Tours and PanaCarib Business Solutions to make the experience possible.

“BLMI is designed to support students academically and professionally throughout their college career, and increase the number of men of African and Latino descent, and other historically underrepresented groups, who enroll in and graduate from college,” adds St. Clair. “This opportunity is in alignment with that mission and supports Brooklyn College’s overarching goal of its educational experience: To provide students with the knowledge and skills to live in a globally interdependent world.”

This trip was senior Gabrielle Powell’s first visit to Jamaica. Powell, who majors in anthropology and minors in children’s and youth studies, says that her classroom learning was made more concrete by the experience.

“Not everyone is an auditory learner,” Powell says. “Seeing everything, being immersed in everything—not only the culture, but the information—was really key. I learned more about social justice leaders like Marcus Garvey. I learned more about black liberation. I learned more about heritage and what it means to be proud and black during that week in Jamaica than I’ve learned in all of the time that I spent in academia.”

Particularly interesting to Powell was her interaction with the Maroon community, to whom she felt a special connection. The Maroon people are descended from the indigenous Jamaican population and the enslaved Africans who escaped their captivity to live in the country’s mountainous regions. Under the leadership of their matriarch, Queen Nanny, the Maroons managed to permanently resist re-enslavement.

“Coming from anthropological and historical standpoints, and thinking about ourselves as American citizens, I think it’s been so beat into us that every society outside of our own is scary, and anyone who is indigenous resides ‘in the past,’ that the rest of us are modern and people who don’t live like us are ‘primitive,'” Powell says. “The Maroon community proved these to be fallacious perspectives and embraced us in ways that I don’t think they embrace other tourists. Look, I was in the kitchen, they showed us different recipes, taught us how to make medicine, we went swimming, hung out and played with the kids, ate amazing food, learned so much about nature and how well it works and how silly we are as ‘modern people’ to not be utilizing and working in harmony with it rather than always against it.”

Powell’s Brooklyn College roots go deep. She is a third-generation Brooklyn College student. Her mother and grandmother both received degrees in English education from the college. Powell’s mother once taught at Brooklyn College and Powell was once a student in the college’s Early Childhood Center.

“I’m interested in not becoming an educator, but in improving the quality of education—specifically for black and brown students. I’m interested in the ways that different communities, especially black communities of the diaspora, use education to promote a healthy growth, development, and pride,” she says. “So I’m asking: ‘What is the best way?’ because I don’t feel that our public education system is the best way. I feel that academia is one of those spaces where you’re groomed to become an academic, to leave the community you’ve come from rather than use what you’ve learned to improve it and the lives of those who inhabit it.”

The Chief of the Charlestown Maroon Community shows the BLMI group the cemetery where the Maroon ancestors are buried.

Powell, a BLMI ambassador and president of the Brooklyn College Women of Color Club, says that through BLMI, she encountered the works of Associate Professor Haroon Kharem of the Department of Childhood, Bilingual, and Special Education, which detail African Free Schools, a system pre-dating the American public school system. Powell argues that the African system better educated black children and wants to use the strategies and curricula involved as a template for transformative practices in the present. She sees her work, particularly her sociopolitical liberation work, as intersectional—that is, tied to everyone else.

“As someone who is black, woman, and queer, I always think about how we can connect struggles across the board, keeping in mind people around the world, but black people in particular,” said Powell. “So I’m fighting for disabled black people, cisgender and transgender black people, working class or poor black people, and really considering how our lives are intersecting to ensure everyone has freedom and equity in the world.”

The Brooklyn College Black and Latino Male Initiative provides students like Gabrielle Powell with the assistance, skills, values, and opportunities essential to fulfilling their academic and career aspirations thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To make a charitable donation to the college, please visit the Foundation’s website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Bronx Borough President Diaz Allocates Over $2 Million to Bronx CUNY Colleges

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. announced today that his office will allocate more than $2 million in capital funds to help support higher education institutions throughout the Bronx this year.

“I am committed to providing all the necessary resources the school system in the Bronx needs to help our students to strive for a higher education,” said Diaz Jr, a proud alumnus of Lehman College. “We have always been known as ‘the borough of universities,’ and investing in our higher education institutions is imperative in order to provide a top-flight education for all of our residents.”

Funds will go towards improving Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance routes, as well as other improvements, for Bronx Community College’s Roscoe C Brown Jr. Student Center Hall of Fame Playhouse; upgrades for Hostos Community College’s Allied Health Building; converting 25 Lehman College classrooms into state-of-the-art “Networked Smart Classrooms,” as well as provide equipment for their Access & Technology Center; and renovating a new state of the art facility at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University.

“We are very grateful to Borough President Diaz for funding our Access and Technology Center,” said José Luis Cruz, Lehman College President. “These funds will enable us to deliver state-of-the-art assistive technology to a growing population of students with disabilities. Borough President Diaz has been a true partner in our efforts to expand educational opportunity to young people throughout the borough.”

In total, Borough President Diaz has allocated $2,138,000 million across four colleges and universities in FY18. Since 2009, Bronx Borough President Diaz Jr. has invested $13,142,000 in capital funds towards higher education.

“The Bronx is producing top-level talent that can compete in the job market with graduates from any higher learning institute in the country. That is why it is very important we invest in our colleges and universities,” said Borough President Diaz. “Bolstering our borough’s higher learning institutions, both at public institutions as well as private colleges and universities, not only provide the Bronx with a more highly-skilled work force that can compete in the global job market, but it also helps in bolstering our local and citywide economy in the long-term, helping our borough continue to build on the success of our current renaissance.”

“Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. funded two projects, whose funds will be matched by the state, that will help with additional needs be met so that we can operate at full capacity,” said Elizabeth Friedman, Director of Campus Planning for Hostos Community College. “We appreciate the Bronx Borough President’s support of Hostos Community College, who is helping make our buildings more energy efficient while also helping us maximize addressing the needs of our students.

“Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr has been a staunch supporter of Bronx Community College,” says Bronx Community College President Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “As a CUNY alumnus, he knows firsthand the importance and need for an elected official to support and invest in public higher education. For Fiscal Year 2018, the Borough President appropriated $500K for the renovation of the Hall of Fame Playhouse in BCC’s Roscoe C. Brown Student Center. This project will provide a fully accessible route from the Playhouse’s exterior entrance, through the lobby and onto the stage. It will also upgrade the telecommunications, AV systems, signage and mechanical equipment. This funding will have a positive impact on the BCC student experience. Our College is proud of the partnership we have with the Borough President and we are grateful for his years of friendship.”

“Thanks to Borough President Diaz, families across The Bronx that struggle with various forms of mental illness will continue to receive the treatment they need at the Parnes Family Psychological and Psychoeducational Services clinic at Yeshiva University’s Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology,” said Phil Goldfeder, assistant vice president for Government and Community Affairs at Yeshiva University. “This critical investment will allow us to build a new mental health clinic to enhance services and increase our capacity to serve additional residents. The new state-of-the-art clinic will include 17 assessment and therapy rooms, as well as space for conducting play therapy with children, group therapy, and a patient waiting area. Families deserve a mental health clinic that can effectively provide for the community and prepare our students for the future and with this investment, we are another step closer to a stronger Bronx.”

This year, Borough President Diaz’s office has provided $58,718,000 in total capital dollars across 146 projects. Since coming to office in 2009, Borough President Diaz has provided $248,646,000 in total capital funding to 725 projects.


$1.2 Million Grant for New Beyond Identity Initiative

Visiting Professor Nimmi Gowrinathan

The Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at The City College of New York has a new gift of $1,291,000 from the NoVo Foundation, which works to transform global societies from cultures of domination to ones of equality and partnership. Visiting Professor Dr. Nimmi Gowrinathan, a leading analyst and commentator on gender and violence, will be the head researcher and administrator of the grant.

The Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative and the Colin Powell School, will collaborate on a new campus-wide initiative, Beyond Identity: A Gendered Platform for Scholar-Activists. The program will train young women of color from both immigrant and U.S.-based minority communities in identity-driven research, allowing them to draw on lived experiences of discrimination to inform unique research agendas.

Gowrinathan, together with CCNY’s director of Women’s Studies Dr. Asale Angel-Ajani, describe the program as “an intensive engagement in the critical work of developing political solidarities between young women* of color.”

The program combines elements of teaching (learning identity-driven research from activist-scholars studying immigration, social movements, protest, gender and violence); writing (nonfiction narrative writing and political writing from well-established writers from around the world); activism (movement-building workshops from community organizers); and public engagement through student-driven public events, the submission of student’s writing for publication, and the presentation of research findings to relevant policy audiences.

“With this program, there are unique opportunities for transformation and dynamic risk-taking,” said Angel-Ajani. “From an intersectional standpoint, immigrants, women of color, those impacted by economic determinants can share stories in a bigger way through narrative writing and activism.”

The goal of the cohesive, three-year program is to support a more thoughtful resistance to the challenges faced by young women of color, allowing them to develop a portfolio of work to establish their own, unique, political platforms.

“A central component of the program is the ability to articulate lived experiences, and disseminate findings and opinions,” said Gowrinathan. “Sustained, intensive writing courses will push each student to craft nonfiction narratives, as compelling forms of political communication. Without the personal in the political, the stories of these young women remain footnotes in the often exploitative narratives that capture their lives.”

City College provides an essential home for the initiative where educating activist-scholars is a part of the culture. “We are a campus of immigrants, a campus community that proclaims its diversity,” said CCNY interim president Vincent Boudreau, “and so must be a refuge and a source of wisdom on questions of racial, religious, and gender fairness.”

*The category “women” is inclusive of cis-sexual, transgender, and non-binary forms of gendered identities. The Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative does not discriminate on gender or race. All programs are open to all eligible participants without regard to race, gender, national origin, or other characteristics protected by law.

Dr. Gowrinathan is the Founder and Director of the Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative, which examines the impact of rape on women’s political identities, and a Visiting Research Professor at the Colin Powell Center for Global and Civic Leadership at City College New York. Through this initiative she is the director of, Beyond Identity: A Gendered-Platform for Scholar-Activists. She is also currently a Senior Scholar the Center for Political Conflict, Gender, and People’s Rights at the University of California, Berkeley and the creator of the Female Fighter Series at Guernica Magazine.

She has recently been a senior advisor on political voice for the ADB/UN Women Benchmark Paper on SDG’s in the Asia-Pacific region; a Gender Expert for the United Nations Human Development Report on Afghanistan; and a policy consultant and analyst for the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue and the International Crisis Group, researching and analyzing gender inclusion in peace-building and women’s insecurities in Sri Lanka. She was formerly the Director of South Asia Programs and UN Representative for Operation USA. Dr. Gowrinathan received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles titled “Why Women Rebel: Understanding Female Fighters in the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam” which received the Jean and Irving Stone Award for Innovation in Gender Studies. She provides expert analysis for CNN, MSNBC, Al Jazeera, and the BBC, and has published in Harper’s Magazine, Foreign Affairs, Guernica Magazine, and Al Jazeera English, among others. Her work, and writings, can be found at www.deviarchy.com

Established in 2006 by Jennifer and Peter Buffett, NoVo Foundation (NoVo) is a private foundation whose mission is to foster a transformation from a world of domination and exploitation to one of collaboration and partnership. Novo supports the development of capacities in people—individually and collectively—to help create a caring and balanced world. They envision a world that operates on the principles of mutual respect, collaboration, and civic participation, thereby reversing the old paradigm predicated on hierarchy, violence, and the subordination of girls and women.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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Students Will Save on Textbook Costs with Classes Adapting New Open Educational Resources

During the upcoming 2017-18 academic year, Lehman College will be converting 15 classes to Open Educational Resources, (OER) an initiative that will save students an estimated $240,000 in textbook costs. A number of OER classes begin this fall and will continue to be added next spring.

OER is a an increasingly popular and important trend in higher education that replaces “proprietary” textbooks with freely accessible, open educational resources that are not limited by traditional copyright restrictions. The goal is to save students the often-prohibitive cost of textbooks while providing high quality text, media, educational video games, encyclopedias and periodicals.

The Office of Library Services is overseeing the OER “scale up initiative” at Lehman, with support from the Offices of the Provost and Information Technology. “It’s valuable that New York State recognized the need to support students by providing significant funds to underwrite faculty creation of open textbooks,” says Professor Kenneth Schlesinger, chief librarian at Lehman’s Leonard Lief Library. “Rising textbook costs have been identified as a major barrier inhibiting student success.”

Stacy Katz, a substitute open resources librarian and STEM liaison, and one of the librarians coordinating the initiative, says that faculty members in the Business, Education, Nutrition, Spanish and Sociology departments, will be among those participating. Katz says faculty will have the opportunity to customize their teaching material to be more innovative and more closely tailored to their syllabus. Classes converting to OER include sections of Business Law, Creative Writing, Women’s Studies, and Media and Communications Studies.

“We have research showing that students are increasingly engaged and perform as well or better in OER classes,” says Katz. “Textbook costs are an even bigger deal than we realized. Students with high textbook costs take fewer classes and have increased rates in dropping classes.”

Dr. Yuri Gorokhovich, an associate professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental, and Geospatial Sciences, was one of three faculty members to participate in a pilot OER program at Lehman last year. “OER pushed me to search for new material on the subject of the class,” he said. “Instead of adapting a book for the class, I feel like I am adapting a world for the class.”

Olena Zhadko, Lehman’s director of online education, has been supporting the effort to train Lehman professors in the intricacies of the OER process. In June, Zhadko and Katz were among of the facilitators of a two-week workshop called “Enhancing your Course through the Use of Open Educational Resources.”

“My job was to train my faculty to discover the resources, work with those resources, and come up with a final project that they can use to adopt the OER,” says Zhadko. “The idea is that by the end of this program, they will no longer need me.

Lehman has been allocated a budget from New York State of $121,185 for the scale up initiative. Students can find information to register for OER classes on CUNYFirst, under the heading “Zero textbook costs.”

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013


New Faculty Bring Scholarly Distinction and a Passion for Learning to BMCC

This Fall 2017, 38 professors are joining the more than 1,500 faculty at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY). Teaching in BMCC’s 47 associate degree programs, these new faculty members bring expertise in areas ranging from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields, to Liberal Arts areas such as Art History, Modern Languages and Theatre. As part of their orientation to the College, they took part in activities that culminated in a reception on the 13th-floor terrace of Fiterman Hall, where they met with colleagues and the administration of the college, including President Antonio Pérez, Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Karrin E. Wilks and Associate Dean of Faculty, Jim Berg.

New faculty_DSC7704.jpg

Professors at BMCC not only teach, but mentor students who join faculty research projects and conference presentations. The faculty takes part in their own development at BMCC through The Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Scholarship (CETLS) and grant-funded projects. They help lead the college and serve the community, setting an example for students who explore academic and career options as they complete their degrees.

Faculty joining BMCC in the 2017 Fall semester include: Kenneth Cotton and Candido Hernandez (Academic Literacy and Linguistics); Peter Hoontis, Peter Mayer and Roderick S. Snipes (Business Management); Tamir Avcilar (Computer Information Systems); Maria Alvarez, Angela Florschuetz, John Hodgkins, Amanda Hollander and Frederick Solinger (English); Sara Elmiligi (Health Education); Anthony Bishop and Sharell Walker (A. Philip Randolph Memorial Library); Elisabeth Jaffe, Aradhana Kumari, Serine Ndiaye and Hong Yuan (Mathematics); Melanie Oram and Owen Roberts (Media Arts and Technology); Giada Geraci and Laurie Lomask (Modern Languages); Joshua Henderson, Yan Tang and Terttu Uibopuu (Music and Art); Judy Ashton, Careen Purcell and Edward Williams (Nursing); Jamal Ali and Moussa Gazali (Science); Liza Chowdhury, Gerard Clock, Paoyi Huang, Shirley Leyro and Nicole Lopez-Jantzen (Social Sciences, Human Service, and Criminal Justice); Charles Burk and Vanessa Leuck (Speech, Communications and Theatre Arts) and Ruth Guirguis (Teacher Education).

This group of academic scholars reflects the 47 associate degree programs at BMCC,  including new offerings such as Art History, a program that welcomes Professor Yan Yang to its faculty.

Yan Yang_DSC7581.jpg

Professor Yang has taught courses on East Asian art — Chinese, Japanese and Korean art from prehistory to 21st century — at the University of Connecticut, University of Tennessee and Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan. “I am researching the notion of ‘Japanese art’ known as yamato-e’; the codification of its meaning during a very political moment in the early 20th century and how it has affected our understanding of the more distant past,” he says. At BMCC, he looks forward to participating in “curriculum-building that will provide students with innovative ways to think about art, art history and Asia. There are numerous institutions and organizations devoted to Asian art in New York City and I invite anyone with an interest in Asia to join me and experience it through its objects.”

Professor Charles Burk, who is new to the Speech, Communications and Theatre Arts Department at BMCC, brings experience teaching Voice and Movement, Screenwriting and Collaboration Adaptation to Performance (CAP) at institutions including The City College of New York/CUNY (City College) and Fairfield University in Connecticut.

Charles Burks_DSC7569.jpg

Recently, Professor Burk performed in the Obie-nominated, off-Broadway play “Othello Remix,” and he is working on what he describes as a rap adaptation of Shakespeare’s “A Taming of the Shrew,” titled “To Catch a Fox!”

Other projects include directing a musical about adjusting to college life, “What Now? Now What?,” which will be presented September 5 and 7 in Aaron Davis Hall (Theatre A) at City College. He is also creating a theater piece that addresses “the issue of single mothers raising young black men, and how the lack of male role models have shaped their outcomes.” At BMCC, Professor Burk foresees developing “an apprenticeship for student involvement with these projects. I am also excited about partnering with fellow faculty.”

Before joining BMCC’s Math Department, Professor Elisabeth Jaffe taught algebra, calculus, advanced topics in mathematics and writing at Baruch College Campus High School.

Elisabeth Jaffe_DSC7578.jpg

“My favorite thing is to help students see mathematics in the world around them,” she says. “I want them to see the quadratic functions of water fountains or throwing a basketball. I want them to think about the relationship between volume and surface area when blowing up a balloon, or the importance of angles when buying a slice of pizza. I want them to realize they do complex mathematics in their heads every time they cross a street against the light. I want my students to see math as a creative subject.”

At BMCC, she plans to help non-STEM students develop an enjoyment of, and confidence in mathematics. “There is a high expectation at BMCC that every student can learn,” she says. “We are all lifetime learners, and BMCC embraces that philosophy.”

Shane Snipes, a new professor in the Business Management Department at BMCC, is focused on “how to best teach disenfranchised students to think like an entrepreneur.” One of his goals at BMCC “is to connect with students in as many majors as possible, so they understand that being an entrepreneur is possible whether studying health, theater, math, art, computer programming or any other field.”

Roderick Snipes_DSC7670.jpg

Professor Snipes has taught social entrepreneurship at Fordham University, as well as having taught “innovation methods to hundreds of managers at Microsoft, HP and Best Buy. From there, we set up innovation labs for international divisions.”

With this experience, he sets an example for BMCC students who dream of startingtheir own businesses. “I ‘walk the walk’ of entrepreneurship,” he says. “I successfully sold a sustainability consultancy in 2013 to Siemens Corporation. I was in Lithuania in the early 1990s, when starting a nonprofit to address ecological education was important, and the organization I founded was later brought into the Bureau of Land Trust. Entrepreneurship isn’t ‘The Answer’ as I hear, sometimes. It does, however, help show how our interests can solve problems for others — and that’s business.”

Professor Ruth Guirguis taught education courses at Pace University before joining the Teacher Education Department at BMCC. “One of the key things that attracted me to BMCC is its multicultural and diversity aspects,” she says. “It is beautiful to see so many cultures come together, and to be a part of guiding students as they earn their degrees and move on to teach a very diverse student population, themselves.”

Professor Guirguis’ scholarly focus centers on the development of self-regulation and dual language learners. “I come from the CUNY system,” she says. “It was the teaching and learning that occurred while completing my master’s degree that allowed me to go on and get my doctorate.” At BMCC, “Students can make a positive start and develop a solid foundation to further their careers,” she says. “In the past I have worked with my students and together we have been able to publish. I look forward to working with student researchers at BMCC.”

To learn more about BMCC faculty, their research projects and successes, as well as resources available to faculty, visit Faculty Affairs on the BMCC website.


City Tech’s Interdisciplinary Peer-Reviewed Journal NANO: New American Notes Online Explores the Gift in an Age of Austerity

How do gifts move and also stay put? The new issue of NANO: New American Notes Online, an open access City Tech humanities journal, explores this and related questions by considering how gift exchange functions in contemporary consumer culture, the Burning Man festival, Amish domestic life, and literary works from Marianne Moore to Dave Eggers.

Issue 11, “Economies of the Gift in an Age of Austerity,” is the result of a collaboration between guest editors J.P. Craig (Alabama State University) and Jennie Stearns (Georgia Gwinnett College), the article authors, and NANO’s editorial team: Sean Scanlan and Rebecca Devers.

Guest editors J.P. Craig and Jennie Stearns describe the direction of this special issue:

In our culture, all material gifts are generally first commodities and all commodities potential gifts. But is it really that simple? The thread that we have tried to weave throughout this introduction is that any time one mixes social codes with offerings, social feelings will emerge. If an object can be either a gift or a commodity at different times, then a transaction is defined not by the objects exchanged but, at least in part, by the social relations it represents. The boundary between gift and commodity exchange demarcates transactions between those who recognize an ongoing relationship with each other as distinct from transactions between those who do not.

Gift exchange thus plays a critical role not only in the maintaining of relationships between friends and family, but also in the defining and even the formation of larger communities. For this reason, they must also be viewed critically: the gift that binds might also be a gift that simultaneously excludes or one that carries with it the risk of subordination. The contributors to this issue of NANO rely upon these and other understandings of the gift to explore how generosity functions in the face of scarcity—scarcity of time, resources, mutual tolerance—to strengthen, or weaken, communal bonds.

Pandora, by Rossetti

Table of Contents:

Issue 11: Economies of the Gift in an Age of Austerity
Guested Edited by: J.P. Craig and Jennie Stearns

Editors’ Introduction for NANO Special Issue 11: Economies of the Gift in an Age of Austerity
J.P. Craig and Jennie Stearns

Woolf’s Weighty Gifts: The Measure of Modernist Autonomy
Rebecca Colesworthy, SUNY Albany

Gift Exchange as Communal Resistance in Ernest Gaines’s A Lesson Before Dying
Scott Thomas Gibson, La Universidad San Francisco in Quito, Ecuador

“To fulfill a private obligation”: Marianne Moore, Her Patrons, and the Social Economy of the Gift
Síofra McSherry, Freie Universität Berlin

Are Women Full Citizens? The Abortion Debate, and the “Gifts” of Life and Poverty
Elizabeth Gregory, University of Houston

Consumption in Practice: Gift-Giving as Mutual Aid in Amish Home Sales
Nao Nomura, Saitama University, Japan

Blazing Grace: The Gifted Culture of Burning Man
Graham St. John, University of Fribourg, Switzerland

The Gift Network: Dave Eggers and the Circulation of Second Editions
Jacquelin O’Dell, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth

In Looking “We” Become: Neoliberal Giving and Whole Planet Foundation’s Faces of Poverty
Anushka Peres, University of Arizona

NANO Gets a New Look:
In addition, the founder and editor of the journal, Sean Scanlan, has overhauled the look of the journal. The reason for this design, explained at length in the new blog section of the journal, is due to the need to update the CMS so that NANO gets indexed quickly and efficiently. The updated design not only loads faster, it also is responsive on mobile devices. NANO is now https instead of http, which is essential for security and stability. The journal has always been at the forefront of giving authors rights over their material. Now, NANO has a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. This designation more clearly spells out NANO’s and the author’s desire to share and to receive attribution. NANO has an Instagram account, so if readers have a NANO theme-related photo, or an academic-related image, please send it the editor: editornano@citytech.cuny.edu or sscanlan@citytech.cuny.edu.

On the Horizon:
Issue 12 on The Force Awakens is ramping up this summer and will be published in the late fall of 2017. And Issue 13 on The Anthropocene is slated for spring 2018.

https://nanocrit.com


NSF awards CCNY-led team inaugural convergence research grant

CCNY biodiversity expert Ana Carnaval and her interdisciplinary team are recipients of an NSF convergent research grant.

City College of New York biodiversity expert Ana Carnaval co-heads an interdisciplinary team of scientists that won a National Science Foundation Growing Convergent Research award. Twenty-two other teams nationally are recipients of the NSF’s first grants to address societal challenges through scientific collaboration.

Carnaval’s collaborators include:

Cavender-Bares, Figueiredo and Loiselle are Carnaval’s co-PIs. The group will receive $500,000 over five years for its project “RCN: Cross-Scale Processes Impacting Biodiversity.”

“NSF has supported cross-disciplinary collaboration for decades,” said NSF Director France Córdova. “Convergence is a deeper, more intentional approach to the integration of knowledge, techniques, and expertise from multiple disciplines in order to address the most compelling scientific and societal challenges.”

Highlighting the importance of her team’s project, Carnaval pointed out that nearly 10 million species share the world with mankind. This diversity of living beings – Earth’s biodiversity – is both a legacy of how life evolved and is essential to mankind’s survival and well-being.

“Biodiversity provides crucial services to the planet, to all of life, and to humans,” said Carnaval. “Because it is so relevant to the health of our planet and to human societies, science has a crucial role to play in understanding how it is generated, maintained and lost.”

At City College, the NSF grant, Carnaval noted, will help leverage a Center of Biodiversity and Climate Change that she is establishing in the Division of Science.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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New York Times Op-Ed by LaGuardia President Gail Mellow: The Biggest Misconception About Today’s College Students

Paris Welcomes LaGuardia StudentsKelsey Wroten – New York Times

“You might think the typical college student lives in a state of bliss, spending each day moving among classes, parties and extracurricular activities. But the reality is that an increasingly small population of undergraduates enjoys that kind of life.

Of the country’s nearly 18 million undergraduates, more than 40 percent go to community college, and of those, only 62 percent can afford to go to college full-time. By contrast, a mere 0.4 percent of students in the United States attend one of the Ivies.

The typical student is not the one burnishing a fancy résumé with numerous unpaid internships. It’s just the opposite: Over half of all undergraduates live at home to make their degrees more affordable, and a shocking 40 percent of students work at least 30 hours a week. About 25 percent work full-time and go to school full-time.…

… At LaGuardia Community College in New York, where I am president, 77 percent of students live in households making less than $25,000 per year.…

… Community colleges need increased funding, and students need access to more flexible federal and state financial aid, enhanced paid internships and college work-study programs. Improved access to public supports, like food stamps and reduced public transportation fares, would also make a world of difference.…”

To read more, click here to download a PDF of the complete essay. Or click here to read it on The New York Times website.

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Let’s Talk About Sex: Lehman Course Teaches School Counselors How to Do Just That

On a recent afternoon, while temperatures outside hovered in the high eighties, 16 students sat at desks arranged in a half circle in one of Carman Hall’s classrooms. They were waiting for their guest speakers—Lehman Counselor Education/School Counseling alumna Theresa Wyre and her co-presenter to begin their presentation. The two were there to share their experiences as teen parents of a daughter who is now an adult, and how they navigated New York City’s array of family services.

Wyre was 14 years old when she learned she was pregnant. For years she struggled with a public school system that shunned young mothers and school counselors who lacked empathy. Wyre entered the school counseling profession to address these very issues. Today she is an assistant principal in the Bronx, where she ensures that her students receive accurate information about sex and how to prevent teen pregnancy.

It would be just one of several frank and deeply personal discussions about sexuality scheduled into Professor Stuart Chen-Hayes’ carefully crafted Sexuality Counseling course designed specifically for school counselors.

A former sexuality counselor, middle school counselor and college counselor, Chen-Hayes has been teaching the course at Lehman for the past 20 years. It’s an intense two-week elective in the Counselor Education/School Counseling program, and is usually offered each year during the summer. The course includes topics like comprehensive sex education, gender identity and expression; sexual orientation, technology and sexuality; recognizing perpetrators of sexual abuse; sex worker awareness and how to recognize its presence in schools; abortion counseling; paraphilias; and healthy teen and adult relationships.

In addition to the usual required reading and discussions, the course features an eclectic cast of guest speakers—ranging from sex workers to sexual abuse counselors to LGBTQ+ families. Their stories are often raw and powerful and reveal perspectives that are unique, yet not uncommon.

For Samantha Valcarcel, who graduated this past spring, the class defied her expectations. “I thought it would teach me to speak to students about sexual identity, but it was that and more,” she explained. “In human development, you touch on sexuality, but this class really woke me up.”

“I want students to feel that there is no human sexuality issue that they can’t deal with once they leave the program,” explains Chen-Hayes. “Of course not all students are comfortable with all of the material or guest speakers so they are on a personal and professional journey as well and that’s what makes the learning so dynamic. The level of trust between our students is fantastic and it allows folks to make mistakes, ask great questions, and collaborate in the learning process. It’s always my favorite class to teach and students report it’s their favorite class in the program as well.”

Chen-Hayes has been a counselor educator for 26 years. He is the author of multiple publications in refereed journals and books. His second book, which is to be published in 2018, is a memoir about his family’s two-generation, LGBTIQ+ journey toward marriage equality and parenting via surrogacy in Taiwan and the U.S. He is at work on a third book on college access, affordability, admission and school counseling.


Lehman Students Receive Six Gilman Scholarships for Study Abroad

Lehman College has been awarded a personal best: six Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships for the Fall 2017 semester. The scholarships provide financial assistance to qualifying students who will study abroad. This fall, Lehman awardees will receive up to $5,000 to pay for their studies in Italy, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, South Korea, Singapore, and the Netherlands.

The winning students are Katherine Agurcia-Amaya (Italy); Izadora Dau (United Kingdom); Daniel Familia (South Korea); Maria Hernandez (Costa Rica); Grisel Mora (Singapore); and Mariam Sakande (the Netherlands).

“I am so excited to study abroad, not only because of the academic gains but because of the challenge it presents,” said Grisel Mora, a senior majoring in journalism. “It will take me out of my comfort zone and plummet me into the unknown. I believe it’s an experience that will make me competitive in the pool of job seekers.”

Mora will be studying international business and chose Singapore because it’s a “global business hub…due to its powerful financial center and multicultural population.”

Lehman partners with many universities around the world to provide students with compelling international study opportunities. Miriam Sakande will be attending Hague University in the Netherlands, while several Hague students will be studying at Lehman.

“Our students want to go to different places and they come back thirsty for more,” said Lynne Van Voorhis, the assistant dean of international programs and global partnerships. “They learn about themselves and realize they can actually survive and thrive in a different culture. I value the fact that they have the guts to get out in the world and test themselves. They always succeed.”

“Without a dedicated staff and talented students, Lehman would not be able to earn the distinction of being a college on the move,” said Dr. Harriet Fayne, interim provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. “This ‘personal best’ is a result of teamwork and commitment to globalize the student experience.”

The Benjamin A. Gilman International scholarship is sponsored by the United States Department of State and has been administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE) since its inception in 2001.


Director of Lehman’s Urban Male Leadership Program Honored by City & State New York

Michael Deas, LMSW, founding director of Lehman’s Urban Male Leadership Program (UMLP), was selected as one of the 25 most influential leaders in the Bronx by City & State New York.

Deas was appointed in August 2008 to lead the program, which seeks to increase the retention and graduation rates of all students, with a specific emphasis on Black and Latino males. The program currently serves 352 students, both male and female, through academic support, peer-to-peer mentoring, workshops, and special events. “I like to think that the program is committed to bringing forth greatness—one student at a time,” he said.

According to Deas, “These programs provide a circle of support for participants.” And the support seems to be working—retention and graduation rates for students in the program have steadily improved.

President José Luis Cruz, who was honored by City & State last year, praised Deas and his efforts. “As someone committed to equal access and opportunity in higher education, I can attest to Michael’s untiring dedication to the young men and women at Lehman,” President Cruz said. “He is a fierce advocate for the students in his program. It is always gratifying to see colleagues get the recognition they deserve.”

Born in New Jersey and raised in the Bronx, Deas attended Lehman and Fordham University. In 2015 he received the Bronx Chamber of Commerce African American Heritage Award, for influencing “our society and future generations in a manner that we are thankful for today.”

Deas and his fellow honorees will be honored on Thursday, August 24, 2017 at a reception at The Bronx Museum of the Arts, which will feature a keynote address by Bronx Borough—and Lehman alumnus—President Ruben Diaz, Jr.


Seven Baruch Students Receive Gilman Scholarships to Study Abroad in Six Different Countries

Marks Record-breaking Number of Gilman Scholarships in

 a Single Competition

New York, NY – August 24, 2017 – Baruch College students Vanessa Celissaint ‘18, Sita Fofana, ‘19, Bowen Hao ‘18, Mary Johnson ’18, Nicholas McKechnie ’18, Rona Naseri ’18, Lingfeng Zheng ‘18,  have been awarded the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships to study abroad for the fall 2017 semester. These seven Gilman recipients, all from the Zicklin School of Business, will be using their scholarship funds to study in Austria, China, Denmark, Hong Kong, Japan, and Thailand.

The Gilman Scholarship, named after former Congressman Benjamin A. Gilman of New York, is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, and grants awards up to $5,000 to apply towards study abroad or internship program costs.

In addition to the Gilman awards, Johnson and Hao each received extra funding through Gilman’s Critical Need Language Award. This additional award is offered to a limited number of Gilman Scholars each year who are studying critical-need languages.

A Record-Breaking Year

For Baruch College, these seven Gilman scholarships mark a record-breaking number that have been awarded in a single competition period.

“We are very excited that this round of awards represents the largest number given to Baruch students within one competition,” said Valeria L. Hymas, Deputy Director of the College’s National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising. “The fall 2017 Gilman awardees clearly demonstrate how Baruch students have the talent and ambition to be emerging global leaders. Through this intensive study abroad experience, they will build lasting relationships with their host communities, and learn life-long cultural competency skills that will make them even more competitive when they begin their professional careers. ”

According to Hymas, the Gilman International Scholarship enables students to achieve their goals for international experiences.

“Whether it be for a full semester, a summer program or even a three-week winter intersession program, funding through Gilman can make the difference between a dream and a reality for students,” said Hymas.

Meet Five Fall 2017 Gilman International Scholars

Vanessa Celissant

Vanessa Celissaint

Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

“I’m most looking forward to being surrounded by Thai culture and learning about the cosmetics industry here in Asia. I want to work in beauty advertising and this opportunity will be very enriching.”

 

Bowen Hao

Bowen Hao

Peking University, China

“The market and professional demands of international business industries are increasing yearly, so studying in China will definitely help me achieve my career goals. I hope I’m able to trace my origins and have a new understanding of Chinese culture and society.”

 

 Mary Johnson

Mary Johnson

Waseda University, Japan

“Being awarded the Gilman Critical Need Language Award will allow me to improve my Japanese speaking skills and explore a new world full of expression, friendship, and culture. The guidance I received from the Office of National and Prestigious Fellowships helped me feel prepared and confident for this next journey.”

 

Nicholas McKechnie

Nicholas McKechnie

 Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

“I hope to one day own my business, and although at this moment I am unsure of exactly what type of business that is, the Gilman Scholarship will afford me the opportunity to enhance my cultural intelligence. Meeting locals and other exchange students from around the world will offer me a new perspective.”

 

Rona Naseri

Rona Naseri

 Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

“I’m most looking forward to learning from diverse faculty from all over the world at Copenhagen Business School and gaining exposure to different teaching styles than those traditionally used in American universities. Although I’ve traveled to Copenhagen before, I want to see different parts of the city that I didn’t get to experience. I look forward to exploring museums, palaces, and gardens to gain perspective on Denmark’s rich culture and history.”

 

Study Abroad Opportunities Open to All Students

The institutions this year’s Gilman Scholarship recipients will be attending are but a fraction of the opportunities available to Baruch students who wish to study abroad. Baruch offers students over a hundred different programs to choose from, whether they want to study abroad during the January intersession, for a semester, or in the summer. Many of the over 300 Baruch students who study abroad each year are eligible to apply for the Gilman Scholarship, and students who study abroad for a semester are also eligible to apply for the C.V. Starr Study Abroad Fellowship. The Baruch Study Abroad Office works with Baruch students to help them find the best study abroad opportunity that fits their academic and cultural learning goals.

Hymas noted that all Baruch students should explore the opportunities to study abroad.  “Without a doubt, it’s a life-changing experience that not only contributes to your education and enhances your career potential but also adds to your personal development.”

For more information about study abroad opportunities at Baruch, please contact the Baruch Study Abroad Office. For additional information on the scholarships that can help fund study abroad opportunities, please contact the Office of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising.

 


New programs welcome back CCNY students

CCNY_NewBanners_2017

CCNY campus with statue of General Alexander S. Webb, former president of the college.

After an inspiring 170th Anniversary celebration, students and faculty are back on City College of New York’s historic grounds excited for the semester to begin. As the summer turns to fall, new programs are brightening the campus.

There are programs focusing on both electrical engineering and computer science concepts as well as a program that incorporates identity-driven research from activist-scholars studying immigration, social movements, protest, gender and violence.

Following is a list of the new offerings:

Computer Engineering, a 30-credit program from the Grove School of Engineering of that will lead to a Master of Science degree in the field of Computer Engineering.  It combines studies in key aspects of computing hardware and software.

Beyond Identity: A Gendered Platform for Activist-Scholars, a three-year program in collaboration with the Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative and the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. This initiative will train young women of color from both immigrant and U.S.-based minority communities in identity-driven research, allowing them to draw on lived experiences of discrimination to inform unique research agendas.

Minor in Community Change Studies, offered by the political science department in the Colin Powell School. It connects students with the skills and organizations at the forefront of change in New York City and prepares them for careers and lives in public service. The program entails required courses in community organizing and community-based research and an internship with leading social justice organizations in New York City.

Click here for more information about academic programs at CCNY. The college celebrates the start of the fall semester with a Welcome Back Day on Thursday, August 31. Click here for more information.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.


MEC 5K Raises Over $25,000 for Student Scholarships

Over 500 people registered for the inaugural MEC 5K Run/Walk on Saturday, August 19, raising over $25,000 for student scholarships.

At about 10 a.m. the runners took off from the College’s flagship building at 1650 Bedford Avenue. They ranged from elementary school students to senior citizens.  MEC students were among the top runners on Saturday. A list of timed finishers can be found here.

Following the race, the runners (and the walkers) gathered in the Amphitheater for a Hot-97 after-party with food and music. Afterwards, race participants visited several local shelters to share food and beverages that had been donated to the event.

“The day could not have been more perfect,” said Tara Tomlinson, MEC’s Director of Development and Alumni Relations. “We had sunshine, enthusiasm, energy and a real sense of community. As President Crew said in his comments, the future will bring many more of these health-related events.”

“The day could not have been more perfect,” said Tara Tomlinson, MEC’s Director of Development and Alumni Relations. “We had sunshine, enthusiasm, energy and a real sense of community. As President Crew said in his comments, the future will bring many more of these health-related events.”  Event photos may be viewed here.


JACK ROSENTHAL, FORMER DIRECTOR OF ROOSEVELT HOUSE PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE AT HUNTER COLLEGE, DIES

Jack Rosenthal, 82, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, government official and civic leader who served as interim director of Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College during the 2014-2015 academic year, died on Aug. 23.

During a life of public service, he was a spokesman and strategist for Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy; the principal editor of the landmark Kerner Commission report, which condemned white society for isolating African-Americans and, in a chapter he wrote on “The Future of the Cities,” argued for federal investment in integration to reverse “the movement of the country toward two societies, separate and unequal.” He directed the editorial page of The New York Times and The Times Magazine and, as president of The New York Times Foundation, raised millions of dollars for victims of the 2001 World Trade Center attack. He won the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing.

A video of his 2014 Roosevelt House interview with historian Rick Perlstein, author of The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan, is at http://bit.ly/1mfEKPp.

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An Overview of AT&T and the Local Communities with Marissa Shorenstein, President, AT&T East Region

Friday, September 8, 2017, 8–10 am

WHAT:
Presentation by Marissa Shorenstein, president, AT&T East region, on AT&T and the local communities, with an audience Q&A session to follow. Breakfast will be served.

Free and open to the public, but seating is limited.
Public RSVP deadline is September 6: Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5252, or register online here.

Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background: Marissa Shorenstein, president of AT&T East Region, oversees its external and legislative affairs for everything from Maine to Virginia, including Washington, DC. She was previously president of AT&T New York State. Shorenstein’s career has encompassed both the private and public sectors. She served as director of communications for Andrew Cuomo’s 2010 campaign for governor of New York State. From 2004 to 2007, she was senior manager for strategic planning and corporate communications for the New York Jets. Her resume includes work with prominent legislators, as well as Cover the Uninsured Week, a public awareness campaign that called attention to the tens of millions of Americans without health insurance.

Shorenstein serves on the executive committees of the New York State Business Council, the Citizens Budget Commission, the Jewish Community Relations Council of New York, and the Women’s Forum of New York. In addition, she is a member of the Board of Directors of Girls Who Code, the Women’s Leadership Council of the Lincoln Center Corporate Fund, the Battery Conservancy, and the YMCA of New York City’s Development Committee. She represents AT&T at the Partnership for New York City.

Launched in 2005, the QC Business Forum brings together the business community, local government, academia, and students to provide an opportunity for town and gown to interact. Influential leaders in a number of fields serve as keynote speakers at its breakfast and lunchtime lectures, touching on issues vital to the local business community.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact: Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Andrea Alù to Direct Photonics Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center at the GC

Andrea AluAndrea Alù, renowned engineer and photonics researcher, has been named the founding director of the Photonics Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Alù, who will also hold the title of Einstein Professor of Physics at the Graduate Center in affiliation with the Department of Electrical Engineering at The CIty College of New York, comes to the ASRC from the University of Texas at Austin where he was the Temple Foundation Endowed Professor #3 in the Cockrell School of Engineering. He was also a member of the Cockrell School’s Wireless Networking and Communications Group and the head of the Metamaterials and Plasmonic Research Laboratory.

* * *

The ASRC appointment marks the latest achievement in an impressive career.

He is a recent recipient of the Alan T. Waterman Award (2015) from the National Science Foundation — one of the top prizes for scientists and engineers in the United States. Winners are selected based on the innovation of their research and their overall impact on their field and receive $1 million in research funding.

Alù is best known for his breakthroughs in invisibility cloaking, or making objects transparent to incoming microwave signals. He realized the first freestanding three-dimensional invisibility cloak. He also developed the first nonreciprocal acoustic circulator — or one-way sound device.

His discoveries in metamaterials and plasmonics have broad implications for a range of sectors, including defense, communications, medical imaging, acoustics, mechanics, and robotics.

* * *

“I am very excited to be selected as the director of the Photonics Initiative at the ASRC, and I look forward to the opportunity to establish a recognized center of excellence in photonics and electromagnetics in New York City,” Alù said. “The resources and research culture located at the ASRC will be a boon to my research, and I am intrigued by the collaborations between my lab and the other initiatives at the center.”

“Andrea is an innovative thinker, dedicated researcher, and excellent teacher whose work has the potential to transform not just technology but daily life,” said Joy Connolly, provost and senior vice president of the Graduate Center. “We are thrilled that he is joining our team of equally accomplished and committed ASRC directors. I am confident that Andrea, in collaboration with his ASRC and Graduate Center colleagues, will put CUNY at the forefront of science research and teaching.”

Alù is the fifth internationally recognized scientist to be named a founding initiative director at the ASRC. He joins Patrizia Casaccia (neuroscience), Kevin H. Gardner (structural biology), Rein V. Ulijn (nanoscience), and Charles J. Vörösmarty (environmental sciences).

“With Andrea’s appointment, we have filled the ASRC’s five directorships, and we couldn’t have found a more qualified candidate,” said Eric Shipp, deputy executive director of the ASRC. “The ASRC is designed to be a hub of interdisciplinary research in some of today’s most exciting and important fields. Already, we have supported and produced groundbreaking research, and, with Andrea as our photonics director, that will only accelerate.”

* * *

In addition to the Waterman Award, Alù has received the International Commission of Optics Prize in Optics (2016), the Optical Society’s Adolph Lomb Medal (2013), the International Union of Radio Science’s Issac Koga Gold Medal (2011), the Kavli Foundation Early Career Lectureship in Material Science (2016), the Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Engineering (2015), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Microwave Theory and Techniques Society’s Outstanding Young Engineer Award (2014), the International Union of Pure Applied Physics Young Scientist Prize in Optics (2013), the NSF CAREER Award (2010), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award (2010), the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Young Investiator Award (2011), the Leopold B. Felsen Award for Excellence in Electrodynamics (2008), and several other awards. He has twice been named a finalist of the Blavatnik National Award for Young Scientists (2016 and 2017).

Alù is a fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Americal Physical Society (APS), and the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE). He is also a Simons Foundation Investigator in Physics and a distinguished lecturer for the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society and the OSA.

He holds more than a dozen patents and patent applications and has co-authored more than 500 frequently cited contributions to scientific literature. He serves on the editorial boards of several international journals including Physical Review B, New Journal of Physics, and Advanced Optical Materials.

Alù has a Ph.D., M.S., and an undergraduate degree from the University of Roma Tre in Rome, and he conducted his postdoctoral research at the University of Pennsylvania.

He begins his appointment at the Graduate Center in early 2018.


American Dream or Pipe Dream? Inequality Awareness Spurs Support for Change

"American Dream" neighborhood

Despite historic levels of economic inequality that by some measures rival those of the 1920s, Americans are often said to be undisturbed by it. They appear steadfast in their belief in the American Dream, at least as evidenced by limited public support for higher taxes on the wealthy and other redistributive policies. But are Americans actually indifferent to rising inequality?

A new study led by Leslie McCall (pictured below), a sociologist and political scientist at the Graduate Center of the City of New York (CUNY), and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals that when presented with straightforward, objective information about rising economic inequality, Americans become more skeptical about the American Dream and are more likely to support policies that redistribute income and pay.

Leslie McCallMcCall and Yale University social psychologist Jennifer Richeson, along with two graduate students from Northwestern University, Derek Burk and Marie Laperierre, designed and conducted three controlled experiments involving nearly 3,300 Americans. In each experiment, participants shared their beliefs about how people get ahead — whether through hard work and ambition or family and class background.

The researchers provided some of the participants with information about rising inequality, while other participants — the ones in the control group — received comparable information unrelated to inequality.

The experiments showed that, when exposed to information about rising inequality, Americans are more likely to say that structural advantages — being wealthy, having highly educated parents — are important drivers of success, and less likely to say that individual factors, such as hard work, are important.

The third experiment also revealed that those given the information about inequality are more likely to support government and business interventions, such as policies to reduce the pay gap between executives and unskilled workers in major companies and the income gap between the rich and the poor in broader society.

The study stands apart for its interdisciplinary approach — using both psychological and other social scientific approaches to understand how Americans respond to rising economic inequality.

“We know of no other research that has explored the causal impact of exposure to information about rising societal economic inequality on perceptions of opportunity and support for multiple types of equity-enhancing policies,” the authors write.

The authors acknowledge that faith in the American Dream remains strong, even in the face of rising inequality. In all three of the experiments, participants rated individual factors as more important than social and class advantages in getting ahead.

While the researchers point out that Americans are hardly unique in this respect, their main contribution is to show that greater knowledge about the recent leap in inequality dampens faith in the American Dream and engenders greater support for policy solutions.

The study has important implications for ways to increase support for policies that enhance economic equality.

“It reopens a conversation that many thought was settled,” study coauthor Jennifer Richeson said. “It also shows that we need to do more research, particularly looking at the role of racial and gender identities and inequalities in shaping beliefs.”

Leslie McCall is a presidential professor of sociology and political science at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and associate director of the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality, which is based at the Graduate Center.


Prepare for the Fall Semester: Assemble Your Time Management Toolkit

“Time management is a state of mind. Our relationship to time can make or break our academic, professional and personal commitments,” says Nicole O’Donnell, a student in the Bilingual Childhood Education major at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) and a student in the CUNY Baccalaureate School for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies.

For college students gearing up to take on the new year, a key factor in making the transition from high school to college is time management. Though it is a skill that students will need for the rest of their lives, honing that skill proves to be difficult when paired with the academic and extracurricular commitments of a typical college student’s life.

So how can students get into this state of mind? Often, it begins first thing in the morning.

O’Donnell, who commutes from Brooklyn, sets two alarms.“That way, I never find myself having [overslept],” she says. She also uses the MTA.info website to view train schedules. BMCC alumna Gifty Blankson (Speech, Communications and Theatre Arts, ’16), who commutes from the Bronx, uses the Transit app in order to see real-time updates to train schedules and avoid service interruptions. Vito DiGiorgio III, a Liberal Arts major at BMCC, commutes by bus from New Jersey. DiGiorgio arrives at BMCC a couple of hours prior to his first class in order to mentally ready himself for the day ahead.

Balancing student activities with classes

Students enrolled at BMCC receive a Co-Curricular Transcript (CCT) that documents their activities outside the classroom. These activities, while important in developing communication skills and a sense of responsibility, require a sizeable time commitment.

Is it worth it? Melissa Aponte, Assistant Director of Student Activities, believes so. “Students create meaningful relationships with peers, faculty and staff though their participation in extracurricular activities,” she says. “Also, club activities typically only require about two hours and take place when class is not in session.”

Blankson, who has held leadership roles in the BMCC Scholarship Society and the BMCC Sisterhood Society, says her involvement in extracurricular activities was “an opportunity to learn and practice networking skills with faculty members and colleagues.”

DiGiorgio is involved in the BMCC BOLT Program, BMCC PLUS, the BMCC Learning Academy and Rowing Club. He is also Vice President of the Essence of Earth Club. “I find myself busy in a good way,” he says. “I wanted to test everything out to see what I liked to do. I get to meet new people and make connections that open doors to scholarships and other opportunities.”

O’Donnell, a BMCC Foundation Scholar, has attended the BMCC Foundation Gala and MoneyWorks seminars and participated in research projects. “Things can be overwhelming when you’re balancing life and school, and it can be daunting to add more to one’s schedule,” she says. “However, professional careers are built on people skills, leadership, initiative and time management,” skills she has developed through her extra-curricular commitments.

Blankson believes that while extracurricular activities are valuable to a student’s experience, school is her first priority. “Don’t let anything deter you from attaining your degree,” she says.

For students balancing life with school, time management is even more critical. Deborah Harte, Single Stop and Special Services Manager, helps students with time management and other related issues. “Some students have families, work and school, and some are single parents with childcare issues. Some are homeless and others have no means of eating regularly,” Harte says.

Time management tools

Both DiGiorgio and O’Donnell like to use paper planners. “I like using the pen-to-paper technique because I visualize what I want to get done every day,” DiGiorgio says. For O’Donnell, “carrying a planner equips me with visual cues,” she says, “that help me remember my goals.”

O’Donnell also uses the iBooks app to download her assignments from Blackboard and make them accessible during her commute. “I have even taken pictures of textbook pages and math assignments so I can ponder the material until I get home,” says O’Donnell, who also utilizes the project management app Trello, which lets her organize tasks by category and color code projects by deadline.

Additionally, BMCC has numerous programs dedicated to nurturing a good work ethic in its students. “To be a well-rounded student, you must allow the school to go through you just as you go through it,” Blankson says. “Don’t just go to class and go home. Participate in events, build relationships — and manage your time well.”

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article was researched and written by Public Affairs intern Tasfiah Tabassum, who will enter Horace Mann School as a senior in Fall 2017. 


CCNY Historian Beth Baron is CUNY Distinguished Professor

Beth Baron

CCNY’s Beth Baron is CUNY Distinguished Professor.

Historian and author Beth Baron is the latest CUNY Distinguished Professor at The City College of New York. She is the 15th current faculty member at CCNY to earn that distinction.

“Professor Baron is an internationally renowned scholar whose research is of the highest caliber,” said Mary Driscoll, interim provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs. “She is hailed by other distinguished scholars in her field for her ability to develop and sustain a powerful argument for the place of women and gender in Middle East Studies.”

“Professor Beth Baron has conducted groundbreaking research on women’s movements, gender and nationalism and social politics in Egypt,” said Erec Koch, dean of CCNY’s Division of Humanities and the Arts. “She has consistently been a vital contributor to the Department of History and to the intellectual life of our academic community in the humanities division.”

Baron, who also teaches at the Graduate Center, CUNY, has written three books. Her most recent is “The Orphan Scandal: Christian Missionaries and the Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood” (Stanford University Press, 2014). She co-founded and directs the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center at the Graduate Center, and heads its Master’s in Middle Eastern Studies program.

In addition, Baron is president of the Middle East Studies Association, an international group of scholars, educators and those interested in the study of the region.

“I am honored to be a distinguished professor and particularly honored to receive this recognition at an institution which is a national leader in promoting social mobility,” said Baron.

Her research has been supported by grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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CUNY INSTITUTES CHOSEN TO OVERSEE NEW STATEWIDE COLLEGE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAM FOR PRISONERS

Two CUNY institutes have been tapped to oversee the new statewide College-in-Prison Reentry Program announced by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. The program will draw upon on the broad skills and experience of the Institute for State and Local Governance staff and the deep expertise of the Prisoner Reentry Institute at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

The prison education program will provide college-level instruction leading to bachelor’s or associate degrees, or industry-recognized certificates, to incarcerated individuals with less than five years remaining on their sentences.

“To talk about the power of education to transform lives, give hope and open doors is not lofty conjecture, but rather thoroughly researched and documented fact,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “This initiative will be essential to ensuring that those seeking to turn their lives around have access to the most valuable resource they need to succeed. CUNY is proud to play a key role in implementing a program that will not only help incarcerated individuals rejoin society but benefit New York as a whole.”

The $7.3 million College-in-Prison Reentry Program will bring teachers from seven colleges and universities to 17 New York State prisons. It will create more than 2,500 seats for students over the next five years – eventually nearly tripling the current number and bringing in-prison education to many facilities that lack them.

ISLG will have responsibility for overseeing the College-in-Prison program, working closely both with the state Department of Corrections and Community Supervision and with the public and private institutions that will provide the program’s educators. To implement the program, ISLG staff will collaborate with the Prisoner Reentry Institute, which has been developing, managing and evaluating innovative reentry programs since 2005. The John Jay institute will receive $2.37 million, a third of the program’s budget, to serve as the program’s education and reentry coordinator in collaboration with the State University of New York.

The College-in-Prison program is part of the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative (CJII), established by District Attorney Vance to use $250 million from criminal forfeiture funds for innovative projects to improve public safety, prevent crime, and promote a fair and effective justice system. To carry it out, he selected ISLG as the technical assistance provider for CJII.

The prisoner education program is the newest of many projects at ISLG. The institute is a research and policy institute that helps state and local governments deliver more effective and equitable public services. It was co-founded in 2013 by two veterans of New York City government: Its director, Michael Jacobson, a former commissioner of both the city’s correction and probation departments and currently professor of sociology at The Graduate Center; and Marc Shaw, a former first deputy mayor and now the University’s interim chief operating officer, who chairs the institute’s advisory board.

ISLG has forged partnerships with major foundations and government entities to develop and oversee projects aimed at helping local and state governments across the country do a better job serving the public interest.

One of the institute’s most ambitious and potentially impactful projects is a $75 million initiative, funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, to help cities and towns across the country reduce the populations and racial disparities of their jails. Twenty local governments have been selected as pilot sites, each implementing measures whose effectiveness will be assessed for wider adoption.

“Most of the attention on criminal justice reform and the country’s high rate of incarceration is focused on state and federal prisons,” Jacobson said. “But there are 12 million people going to local jails each year – that’s an astounding number.”

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To INFINITY and Beyond

Grad Student David Engel was over the moon about his internship at NASA this past summer, which he secured through his work with the Magner Career Center. 

 

NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center is located in Hancock County, Mississippi, on the banks of the Pearl River. It occupies nearly 14,000 acres and is surrounded by a 125,000-acre acoustical forested area called “the buffer zone,” meant to provide a layer of protection between the general public and the rocket blasts that occur like clockwork, testing the engineering miracles that launch human beings into outer space.

Beyond the trees lie unexpected sights. Aside from the multitude of laboratories, towering scaffolding, space shuttles, rockets, and the massive plumes of smoke emanating from them during testing, Stennis is a city onto itself. There is a barbershop, a gas station, an automotive repair shop, and a supermarket—all far enough apart from one another that one would need to drive to move around the facility. Stennis’s official visitor center, the INFINITY Science Center, is a state-of-the-art, mostly glass-and-metal learning environment and museum that overlooks the calm waters of a pond, and where David Engel, a graduate student in Brooklyn College’s Department of School Psychology, Counseling, and Leadership, has just spent 10 weeks this summer as an intern.

“I still have some trouble processing the fact that I really worked for NASA,” says Engel. He was a counselor at NASA’s Astro Camp, teaching second to 10th graders the fundamentals of the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), in the hopes of cultivating the next generation of astronauts and engineers.

“NASA gave me a particular kind of exposure in working with kids and helped me understand how children are much more concrete, tactile leaners than I previously believed.” Engel was responsible for leading classroom instruction, arts-and-craft/science projects, and field activities.

“I had the opportunity to help kids construct windsocks and stomp rockets, taught them about the four forces of flight and understanding of what keeps an airplane in the air,” he adds. “Although my area of study is education and not in the STEM fields, this experience enabled me to utilize my willingness to learn about things outside my comfort zone, improve my leadership skills, and reinforce my ability to build group dynamics.”

A Brooklyn native born to parents who are of Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish origin, Engel came to Brooklyn College after graduating from Baruch College in 2011 with a degree in industrial organizational psychology. He also spent some time working in real estate sales, honing his ability to build interpersonal connections, while attempting to discover his purpose. He believes he discovered his purpose here at the college, not only in the classroom, but also in his role as the career outreach liaison at the Magner Career Center, where he first learned about internship opportunities at NASA.

Outside of school, Engel is an active member and ambassador for Lime Connect – a not-for-profit organization focused on rebranding disability through achievement. They attract, prepare and connect highly accomplished university students and experienced professionals who happen to have disabilities for careers with the world’s leading corporations such as Facebook, Google, Goldman Sachs, among others.

“This organization has connected me with valuable resources and amazing people. I think it’s important to surround yourself with self-motivated people who support you and provide honest feedback, which is something that I’ve learned being part of this organization, in my work experiences, and in the school counseling program at Brooklyn College.”

In addition to working with the future generations of space travelers and astrophysicists, Engel also had the chance to learn about astronauts. He discovered that it could take about 45 minutes to put on a spacesuit and that astronauts exercise for about 2.5 hours a day. During his time at NASA, he was able to watch a rocket testing. He also had a conversation with Fred Wallace Haise, Jr., legendary Apollo 13 mission lunar module pilot astronaut, best known for the now ubiquitous phrase, “Houston, we have a problem.” His experiences on Apollo 13 were made into an Oscar-winning film starring Bill Paxton as Haise. Engel admits that when he first met Haise, he had no idea who he was.

“He was just walking through the halls and chatting with one of my colleagues about an event on aeronautics that he attended and I just joined the conversation, asking him how he enjoyed the event. My colleagues were a little shocked that I wasn’t asking about his space missions and such. It was really funny. [Haise] laughed about it.”

Engel is not Brooklyn College’s NASA only connection. At its 2011 Commencement Ceremony, the college presented Joel Levine ’64 with the Distinguished Alumnus Award. Levine is the senior research scientist in NASA’s Langley Research Center Science Directorate and also serves as chief scientist and principal investigator for the proposed ARES (Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Surveyor) Mars Airplane—a robotic, rocket-propelled aerial vehicle that NASA plans to use in a search of life on Mars.

“I was influenced by this outstanding institution and its very dedicated and excellent faculty,” Levine said at the 2011 graduation. “I first saw the planet Mars from on top of Ingersoll Hall. Little did I know that I would spend the next four decades involved in our nation’s program to explore the red planet.”

Like Levine, Engel wants to be the kind of change agent that inspires and opens doors to a myriad of possibilities, whether that is as a career counselor or as a recruiter for a company like Facebook or Google.

“I want to help other Brooklyn College students have the same experiences that I’ve had at NASA, which my employment with the Magner Center helps make possible” says Engel. “I want to be a leader in whatever I do. Working at NASA has helped me improve on my strengths and realize my ability to make a positive impact in students’ lives.”

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


VIDEO, PREPARED REMARKS: CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ADDRESSES CITY & STATE EDUCATION FORUM

Chancellor Milliken: “Educational institutions must adapt to the new challenges of the 21st century, to changing requirements for our students, to new funding stresses.”

Chancellor Milliken: “To remain an engine of mobility on a scale that can really make a difference in this restless giant of a city we live in, we have to change.”

Critical Elements of CUNY’s strategic plan to meet the challenges of today:

• Widen CUNY’s fundamental value of access, scaling up programs with the Department of Education, and enhancing our use of effective technology

• Institute and expand programs to significantly boost CUNY’s graduation rates

• Implement major expansion of programs giving graduates more workplace experience through internships and other learning initiatives

Prepared remarks for an address to City & State education forum delivered by Chancellor Milliken is available here.

Video:
https://youtu.be/aditbbY2EmE


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN REGARDING REMOVAL OF CONFEDERATE GENERALS FROM BCC HALL OF FAME

 

Bronx Community College has announced it is taking steps immediately to remove the busts of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson from the Hall of Fame for Great Americans on its campus.  This must occur without delay.  There are many great Americans, many of them New Yorkers, worthy of a place of honor in this hall; these two Confederate generals are not among them.


Hostos Celebrates Two Generations Summer Achievement Graduate

August 7th may have been an unseasonably gray and drizzly day, but all was bright and high-spirited in the Hostos’ Faculty Dining Room, where the 4th annual Two Generations Summer Achievement Ceremony was held. Student-parents, children, faculty, and staff members celebrated the conclusion of this year’s program.

Launched in 2014, the Two Generations program helps student-parents accelerate their higher education through one free Hostos summer course and free enrollment for up to two of their school-aged children in the Hostos’ College for Kids Summer Academy. 35 student-parents completed this year’s program—the largest number in the program’s history. Four student-parents completed their degrees via the program.

New York City Council Members Vanessa L. Gibson and Rafael Salamanca, Jr. attended the ceremony and added their congratulations to those of Hostos President David Gomez  and the Two Gens faculty and staff. Gibson stressed the city’s commitment to education, and urged the student-parents to “Continue aiming for stars. It is time for women—and women of color—to take their rightful place in society.” She highlighted the need for involvement in the current political scene:  “We need you like never before.”

Three cheers for this year’s Two Gens grads!

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Hostos Celebrates Student-Fathers

On July 20, the CUNY Fatherhood Academy at Hostos (CFA) recognized the hard work and sacrifice of its latest cohort of student-fathers.

In total, 20 fathers were celebrated in a special event held in the Hostos Café attended by administrators and staff, and most importantly, the families, friends and other supporters who helped the program’s participants reach this milestone.

Darryl Rogers, Senior Director of Pre-College Programs, introduced the group and Danielle Allen, the CFA Program Director, served as the host. The cohort also received special congratulations from Hostos Dean Peter Mertens and Andre Peterson from Bronx Fathers Taking Action in the Office of the Bronx Borough President, Ruben Diaz Jr., among others.

The cohort dedicated itself to preparing for the High School Equivalency Diploma test and participated in several college readiness programs. They also received occupational training and guidance through Hostos’ Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development.

CFA, a program of the NYC Young Men’s Initiative (YMI), is a free, 16-week high school equivalency and college preparatory program for resident New York City fathers ages 18 to 28. CFA promotes responsible parenting, college readiness, and work among unemployed and underemployed fathers.

The CFA Spring Class of 2017:
Abraham Kennings, Anthony Walker, Brandon Carrasco, Corey James, Dakota Wilson, Daniel Emmanuel, Daniel Batiz, Donovan Gordon, Julius Stewart, Jeremy Gordils, Guy Heyward, Jaccob Serrano, Jean Ortega, Jose Montijo, Justin Anthony, Kelvin Guzman, Leroyal Lee, Nile DeCastro, Tyrone Shine, and Wilder Nunez.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Hostos President Recognized as One of Top 25 Influentials in the Bronx

The Bronx is certainly booming, and Hostos has been a key component to driving the borough forward for nearly 50 years.

To recognize this contribution, Hostos President Dr. David Gómez will be featured in City & State magazine’s upcoming special edition of “Borough Series: The Bronx,” which will acknowledge the “Top 25 Influentials” in five key sectors whose work has contributed to the borough’s success. Gómez was selected for his contributions to education, and he will join other honorees, including keynote speaker Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr., at City & State’s Bronx Event on Aug. 24 at The Bronx Museum of Art. The list of honorees will be revealed in their August 21 issue.

“On behalf of the entire Hostos Community College family, I am thrilled that City & State has recognized the importance of this institution to the community it serves,” Gómez said. “For close to a half a century, Hostos has been committed to changing the lives of people in and around the Bronx for the better—the very same people who were the inspiration and catalyst for this institution. As we look toward our 50th anniversary in 2018, sharing our many successes, as well as some of our plans for the future, is something we are looking forward to. This recognition could not have come at a better time.”

Gómez is no stranger to The Bronx or Hostos. He spent more than a decade at Hostos in senior administrative positions, including Dean of the College, Interim Dean of Academic Affairs, Associate Dean of the College, and Special Assistant to the President for Management and Planning, before being named President in June of 2015.

During his tenure, Gómez helped to lead Hostos to several important milestones, including increased graduation numbers and a Top 10 finish for the million-dollar 2015 Aspen Prize for Community College excellence.

Gómez earned a B.A. in English Literature from SUNY Albany. He earned an M.A. in Higher Education Administration and Ed.D. in Higher and Adult Education from Teachers College, Columbia University.

For more information about Hostos Community College’s 50th Anniversary Celebration, go to www.Hostos50.com.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


City Tech and Weill Cornell Medicine Awarded NIH Grant for Big Data Training Program in Biomedical Informatics

A joint training program between City Tech and Weill Cornell Medicine (WCM) of Cornell University was recently awarded a $1.2 million, 4-year National Institutes of Health (NIH) Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) training grant to educate and train undergraduate students in biomedical big data sciences and informatics. The City Tech-WCM Big Data Training Program in Biomedical Informatics (BD2BMI) is led by Evgenia Giannopolou, PhD, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, City Tech, and Jyotishman Pathak, PhD, Frances & John L. Loeb Professor of Medical Informatics, Weill Cornell Medicine.

As the era of “Big Data” dawns on biomedical research, multiple types of biomedical data are being generated on an unprecedented scale. A 2012 report from the NIH recognized that the greatest challenge to leveraging the significant potentials of big data will be in educating and recruiting future computational data scientists with the background and experience to exploit big data opportunities.

“Today’s big data challenges on biomedicine demand education and hands-on training; City Tech and Cornell will work together to prepare the next generation of innovators and visionaries in the field of biomedical big data science,” said Professor Giannopolou.

The considerable challenges of big data demand education and hands-on training that are currently insufficient. Equally importantly, recent data from the National Science Foundation (NSF) show that big data training programs across the U.S. lack diversity. To bridge this knowledge gap for the U.S. biomedical workforce in underrepresented minorities, City Tech and WCM will implement a training program—the City Tech-WCM Big Data Training Program in Biomedical Informatics (BD2BMI)—that will enhance diversity in biomedical data science by instructing and mentoring undergraduate students in the use of cutting edge big data methods in biomedical data sciences.

The goal is to provide educational and research training opportunities to students and to foster the development of new interdisciplinary research collaborations between faculty at City Tech and WCM in a shared mission to prepare the next generation of innovators and visionaries in the field of biomedical big data science.

BD2BMI is one of the few examples of innovative collaborations between New York City academic institutions aimed at providing educational and research training opportunities for underrepresented students in biomedical data science and cultivating new interdisciplinary research collaborations between faculty. BD2BMI will prepare the next generation of innovators and visionaries in the field of biomedical big data science and enhance diversity within the field by:

1) Enhancing research experiences for students in cutting-edge biomedical big data science, under the joint mentorship of City Tech and WCM faculty;

2) Establishing educational opportunities in big data science for students and faculty via curriculum development and co-curricular training activities that will incorporate big data methods and applications in biomedical sciences.

BD2BMI aims to elevate the competencies of City Tech student trainees from diverse underrepresented backgrounds as well as faculty, and provide them the necessary skills to further their career in biomedical data sciences.


City College researchers produce smart fabric to neutralize nerve gas

A team led by pioneering CCNY chemical engineer Teresa Bandosz develops smart textiles with the ability to detect and neutralize nerve gas.

From the lab of City College of New York chemical engineer and Fulbright Scholar Teresa J. Bandosz comes a groundbreaking development with the potential to thwart chemical warfare agents: smart textiles with the ability to rapidly detect and neutralize nerve gas.

The fabric consists of a cotton support modified with Cu-BTC MOF/oxidized graphitic carbon nitride composites. The latter were developed in the lab previously and tested as nerve agent detoxification media and colorimetric detectors.

Combining Cu-BTC and g-C3N4-ox resulted in a nanocomposite (MOFgCNox) of heterogeneous porosity and chemistry. Upon the deposition of MOFgCNox onto cotton textiles, a stable fabric with supreme photocatalytic detoxification ability towards the nerve gas surrogate, dimethyl chlorophosphate, was obtained.

The detoxification process was accompanied by a visible and gradual color change, which Bandosz said can be used for the selective detection of chemical warfare agents and for monitoring their penetration inside a protective layer.

“These smart textiles adsorbed almost 7g of CWA surrogate/its detoxification products per gram of Cu. The superior performance was linked to the high dispersion of the MOF crystals on the fibers, and a specific texture promoting the availability of the active copper centers,” said Bandosz, who is seeking funding for additional research.

Her research team included Dimitrios A. Giannakoudakis, a PhD student; Yuping Hu, visiting scientist from China; and postdoctoral research associate, Marc Florent.  Their study appears in the journal Nanoscale Horizons.

Bandosz received a 2016-2017 Fulbright Senior Scholar Award for her pioneering work. She did research at the University of Malaga in Spain to help alleviate global warming and solve energy problems.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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CCNY’s Naresh Devineni receives DOE Early CAREER Award for outstanding research

CCNY civil engineer Naresh Devineni is the recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy Early CAREER Award for outstanding research.

Naresh Devineni, assistant professor in The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering and NOAA CREST, is one of 59 recipients nationwide of 2017 U.S. Department of Energy Early CAREER awards. He’ll receive a five-year $760,000 grant for his proposal “Multi-scale Modeling of Extreme Events and Impact Information,” selected by the DOE Office of Science’s Biological and Environmental Research Program.

Devineni is the first City University of New York faculty to receive an Early CAREER Award from DOE since the honor was introduced eight years ago.

The awards are based on peer review of about 700 proposals this fiscal year.  They support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and stimulate research careers in the disciplines supported by the Office of Science.

A civil engineer, Devineni’s research thrust includes hydro-climate modeling and extremes analysis, statistical methods, water, and energy sustainability and risk assessment. His contributions cover innovations in modeling spatiotemporal dependence in hydrometeorological fields, new algorithms for the assessment of water stress, tree-ring based streamflow reconstruction and optimization to address water stress. He also works on dynamic Bayesian network models to address model and prediction uncertainties.

Click here for all of his work.  In addition, Devineni is the creator of a web site where people of all backgrounds can learn data analysis, probability and statistics in a fun and intuitive way without the technical lingo. Click here to access the site.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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CHANCELLOR REAFFIRMS CUNY’S COMMITMENT TO INCLUSIVENESS, EQUALITY AND RESPECT

“The CUNY community mourns the tragic loss of life, violence and hatred we saw in Charlottesville over the weekend. The bigotry, anti-Semitism and racism of the neo-Nazis, white supremacists and their followers showed us, sadly and vividly, the views that we oppose so strongly at The City University of New York. It was a painful spectacle, but it was also a reminder of why we must never waiver from the principles of inclusiveness, equality and respect, which need to guide us as a university and a country. A great source of strength of CUNY, the country’s largest urban university, has always been our diversity and inclusiveness. I hope that, as we mourn and try to come to terms with the terrible events of the weekend, we can also reaffirm our commitment to the principles that must overcome hatred and divisions in our country.”


Discovery From The Miocene Epoch: A New Species of Primate

A new paper co-authored by Hunter Professor Christopher Gilbert Discovery From The Miocene Epoch: A New Species of Primatepresents an exciting discovery, filling in a gap in the scientific understanding of primate evolution. In August of 2014, Dr. Isaiah Nengo, an anthropology professor at De Aznza College and associate director of the Turkana Basin Institute at Stony Brook University, made a remarkable discovery during a paleontological dig: a fossilized ape cranium, recovered in its entirety from approximately 13 million year old rocks in Kenya. Funded by the Leakey Foundation, the discovery took place in the famous Turkana Basin, an area surrounding Lake Turkana in Northern Kenya. Numerous fossils from that location have provided key clues to our understanding of ape and human evolution in Africa, but most pieces found are bone fragments – useful, but pieces with most of the puzzle missing, and difficult things from which to extrapolate a comprehensive understanding of any species. The newly recovered cranium, the most complete specimen of its kind, presents researchers with unparallelled new opportunities to learn about ancient apes.

Professor Gilbert, a known expert in ape and monkey anatomy and evolution, was a clear resource for Dr. Nengo when the significance of the discovery became clear. Along with his colleague Dr. John Fleagle of Stony Brook University, Professor Gilbert began to analyse the fossil. Their determination – that it was an adolescent ape cranium representing a new species – confirmed the importance of the specimen: it could lead to groundbreaking connections in the study of primate evolution.

Professor Gilbert, Dr. Fleagle, and Kelsey Pugh, a current Hunter/CUNY Ph.D. student focusing  on the evolutionary relationships among fossil apes, performed many of the primary analyses for the paper, spending days combing through the collections of the American Museum of Natural History, taking measurements, performing CT scans, and looking for correlations between existing ape skulls and their new find. Their wide study of living and fossil ape crania led them to an intriguing conclusion: the new species Nyanzapithecus alesi is closely related to the common ancestor of all living apes and humans.  The fossil may in fact be the entryway to creating a picture of what the common ancestor of all living apes and modern humans might have looked like. “We are just getting started with understanding the true significance of this amazing fossil, and I’m sure that future studies will highlight other important details as well,” says Professor Gilbert.

It was particularly serendipitous that CUNY and Hunter’s Kelsey Pugh happened to be performing research in this particular field at the time of this discovery and was able to contribute significantly to the research, receiving co-author credit for her work. Professor Gilbert is particularly gratified by this: “At Hunter, bright and motivated students can make significant contributions to our research projects and, ultimately, to our understanding of primate evolution.”

The study is already receiving national attention, with publication in Nature, the world’s leading scientific journal and an article in the Washington Post, among others. As the conversation and analysis of this momentous discovery continues, so will our comprehension of our biological past, and the ways in which human life emerged.

For more information click here


A Classics Man

Essowe Tchalim ’15 scored a coveted role at Droga5, one of the top ad agencies in the world, and credits his education in the Brooklyn College Department of Classics for giving him the knowledge, tools, and resources to achieve his goals.

How did a recent Brooklyn College graduate with a B.A. in classics secure a position at Droga5, one of the top advertising agencies in the world? And what does the study of Greco-Roman antiquity have to do with advertising? Essowe Tchalim ’15 has answers.

Tchalim—a native of Lomé, Togo in West Africa, who came to the United States with his family when he was six years old—joined the Droga5 staff as broadcast production intern. He is now an associate broadcast producer for the award-winning ad agency, whose clientele includes Android, CoverGirl, Google, The New York Times, and Sprint, among many others.

“The classics center on studying the art, literature, and politics of ancient civilizations to deconstruct and understand their culture as best we can,” said Tchalim, who minored in English. “Good advertising demands that type of understanding for the present-day culture, as the industry rests on how well one can tap into the core values, concerns and desires that people share. After you spend years analyzing cultural constructs and behaviors of long-dead civilizations by studying their ruins and fragmented literature, you excel at dissecting a more modern, more familiar civilization such as your own; and that skill is very valuable in a creative advertising agency.”

Tchalim began his academic career as a student at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering (formerly New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering), where he studied biomolecular science. But he soon realized that he was passionate about the humanities, and that Brooklyn College could offer him the same rigorous education as NYU, but at a fraction of the cost.

“Essowe did exactly what a college student should do,” said Assistant Professor Brian P. Sowers of the Department of Classics. “He studied things he was deeply passionate about and he augmented that study with experiences that would get him the type of work he was seeking. When the folks at Droga5 saw this, they weren’t just looking at his humanities degree—a degree they want candidates to possess because it signals well-roundedness and superior communication skills; they were looking for someone who had the real-world, practical experience through the internships and part-time jobs that Essowe had designed for himself very carefully.”

The Department of Classics distinguishes itself by working very closely with its students to ensure that their success translates beyond the borders of the Brooklyn College campus. Faculty members utilize their relationships with alumni and other power brokers to help students get their foot in the door at some of the most well-known companies in the world. And the classics students, who commit to learning to read and write Greek or Latin, excel in whatever industry they enter, bolstering the reputation of both the college and the Classics Department as a site for qualified candidates.

And that is because classics, as taught at Brooklyn College, is a broader area of study than it is often perceived to be. “The ancient Mediterranean isn’t just Europe,” Sowers said. “It also includes North Africa and vast amounts of land that we now call Asia. In the ancient world, these were part of this larger cohesive group, mainly because they were connected by one sea. This group was diverse, composed of at least 50 percent women, if not more; people who weren’t Greek or Latin speakers; people of a variety of colors and ethnicities. Unfortunately, the literary record that survives tends to be dominated by male aristocratic authors. And so that skews the perspective of the ancient experience.”

With this understanding, contemporary classicists are exploring the field much more holistically, engaging in research that focuses on, for example, ancient sexuality, uncovering that the binary, heteronormative modes of sexuality that are considered the standard today were only one of many acceptable expressions of such in ancient times. There is also an emerging field within classical study which has gathered significant evidence in support of the idea that ancient Greeks and Romans did not view themselves as white, in terms of racial construction, and that this categorization comes much later, when Enlightenment-period historians projected the identity onto them. Scholarship approached from this broader point of view helped Tchalim feel highly prepared to embark on any number of career paths and achieve his goals.

“I’m very grateful to have had as good an education as I did,” says Tchalim. “My professors encouraged me to do more than just what was expected of me and instilled in me a good work ethic. I never thought I’d say this, but the piles of homework I had in undergrad helped prepare me for the work I have now in my current job.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


NATIONAL ACCREDITATION, NEW ARTS DEGREE BOOST CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR CUNY COMMUNITY COLLEGE ARTS GRADS

Arts and music graduates from two CUNY community colleges have new prestigious paths to bachelor’s degrees and careers in the arts this fall. National accreditation for Queensborough Community College’s arts programs and Borough of Manhattan Community College’s new linkage with Lehman College’s B.S. in Music program open new horizons for arts students.

“The City University of New York offers an education in the arts equal to that at the most highly regarded private schools at a fraction of the cost,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “CUNY provides the opportunity for all students to pursue their passion in the arts.”

Queensborough Community College in June received accreditation from the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, one of only 19 community colleges in the nation to be accredited by NASAD and the only one in New York. With this Queensborough joins the ranks of New York City’s premier art education institutions to offer a nationally recognized art and design education.

Most Queensborough art and design graduates want to go on to earn a bachelor’s degree. The majority of four-year private art colleges accept transfer students into the third year of their programs. With accreditation, the students who attend Queensborough for their first two years can be confident that their education will be of the same caliber as that at the private institutions, but at often significantly less cost.

In addition, students will be able to get full credit for their first two years of foundation study in art, although transfer schools frequently allow only partial credits to two-year schools.

The rigorous five-year NASAD accreditation process examines not only the art programs but also the college itself, the faculty, the successful graduates and the support systems that are in place to ensure a rich educational experience. The Queensborough Art Gallery and Kupferberg Holocaust Center offer world-class exhibitions in addition to hands-on learning opportunities to students in a wide variety of arts fields.

Borough of Manhattan Community College students who look forward to careers in performing or teaching music can enroll this fall in the college’s new Associate in Science (A.S.) in Music program with specializations in Music Studies and Music Performance. The program will integrate with the Bachelor of Science in Music at Lehman College, which offers a specialization in Music Education. The new program will educate students in the fundamentals of music and in specialized topics in music education and music performance, including music theory, keyboard skills, ear training and sight singing.

Music majors at BMCC have a wide range of facilities to support their work including 16 practice rooms; the Art and Rita Siegel Piano Lab, which provides 24 electronic keyboards, and classrooms with Steinway grand pianos as well as a comprehensive collection of percussive and string instruments. Past music majors at BMCC have won national contests and performed widely. Auditions for the Fall 2017 Music Program will be held August 18 in the college’s Fiterman Hall.
Other ongoing CUNY art education programs include LaGuardia Community College integrated with the B.A. and BFA programs at Queens College and Hunter College and the program in Fine Arts at the School of Visual Arts, and Queensborough Community College with Queens College.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.

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ICYMI: American Dream Machine

City Journal, The Shape of Work to Come 2017
By Charles Upton Sahm

Intel cofounder Andy Grove, a City College graduate, once dubbed his alma mater “the American dream machine.” A fascinating new study on the economic mobility of college graduates confirms that the moniker fits City College and the broader City University of New York (CUNY) system.

CUNY officials are justifiably proud of the high marks that the network of 11 senior colleges and seven community colleges earned in a new study, “The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility.” Looking to determine how higher education affects socioeconomic mobility, a team of economists led by Stanford’s Raj Chetty used millions of tax filings and financial-aid records to track nearly every person in the United States who attended college from 1999 to 2013, comparing their family income upon entering college with their family income years after they exited. CUNY scored among the highest on the mobility scale, measured by the percentage of students who started in the bottom quintile of family income and ended in the top quintile. In fact, six of the top ten colleges for mobility are CUNY schools. The other four are Cal State (Los Angeles), Pace University (New York), SUNY Stony Brook (New York), and the for-profit Technical Career Institutes (New York). In terms of raw numbers, the study shows that CUNY moves nearly six times more students from the lowest income quintile to the top three quintiles than all eight Ivy colleges plus the University of Chicago, Duke, MIT, and Stanford combined. Nearly a third of CUNY students come from the bottom income quintile; but at these elite colleges, less than half of 1 percent of students do.

Less encouragingly, the study finds that the percentage of students from the bottom income quintile has been shrinking at public institutions like CUNY, where the share fell from 30.4 percent in 2000 to 23.3 percent in 2011. Much of the decline has taken place since the 2007–08 recession. Still, the Chetty study coincides with a period of revival at CUNY, and two recent initiatives—CUNY Start and the Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP)—are aimed at further improving low-income students’ college readiness and graduation rates. Both are showing promising results.

CUNY Start was launched in 2009 to help students who don’t pass CUNY assessment tests in reading, writing, and math—tests they must take to demonstrate college readiness if they don’t score high enough on the SAT or state Regents exams. (Currently, about 80 percent of students entering CUNY associate-degree programs must take at least one remedial course.) CUNY Start provides a semester-long course—25 hours a week if students need help in all three areas; 12 hours if they need help in just one—that costs just $75, including textbooks. Instructors “teach practical math concepts and effective reading and writing strategies—not just to pass the test but to become better prepared for their degree studies,” explains Donna Linderman, CUNY’s dean for Student Success Initiatives. Most important, the clock doesn’t start on time-limited financial aid for CUNY Start students until they’re ready to enter a full-time degree program.

A CUNY study found that 62 percent of CUNY Start students passed assessment tests in writing in one semester, while just 26 percent did so in a comparison group; 53 percent of CUNY Start students reached college-level proficiency in mathematics, while just 10 percent did so in a comparison group. Researchers from the education nonprofit MDRC are studying students’ long-term outcomes.

Started in 2007, ASAP helps low-income students who agree to study full-time overcome barriers in their progress toward timely degree completion. The program provides financial support with free MetroCards, textbook vouchers worth $500, and consolidated scheduling to help students balance jobs, family, and school.

A key ASAP service is its “intrusive and mandatory advisement model.” Students get assigned one advisor from entry through graduation. Advisors have a maximum caseload of 150 students, far fewer than at most colleges, and help students map out a structured degree pathway and monitor their progress. “They’re a coach, they’re a cheerleader, they’re an advisor, a trusted, trained individual who really knows the student and is there for them,” says Linderman.

CUNY and MDRC studies show that ASAP has doubled three-year associate-degree graduation rates compared with those of similar CUNY students. The current average ASAP three-year graduation rate is 53 percent, versus 24 percent for similar CUNY comparison-group students. The effort does require additional funding—about $3,700 per student per year—but the cost continues to decline as the program reaches economies of scale. A study by Teachers College professor Henry Levin shows that ASAP is cost-beneficial in the long term. In fact, given the low-income status of many CUNY students—half have household income under $30,000—ASAP could be viewed as one of the city’s most effective antipoverty programs.

Based on the program’s success, the de Blasio administration recently provided $77 million to expand ASAP, which will soon reach 25,000 students per year. The ASAP model is also gaining national attention. Three community colleges in Ohio are replicating it, and Governor John Kasich wants to extend the program. Westchester Community College in New York and Skyline Community College in California are implementing ASAP, thanks to the Laura and John Arnold Foundation’s Moving the Needle initiative. Four-year colleges, including CUNY’s John Jay College, are also adopting the ASAP model.

CUNY remains far from perfect. Despite all the hard work, its system-wide three-year associate-degree graduation rate is just 18 percent; its six-year bachelor’s rate is 55 percent. But these figures are up significantly in recent years. In fact, the three-year graduation rate at CUNY’s community colleges jumped from 16.9 percent to 21.1 percent last year—the largest one-year increase in memory. CUNY’s chancellor James Milliken has committed to doubling the three-year associate-degree graduation rate and raising the bachelor’s rate by 10 percentage points in the coming years. The expansion and enhancement of CUNY Start and ASAP play a big role in his plans.

“If you want to move more low-income individuals out of poverty through degree attainment, you must address students’ issues comprehensively,” notes Linderman. “Programs like ASAP and CUNY Start do that. . . . If you want to see large numbers of students earn their degrees and hopefully enter the middle class, you must invest in the infrastructure.” CUNY is doing it.


Council Member Carlos Menchaca Visits City Tech Citizenship Classes at Industry City

City Tech students enrolled in the Division of Continuing Education’s Adult Learning Center presented New York City Council Member Carolos Menchaca with a certificate of appreciation and recognition for “outstanding service and support of adult literacy programs,” on June 29 at Industry City in Sunset Park. Menchaca was invited to visit City Tech’s ESOL/Citizenship classes held at Industry City’s Innovation Lab, which is a public-private collaboration that includes Industry City, City Tech, and local non-profit community-based organizations: Southwest Brooklyn Industrial Development Corporation (SBIDC), Opportunities for a Better Tomorrow (OBT), and Brooklyn Workforce Innovations (BWI).

Menchaca, who represents district 38, has been a leader in the fight for adult literacy funding in New York City, working closely with the NYC Coalition of Adult Literacy, since he joined the City Council in 2013.

“We invited [Menchaca] to visit our two ESOL/Citizenship classes since students had been learning about US history and government while improving their English. This included representative democracy, so it was a perfect fit for the City Council member from the district to visit, and he did not disappoint,” said Leah Clay-Youman, director of special projects at City Tech. “He spoke passionately about how government can help them, really listened when they spoke, showed great appreciation for their efforts, and also a deep understanding of the importance of adult literacy. Menchaca also showed a strong appreciation for the diversity of New York City.”

Menchaca took questions from the students and when asked about his greatest accomplishments he mentioned his work on the NYC ID program, which is especially important for undocumented workers, and added that he is especially proud of being the first openly gay city council member as well as being the first Mexican American. He encouraged all women in the room to consider running for office, stressing that the City needs more women elected officials. He committed to personally help anyone present interested in running for an elected office.

A student spoke about how she was late to class that day because she had to wait for her husband to get home from work, and then literally handed their baby to him as she walked out the door to come to class. She said that it’s very hard to find time to study for her citizenship exam on her own, and thanked the City Tech program for helping her to recently pass her citizenship interview.

Menchaca said he understood the difficulty of learning English while raising children and working, having watched his own parent—a single mother of seven children—struggle with the language. He also shared how the issue of US citizenship preparation was near and dear to him, because his partner, who is Egyptian, had recently passed his citizenship interview.

Menchaca told the students at the end of the event: “You’re what makes New York City beautiful!”

City Tech’s citizenship classes and Spanish High School Equivalency (HSE) classes were funded by the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs as part of the ActionNYC Education Initiative.

New York City Council Member Carlos Menchaca is Chair of the Committee on Immigration and a member of the LGBT Caucus. He authored, introduced and passed legislation to create the first municipal identification card program in New York City, and worked to secure funding for the largest public defender program for undocumented immigrants in the nation. Menchaca represents an incredibly diverse district of front-line communities in New York: a large Chinese and Latino immigrant population, the second largest public housing development in the City, and a waterfront community heavily impacted by Hurricane Sandy. After a successful first round of Participatory Budgeting last fiscal year, Menchaca plans to bring a broader vision of participatory democracy to this diverse district by encouraging community involvement in the entire budget, legislative, and policy making process. District 38 includes portions of Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Borough Park, Carroll Gardens, Dyker Heights, Gowanus, Green-Wood Cemetery, Red Hook, South Slope, Sunset Park and Windsor Terrace in Brooklyn.

About City Tech (New York City College of Technology) City Tech, of The City University of New York, is the largest four-year public college of technology in the Northeast and a national model for technological education. Located in Downtown Brooklyn, City Tech has an enrollment of more than 17,000 students in 29 baccalaureate and 27 associate degree programs and was recently ranked third in the nation in producing the highest paid associate degree-earning graduates (www.payscale.com). City Tech was also ranked fifth out of 369 public colleges and universities in overall economic mobility for its students and ninth among more than 2,000 U.S. institutions (www.equality-of-opportunity.org).

For more information, visit www.citytech.cuny.edu.


CCNY’s Elgin Marbles casts on display at CUNY Graduate Center

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Galloping horsemen on the frieze of the Parthenon.

The City College of New York’s Frieze of the Parthenon casts, sometimes called the Elgin Marbles, are on display at The Graduate Center, CUNY. The casts were recently installed in The Graduate Center lobby and Mina Rees Library where they are visible to the public.

The casts consist of 20 plus rectangular relief panels that were part of the Parthenon frieze; four metopes (square panels that were on the exterior of the Parthenon); a reclining figure of Dionysus; and a horse’s head from a pediment (the triangular roof).

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Dionysus in the Graduate Center’s Mina Rees Library.

“The Elgin Marbles casts came to the U.S. during the nineteenth century, most likely among the first three sets to arrive here,” said Harriet F. Senie, co- director of the Master of Art’s Program in Art History and Art Museum Studies. “They have the insignia of the British Museum attesting to their authenticity.”

They were gifted to City College in 1852 by Charles M. Leupp, Esq. Although the casts were incomplete, they served an important educational function in the college’s Art Department studio and art history classes for more than a hundred years.

In 1992, the casts were scheduled to be destroyed together with the building that housed them, but the Onassis Foundation USA agreed to fund the restoration of the casts and the installation at Olympic Tower, where they remained until recently.

The casts will be on long-term loan at The Graduate Center and are entirely viewable in the public lobby and visible from the Mina Rees Library windows along Fifth Avenue at 34th Street, in the landmark building formerly known as B. Altman & Company department store.

“Since most of us will not have the privilege of seeing the originals, these offer a unique experience of interacting with the Parthenon casts on a regular basis,” said Senie. “With repeated viewings, students and faculty alike, as well as visitors, will have the opportunity to have nuanced and personal relationship with these priceless pieces of the past.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Researchers link genes and motor skills development

CUNY Medical School at CCNY professor John Martin and his collaborative team have linked genes and motor skill development.

Genes for many may be widely associated with determining certain traits and characteristics. Now a study co-led by John H. Martin of The CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York is demonstrating that they could also influence neural motor skills. This could lead to new insights in the treatment of motor skills impairments such as Cerebral Palsy.

Martin and his collaborators from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center found that the lost function of two genes prevent infant laboratory mice from developing motor skills as they mature into adults. The cause is neural circuits between the brain’s motor cortex region and the spinal cord that did not properly reorganize in mice as they matured. These circuits are part of the cortical spinal network, which coordinates the activation of muscles in limbs.

The mice were bred to lack molecular signaling from the Bax/Bak genetic pathway. Through a variety of experiments, the researchers demonstrated how Bax/Bak’s downstream molecular targets are vital to developing appropriately sophisticated connections between the motor cortex, spinal circuits and opposing extensor/flexor muscle groups in the animals.

“If mutations in the Bax/Bak pathway are found in human patients with developmental motor disabilities, these findings could be very translational and lead to possible medical applications,” said Yutaka Yoshida, Martin’s co-lead author.

The team’s goal is for future studies to determine whether disruptions in Bax/Bak pathway are implicated in some people with skilled motor disabilities and whether it also regulates reorganization of other circuits in the mammalian central nervous system.

The study was published in the journal Neuron.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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John Jay’s Prisoner Reentry Institute to Serve as Education and Reentry Coordinator for State College-in-Prison Reentry Program

John Jay’s Prisoner Reentry Institute to Serve as Education and Reentry Coordinator for State College-in-Prison Reentry Program

August 8, 2017 – New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. have announced the award of $7.3 million to fund college classes at 17 New York State prisons over the next five years. The Prisoner Reentry Institute (PRI) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, in collaboration with the State University of New York, will receive approximately $2.37 million over five years to serve as the Education and Reentry Coordinator for the College-in-Prison Reentry Program.

“We applaud Governor Cuomo and District Attorney Vance for launching this important program and recognizing the transformative power of a college education to improve the lives of those reentering their communities, reduce recidivism and ultimately help build safer communities,” said Karol Mason, President of John Jay College. “We also recognize the work of the New York State Council on Community Re-Entry and Reintegration and its chair, Secretary of State Rossana Rosado.”

“We are pleased to be a part of this significant initiative and look forward to working closely with the NYS Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, SUNY, and the education providers to help incarcerated individuals access college education and to ensure they have the support they need when they return home to be able to succeed,” said Ann Jacobs, Director of PRI.

The Education and Reentry Coordinator will oversee the education providers’ reentry planning and offer technical assistance as needed; align course requirements across and develop articulation/transfer agreements between funded colleges; develop standards for prison education curricula in New York State; and exchange best practices and lessons learned among the education providers. The CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance, technical assistance provider to the Manhattan DA’s Office on all of the Criminal Justice Investment Initiative, will work with the NYS Department of Corrections and Community Supervision to oversee the program’s daily operations, working directly with the education providers.

According to the announcement issued by the Governor’s office, the College-in-Prison Reentry Program is being funded through the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office’s Criminal Justice Investment Initiative. Read the full press release here.

 

Prisoner Reentry Institute (PRI) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice was founded in 2005 with the mission  to spur innovation and improve practice in the field of reentry by advancing knowledge; translating research into effective policy and service delivery; and fostering effective partnerships between criminal justice and non-criminal justice disciplines. PRI’s diversified portfolio reflects a focus on understanding what it takes for people to live successfully in their communities after contact with the criminal justice system, and on increasing the effectiveness of the professionals and systems that work with them.  Central to PRI’s work is a commitment to creating access to higher education for people who have been involved in the criminal justice system.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations.  In teaching, scholarship, and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.


BMCC Students Showcase Mentored Research at CUNY-wide Symposium

Working alongside faculty mentors, Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students investigate the link between dopamine receptors and drug addiction. They analyze metal-tolerant bacteria in the waters around New York City and push mathematical theory to new levels.

These and other research projects were showcased at the CUNY Research Scholars Program (CRSP) 2017 Symposium held at BMCC on July 25. Twenty BMCC student researchers — as well as more than 200 students from Bronx Community College, Gutman Community College, Kingsborough Community College, New York City College of Technology and Queensborough Community College — presented abstracts of their projects in poster sessions, and celebrated the culmination of a yearlong project that involved not only research but also workshops in laboratory safety, abstract writing and public speaking.

“Students in CRSP are incredibly dedicated to advancing their knowledge in STEM by conducting faculty-mentored, novel research,” said Helene Bach, Director of Research at BMCC. CRSP students and their faculty mentors commit to 400 hours towards their research activities in the fall and spring semesters, culminating in a huge poster presentation in the summer, she explains.

“They are among the most rigorous of researchers, often presenting at national scientific conferences and even publishing with their mentors in peer-reviewed journals,” says Bach. “These activities, together with the deeper science learning they attain working in a research setting alongside their mentors, gives BMCC students a competitive edge so they can hit the ground running when they graduate and enter as STEM majors at a four-year school.”

The success of the program is evident in its data: One hundred percent of the students in CRSP do go on to a four-year college, “and one hundred percent continue in a STEM field,” Bach says. “This is a highly successful program that produces promising researchers that will be highly marketable.”

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Research: The foundation for scientific understanding

The 2017 CRSP Symposium opened with a morning program including remarks by Vita Rabinowitz, Vice Chancellor and University Provost, CUNY, and Karrin E. Wilks, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, BMCC. Jayne Raper, Professor of Biological Sciences at Hunter College, presented a talk, “The Good Cholesterol Primates: Protecting Africa One Cattle at a Time.”

The afternoon program featured remarks by Mark Hauber, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, CUNY, followed by remarks by Provost Wilks and a talk by Kevin Gardner, Founding Director of the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center’s Structural Biology Initiative: “Inspired by Nature: How Studying Cellular Sensing Leads to New Therapies and Biotech Tools.”

“Research is the foundation of all scientific understanding, and through mentored laboratory experiences, students participate firsthand in the creation of knowledge,” say the Symposium’s Co-Directors, Avrom J. Caplan, CUNY Associate University Dean For Research and Ron J. Nerio, CUNY Research Associate, in their welcome message of the event program. “The New York City Mayor’s Office funds the program, and we are especially grateful to Mayor Bill de Blasio for his generous support.

Sharing research findings with peers across CUNY

In the afternoon session, BMCC students joined their peers from other colleges who delivered oral presentations of their work. BMCC Science major Md Samirul Islam gave a talk on the research he took part in, mentored by Professor Abel Navarro: “Absorption of Phenol from Aqueous Solutions with Native Caribbean Seaweed: Purify Toxicity of Phenol from Water.”

The event also included a poster competition. The first place winner was BMCC student Tesfamichael Demeke, who will attend Columbia University in the fall, and the second place winner was Jayeda Hossain, who will attend Baruch College starting fall 2017.

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The students also presented highlights of their research in posters session where they talked with guests and fellow researchers about their work. These projects from BMCC included:

  • “Solar Panel and Optical System,” Robiul Alam and Zhixin Deng; Mentor/Professor Shalva Tsiklauri.
  • “Preparation and Characterization of Chemically-Modified Biomaterials and Their Application as Adsorbents of Penicillin G.,” Jacqueline Baah Twum; Mentor/Professor Abel Navarro.
  • “Two Different Approaches for the Stirling Numbers of the Second Kind,” Xueying Chen; Mentor/Professor Jaewoo Lee.
  • “Isolation and Characterization of Heavy Metal Tolerant Bacteria from the Newtown Creek,” Lionel Colon, Nicole Yoo and Walker Farnham; Mentor/Professor Sarah Salm.
  • “Joining of Low-Module Thermoplastics for Dental Implants,” Mayumy Cordova; Mentor/Professor Rafael Niyazov.
  • “Utilization of Used Green Tea Leaves for the Removal of Yellow Hair Dye Through Bioremediation,” Tesfamichael Demeke; Mentor/Professor Abel Navarro.
  • “The Effects of Forskolin on Cultured SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells,” Jay Gadsden; Mentor/Professor Jane M. Tezapsidis.
  • “Black Tea Extract Has Anti-Proliferative Effects on the Oral Bacteria, Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Human Gingival Fibroblasts in a Dose Dependent Manner,” Shanna-Key Griffiths; Mentor/Professor Brian Rafferty.
  • “Fighting Drug Addiction with Water: Analyzing the Solvation Thermodynamics of the D3 Dopamine Receptor Binding Cavity,” Jayeda Hossain; Mentor/Professor Lauren Wikstrong, Emilio Gallicchio (Brooklyn College) and Tom Kurtzman (Lehman College).
  • “Adsorption of Phenol from Aqueous Solutions with Native Caribbean Seaweed: Purify Toxicity of Phenol from Water,” Md Samirul Islam; Mentor/Professor Abel Navarro.
  • “Response Priming Reveals Capacity Limitation,” Urjana Kica; Mentor/Professor Marjan Persuh.
  • “Simulation of Adsorption Models: Instantaneous and Non-Instantaneous Mixing,” Jieying Li and Jie Lan; Mentor/Professor Chris McCarthy.
  • “An Autonomous Ground Explorer Using Computer Vision,” Jiahua Liao; Mentor/Professor Hao Tang.
  • “Quantum Dots in 2-D TMDs Materials,” Sofia Mvokany; Mentor/Professor Shalva Tsklauri.
  • “Biological Activity of Taraxacum Officinale,” Eric Pereira; Mentor/Professor Adolfina Koroch.
  • “Molecular Recognition of Cell Adhesion Proteins: Does Water Help the Candida Fungal Pathogen Colonize a Host?” Sheila Sarkar; Mentor/Professor Laurent Wickstrom and Emilio Gallicchio (Brooklyn College).
  • “Body Segmentation and Recognition in AR/MR,” Pedro Torres; Mentor/Professor Hao Tang.

Year Up Graduation Honors 21st Class, Including BMCC Cohort

As a finance intern at Synchronoss, BMCC Accounting major Anthony Nuñez (below) turned classroom learning into hands-on skills development.

“I served as a syndicate between three teams: accounting, taxation and billing,” Nuñez says. “This means I micromanaged and archived the activities of 30 accounts, downloading and reviewing bank statements. I also converted and tracked travel and entertainment receipts into an Excel spreadsheet, and reconciled bank transactions.”

The opportunity to immerse himself in these tasks was made possible by Year Up, an intensive, one-year program that mentors students as they complete internships in some of New York City’s leading corporations and nonprofits.

Nuñez was one of 35 BMCC students included in the 21st Class Graduation Ceremony of Year Up, held August 1 in the BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center Theatre II at the College’s main campus on 199 Chambers Street.

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A total of 115 participants were honored at the event, which was opened by Year Up alumna Krystal Smith. “You made it,” she told the audience, “the papers, the deliverables, and all those elevator pitches.” Year Up President Garrett Moran, a former COO of the Blackstone Private Equity Group, encouraged the graduates “to keep you eye on the horizon when you have those tough days, lifting others while you climb.”

Recognizing strengths

Year Up President Moran presented the Urban Empowerment Award to the CUNY Black Male Initiative, which was accepted by University Director Jermaine Wright. The Community Ambassador Award was presented to the New York City Housing Authority Office of Resident Economic Empowerment & Sustainability, and the Corporate Champion Award was presented to Salesforce. Year Up mentor Evelyn Guernsey and her mentee Toni Newton received the Omar Moodie Mentor Award.

Before the graduates received their awards and certificates, Year Up graduate Morris Hilton spoke of his experience with the program, quoting Winston Churchill: “Success is not final, failure is not fatal.” Nuñez also took the stage. “I share with you an inclusive, historical journey,” he said, “one that recognizes our strengths regardless of race, religion, gender or sexual orientation.”

BMCC cohort: Looking ahead

The BMCC cohort of Year Up graduates included Nabid Ahamed, Fateh Ahmed, Juan Alvarez, Elias Arellano, Jose Buelto, Katherine De La Cruz, Mouctar Drame, Kebin Farez, Emmanuelle Figueroa, Patricio Garcia, Emily Gomez, Brandon Grech, Shaina Guallpa, Juana Guerra, Lisset Guerrero, Daniel Hallinan, Ronaldo Julien, Venice Lewis, Ailing Li, Vanessa Mora, Salma Munoz, Anthony Nuñez, Starasia Owens, Sandrea Phillips, Lilibeth Quinsa, Maurice Rodriguez, Aisha Saleh, Natalie Sanchez, Christopher Tan, Matthew Taylor, Ana Tchikaidze, Shelly Uzagir, Antonio Worrell, Ernesto Zavala and Sonia Zempoaltecatl.

While still in the interviewing process, a dozen of the graduates have landed full-time positions in companies including New York Life Insurance Company, Turner & Townsend, Neuberger Berman, State Street Corporation, The College Board and KKR.

“I have an interview soon with an accounting firm that only works with nonprofits,” says Nuñez. “I would be excited to get that position and have the chance to visit the organizations they serve.”

He has one more semester at BMCC, and in addition to applying for jobs, has applied to the BMCC program Refining Each Ascending Leader (REAL), which presents guest speakers from the business sector and other fields. Nuñez — who has made the Dean’s List, is a member of Phi Theta Kappa and president of the college’s Toastmaster’s Club — feels confident about the busy schedule he is putting together.

“Year Up has prepared us for doing full-time school and full-time work at the same time,” he says. “I took 12 credits of classes while I completed my internship, which was another four credits, over a six-month period. I was able to do it because the staff at Year Up is there for us the whole way. You feel like you have an overwhelming amount of support, from the social workers to everyone else at Year Up. Many of them left careers in the corporate sector, and they are really committed to helping us reach our goals. I definitely recommend Year Up to other students.”

For more information about joining Year Up at BMCC, call (646) 341-6800 or email admissionsnyc@yearup.org.


From Digital Imaging to Economic Analysis, BMCC Introduces 19 Courses

Tomorrow’s artists, economists, psychologists, health educators, sociologists, animators and linguists have all found new Associate degree programs at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) to get them started on their academic and career journeys.

Within its close to 50 Associate degree programs, BMCC also introduces cutting-edge courses and internships.

These new courses — ranging from digital imaging to economic analysis to principles of language learning — raise the bar for students who want to excel in their chosen fields of study.

The new courses include:

MEA 371 – Media Arts and Technology Internship 2 credits, 11.5 hours

In this internship, the student applies classroom theory and gains work experience relating to his or her major. Over a semester, the intern completes a term project assigned by the coordinator, and is evaluated by the work site supervisor.

MEA 201 – Professional Development and Career Planning in Media Arts and Technology, 2 credits, 2 hours

In this course students are instructed in industry appropriate methods to creatively plan their careers. Students learn about self-assessment, career exploration, and practical job search skills.

ART 203 – Digital Creative Studio, 3 credits, 2 hours, 2 lab hours

This course will use digital imaging principles as an essential part of photographic editing. Fundamental digital imaging skills will include input, editing, archiving and output as part of the creative process. A range of approaches to producing, processing and printing digital images will be explored as they relate to current practices.

CIS 359 – Information Assurance, 3 credits, 2 hours, 2 lab hours

This course introduces the fundamentals of information security in the context of computer vulnerabilities and how to safeguard computers and networks. The students will examine security planning, organization and technologies and the legal and ethical issues associated with computer and network security.

CIS 362 – Cloud Computing, 3 credits, 2 hours, 2 lab hours

This course introduces students to the principles, foundations, and applications of Cloud computing. Through hands-on assignments and projects, the students will study the paradigm of computing in which dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources are offered as services over the Internet.

CIS 364 – Mobile Device Programming, 3 credits, 2 hours, 2 lab hours

The course will focus on installing, developing, and testing mobile applications. Students will learn the basic framework of a mobile application, mobile user interface design, methods for storing and retrieving information, and mobile security.

CIS 459 – Ethical Hacking and System Defense, 3 credits 2 hours, 2 lab hours

This course provides an in-depth look at network security concepts and techniques. It introduces students to the fundamentals of ethical hacking. The course focuses on the code of conduct and ethics of exploiting systems. It employs a hands-on approach when examining networking security techniques.

MAT 56.5 – Elementary and Intermediate Algebra with Trigonometry, 0 credits, 7 hours

This course is a combination of elementary algebra and intermediate algebra including trigonometry. It includes topics such as properties of real numbers, polynomials and factoring, systems of linear equations and inequalities, rational expressions and functions, quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and an introduction to trigonometry.

ECO 240 – Behavioral Economics, 3 credits, 3 hours

This course is an introduction to behavioral economics, which is the use of the methods of psychology to evaluate economic models of decision-making. The course reviews decisions made under conditions of uncertainty, judgments of risk and probability, intertemporal decision-making, and other topics.

ECO 245 – Competition and Strategy, 3 credits, 3 hours

This course introduces students to the economic analysis of strategic interaction and competition among firms in imperfectly competitive markets. While the focus of the course is on the behavior of businesses in an oligopoly, basic concepts of game theory will also be applied to a variety of situations facing firms.

LIN 130 – Sounds of English, 3 credits, 3 hours

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the sound system of English, with a focus on Standard American English and non-standard dialects of American English. The course will also introduce students to the physical production of sounds as well as the mental perception of sounds and how they pattern in English and other topics.

LIN 200 – Language Acquisition, 3 credits, 3 hours

The first part of this course introduces students to theories of first-language acquisition. In the second part of the course, students will become familiar with the theories of second-language acquisition and factors such as motivation, age and learning styles that affect language learning.

LIN 210 – Foundations of Bilingualism, 3 credits, 3 hours

This introductory course provides an overview of the psychological, social, and political aspects of bilingualism. Topics covered include definitions of bilingualism, language development in bilingual children, the linguistic behaviors of bilingual speakers, language loss and maintenance, and socio-political issues pertaining to bilingual language policy and planning.

LIN 220 – Language Teaching Practices, 3 credits, 3 hours

This course will provide students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and principles of language instruction and language learning. Special emphasis will be on studying pedagogical approaches to TESOL that address the learning needs of diverse language learners in multiple settings.

LIN 120 – Introduction to Linguistics, 3 credits, 3 hours

This course will introduce students to linguistics, the scientific study of language. Students will apply methods of scientific inquiry (including the scientific method) to linguistic systems (phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic) and language phenomena and events.

LIN 150 – Language, Race, and Ethnicity in the US and its Territories, 3 credits, 3 hours

This course explores historical, cultural, and theoretical perspectives on the relationship between language, race, and ethnicity in the United States and its territories. It will examine language varieties such as Black American English and its cross-racial uses by other groups, Chicano English and Spanglish, Hawaiian English, and American Indian English.

ACR 250 – Issues in Literacy & Language Development, 3 credits, 3 hours

Through this course, students will examine diverse perspectives on language and literacy development, specifically atypical development of children (birth through adolescence). Specific attention will be paid to language disorders, language delays, dyslexia and developmental disorders related to language and literacy.

LIN 240 – Language and Power, 3 credits, 3 hours

In this course, students will study the relationship between language and capital, language and institutionalized oppression, and language and activism. Students will also explore the relationship between language, inequity, domination, and resistance.

MAT 161.5 – Mathematics Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning, 3 credits, 6 hours

This course aims to teach students how to interpret quantitative information, analyze quantitative data, and make inferences in contexts involving mathematical concepts. Topics include proportional reasoning, interpreting percentages, units and measurement, thinking critically, numbers in the real world, financial management, statistical reasoning, probability, and linear and exponential modeling.


Hostos Secures State Grant to Support Student-Parents

Hostos is family.  And for close to 50 years, the College has nurtured that ideal.

Now, a $150,000 grant from the New York State Department of Health will allow Hostos to help families stay strong by assisting expectant and parenting teens and young adults to complete their education, maintain healthy lifestyles, and be nurturing parents.

The support services that will be funded from this one-year grant will work toward continuing the services offered over the past four years in Hostos’ Health and Wellness Unit’s Empowering Student Parents (ESP) program.

The overall goal is to create a sustainable program that adopts a holistic and integrated approach to support expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families through five core service domains by direct service provisions, linkages and referrals.

“We are very happy that Health and Wellness will be able to continue to support our expectant and student parents at Hostos,” said Fabian Wander, Director of the Health and Wellness Unit. “We understand how challenging it is to manage the responsibilities of being a parent and college student at the same time. We want the students to know that we will support them though their educational journey and needs as a parent.”

The Unit is staffed with clinical social workers, a registered nurse, a wellness specialist, community health educators and social work graduate students who provide direct services and build on community partnership for expectant and parenting students.

Leading the way in this initiative, Hostos will serve as a mentor to other CUNY institutions that agree to participate in the Pathways to Success program, including LaGuardia and Borough of Manhattan community colleges.

Specifically, this funding will assist to:

  • Hire staff to strengthen linkages with community organizations that service parenting and expectant young adults into the Pathways to Success program.
  • Collaborate with other service providers in the community to enhance sustainability for our expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families, including other funded implementation sites.
  • Update the comprehensive needs and resource assessment, which is critical to identifying gaps in services, informing program activities and ensuring that grant expectations are met.
  • Build on internal partnerships that support the overall health and academic success of parenting and expectant student.
  • Collaborate with the LYFE program in encouraging students to enroll in higher education or vocational goals.
  • Participate in all required DOH trainings including a Learning Collaborative.
  • Collect data on project participants and submit reports as required by the NYSDOH.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


ICYMI: Union-Backed Center Polishes Skills, Broadens Education As Jobs’ Complexity Grows, Murphy Institute Helps Bridge Knowledge Gap

The Chief
By Bob Hennelly

A PLACE TO GROW: Esther Murray and Anthony Scruggs both found the Murphy Institute a nurturing place where they could hone their educations and develop skills that allowed them to get more out of their jobs. Mr. Scruggs said that when he began he was concerned that his fellow students were all smarter than him, and ‘The biggest surprise was that I was able to do it. I cried when I graduated.’

Over the next five years, more than a third of New York City’s municipal workforce will be retiring. That is a lot of succession-planning, and union officials tell this newspaper that city workers who want to advance during this massive generational shift are going to have to hit the books.

“Over the next five years, 120,000 city workers will retire, and we really need the professional public employees that remain to be up to the challenges that lay ahead,” said Henry Garrido, executive director of District Council 37, which has 125,000 members.

Tech Driving Changes
The decades between when retiring city workers first started their careers with the city and now mark a period of unprecedented change in both America’s public- and private-sector workplaces. In 2014, Government Technology magazine reported that local governments were already years into a full embrace of the latest technology to meet expectations of an increasingly tech-savvy public.

In the mid-1990s, the NYPD’s CompStat program set the standard nationally for local governments’ use of stat programs and data analytics to measure and improve their performance. Nowhere was the impact of the advance of technology more evident than in health care, where the imperative became reducing hospital stays and promoting outpatient and in-home care.

All these changes have an impact on how workforces are managed as well. And, as in the case of the recent NYC H+H white-collar layoffs, entire layers of management are being eliminated, with the slack being picked up by the remaining managerial workforce.
Whether in the public or private sector, there’s no escaping the reality that the ever-advancing technology and knowledge itself requires that employees be open to advancing their education throughout their entire career. According to a recent Pew Center survey of employment trends, “the number of workers in occupations requiring average to above-average education, training and experience increased from 49 million in 1980 to 83 million in 2015, or by 68%.”

Need Skills to Advance
The Pew survey found that more than half (54 percent) of adults in the labor force believed it would be “essential for them to get training and develop new skills throughout their work life in order to keep up with changes in the workplace. And 35 percent of workers, including about three in 10 (27 percent) adults with at least a bachelor’s degree, say they don’t have the education and training they need to get ahead at work.”

To help workers weather the turbulence ahead, DC 37 is building on its long relationship with the City University of New York’s Murphy Institute [emphasis added]. The institute was established in collaboration with city labor unions in 1984 at Queens College to serve the higher-education needs of working adults. It started with just 52 students, and today serves more than 1,500 who are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs. CUNY plans on elevating it to being one of the university’s schools by next fall.

DC 37 has 125,000 members within 51 locals that represent 1,000 civil-service job titles that encompass jobs from crossing guard to scientist. As a consequence, Mr. Garrido said, any successful continuing adult-education strategy has to be tailored individually to meet the needs and life situation of the would-be student, remarking, “Obviously, with the adult learner, you are talking about people that are bread-winners that have children and may even have two jobs.”

He continued, “What we have done is relaunched our education program, and we have committed to provide the members that want it an individual assessment of just where they are at, which helps them get a sense of what their skills are currently and where they need to be so they can attain their own goals for professional development. Whether it be registered nurses or engineers, they all need to have a path to help them stay current by upgrading their information base so they evolve with their professions, which in turn insures they will continue to have upward mobility.”

‘Murphy’s the Facilitator’
Mr. Garrido said the union was working with CUNY to develop courses designed for specific cohorts of workers based on their vocational skills. “Whether it be IT, health-care, or green-job technology, we see Murphy as the facilitator,” Mr. Garrido said. “In essence, CUNY is lined up to be the incubator of the new city workforce [emphasis added]. What you will see is collaboration to develop relevant courses with city agencies like DoITT, DCAS, the School Construction Authority, HRA, NYC H+H. The city needs this trained workforce, and so it is in the long-term interest of these agencies to help with our basic assessments. The reality is you can’t get training for these jobs off the supermarket shelf.”

The union leader said that there was no better example of the need for workers to be nimble in the years ahead than in the health-care industry. “For decades we have had hospital-based care, but that has shifted to outpatient, and so we now know health-care providers have to be more mobile because of the major way the practice of medicine has evolved.”

Charlie Wortmann is the founder and president of ERI, a national workforce education company that over the last 25 years has offered 10,000 training and skills-development courses in 250 cities. ERI also offers individual courses of study that can serve as a critical bridge back to college for the returning adult student. “We don’t call it basic skills but the Center for Independent Learning,” he said in a phone interview. “This is the program where the course is truly shaped by what the student wants to achieve. Say that they want to improve their math or writing skills, they can do it on their terms.”

Helps At Home, Too
He continued, “The payoff goes well beyond their increased capabilities at work, but it helps them in their private lives with their families and their children whom they can now help with the new math.”

In the abstract, the notion of adults going back to school mid-career seems like a no-brainer, but in the real world there are lots of obstacles. There’s family, work and in many cases, considerable self-doubt after so many years out of the classroom. According to a national survey of older, non-traditional returning students, personal insecurity was a major stumbling block, with over 50 percent surveyed admitting that they were stressed out that they didn’t possess the intellectual capability to handle the college coursework.

That was the case for Anthony Scruggs, 46, the executive vice president of DC 37’s Local 768, which represents dozens of titles from Social Worker to Physician Assistant.
A single parent since he was 16, Mr. Scruggs, who is from Far Rockaway, Queens, said, “I left high school because I had to work two jobs to raise a family.” At 20, he fit in getting his GED. In 1992, he went to the Institute of Applied Medical Technologies and earned a certification in electrical cardiograph reading and went on to get his Emergency Medical Technician certification at CUNY’s Bronx Education Opportunity Center.

Waste of Money, Time
But his next attempt at educational advancement turn­ed out to be a costly fiasco. “I signed up at Taylor Business Institute and it cost me $5,000 and the credits were worthless and non-transferable,” he said. In 2006, state regulators ordered Taylor to shut down. He got back on track getting his associate’s degree from Queensborough Community College in Business Management in 1994.

But from then on, working to support his family of four kids prevented him from getting any additional education. For 14 years, he worked his way up in the private security business, where he became a top manager with no benefits. “I got to the point where I was managing 3,000 security guards and had no benefits except for the paycheck I got every week,” he said. He had a falling-out with the owners when they failed to pay bonuses as promised to the guards he supervised, and the single father was out of a job.

“Actually it was the Work Experience Program, welfare to work, that helped me get in the door at the Department of Health after a six-month internship,” he said. “By 2006 I was a Public Health Advisor working for the Department of Health as a member of Local 768 with health-care benefits.” He turned out to have a gift for organizing, and worked his way up the union ranks from being a shop steward.

With the support of Local 768 president Fitz Reid, Mr. Scruggs applied to the Murphy Institute to attend its 18-credit college labor-studies accreditation program. But the father of four felt trepidation because it had been so long since he had cracked a book.

‘Family Atmosphere’
“At first when you go into the classrooms, you have this feeling that everybody is smarter than you. I was scared and nervous, but it turned out to be a family atmosphere,” he said. “There were 22 people in the class and I was in a class with other students who had their master’s degree. Some of them had already written books. It was not only diverse racially but experientially, with people with just their GED and others with their Ph.D.”

He continued, “The biggest surprise was that I was able to do it. I cried on stage when I graduated.”

No two paths to the Murphy Institute are the same. Consider Esther Murray, 47, a mother of two. Ms. Murray, a member of CWA 1180, is a Principal Administrative Assistant in the Department of Finance.

“I left my home in Tobago where there was no university. There was a university in Trinidad, but your parents had to have a lot of money to go but my mother, with my three brothers could not afford to send me,” Ms. Murray said in a phone interview.
She came to the U.S. when she was 21, where she did baby-sitting jobs, and got a temp assignment when she was 25 as a per-diem in the Finance Department in 1997, which led to a permanent job with the agency.

Focus: School, Job, Family
Over the next decade or so, she handled college course-work, family life and her city job and by 2008 had a four-year degree from the Fashion Institute of Technology in trade and marketing. In 2015, she went on to earn her master’s in global affairs from NYU. “Throughout my education, I have been an evening student, maintaining my family and two children even as I was doing my 9-to-5 job,” Ms. Murray said. “But there is a struggle when you’re in a job where you feel stuck, but you have a bigger vision for yourself. Murphy made me aware of the broader labor movement.”

She learned of Murphy when she was working with 1180 to prepare to take a job-related test to move up the ladder at the Department of Finance. “The instructor said, ‘Esther, you are very engaged, you are always asking questions; you should go to the Murphy Institute,’ and I said, ‘What’s Murphy?’”

Once there, the social interaction made her nervous. “The only concern I had with Murphy, I told my professor, was that I felt like an outsider. The other classmates had been experienced in the labor movement. They had been out there in a picket line.” She expects to be getting her master’s in labor studies by 2019 and sees herself being an advocate “helping those who need help who have lost their job or have no security or no voice.”

Mr. Reid, the Local 768 president, said that all too often the U.S. education system “glorifies the successes of the individual over the collective” which “undermines the need for the collective, sustained struggles that energize and advance the labor movement.”

‘Create Chain Reaction’
“Labor education, if successful, has to create a chain reaction to sustain the struggle of resistance and advancement of the working class if we hope to achieve and maintain economic and social justice,” Mr. Reid said. “In this context, labor education, such as provided by the Murphy Institute, is not a leisure activity, an optional way to better oneself, or just a path to a higher income. It is a crucial necessity, if workers want to defend the gains of the labor movement and expand upon them.”

Ed Ott, a Distinguished Lecturer on Labor Studies at the Murphy Institute, has decades of experience in the union movement, serving most recently as executive director of the New York City Central Labor Council, which represents 1.3-million trade unionists from over 400 affiliated unions. He said what makes the Murphy Institute stand out is not just the diversity and accomplishments of the students, but the collective support they get from the entire school community.

“A student came to me several years ago and said something had happened in her personal life and she said she had to quit and I said, ‘You can’t’; and several of our staff members worked with her and she just graduated this year. Now she is going for her master’s,” Mr. Ott said in a phone interview.

“People are not only raising their children, but sometimes their grandchildren, and they come back to school to impress on their children the lifelong value of education.”

Age Mix’s Benefits
He continued, “Our inter-generational mix is very important for the older, working students so they can interact with the idealism of the younger students,” and for the younger students to take full measure of the character of their older classmates. “When you see that 55-year-old woman who is going to school at night but will be back at work at 7:30 a.m., you can’t feel sorry for yourself.”

Mr. Ott said that for many students, Murphy provides the missing link when it comes to labor education. “History books don’t often mention the role of labor,” he explained, and “people [don’t realize], particularly young people, that benefits like the 40-hour workweek, health benefits, pensions, sick days were not just granted, but were fought for.”


CUNY COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS TAPPED AS KAPLAN SCHOLARS, JOINING PROGRAM THAT HELPS LOW-INCOME STUDENTS SUCCEED AT ELITE 4-YEAR SCHOOLS  

Seven CUNY community college students have been selected by the Kaplan Educational Foundation as the 11th cohort of Kaplan Leadership Scholars – high-potential, low-income, associate-degree candidates who receive financial, academic, advisement and college admissions support in preparing them to transfer to selective four-year colleges and complete their bachelor’s degrees.

Kaplan Scholars who graduated from CUNY community colleges this year are slated to attend four-year institutions including Stanford, Brown and Syracuse universities, and Wellesley College. Kaplan Scholars have been accepted at numerous selective and elite four-year and graduate programs across the country, and program alumni are employed in fields including education, nonprofits and scientific research, and at Fortune 500 companies. A number of selective four-year colleges actively recruit and provide substantial aid to Kaplan Scholars, all of whom are drawn from CUNY.

“By providing financial and other support, the Kaplan Scholars program affords low-income students an invaluable opportunity to prepare for and excel in highly competitive colleges across the country,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Congratulations to the newest cohort of Kaplan Scholars.”

The new group includes:

•           Rukayat Akinola, Borough of Manhattan Community College

•           Hector Castillo, Guttman Community College

•           Tiffany Garcia, Borough of Manhattan Community College

•           Karen Alvarez Julian, Bronx Community College

•           Andre Morrison, Borough of Manhattan Community College

•           Kyle Paneto, LaGuardia Community College

•           Felix Patawah, Bronx Community College

The Kaplan Leadership Program, launched by the nonprofit foundation in 2006, provides scholarships, stipends, living expenses, intensive guidance and academic preparation during the Scholars’ community college years, continuing through their graduation from their four-year schools. Foundation Executive Director Nancy Sánchez said that Kaplan candidates, who are identified by their CUNY colleges and receive application assistance from them, are generally students of color who have at least a 3.5 GPA, demonstrate high academic potential and leadership abilities, and have financial need.

Ninety-eight percent of Kaplan Scholars are eligible for federal Pell grants for low-income students.  Seventy-seven percent are first-generation college students. According to the foundation, 38 are black and 31 are Latino; 36 are women, 33 are men, the students’ age range is 18 to 37, and nine have children. Program support includes $3,000 toward CUNY tuition and a stipend of up to $500 a month.

Sánchez also announced the foundation’s launch of a pilot program to provide transfer admissions and financial aid application assistance to 15 CUNY community college students who applied but were not selected as Kaplan Scholars. She said the new KEF Transfer Initiative Program would provide a series of workshops for these students so they have the tools to complete college transfer applications and to interview.

“Many of the schools really want these students,” she said. “Unfortunately, students don’t have the resources to apply.” She said she hoped the Transfer Initiative Program would expand in the coming years to accommodate a bigger group of students

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the CUNY School of Professional Studies.


Baruch College Launches The Great Leaders Program for Future Nonprofit Chief Executive Officers

First-in-the Nation Executive Certificate Program to Address

Critical Need and Training in Executive Turnovers

 

New York, NY – August 1, 2017- Baruch College announced the launch of The Great Leaders Program, located within the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, in response to the specific needs of the next generation of chief executive officers (CEOs) who will be heading nonprofit organizations in the New York City metro area and in the nation.

This executive certificate program – the first of its kind in the nation – is designed to provide leaders in the nonprofit sector with the expert knowledge, specific skills, and perspectives that are required today of CEOs and other C-suite staff to achieve professional success.

“Regardless of their previous experience, very few leaders seem fully prepared to become the CEO of a nonprofit organization. It is the scope of their responsibilities that is the most daunting,” said David S. Birdsell, Dean of the Marxe School for Public and International Affairs (“Marxe School”) at Baruch College.  “The Great Leaders Program will help these future CEOs perform effectively in leading their organizations during their tenure.”

According to Dean Birdsell, the executive turnover among nonprofits in the New York metropolitan area alone is expected to accelerate in the next few years.

“While retirements are one of the leading factors in this critical turnover, it is also the mounting fiscal pressures on these organizations that present very difficult challenges,” said Birdsell. “For nonprofits, large to small, current and predicted executive vacancies must be addressed.”

From Aspiring CEOs to “Sector Switchers”

The Great Leaders Program is designed for career nonprofit professionals who aspire to be CEOs.  The program also was developed for “sector switchers”, those senior managers in government and business who seek to move to the nonprofit area and lead charitable organizations.

“Most staff in nonprofit organizations are specialists,” said Frederick S. Lane, Ph.D., academic director of The Great Leaders Program.  “They are either in service delivery – health and human services and the arts, for example – or they work in support functions, like financial management, fund raising, human resources, or IT.  So, when the time comes for career advancement into the CEO or executive director’s office, they feel underprepared.  The Great Leaders Program will be instrumental in filling those critical gaps.”

About The Great Leaders Program:

Learning from Experienced Professors

 The Marxe School has the largest full-time faculty devoted to nonprofit organizational studies of any university in the country. The school also includes Baruch College’s nationally recognized Center for Nonprofit Strategy and Management. Carefully selected professors for The Great Leaders Program have been drawn from the Marxe faculty and from exceptional nonprofit executives working in the New York region.

A Course Unlike Any Other

The Great Leaders Program has three distinctive features for high-impact learning:

  • Active learning in face-to-face classroom time, putting emphasis on performing leadership tasks
  • Peer learning, where participants learn from the experiences and viewpoints of one another, including the analysis of decision-forcing cases, simulated leadership situations, and their own management lessons
  • Capstone experience, a unique leadership exercise.

Classes will consist of a range of topics, delving into the role of a nonprofit CEO and top management team, working with the board of directors, and the digital leader. Fundamental topics, such as Strategic Planning, Financial Management, and Fundraising will also be covered. Lectures given by subject matter specialists on relevant topics will include nonprofit law, marketing, crisis management, diversity, and volunteer administration.

For more detailed information about The Great Leader Program’s high-impact learning, go here.

Networking Opportunities

 The most unique feature of The Great Leaders Program is its “CEO Perspectives.” Students will meet and network with some of the most effective and creative nonprofit CEOs in New York.  These current and former leaders include: John Banks, President of the Real Estate Board of New York; Gary Begley, Executive Director of New York Cares; Lorenzo Brown, CEO of Heaven’s Hands Community Services; Dr. Tom Kamber, founder and Executive Director of OATS; Brooke Ritchie-Babbage, attorney, founder and former Executive Director of RAP, Resilience Advocacy Project; Allison Sesso, Executive Director of the Human Services Council; Fatima Sharma, Executive Director of The Fresh Air Fund; and Ariel Zwang, CEO of Safe Horizon.

“By completing this transformative educational experience, we expect that participants will have a significant advantage over their peers in competing for CEO positions and in fulfilling CEO and other top management jobs in nonprofit agencies,” observed Edgar Zavala, Director of Executive Programs at Baruch’s Marxe School.

Learn more about The Great Leaders Program by emailing Edgar.Zavala@baruch.cuny.edu or calling (646) 660-6718.

 

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Baruch College Named as One of Country’s Best Colleges by The Princeton Review

Marks Tenth Consecutive Year as an “Outstanding Institution”

 NEW YORK, NY- July 31, 2017 – Baruch College has been named one of the country’s best undergraduate colleges by The Princeton Review. The 2018 edition of the annual guide, “The Best 382 Colleges,” includes Baruch for the tenth consecutive year as among the “outstanding institutions” in its survey of more than 100,000 students across the United States.

The Princeton Review also named Baruch College as one of the more than 200 schools selected in its “Best Northeastern” and “Colleges That Pay You Back” lists.

The guide also includes top 20 rankings in a number of areas that address quality of life, the social scene, and life around the city or town for students. Baruch College received high marks in the following categories.

  • #7 Top Schools for Entrepreneurship: Undergraduate
  • #10 College City Gets High Marks (Based on students’ answers to the survey question: “How do you rate the city or town where your school is located?”)

Positive Feedback from Students

According to The Princeton Review’s student survey, being in “the greatest city in the world” allows students to gain a unique educational experience from professors who have “led huge corporations and [whose] anecdotal experience helps students internalize material.” The school has an “impressive number of career developing opportunities on campus” that help students gain valuable intern and work experience.

Despite being a commuter campus, Baruch students highlighted the school’s sense of community. “It is all about how much time and effort you put into finding things to do,” one student said. Clubs and extracurricular activities always offer “something going on and free food around campus.”

In social scene categories, Baruch College ranked:

  • #3 Scotch and Soda, Hold the Scotch
  • #3 Got Milk?
  • #9 Don’t Inhale

Methodology

 The rankings are based on the data from the guide’s surveys of 143,000 students at the 382 schools in the book. In the survey, students were asked about: 1) their school’s academics/administration, 2) life at their college, 3) their fellow students and 4) themselves. For more details on the methodology or to view the full rankings, see here.


Baruch College MPA Graduates Earn Competitive New York Excelsior Service Fellowships

From the Marxe School of Public Affairs to State Government Positions

 

NEW YORK, NY- July 31, 2017 – Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs announced that four of its Master in Public Administration (MPA) graduates from the class of 2017 have been selected to participate in the competitive Excelsior Service Fellowship Program.

Launched by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo in 2013, the program brings “highly talented recent graduates of law, graduate and professional schools into state government service. Excelsior Fellows bring diverse backgrounds and new perspectives to a host of policy and operational positions in New York State government.”  Beginning in early September, the fellowship runs two years within the New York State’s Executive Chamber, a government agency, or authority.

“These fellowships were designed to attract people of great talent to leadership roles in government,” says David Birdsell, Dean of Baruch’s School of Public Affairs. “We are very proud to have so many of our alumni involved in the program since its establishment and particularly congratulate this year’s group of four outstanding Excelsior Fellows.”

According to Dean Birdsell, the Excelsior Fellows work full-time alongside senior members of the administration and play a policy-influencing role in New York State with the opportunity to work on the most pressing issues of the day.

To date, more than 25 graduates of the Marxe School’s MPA program have been accepted into the program since it was launched four years ago and have worked at such top-tier state agencies as Empire State Development, The Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation (PATH), the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA), and the state’s Executive Chamber.

Meet the 2017 Excelsior Service Fellows

Tydie Abreu

 

 

 

Tydie Abreu, Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC), Executive Office, Albany, NY

”The Excelsior Fellowship is the career opportunity I’ve been hoping for. Throughout my undergraduate studies, years of work experience, and later grad school at Baruch, my ultimate goal was to obtain a role where I can influence policy and enhance educational opportunities for youth. Now with my placement at HESC, I finally have the opportunity to do so. As a born and bred New Yorker, I am so excited to give back and serve the place I call home.”

 

Nabila Ibrahim

Nabila Ibrahim, Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC), Executive Office, Albany, NY

“I’m very excited to start my career in the New York State government through the Excelsior Fellowship Program. Working with people with disabilities has been my passion throughout my life. My placement in the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council will not only give me the opportunity to provide direct services but also to advocate for more programs and resources for the community.”

 

Danny Lundy

Danny Lundy – NYS Thruway, Office of Administrative Services, Albany, NY

“The Excelsior Fellowship is a great opportunity to see the inner workings of NY state government and watch how policy is implemented, all while gaining valuable work experience. I am honored to be a part of this program, and can’t wait to see what this experience brings.”

 

Ben Matthison

Ben Mattison, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation, Executive Office (working on FEMA storm resiliency grant), Albany, NY

“I am honored and elated to have been chosen as one of Baruch’s New York State Excelsior Service Fellows. It’s an exceptional opportunity for me to put the skills I developed earning my MPA to work for the state of New York and a vital stepping stone to a career in public service.”

 

Competitive Selection Process

The selection process involved faculty and administrator nominations, an application in which the students had to articulate their interests and qualifications via a statement of purpose, and an interview during which a committee assessed their interests, qualifications, drive, and potential for success via a variety of traditional, behavioral, and scenario-based questions.  The process is highly competitive and approximately 60 fellows are chosen each year.

In addition to Baruch College, participating schools include Albany Law School, Cornell Law School, the New York University’s School of Law and its Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, among others.

For more information about the MPA program at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, go here.  Applications are now being accepted for fall 2017.

 

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CUNY, CUCF HOST CONFERENCE ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR BUSINESSES OWNED BY MINORITIES, WOMEN AND SERVICE-DISABLED VETERANS

The City University of New York and the City University Construction Fund, CUNY’s public benefit construction corporation, hosted a conference to afford businesses owned by minorities and women (MWBE) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOB) access to key contract decision-makers and procurement professionals representing all 24 CUNY campuses and selected contractors.

“To accelerate The City University of New York’s progress in the next decade, we will need to continue to innovate in ways that are central to our mission and that have major impact,” CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken said.  “MWBE and SDVOB firms will play an active role in shaping the 21st-century CUNY, the connected university.”

“Accessing the full spectrum of talent and experience that New York has to offer is commonsense business practice,” said William C. Thompson Jr., Chairperson of the CUNY Board of Trustees.  “Creating gateways of opportunity for MWBEs and SVDOBs promotes CUNY’s own growth.”

More than 1,000 registered for the conference with the theme “Build Your Business,” which was held at John Jay College today and offered 70 exhibitors including CUNY and City University Construction Fund (CUCF) purchasing teams; representatives of other New York State/New York City agencies; architecture, engineering and construction management contractors doing business with CUNY; and business-resource organizations. A new CUNY and CUCF Help Desk, staffed by the Staten Island Small Business Development Center and LaGuardia Community College Procurement Technical Assistance Center, was available to provide guidance on how to do business with CUNY and CUCF.

“By increasing MWBE and SDVOB participation, we are helping these job-creating small businesses prosper and build New York State’s economy,” said Philip Berry, Acting Chairperson of the CUCF Board of Trustees.

Speakers at the conference included Chairperson Thompson; Chancellor Milliken; Acting CUCF Board Chairperson Berry; Alphonso B. David, Counsel to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo; John Jay College President Karol Mason, Gerrard P. Bushell, president and CEO of the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York and other distinguished guests.  Brooklyn Assembly Member Rodneyse Bichotte, Chair of the Assembly’s Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprises Subcommittee, was Master of Ceremonies.

The full-day program includes six business-development workshops, boot-camp intensives, exclusive business meet-ups for New York State-certified MWBE and SDVOB companies, and the Help Desk, which provides real-time, direct answers from business experts. The Marketplace Exhibit Hall features representatives of more than 70 public agencies, private contractors and nonprofit organizations providing direct, one-on-one networking and new business opportunities.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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An Afternoon at Socrates Sculpture Park with Professor Nari Ward

Socrates Sculpture Park, a museum and public park, is a well-known haven for New YorkersAn Afternoon at Socrates Sculpture Park with Professor Nari Ward seeking stimulating and surprising art in the outdoors. Located in Long Island City and open every day till sundown, the park offers New Yorkers the opportunity to stroll through multimedia installations and take in views of the water – always for free. This summer, it features an individual exhibition by Nari Ward, Hunter College Professor of Studio Art, making Professor Ward the first artist in the park’s thirty year history to receive a park-wide solo commission. His installation, entitled G.O.A.T, again, spans the entire 5-acre park, and consists of six newly commissioned artworks that employ many of Professor Ward’s go-to materials: fire hoses, broken glass, tubing – found materials repurposed and re-contextualized to create large scale art pieces.

This exhibit features variations and explorations of goats, animals that have mythologically mined for both their hubris and their vulnerability. G.O.A.T., which stands for Greatest Of All Time, refers dually to Donald Trump’s “Make America Great Again” slogan, and to the often used descriptor of sports heroes, famously Muhammad Ali. With the political anxiety in the air, Professor Ward wanted to blend his frequent brand of absurdism with a more sobering lesson about grandiosity and tribalism.

Seeking to honor his heritage – Professor Ward was born in Jamaica and lives and works in Harlem — Professor Ward has placed 3 sticks protruding from the top of many of his goat sculptures, a reference to building practices on Jamaican huts. He has also erected a replica of the Apollo Theater marquee in the garden, an homage to the performance development grounds of many Black artists – and a bit of wordplay on the political theme (“pol” is embedded within “Apollo,” after all).

“I look for the strangeness in my work,” Professor Ward says. “Strange is good because strange means that you have to consider what you might know. It’s not necessary to take or make something super new – I try to take something familiar and make it so that you look at it in a new way.”

G.O.A.T., again will be on exhibit through September 4, 2017.
For more information:
http://socratessculpturepark.org/exhibition/nariward/


Hunter’s David Himmelstein and Stephanie Woolhandler Earn Distinction and Wide National Influence

Hunter College is proud to announce that David Himmelstein and Stephanie Woolhandler –Hunter’s David Himmelstein and Stephanie Woolhandler Earn Distinction and Wide National Influence esteemed teachers, brilliant scholars and front-line leaders in the field of public health – have been named Distinguished Professors by The City University of New York.

“Nationally and around the world, Professors Himmelstein and Woolhandler are known and admired not only for their knowledge, research and expertise, but also for their forceful activism for quality health care,” said Hunter President Jennifer J. Raab. “No one is more deserving of the designation ‘distinguished professor’ than these longtime collaborators.”

Professors Himmelstein and Woolhandler, both MDs, came to Hunter from faculty posts at Harvard Medical School.

Their latest study, appearing in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, has been gaining attention, and as the national healthcare debate intensifies, more and more Americans are getting vital facts and analysis from Hunter’s two Distinguished Professors of Public Health.

Both Himmelstein and Woolhandler were featured extensively in this CBS News article and Dr. Woolhander was recently interviewed on Democracy Now (starting at 15:15).


CUNY TEAMS WITH REVATURE TO PREPARE MORE WOMEN FOR TECHNOLOGY LEADERSHIP

The City University of New York is moving aggressively to prepare more women for leadership roles in technology fields by expanding its strategic partnership with Revature, a prominent technology talent-development company.

Since CUNY began working with Revature in 2016, more than 3,500 CUNY students and graduates from a range of majors have enrolled in Revature’s tuition-free, noncredit online coding programs. Revature is on track to hire more than 200 CUNY graduates by the end of this year.

While the initial partnership offered online training to CUNY students and alumni regardless of gender, the latest initiative targets women, who are greatly underrepresented in the tech workforce. The application deadline for the new program is Aug. 14, 2017; see http://www.revature.com/witny

“CUNY is extraordinarily pleased with its strategic partnership with Revature and especially with these new initiatives to expand opportunities for women in technology,” said CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken. “We are enthusiastically committed to increasing the numbers of women in tech disciplines and careers, and our work with Revature and WiTNY is making this possible.” WiTNY, or Women in Technology and Entrepreneurship in New York, is a public-private partnership of CUNY, Cornell Tech and tech companies that aims to significantly increase the number of tech-savvy women in both higher education and New York-area entrepreneurship.

The new women-oriented initiative has three goals:

  • Involving recent female CUNY graduates in industry-aligned coding programs designed exclusively for them this fall. Those accepted will be paid during training will have the opportunity to work as software developers for one of Revature’s corporate partners. This program will feature guest lectures by female leaders in technology who can serve as much-needed role models to aspiring female technology professionals.
  • Introducing students to the power of coding and building their own small applications, starting with one-day introductory coding classes for freshman women on several CUNY campuses offered by Revature’s online mentors and trainers this fall. The goal will be to encourage these young women to register for an introduction to computer science course, to pursue a degree and, ultimately, enter a career in technology.
  • Creating a “rising seniors” program for CUNY women who aspire to be software engineers but have not previously chosen to study computer science. These students can participate in an immersive enterprise-level coding program between their junior and senior years, with additional training provided between terms. Upon graduation, each student can join Revature as a software engineer.

“Despite the growing number of talented women developers, the gender gap in the technology industry remains a significant concern,” said Revature CEO Srikanth Ramachandran. “Revature is closing this gap by working with CUNY, WiTNY and similar organizations. These partnerships allow us to fulfill our mission to cultivate and deliver the next generation of tech talent while breaking down barriers and making technology education accessible for everyone.”

“These new programs will open up innovative and alternative pathways for undergraduate women to find their way into tech careers, establishing a more robust pipeline for the next generation of women leaders in tech,” said WiTNY’s program director Judith Spitz, a former CIO at Verizon.

CUNY’s initial collaboration with Revature created 12-week online and in-person boot camps for CUNY graduates so they could learn the latest enterprise-level, next-generation and niche technology skills at no cost. Revature employs students who complete the training; they receive industry certification and continuing education. The program is expected to train and hire more than 2,000 CUNY graduates over the next five years.

CUNY also offers Revature’s custom online course training, RevaturePro, to current CUNY students and alumni. These courses are designed for both nontechnical and advanced students to learn enterprise-level programing skills at their own pace and receive dedicated support from Revature’s industry mentors. RevaturePro features free online training programs supporting all levels, from beginner to advanced, where students can learn Java, Microsoft.NET and other front-end development languages.

About CUNY

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

About Revature

Revature recruits, develops and deploys the next generation of technology talent enabling its corporate partners to succeed and grow. Its mission is to create a pathway where university graduates with diverse backgrounds can build the knowledge, skills and abilities to reach their potential as technology professionals and leverage those talents to contribute to the growth and success of customers. Revature’s role is to provide students with state-of-the-art “last-mile” training at no cost and then a well-paid first job in coding and software development, setting them up for a range of career options. Due in part to its talent development strategy, Revature successfully serves a wide range of Fortune 500 enterprises, government organizations and top systems integrators. Learn more atwww.revature.com

About WiTNY

WiTNY is a public/private partnership between CUNY, Cornell Tech and a group of funding corporations led by Verizon and Accenture, with a mission to facilitate, encourage and enable a significant increase in the participation of women in both higher education and entrepreneurship in fields related to technology in the New York market. Through strategic initiatives and purposeful integration with key institutions and programs in the city of New York, WiTNY targets high school girls getting ready for college, undergraduate and graduate women, preparing them to secure a rewarding and lucrative position in the technology industry.

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Princeton Review names CCNY one of the Best Colleges for sixth year

The City College of New York is one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education, according to The Princeton Review. The education services company features the school in the new 2018 edition of its college guide, “The Best 382 Colleges” (Penguin Random House/Princeton Review, $24.99, August 1, 2017).

Only about 15% of America’s 2,500 four-year colleges and two colleges outside the U.S. are profiled in the book, which is one of The Princeton Review’s most popular guides. Published annually since 1992, it has detailed profiles of the colleges with rating scores in eight categories.  The book also has ranking lists of top 20 schools in 62 categories. All of the ranking lists are based on The Princeton Review’s surveys of students attending the colleges.

“We chose City College for this book because it offers outstanding academics,” said Robert Franek, Princeton Review’s editor-in-chief and author of “The Best 382 Colleges.”

“Our selections are primarily based on our surveys of administrators at several hundred four-year colleges,” added Franek. “We also visit dozens of colleges each year and give considerable weight to opinions of our staff and our 24-member National College Counselor Advisory Board. Most   importantly, we look at valuable feedback we get from each school’s customers – our surveys of students attending them.”

This is the second major national recognition for CCNY from The Princeton Review this year.  In January, the institution was named one of the nation’s outstanding colleges for the high-value return it offers students on their investment in higher education. This earned CCNY a listing in the 2017 edition of The Princeton Review’s “Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck.”

Princeton noted that City College offers students a superb education with great career preparation at an affordable price.

About The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. The Princeton Review is headquartered in New York, NY.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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NEW CUNY PARTNERSHIP CREATES MENTORSHIPS AND JOBS IN THE ARTS

 

The City University of New York is partnering with the nonprofit arts organization, The New 42nd Street, to expand CUNY student opportunities, providing long-term jobs and mentorships in the arts.

The New 42nd Street College Corps is the most recent addition to the University’s CUNY Arts initiative that was created to bring the arts into the lives of students and diversity into the workforce of the city’s arts and culture world.

On Friday, Aug. 4, the College Corps will be working from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the final performance of another New 42nd Street theater project, Victory Dance, which provides free dance performances to city run summer schools and day camps.

The first group of 16 students to work with The New 42nd Street, most from CUNY community colleges, began in July at the Duke, an off-Broadway venue for theater and dance performances. Under the guidance of The New 42nd Street staff, College Corps students have paying jobs as ushers and receive one-on-one counseling, as well as access to CUNY services and resources beneficial to them. The program is planned to eventually include 25 to 30 students.

“This partnership gives our students access to yet another exciting cultural institution, provides a pipeline for paid internships and jobs, and helps promote diversity in the arts,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “It exemplifies the ambitions of our CUNY Arts initiative.”

Cora Cahan, president of The New 42nd Street, said that “as a graduate of CUNY’s Brooklyn College, I am especially pleased on behalf of everyone on the board and the staff to welcome CUNY students to The New 42nd Youth Corps, which pairs paid employment and cultural engagement for young New Yorkers.” The organization, which was created by the city and state in 1990 to redevelop Manhattan’s famous thoroughfare, now operates three theater projects and a number of youth development programs.

Its newest, the College Corps, was developed by The New 42nd Street to support CUNY students in ways that go beyond providing them with jobs. Besides working at performances and learning about the arts from inside a leading, cultural nonprofit, participants will be mentored by staff members and take part in professional development and life skills workshops to help them succeed in college and beyond.

“This is a wonderful example of the possibilities when the CUNY Arts initiative partners with organizations that care deeply about CUNY students,” said Associate Vice Chancellor Andrea Shapiro Davis.  “The New 42nd Street doesn’t want to just hire our students, they want to help our students grow professionally and personally, and are providing them with opportunities and support services that they need and want.”

CUNY Arts is a comprehensive initiative that includes the CUNY Cultural Corps, itself a new initiative to create opportunities for CUNY students to work in the city’s arts and culture industry. Launched last fall, the Cultural Corps is modeled on the CUNY Service Corps, which provides students with paid work experience in civic-oriented jobs in community-based organizations and government agencies.

Likewise, The New 42nd Street College Corps is part of a broader initiative by the arts organization. It’s the fourth program under the group’s Youth Corps, which provides more than 100 young people a year with jobs in the arts. “This partnership with CUNY Arts is an extension of our nationally recognized work in offering academic and career mentorship with unique opportunities to experience New York City’s world-renowned performing arts firsthand,” said Cahan. The Duke on 42nd Street has been home to numerous performing arts companies and has presented such companies as Playwright’s Realm, Steppenwolf Theater Company, Classical Theater of Harlem and the National Theater of Great Britain.

The New 42nd Street also built and operates two other theater projects, New 42nd Street Studios and The New Victory Theater. In 2014, First Lady Michelle Obama presented the New Victory Usher Corps with a National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award for outstanding excellence in creative youth development.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

Contact: Frank Sobrino, CUNY, (646) 664-9300; Allison Mui, The New 42nd Street, (646) 223-3067

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City College engineers produce long lasting, energy density battery

A look inside the energy density manganese dioxide-zinc battery developed at CCNY

A new generation of manganese dioxide-zinc batteries with unprecedented cycle life and energy density is the latest innovation at The City College of New York-based CUNY Energy Institute. The discovery has made the common household battery suitable for large grid storage applications.

City College Senior Research Associate Gautam G. Yadav and his team applied a new twist to the old chemistry behind batteries. The result is a battery that takes advantage of intercalation and complexation chemistry to make the cathodes rechargeable to a larger extent, greatly extending its life.

“A new layered crystal structure of manganese dioxide is used in this chemistry, which is intercalated with copper ions. This makes it rechargeable to its theoretical capacity for a significant number of cycles,” said Yadav.

According to Yadav, this is the first time a novel calcium hydroxide interlayer is used to block the poisonous zinc ions through complexation. This in turn   allows the battery to maintain its high energy density over 900 cycles.

A recent trend in the energy storage field has been to replace unsafe and expensive lithium-ion batteries with zinc-anode versions as zinc is cheap, abundant and much safer. Until now, the only detriment of this version has been the latter’s relatively short cycle life, which has not allowed it to be successfully commercialized as a rechargeable battery.

The Yadav team’s research appears in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A.

Team members included Xia Wei, Michael Nyce, Jinchao Huang, Joshua Gallaway, Damon Turney, Jeff Secor and Sanjoy Banerjee, Distinguished Professor and director of the CUNY Energy Institute.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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City Tech Alum Chef Matthew MacCartney Talks Wine

By Alastair Cairns
SO Rhode Island

Wine Spectator’s two-glass Best of Award of Excellence, according to the magazine, is given to the restaurant that qualifies as a “destination for serious wine lovers.” The list of winners in Rhode Island has but four names. While one might expect the likes of Castle Hill to seek to impress well-heeled guests with its wine list, the excellence of Chef Matthew MacCartney’s Jamestown Fish flies under the radar. At this intimate location, wine isn’t a commitment to luxury so much as a reflection of the personal passion and life-long learning of its owner and executive chef. Matthew’s resume is seriously impressive, boasting time in the kitchens of Michelin-starred restaurants abroad, as well as high-profile work in New York City at the Gramercy Tavern and as beverage director at Tom Colicchio’s Craft. Jamestown Fish distills all of this experience, with wine at the heart of Matthew’s vision for the restaurant. We talked about the study of wine, the curation of a wine list and the regrettable reputation of Riesling.

Credit: Ron Cowie

You seem to have decided early on that you wanted to understand both the world of the kitchen and the world of wine. What was the trajectory of your study of wine?
I had taken a wine class back at New York City Technical College (now known as City Tech/CUNY), and on a transfer semester in the UK, I took the WSET [Wine & Spirit Education Trust] level one course. I continued with it back in the states while still working in the kitchen, and I really liked it. When it came to the third level, the diploma, I decided the only way I’d really be able to do this would be to step away from the kitchen and dive into wine 100 percent. Gramercy Tavern gave me a job, where I would learn the front of the house and be able to focus on wine, touching bottles, looking at labels, tasting with people, all of that. That worked out well, and in 2001 Tom Colicchio asked me to do his wine program at Craft. They actually paid for my last year of study. So all in all, from 1992 to 2002, I finished the diploma.

Even with hundreds of wines, do you focus on particular areas?
In a restaurant that is fish-oriented, I’m looking toward wines that are more delicate and focused, not the big, brooding, fruit-forward wines of the New World. I tend to focus on things with bright acidity that are food friendly, and fish friendly, and have a lot of umami. You’ll see a passion for Burgundy, both red and white, at a big range of prices, from $50 to $6,000 a bottle. They last a long time, many improve over time, and they go with a lot of different foods. Over the years Burgundy has become a passion for many people, the ultimate classic. I also have a passion for Italy as well, and think there’s a lot of great value there, and diversity. Even in the Barolos, you can bridge that gap with red wines that go with fish, in specific dishes.

What about including recognizable names, playing to the crowd?
That’s never, ever been how I do it; from my days working with Paul Grieco at Gramercy Tavern, I was encouraged to choose wines that are great, that express the variety and region. It’s not about a label, or marketability. We have people here to talk about the wine with you; that is where the service aspect comes in, to help navigate a wine list like we have. You might not recognize any of the names, but we’re going to find you a wine you like, at the price you want. The beautiful thing about what I do is that over time, when you get to know people, they start to trust you, and you create this rapport with a guest where “you know what I like” is all they have to say. You can give them pretty much anything that fits that description.

How do you figure out what makes the cut?
If we have 650 wines on the list, there are probably three times as many wines that I tasted in order to narrow that down. I taste constantly, and buy very little. I’m open to seeing every rep that comes in and just looking at stuff. I get tons of offers, but most things don’t make it on. I want that quality.

Are there wines that people think they don’t like, that they do?
The biggest one is Riesling – Riesling has such a reputation from 1970, you know, being sweet. That’s so not the case. There is so much Riesling that will rip the enamel off your teeth with the acidity and the brightness and not be at all sweet, from most places in the world except Germany. And even Germany is drying their wines more. In Austria, Australia, upstate New York, Canada, it’s dry Riesling. But it can’t seem to shake that sweet thing. It’s really ruined the reputation of that wine.

Jamestown Fish
14 Narragansett Avenue, Jamestown


ICYMI: Children’s Books Missed These Immigrant Stories. So Students Wrote Them.

The New York Times
By David Gonzalez

Greatness surrounds Melissa Cabrera when she attends classes at Bronx Community College. That should not be surprising, because the campus is home to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans, where busts of scientists, scholars and statesmen, among others, line a grand colonnade that wraps around Gould Memorial Library, an architectural treasure designed by Stanford White.

Classical tributes are fine, but the greatness of which Ms. Cabrera speaks was found sitting alongside her in a children’s literature class she took at night, when her fellow students came straight from work, still dressed in the uniforms of nurses, fast-food workers or security guards. A few brought their children, because money for child care was scarce. English was often their second language, and most were the first in their immigrant family to go to college.

They struggle to get an education so they can provide for their families. They do so despite a political climate in which immigrants have become a target of nativist attacks. And in this class, they each wrote a book for children or young adults, drawing upon their lives to offer a point of view often lacking in those literary genres.

(Junot Díaz, the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, next year will publish “Islandborn,” an illustrated children’s book that is the fulfillment of a promise he made to his two goddaughters, who asked him to write a book that reflects their lives as girls from the Caribbean living in New York.)

“Our professor encouraged us to use the significance of our own experiences and apply it to our writing so that, hopefully, others can relate to us,” said Ms. Cabrera, who was born in New York to parents from the Dominican Republic. “We don’t have much of anything to relate to as Dominicans. There aren’t enough Dominican writers, and we need more.”

Ms. Cabrera’s classmates could relate, even if they came from Africa, Asia or Latin America, said Katherine Arnoldi, who finished teaching the writing-intensive class last week. They are older and have day jobs and children, yet still come to class despite the unending daily challenges of New York life.

“They are very proud of themselves for being in college,” Ms. Arnoldi said. “Sometimes it’s hard because they may be the first in the family to go to college, and their parents don’t understand why they can’t stay home and take care of children or take a relative to the hospital. They are caught between their family and trying to make decisions for themselves.”

The single mothers she has taught at Bronx Community College and other campuses in the City University of New York system have especially impressed her, for very personal reasons. In the early 1970s, as a teenager, she became a single parent when her daughter, Stacie, was born. Through detours and setbacks, she stayed focused on her goals and finished college.

In 1998, she chronicled her journey in “The Amazing ‘True’ Story of a Teenage Single Mom,” a graphic novel that she used to give to young women at schools and community groups, where she would give talks encouraging them to continue their education.

She, in turn, draws inspiration from her students, whose final story projects reflected their immigrant journeys, sometimes in very ordinary ways. Umar Bukhari, who felt books about his native Pakistan relied on stereotypes, wrote a tale about a Pakistani child who wanted to win a race. Jeton T. Sylaj wrote about two Albanian-American brothers, one of whom uses a wheelchair, who go to the park and learn how people overcome physical limitations. AnnDenise Acquah wrote about two Ghanaian boys — one rich, the other a servant — whose friendship is shattered when the rich boy betrays his friend.

Ms. Cabrera’s story is called “Antonio’s Journey,” about a parrot who lives on a Dominican beach but flies north when a drought hits the island. He lands in New York, where, he was told, fruits are plentiful and fall from the sky, free for the taking. Instead, he finds himself in the cold, competing against pigeons for scraps of garbage. His fortunes change when he meets Emma, a shy pigeon who persuades him to take her to the Dominican Republic, where they open a mango stand.

“The idea came from my mother’s life,” said Ms. Cabrera, 26, who works as a medical receptionist. “You come here thinking the streets are made of gold and you will live the American dream. But it’s just that — a dream. You have to work hard.”

Her dream is to get a political science degree and, in time, to go to the Dominican Republic to offer her time and talent to uplift the land of her parents. She might even write another children’s book, given how deeply the class affected her.

“People think because you’re an immigrant your future is predestined,” she said. “But we have morals, values and aspirations. I believe we have made a difference for the better in American culture. We made America great. We’re not here to cause trouble. Everyone wants to be great. If we didn’t have those aspirations, we wouldn’t be here to begin with.”


NATIONAL GROUPS HONOR CUNY SOLAR LEADERSHIP

The Smart Electric Power Alliance (SEPA) last night honored Sustainable CUNY with its Visionary of the Year Award at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. The award recognizes CUNY’s Smart Distributed Generation Hub, a collaborative effort with New York State and City agencies, utilities and industry to integrate solar power and storage into the New York infrastructure.

Sustainable CUNY is The City University of New York office that not only guides sustainability initiatives on the University’s 24 campuses, but also leads those efforts for New York City. SEPA is the second national organization to have recognized CUNY for its accomplishments in expanding solar power and solar+storage – batteries fed by photovoltaic cells during the day and, at night or during electricity outages, can power usage off the grid. Earlier this month, the Interstate Renewable Energy Council presented its 2017 3iAward for State and Local Government Achievement to Sustainable CUNY for its work to advance solar in New York City.

“When I signed on to the ‘We Are Still In’ commitment to support the critical goals of the Paris Climate Agreement, I knew that faculty and staff at The City University of New York were working hard to preserve our city’s environment, which of course doesn’t stop at the city limits,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “The better job we do in New York City to use clean energy and reduce greenhouse gasses and fossil fuels, the better everyone will be. Our future depends on the kinds of actions that our University, city and state are already taking to create a clean-energy future.”

Tria Case, the University Director of Sustainability and Energy Conservation, added, “Sustainable CUNY’s role, as a trusted third party, has never been more important. Despite the ever-changing political and atmospheric climate, the demand for power is unabated. The NYC Solar Partnership is an ongoing strategic effort to work collaboratively with NYC and NYS agencies, Con Edison, the industry and other organizations to advance solar, and now solar+storage and helps address climate change.”  A SEPA video on CUNY’s role in the effort can be viewed at

Now in its ninth year, the SEPA Power Players Awards recognize utilities, their industry partners, individuals and other stakeholders on the front lines of energy transformation in the United States that are significantly advancing knowledge of or access to distributed energy resources that benefit electricity consumers and the grid.

Chosen by an independent panel of seven judges with diverse experience in the electric power industry, Sustainable CUNY and winners in six other categories were honored during SEPA’s Grid Evolution Summit: A National Town Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Sustainable CUNY formed the Distributed Generation Hub in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy to help provide resiliency to NYC by developing a streamlined process for integrating solar+storage into the infrastructure and the grid. Working collaboratively, the Hub has already developed significant resources, including a NYC Energy Storage Systems locator on the NY Solar Map and Portal (also developed by Sustainable CUNY). It also created a roadmap for integrating and tracking resilient solar systems and conducted analysis for deploying resilient solar electric systems on designated critical infrastructure facilities. This was done, in part, under a grant in 2015 from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative Solar Market Pathways, along with state and city funds.

Sustainable CUNY is the lead agency in the NYC Solar Partnership, which was formed to remove barriers to solar in the city more than a decade ago by the City University of New York, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and the New York City Economic Development Corporation. Since then, the partnership worked with regulatory agencies to streamline the installation process and lower costs. For example, professional certification at the NYC Department of Buildings cut review time from more than 24 business days to less than 24 hours. As a result of this growth, the city announced a new city solar of 1,000 megawatts by 2030, and the city set its first energy storage deployment target of 100 megawatts by 2020 to support resiliency during outages.

By 2016, solar capacity had quadrupled in just two years, due in large part to the Partnership’s work with regulatory agencies to streamline the installation process and lower costs. Among them was enactment of professional certification at the NYC Department of Buildings, which cut review time from more than 24 business days to less than 24 hours. As a result of this growth, the city announced a new city solar of 1,000 megawatts by 2030, and the City set its first energy storage deployment target of 100 megawatts by 2020 to support resiliency during outages.

Sustainable CUNY’s solar ombudsmen train city employees and other officials throughout the state via the New York State Energy Research Development Authority-supported PV Trainers Network. They have begun workshops throughout the five boroughs that educate the public on solar, and the opportunities through Solarize NYC and Shared Solar NYC. Sustainable CUNY also works regularly with the Fire Department of New York and the Department of Buildings to develop guidelines to clarify how solar, and now solar+storage, can be safely installed within the requirements of the New York City Codes.

BY THE NUMBERS:

At the beginning of 2014, there were 24 megawatts of solar installed in NYC, representing 1,037 installations. NYC has now surpassed 110 megawatts of solar capacity, representing 9,700 individual installations.

The cost of installing solar in NYC dropped from $5.06 per watt in 2014 to $4.32 per watt by the end of 2016.

A decade ago there were only five installation companies in NYC; now there are more than 60 that employ more than 2,700 people.

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CUNY FIGHTING HIV/AIDS INFECTION WITH NIH GRANTS

CUNY researchers have won two of the four grants that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently awarded for long-term studies of how gay and bisexual men become infected with the HIV virus.

Researchers at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and at Hunter College’s Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training won separate but complementary grants aimed at reducing the spread of HIV among gay and bisexual men. Those men account for nearly two-thirds of new HIV diagnoses among males, with men of color being hardest hit by the ongoing epidemic.

“These grants demonstrate the depth and talent of CUNY’s researchers who seek to end the HIV epidemic,” said CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Their parallel approaches may well lead to finding better ways to help people change their behavior and avoid infection. These grants build on the momentum generated by the recent alliance of the School of Public Health with Albert Einstein College of Medicine and The Rockefeller University that’s aimed at finding ways of ending the epidemic.”

NIH also awarded grants to Johns Hopkins University and the Hektoen Institute for Medical Research under a request for proposals “to use innovative technology to conduct epidemiologic studies of large cohorts of U.S. populations at high risk of HIV infection: men who have sex with men, transgender women, and black/African American women.” Together, the four research projects are expected to give a comprehensive view of how behavior may lead to HIV infection among different segments of the U.S. population.

The project at the CUNY School of Public Health provides the outline for all of these longitudinal studies. Christian Grov, an associate professor of community health and social sciences at the school, and his colleagues, will ask 5,000 HIV-negative gay and bisexual men ages 16 to 49 to complete at-home online surveys and self-administer at-home HIV tests. “We need to study these men’s lives in the environments they live in, not in a research environment, clinic or laboratory,” Grov said. “Given that, the study is designed for individuals to participate from their homes, or wherever they are most comfortable.”

This kind of research is needed, he said, because, “In spite of all the tools we have to prevent HIV transmission, too many vulnerable individuals keep falling through the HIV prevention safety net, and we just don’t know why.”

Traditionally, research on gay and bisexual men has focused on adults over the age of 18, “But gay and bisexual men don’t wait until 18 to start having sex.” Recent data suggest many gay and bisexual men are sexually active around age 16, which is on par with when many heterosexuals become sexually active. “Thus, we have an important opportunity to improve the lives of these young individuals,” he said. In recent years, there has been a spike in HIV infections in younger men who have sex with men.

One of the study’s main goals is to identify missed HIV prevention opportunities – the cracks that vulnerable men are falling through – and determine ways to fill them.

Denis Nash, a co-investigator and professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the CUNY School of Public Health, said, “Systematically characterizing and addressing missed HIV prevention opportunities is a priority implementation issue, and critical for ending HIV epidemics for every jurisdiction across the U.S.” Nash also is executive director of CUNY’s Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH)  and an associate director of the new collaboration with Einstein and Rockefeller, a federally funded Center for AIDS Research

The School of Public Health investigative team includes an interdisciplinary group of researchers who also come from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Boston, Rutgers University and the Foundation for AIDS Research.

The Hunter team’s joint principal investigators are Distinguished Professor of psychology Jeffrey Parsons and assistant professor Jonathon Rendina, respectively the director and director of quantitative methods at the Hunter College Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training (CHEST).

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

Schematic showing control of valley properties in 2D semiconductors embedded in microcavity. Image courtesy: Zheng Sun

While the charge and spin properties of electrons are widely utilized in modern day technologies such as transistors and memories, another aspect of the subatomic particle has long remained uncharted. This is the “valley” property which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed “valleytronics” – similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin). This property arises from the fact that the electrons in the crystal occupy different positions that are quantum mechanically distinct.

Now City College of New York physicists led by Vinod Menon have demonstrated how to manipulate the “valley” property using light by placing two-dimensional semiconductors in a light trapping structure called microcavity.  This gave rise to half-light-half matter quasi-particles which have the fingerprint of the “valley” property. These quasi-particles were then optically controlled using a laser to access the electrons occupying specific “valley.” The research appears in the latest issue of “Nature Photonics” and is a major step towards realization of “valleytronic” devices for logic gates.

“Observing this property in traditional semiconductors was not easy. However with the advent of the new class of two-dimensional semiconductors, this property became accessible to manipulation,” said Zheng Sun, a graduate student in Menon’s research group and lead author of the paper.

Other researchers included CCNY graduate students, Jie Gu and Christopher Considine; undergraduate Michael Dollar, postdoctoral researcher Biswanath Chakraborty, Zav Shotan, and  Xiaoze Liu; physics professor Pouyan Ghaemi and his postdoctoral researcher Areg Ghazaryan; and Stephane Kena-Cohen (Ecole Polytechnic, Montreal, Canada) also participated in the study.

The work was supported by the NSF through the EFRI 2-DARE program, the ECCS division, the Columbia-CCNY NSF MRSEC Center, the US Army Research Office and a Discovery grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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CUNY FRESHMAN APPLICATIONS RISE 9% TO A RECORD, TOPPING 76,000

Freshman applications to The City University of New York for Fall 2017 rose 9 percent to a record 76,345, the University announced today.

“This is a testament to the outstanding work being done at our campuses, the excellent outcomes our graduates can expect, and the commitment of the state and city to increasing educational opportunity,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said. “We are gratified that CUNY’s academic quality and our commitment to accessibility are being recognized by families throughout New York City and State.”

Several big initiatives contributed significantly to the upsurge, beginning with Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s Excelsior Scholarship program – there were 30,845 Excelsior applications to CUNY colleges – which will supplement state and federal aid and make college tuition free for more students.  Also adding to the record numbers are Mayor Bill de Blasio’s initiative to waive CUNY’s application fees for low-income students, as well as increased participation of New York City schools in New York State College Application Week.

The most dramatic increase in CUNY admissions applications was in the Bronx, where applications rose 13 percent.

The Chancellor noted that due to a record graduating class last spring, overall enrollment projection for the fall is expected to be stable.

With regard to Fall 2017 transfer-student admissions, CUNY has admitted 1.3 percent more transfers from external institutions than in Fall 2016.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


City Tech Architecture Professor Receives Peter Cooper Public Service Award & Inducted into Cooper Union Hall of Fame

Professor Agustin (Tim) Maldonado, Architectural Technology Department, received the Peter Cooper Public Service Award for exemplary service to the public on June 2, 2017, in Cooper Union’s (CU) Rose Auditorium in the New Academic Building on Cooper Square. At that same event, he was inducted into the Cooper Union Hall of Fame, joining other CU graduates such as Daniel Libeskind (designer of the WTC masterplan), Liz Diller and Robert Scofidio (High Line architects), Toshiko Mori (former Architecture Chair at Harvard), and Irwin Chanin (Chanin Building at 42nd & Lexington).

Professor Maldonado, FARA, NCARB, graduated from the Cooper Union School of Architecture and received a M.S. in Tropical Architecture from Pratt Institute. He also earned an Advanced Hospital Planning Certificate from Columbia University and the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. 

Professor Maldonado has an active private architectural practice covering a wide range of residential and commercial projects, as well as master planning and feasibility studies. His designs have been built throughout the United States and in England, Germany and Central and South America.

Professor Maldonado has been a guest speaker at Pratt Institute, Cornell University, City College, Bank Street College of Education, Centenary College, New York Institute of Technology, the Somerset Art Association and the Architectural Forum of the Hamptons. He served as President of the New York Council of the Society of American Registered Architects.

Professor Maldonado has taught at City Tech since 1974 and was Chair of the Architectural Technology Department for 18 years. He has also served as the Interim Dean of City Tech’s School of Technology and Design. By instituting a policy of service learning in the department, he has helped many architecture students understand civic responsibility and appreciate their special roles as architects in the ongoing betterment of our city and the environment.

Selected Public Service Projects by Professor Maldonado and his students:
• As the only architect and one of the four members of the Tudor City Historic Preservation Committee, Professor Maldonado played a pivotal role in the designation of Tudor City and its parks as a National Historic District. His students produced detailed models, drawings and slide presentations, moving the project through the lengthy land marking process. Students experienced the power of grass roots initiatives and how their work can make a difference.
• Conducted studies for the Metro Tech Business Improvement District in Brooklyn, NY. Components of the plan entailed renovation of storefronts, sidewalk improvements, graphics and historic restoration. Students developed presentations and exhibited their work at the corporate headquarters of Chase Manhattan Bank in Manhattan and at the Brooklyn Union Gas Headquarters.
• Prior to the actualization of the “new” Times Square, supervised students in preparing a video illustrating proposals for the West 42nd Street redevelopment. This study, which also included models and drawings, was exhibited at the Port Authority of New York. Student work illustrated the need to preserve existing functions within the intensive new construction being planned.
• Working with the East Midtown Coalition, his students produced shadow studies and architectural models that resulted in the significant lowering of building heights for the proposed ten-acre development site along the East River directly south of the United Nations. The huge scope of the project and the concessions obtained were documented in the New York Times, 2004-08.
• Supervised student work on the development of a master plan and hospital building for Medical Mission International. The project, located on a thirty-acre site in rural El Salvador entailed a surgical center and clinic, housing for visiting doctors, an administration building, a school, workshop facilities and a chapel. It was showcased in a Channel 75 documentary (CUNY), “Study with the Best” in 2008. Link
• The Village of Greenwood Lake, led by its mayor, partnered with City Tech in order to turn a four-acre parking lot at the water’s edge into a vibrant and useful public space which transformed the Village. Students also developed a master plan for the town.
• Students developed proposals and explored rebuilding possibilities for St. Nicholas Church, destroyed in the 9/11 catastrophe. Their work received significant press attention and the story was carried by the New York Times. (learn more)
• Working with the Urban Design Studio, supervised students in preparing innovative solutions for the revitalization of Chinatown. Working with community leaders, students developed animations, videos, drawings and models that would bring to life the concept of “gateways to Chinatown,” a broad-based effort to preserve the cultural identity of Chinatown.
• An exhibit at Brooklyn Borough Hall featured 40 student projects focused on transforming underutilized areas of Downtown Brooklyn from Borough Hall to the East River. Projects address street planning, building design and way finding. (learn more)
• Working with Industry City and Sunset Park in Brooklyn, our students developed multiple proposals for the development of the area and the underutilized waterfront. Models were prepared and exhibited at Industry City’s headquarters, highlighting the exciting possibilities for dramatically improving the area.
• Developed a master plan for the expansion of St. Catherine’s Academy in the Bronx. Models, renderings and animations were produced and presented at their fund-raising event last year.

A comprehensive listing and images can be found here.


CUNY CUTTING COST OF TEXTBOOKS THROUGH USE OF OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES Openly Licensed Resources Save Students Money, Improve Performance

Chancellor James B. Milliken announced that The City University of New York will slash the cost of textbooks for the highest-demand classes through the use of Open Educational Resources, or OER, freely available, high-quality books and other materials that can be downloaded, edited and shared. OER not only saves students’ money, it also helps them do better in school, according to a growing body of research.

Almost half of CUNY’s students come from households with less than $20,000 of income. Book costs totaling as much as $1,200 a year can be prohibitive for them. When he signed legislation in April enacting the Excelsior Scholarship, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced an $8 million OER allocation to be split equally between CUNY and the State University of New York. CUNY and SUNY are collaborating on strategies to convert commonly used textbooks to OER.

“Skyrocketing book costs often lead students to drop a course, or to try to make do without required texts,” Chancellor Milliken said. “Open Educational Resources will provide important financial relief for many of our students and their families, while helping improve student performance, class completion and accelerated graduation rates. OER and Excelsior are moving us ever closer to a future in which quality higher education is accessible to all low- and middle-income New Yorkers at no cost.”

CUNY will invest the $4 million state allocation on developing and converting materials to OER resources, orienting students and enrolling them in OER courses, and training faculty on how to shift from commercial textbooks to the cost-free OER universe, which already has some 1 billion books, audio recordings, videos and other openly licensed materials available.

Chancellor Milliken explained that the state OER allocation will enable CUNY to:

  • Convert at least 350 high-enrollment courses that have five or more sections to OER. That will affect some 1,750 classes in both community colleges and senior colleges.
  • Create zero-textbook-cost degree pathways that will enable students to attain a degree in some majors without spending any money on texts.
  • Support faculty to create OER textbooks and attendant works, contributing to the broader body of openly licensed materials.
  • Institutionalize OER across CUNY and improve student access, retention, time to graduation and success.

Affecting some 50,000 CUNY students, replacing traditional textbooks and other materials with openly licensed resources will save students more than $4.5 million in out-of-pocket expenses in the first year and an estimated $22 million in the fourth year of implementation.

Over the past decade, the average cost of college textbooks has increased a staggering 73 percent, more than four times the rate of inflation, according to data gathered by the Student Public Interest Research Groups, an independent national student organization. Individual textbooks often cost more than $200.

Borough of Manhattan Community College has been at the leading edge of converting classes to OER. BMCC faculty are teaching approximately 175 sections of zero-textbook-cost courses, resulting in an estimated annual savings of $450,000 for more than 4,000 students. By Fall 2017, cumulative savings for BMCC students will be more than $1 million. BMCC’s Criminal Justice degree program will be fully converted by Fall 2018.

CUNY’s open education librarian, Ann Fiddler, who coordinates OER initiatives, said, OER can improve student achievement. “In one CUNY math course that used OER, students scored 10 points higher on the final exam and were three times as likely to pass the course as students using expensive materials from traditional publishing companies,” she said.

In a controlled application at Tidewater Community College in Norfolk, Va., students utilizing OER resources in a variety of course formats fared as much as 11 percent better in both course completion and achievement. In addition, more than a dozen peer-reviewed studies have found that students who use OER perform as well as – or better – than their peers using traditional textbooks.

CUNY is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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ICYMI: FREE ONLINE COURSE MATERIALS HELP TAKE TEXTBOOKS OFF N.Y. STUDENTS’ SHOULDERSSUPPORTERS OF FREE RESOURCES TOUT CREATIVE LEEWAY FOR TEACHERS, BUT SKEPTICS CAUTION SOME MATERIALS LACK QUALITY OR COHERENCE

The Wall Street Journal
By Leslie Brody

The City University of New York predicts that ditching more textbooks in favor of free online materials will save 50,000 students more than $4.5 million this coming year in book fees.

Like many schools nationwide in recent years, CUNY and the State University of New York have started replacing some required textbooks with free digital options. That effort got a boost in April when the state allotted $4 million to each institution to speed up the change.

So-called open educational resources can be downloaded, edited and shared under an intellectual-property license that allows their use at no cost. Such materials are “outstanding tools,” said Marc Cohen, the 22-year-old president of the Student Assembly at SUNY. He applauded the shift as “life-changing,” saying every student has been forced to buy an “insanely expensive textbook” at some point. One organic chemistry tome, for example, costs $364.

While supporters of free materials say they give teachers more leeway to be creative, skeptics caution that some resources lack quality or coherence and adapting them can be time-consuming.

At CUNY, where almost half of the student body comes from households earning less than $20,000, officials said the cost of a student’s books can total as much as $1,200 a year. The officials said faculty members were converting 350 popular courses to free digital materials for the fall and were being trained on their use. These resources will be shared publicly.

The infusion of funding for this project is “a real shot in the arm for efforts to make college attendance even more affordable,” said CUNY Chancellor James Milliken. He said the course catalog will show which classes have no textbook fees, and, in a year or two, some CUNY degrees won’t require such fees.

Eleven of SUNY’s 64 campuses have reported enrollment information so far, and at those 11 schools, officials projected that 12,000 students will be taking at least one course using open educational resources this fall. Overall, SUNY estimates its students will save around $8 million on textbooks by June 2018.

Jean Amaral, a librarian at CUNY’s Borough of Manhattan Community College, said courses converting to open educational resources this fall include psychology, English literature and public speaking.

In surveys, students at her campus reported that digital materials saved them from lugging heavy backpacks and were more quickly accessible than printed books they had to order. Some students said they could study on cellphones on the subway. One student said saving money on books allowed the purchase of a MetroCard.

Ms. Amaral said some teachers were excited about the chance to tap more engaging and interactive materials, including audio and video. “Textbooks are incredibly dry,” the librarian said.


Professor Sarah Lamdan on Her New Book about Environmental Information Access

Sarah Lamdan

Sarah Lamdan

Professor Sarah Lamdan is the author of the new book Environmental Information: Research, Access and Environmental Decisionmaking, published by the Environmental Law Institute.

CUNY Law students Maria Brinkmann ‘18, Jonathan Cantarero ‘16, Robert Feliu ‘16 and April Whitehead ‘17 provided research assistance.

Here, Professor Lamdan discusses her book and considers what role access to environmental information can play in the future.

Why did you choose to research this subject?
In my work as a legal information specialist and librarian and an environmental law-focused lawyer, I noticed that there were no resources to help people looking for environmental information. There are many resources to help people conducting research in other legal fields, including securities and corporate law, etc. I noticed that areas of the law that are largely the focus of public interest attorneys, like environmental law, criminal law, immigration law, etc. don’t have the same wealth of information access resources. I decided to write a practical book for environmental information seekers, including laypeople, environmental advocacy groups, journalists, law students and practitioners and to do it in a format that can be duplicated for other legal fields – immigration law, health law, etc. Not only is this a book for environmental information seekers, it is also a template that I hope others will use to create similar works for other areas of law.

Why is access to environmental information important?
Environmental information is necessary for understanding and solving any and all environmental issues. In fact, international law has recognized environmental information access as a human right. Before engaging in environmental advocacy, policy-making, or decision-making, all of the parties involved need the facts, figures, data, and policies of environmental phenomena, circumstances, and realities at issue.

Environmental regulation is the backbone of environmental law and regulation, playing a critical and necessary role at every level of environmental decision-making. Governments, industry, and the public all need comprehensive, trusted, and timely environmental information to make decisions about environmental issues.  Without this information, people cannot properly take stock in the state of their environmental surroundings.

Knowing about environmental projects, which are often government-facilitated, and access to environmental data, which is often collected and maintained by the government, also honor the notion that U.S. citizens have a fundamental right to know about what their government is doing. Thus, providing more information to the public puts citizens in a better position to bargain with private entities as well as the government.

Environmental information access is also important because transparency can substantially affect government behavior. Transparency serves as a preventative measure for environmentally detrimental practices, exposing transgressions before they permanently damage the environment. It also empowers citizens to assume an adversarial role when necessary, since this type of information is needed when filing lawsuits against parties violating environmental statutes and regulations. When environmental information is available to the public, individuals can file citizen suits to prevent the damage before it occurs through injunctive relief, rather than engaging in litigation only after the environmental damage has been done.

What are some obstacles to getting, understanding and acting on environmental information?
I discuss the major obstacles to getting, understanding, and acting on environmental information in the book, and also in the law review article addressing environmental information access policy issues that I wrote to accompany the book (available here).

In short, I found four major issues:

  • publicly available environmental information on the EPA’s website and elsewhere is not well organized and it’s very hard to find;
  • environmental information is often incomplete and hard to understand because of data collection processes and scientific jargon;
  • there are often long delays to get timely environmental information (data can take a long time to compile, and transparency laws like FOIA can take a long time to provide fruitful records requests);
  • the information systems and technology used by federal, state and local governments (government entities collect and store the majority of environmental information in the U.S.) are outdated, silo-ing information in unsearchable or hard-to-search databases and information systems, or in formats that can no longer be opened on modern computer interfaces, etc.

Tell us about an instance when citizens were able to use environmental information to significantly influence a decision about the environment.
There are many instances where citizens use environmental information to file citizen suits under environmental statutes, advocate for environmental protection, and learn about environmental threats. One major instance is the Flint, Michigan water crisis, where people were made aware of dangerously high levels of lead in drinking water due to a scientist’s federal and state requests.

What role do you hope environmental information can play under the current administration?
Mostly, I hope that environmental information access is not blocked under the current administration. We’ve already seen efforts to decrease the availability of information regarding climate change and greenhouse gas data and policies. I worked with the Environmental Data & Governance Initiative (EDGI) on efforts to maintain environmental data collection and access, and continue to work with librarians and archivists on initiatives and projects to secure the availability of environmental information and improve access to environmental data. In an ideal world, I’d love to work on initiatives and efforts to implement special environmental information regulations like the ones in the UK, which provide broader access to environmental information than the traditional FOIA laws, but in the current climate, I’ve been focusing my efforts on emphasizing the importance of environmental information access in the hopes that the concept of environmental information access as a human right is extended to future generations.

 


ICYMI: TO GROW TECH IN NYC, DON’T HOPE FOR SKILLED STUDENTS—MAKE THEMA FIRM DESIGNED CUNY COURSES AND PROMISED STUDENT JOBS. IT WORKED

Crain’s New York Business
By Charles Phillips

In 2012, New York City was not the Silicon Alley we know today. There was disappointingly little to show in the market when it came to technology talent. Yet, as CEO of Infor, a multi-billion-dollar software company with 16,000 employees, I somehow persuaded my Silicon Valley-based board of directors to let me move the company to New York City. While the local tech economy had a long way to go, many of our 90,000 customers regularly visit New York, the capital of the business world. There was a strong business case to move, but I knew it would require some significant investment in the local tech community to be sustainable.

What I’ve learned over the last five years is that if you build it, they will come.

Fresh, creative thinking is essential to innovation in tech. But in 2012, I didn’t see a pipeline for the skillsets my business needed in New York. Finding college graduates with relevant skills turned out to be a challenge—partly because many students think of technology as smartphones, web design and social media. In reality, there are far more jobs to be found in the complex world of enterprise technology, including business solutions and application software. For example, enterprise resource planning applications contain millions of lines of code that automate every company’s critical business functions, from finance and payroll to production, supply chains, customer service and commerce.

While the skills gap in enterprise tech was immense, recent college graduates were struggling to find entry-level jobs. Sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roska tracked 1,000 college students and found that two years after graduation, only a quarter earned over $40,000 in a full-time job. Survey results showed one in four of the students living at home two years after graduation, a rate almost double what it was in the 1960s. That didn’t make sense to me. I realized that if I wanted great talent to work at my company, I needed to invest in development at the post-secondary level. This wasn’t just about improving the education system, it was about broadening access to STEM-related training and careers.

Historically companies put fresh graduates through elaborate training programs to develop specific skills around business applications. Now, many companies are increasingly hiring offshore or from competitors. I believe more can be done to drive job readiness, particularly in the New York market.

To start, I met with Chancellor Jim Milliken at City University of New York. As the third largest university system in the country (after those of the entire states of California and New York), CUNY has a long tradition of providing immigrants and first-generation college graduates a pathway to better careers. Most of its students speak a second language. The chancellor was looking to differentiate CUNY by producing career-ready graduates—of course without compromising on developing critical thinking, complex reasoning and writing skills.

It was the perfect partnership. CUNY wanted to set up its graduates for real-world success, and Infor needed skilled talent. We designed two courses on Infor’s software and offered students that passed both courses and the certification exam a guaranteed job at Infor or one of its customers or partners. The first class to learn Infor CloudSuite Industrial, an application that automates manufacturing companies, was oversubscribed threefold, and one-third of students who applied were at the graduate level. It was an “aha” moment for us.

One remaining issue was that many student loan programs and grants do not allow course credit for nonacademic skills training. So the courses we created to provide marketable technology skills could not be offered for credit. This meant we had to not only persuade professors but also fund their training and curriculum development, and provide cloud environments where the curriculum could live, in addition to internships. This kind of job-readiness framework would be an easy win for a federal program, and could also help higher-ed institutions to differentiate themselves and attract students.

Academia may need convincing, but CUNY is showing this model works—and students certainly see the need for career development in addition to academic development. They form their own communities on LinkedIn, and Infor also established a skills marketplace on the platform. There, students can market themselves to our customers and partners, some of which participate as guest speakers in our courses.

We are expanding this effort, offering new courses, and have started to see positive results in our own company and across the technology landscape in New York. We’re committed to driving this change and making New York into a true Silicon Valley competitor—the kind of leader in tech innovation and talent I believe it should to be.

I hope we’ll be joined in this effort by others in academia and the public and private sectors. As part of a New York-based company, my business depends on it.

Charles Phillips is CEO of Infor and a former president of Oracle.


Associate in Science (A.S.) Degree in Music Program Starts Fall 2017

In Fall 2017, BMCC students who envision a career teaching music or performing can enroll in the College’s new Associate in Science (A.S.) program in Music, with specializations in Music Studies and Music Performance that articulate to the Bachelor of Science in Music program at Lehman College, as well as a specialization in Music Education.

According to a proposal submitted by BMCC to the New York State Education Department, the Music program will educate students in the fundamentals of music, and in specialized topics in music education and music performance. The curriculum will encompass basics of music theory, keyboard skills, ear training and sight singing. Each concentration, while offering a different focus, will produce graduates who are better equipped to compete with others in the field.

Music majors at BMCC will benefit from a wide range of facilities to support their work, including 16 practice rooms for chorus and voice, the Art and Rita Siegel Piano Lab, which provides 24 electronic keyboards and classrooms with Steinway grand pianos. They will also have access to a comprehensive collection of percussive and string instruments, unique sets of instruments from Bali and more.

Past music students at BMCC have won national contests and performed widely. They are mentored by BMCC’s accomplished Music faculty, who guide students as they audition for and perform with well-established ensembles including the Downtown Symphony, Downtown Chorus and BMCC Select Chorus, String Ensemble and Flute Choir.

Fitore Mehmetaj, a 2017 BMCC alumna and mezzo-soprano who graduated before the A.S. in Music program was created, nonetheless availed herself of the Music courses and performance practice opportunities at BMCC. “The best voice teachers of my life are here,” says Mehmetaj, who also learned digital music software at BMCC and whose composition, “Themes and Variations,” for cello and piano, was performed in the 2017 Composers Now Festival at BMCC’s Shirley Fiterman Art Center. “I have met so many amazing artists through these experiences,” she says.

“We are very excited about this opportunity for students to earn an Associate degree as they gain competence in the areas of music performance, pedagogy and theory,” says BMCC Music and Art Chairperson Eugenia Oi Yan Yau. “Graduates will be prepared to enter a variety of majors at the baccalaureate level, as well as a range of careers in music.”

Auditions for the Fall 2017 Music Program will be held August 18 in Fiterman Hall, 11th floor. For more information, contact Professor Robert Reed at roreed@bmcc.cuny.edu or Music and Art Chair Eugenia Yau, at eyau@bmcc.cuny.edu.


BMCC Remembers Miosotis Familia’s Determination to Succeed in College and a Career

BMCC is mourning the loss of one of its own. Miosotis Familia graduated with an Associate in Liberal Arts degree from BMCC in Summer 2009. She went on to work as a medical assistant before serving as a law enforcement officer in the New York Police Department for 12 years, a career which came to a tragic end on the night of July 4.

Officer Miosotis Familia

“Miosotis Familia will be remembered for many things, including her determination to gain an education and earn her Associate degree,” says BMCC President Antonio Pérez. “She attended BMCC from 2000 to 2005, then returned in the summer of 2009 to complete one final class and graduate. Her unwavering goal was to help her fellow New Yorkers and she accomplished that goal; first as a medical assistant and then as a law enforcement officer. We are proud to count Miosotis Familia among the alumni of BMCC.”

The NYPD’s Officer Down Memorial Page states that Familia, 48, was “shot and killed from ambush as she sat in a marked mobile command post vehicle at the intersection of East 183rd Street and Morris Avenue in the Bronx.” Officer Familia was taken to St. Barnabas Hospital and pronounced dead about three hours later.

According to an article in the New York Daily News, Familia had switched about three weeks earlier from working days in central booking at the 46th Precinct stationhouse, to working the night shift, in order to have more time with her 12-year-old twin son and daughter. Familia also had a 20-year-old daughter.

An article in The New York Times reports that Officer Familia, who grew up in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, made 76 arrests during her 12-year career with the NYPD, 23 of them in felonies. The marked van in which she was killed was intended to serve as a deterrent to a rash of shootings in the Bronx neighborhood where it was stationed.

“Law enforcement officers across New York put their lives on the line to protect and serve their communities,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo posted on his Facebook page. “This horrific and senseless assassination is a devastating reminder of the risks these brave men and women face each day. I offer my deepest condolences to Officer Familia’s loved ones and fellow members of the NYPD. Today, we all come together to mourn one of New York’s Finest.”

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio posted on his Facebook page, “Officer Miosotis Familia was on duty serving this city, doing the job she loved. I ask all New Yorkers to keep her family in your prayers.” The Mayor also ordered flags on all city buildings to be flown at half-mast in Officer Familia’s honor.


Louis Armstrong House Museum Breaks Ground on New $23 Million Education Center

— Facility to Include State-of-the-Art Exhibition Gallery, 68-Seat Jazz Club, Museum Store, and the Louis Armstrong Archives, Currently Housed at Queens College —

Queens, NY, July 17, 2017—A ground-breaking ceremony for the new 14,000-square-foot Louis Armstrong House Museum Education Center took place today across the street from the museum—the legendary jazz great’s nationally landmarked Queens home—which is located at 34-56 107th Street in Corona. Joining Louis Armstrong House Museum Executive Director Michael Cogswell were Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, New York State Assembly Member Jeffrion Aubry, New York City Council Member Julissa Ferreras-Copeland, and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl.

The children’s choir from Our Lady of Sorrows’ Academy Summer Program performed the Armstrong classic, “What a Wonderful World.” A reception followed in the Armstrong House’s Japanese-inspired garden.

The new facility will broaden the public’s understanding of Armstrong’s life and legacy and complement the visitor experience with a state-of-the-art exhibition gallery, 68-seat jazz club, and museum store. The center will also house the materials in the Louis Armstrong Archives—currently housed at Queens College, which administers the museum through a constituency with its Kupferberg Center for the Arts—in a cutting-edge second-floor archival center.

“We are thrilled to reach this important milepost. The groundbreaking for the Education Center is the next step toward creating a Louis Armstrong campus. When completed, we can offer a broad array of public programs to preserve and promote Louis’s remarkable legacy. There is nothing else like it in the jazz world,” said Cogswell.

“The Education Center is a gift to Corona, to the Borough of Queens, and to Satchmo fans all over the world,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “It was brought about by many offices, and we are profoundly grateful to all of them—the office of the governor and the NYS legislature, the Mayor/NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, the Borough President of Queens, and the City Council, along with a federal planning grant. Queens College has been a primary beneficiary of its association with the Louis Armstrong House Museum for many years. We applaud the efforts of Michael Cogswell, his staff, the Louis Armstrong House Museum Board of Directors, and the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation. Our students conduct research in the museum’s archives—housed, until the Education Center is complete, in our Rosenthal Library—and interns from our Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences work with this material. Armstrong scholar Ricky Riccardi, director of the museum’s research collections, teaches a popular graduate seminar at the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College, and Michael lectures on campus. We will be thrilled to reciprocate by having students from our jazz studies program present public concerts at the Education Center’s Jazz Room.”

“The Louis Armstrong House Museum’s transformative new Education Center and expanded programming will better serve visitors from around the globe and directly support the very community that Satchmo called home,” said Queens Borough President Melinda Katz.

The Center is designed by New York City-based Caples Jefferson Architects, a recipient of numerous commissions and awards, including AIA New York State Firm of the Year. When completed in 2019, the project design aims to achieve a LEED Gold rating.

The campus will also include the home of the late Selma Heraldo—Louis and Lucille Armstrong’s beloved neighbor—who lived next door to the Armstrong House from birth until her death in 2011 at age 87. Heraldo bequeathed her home to the museum, which has since received a $1.027 million grant from New York City to renovate “Selma’s House”—as it will always be called—for offices, meetings, and storage.

About the Louis Armstrong House Museum
In 1943, the great musician Louis Armstrong and his wife Lucille (a Cotton Club dancer) purchased a modest house on 107th Street in Corona, Queens. Despite their wealth and celebrity, they lived there for the rest of their lives. Today the perfectly preserved house is a National Historic Landmark and a New York City Landmark which hosts visitors from all over the world. Located at 34-56 107th Street, it is open Tuesday through Friday, from 10 am to 5 pm, and on Saturday and Sunday, from 12 to 5 pm.

The exhibit “Fifty Years of What a Wonderful World” is on display at the museum now through October and is free with museum admission. Street parking is available in the neighborhood. The museum is accessible via the 7 train from the 103rd Street-Corona Plaza stop.

Thanks to the vision and funding of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, the Louis Armstrong House Museum welcomes visitors from all over the world, six days a week, 52 weeks a year. The Louis Armstrong House Museum is a member of the American Alliance of Museums, Association of African American Museums, Museums Council of New York City, New York State Museums Association, National Trust for Historic Preservation, NYC & Co., and the Queens Tourism Council. The museum is a constituent of Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College, CUNY.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Brooklyn College Enters Into Its First Student Exchange Program With a South Korean University

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson and a team of Brooklyn College students, faculty, staff, and administrators met with a delegation from Dongguk University led by President Tae Sik Han, a Buddhist monk, to formalize a longstanding collaboration between the two institutions and inaugurate a semester-long exchange program. The student exchange program begins fall 2017 and, with departmental permission, students will be able to apply major, minor, and elective toward their degree.

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson and Dongguk University President Tae Sik Han exchange gifts at a meeting to inaugurate a semester-long student exchange program between the two institutions.

“This is a wonderful academic opportunity,” said President Anderson. “For Brooklyn College students, it provides a chance to enhance cultural competency and directly engage in a new kind of learning in a new environment that will broaden their perspectives and give them the sought-after experiences and skills that will make them stand out in the marketplace.”

Anderson also noted that Dongguk University students will have the benefit of coming to Brooklyn College to learn on the beautiful 30-acre campus, with state-of-the-art facilities. She added that the campus is, in many ways, a microcosm of the world itself. With over 100 languages spoken by students who come from more than 140 countries, from all across the political spectrum, practicing or not practicing dozens of religions, Brooklyn College is one of the most diverse institutions of higher learning in the world.

In previous years, Brooklyn College students traveled to Dongguk Univeristy for study in the Media Production and Cultural Studies in South Korea Program led by Program Director and Adjunct Associate Professor Young Cheong ’00 M.F.A. from the Department of Television and Radio.

Biology major and Brooklyn College Korean Culture Club member Franclessa Louis is participating in the South Korea study abroad program for the second time. Louis—who, prompted by her love of Korean popular music (K-pop), has spent the last eight years teaching herself the Korean language—was one of the students who greeted the Dongguk delegation and was very excited to be able to speak with President Han in his native tongue.

“It was amazing,” Louis said. “These opportunities—meeting the delegation and studying abroad—open my eyes about the world and what is possible to accomplish in it. You would think that biology has nothing to do with media production, for example, but I learned that I can make it so. This year, I have an internship with a dentist and one of the things that I’m going to do is create a video project about dentistry and dental health in the United States using all the skills I gained during my time studying in Korea.”

The semester exchange program between Dongguk University and Brooklyn College was developed after the success of the summer program, which is in its fourth year.

 The new semester exchange program is the culmination of a great deal of goodwill, hard work, and dedication on the part of both institutions to provide a rigorous and well-rounded, but also enjoyable, education to students. At Dongguk University, Brooklyn College students can study many subjects in English, including global management, criminal justice, Korean culture  and Buddhist studies.

“There are sometimes difficulties in getting Brooklyn College students to go abroad for study, for a number of reasons, including financial restrictions and global political concerns.” said Gail Bier, senior director of International Education and Global Engagement. Students whose economic situations would not allow for them to pay out of pocket the full price for a study abroad have a number of financial aid, scholarship, and award options to help them with program costs. And Bier says that the efforts behind overcoming these hurdles are their own reward because the benefits gained by studying abroad are vital.

“The value of cultural competency cannot be underestimated,” she said. “For a student to be able to say to a potential employer that they spent time studying in another country, it demonstrates that they are proficient in working with people very different from themselves, in environments very different from ones they are accustomed to, that they are able to communicate across challenges, and are open to expanding their worldview. This gives them the edge needed to stand out amongst other candidates.”

Dongguk University Delegation

Dr. Tae Sik Han, President
Dr. Kwan Jeh, Lee Vice-President for External Affairs
Dr. Jong Tae Rhee, Dean of Office of International Affairs
Mr. Je Sun Ko, Director of President’s Office

Brooklyn College Delegation

Michelle J. Anderson, President
William A. Tramontano, Provost, Vice President of Academic Affairs
Lillian O’Reilly, Vice President Enrollment Management
Stuart MacLelland, Associate Provost for Academic Programs
Katherine G. Fry, Professor and Chair of the Department of Television and Radio
Young Cheong, Adjunct Associate Professor, Education Coordinator for New Media and Digital Technology, Program Director of the CUNY Study Abroad in South Korea Program
Gail Bier, Senior Director of International Education and Global Engagement
Students from the Brooklyn College Korean Culture Club, and past and future participants on the Media Arts and Cultural Studies Program in South Korea

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Queens College is Ranked in the Top 10% of Money Magazine’s 2017-18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money” Listing

— Queens College “Stands Out” for its Affordability, with Students
Borrowing Less than a Third of the National Average —

Queens, N.Y., July 12, 2017—Queens College has been ranked in the top 10% of colleges nationwide in Money magazine’s 2017–18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money.” Queens College stands out for its affordability: Through a combination of low tuition and generous financial aid packages, over 90% of the undergraduates who graduate in four years emerge from the college debt free. The 711 schools Money included were ranked on the basis of 27 measures, such as educational quality, affordability and alumni success.

New York City topped the list of cities with the most schools with 21. Among them, Queens College was noted for its exceptionally diverse student body in a borough “sometimes described as ‘America’s most ethnically diverse county,’ ” with more than half its students being born overseas. Recent analysis by the Equality of Opportunity Project, as reported in the New York Times, ranks Queens College in the top 1% of all colleges in moving students from the bottom fifth of the income distribution to the top fifth.

Student reviews from the Best Colleges ranking-related site Niche.com describe a vibrant campus life and an enriching academic experience: “I loved absolutely everything about this campus! . . .  In NY campuses are small and isolated. QC however is huge! . . . Overall this school was amazing and offered everything you would need to have a fulfilling college life.” Another student adds, “Queens College offers a quality education for all students who are enrolled. The professors are leaders in their fields and they do their best to pass on their knowledge to the next generation. The campus is centrally located in Queens, a lovely neighborhood in the suburbs of New York City.”

See the full Money Best Colleges for Your Money 2017 list here.

About Queens College Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received more than 60 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Queens College is Ranked in the Top 10% of Money Magazine’s 2017-18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money” Listing

— Queens College “Stands Out” for its Affordability, with Students Borrowing
Less than a Third of the National Average —

Queens, N.Y., July 12, 2017—Queens College has been ranked in the top 10% of colleges nationwide in Money magazine’s 2017–18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money.” It “stands out” for its affordability, made possible by a combination of low tuition and generous financial aid packages that results in 90% of its students graduating debt-free. The 711 schools Money included were ranked on the basis of 27 measures, such as educational quality, affordability and alumni success.

New York City topped the list of cities with the most schools with 21. Among them, Queens College was noted for its exceptionally diverse student body in a borough “sometimes described as ‘America’s most ethnically diverse county,’ ” with more than half its students being born overseas. Recent analysis by the Equality of Opportunity Project, as reported in the New York Times, ranks Queens College in the top 1% of all colleges in moving students from the bottom fifth of the income distribution to the top fifth.

Student reviews from the Best Colleges ranking-related site Niche.com describe a vibrant campus life and an enriching academic experience: “I loved absolutely everything about this campus! . . .  In NY campuses are small and isolated. QC however is huge! . . . Overall this school was amazing and offered everything you would need to have a fulfilling college life.” Another student adds, “Queens College offers a quality education for all students who are enrolled. The professors are leaders in their fields and they do their best to pass on their knowledge to the next generation. The campus is centrally located in Queens, a lovely neighborhood in the suburbs of New York City.”

See the full Money Best Colleges for Your Money 2017 list here.

About Queens College Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received more than 60 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Playwright Taylor Adamson Receives Hunter’s Goldberg Prize

Taylor Adamson (MFA ’17) has won the 2017 Rita and Burton Goldberg Playwriting Prize for his thesis work, Endless Summer. Adamson’s award-winning play follows three young people and their adventures as they sublet a New York City apartment and discover more about themselves and the distinct individuals they want to become. It was presented in a staged reading at the MFA Playwriting Festival of New Works, the Hunter graduate program’s spring showcase of second-year thesis projects. Bestowed annually, the Goldberg prize includes a cash award.

Born and raised in Texas, Adamson came to New York to earn his BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. He has worked with several theatre companies and had his plays produced in New York, California, Colorado, Ohio, Washington, DC and Columbia, Ontario. His latest project is a drama set in Texas about the relationship between two sisters who meet for the first time after their father dies.

Adamson says that when he decided to pursue an MFA, he was impressed by the extraordinary faculty of Hunter’s Rita and Burton Goldberg Playwriting Program – a faculty that currently boasts 2016 MacArthur “Genius” and Obie winner Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Pulitzer Prize winner Annie Baker, and 2012 Guggenheim Fellow Brighde Mullins.

“This program has three exceptionally dedicated, brilliant individuals whose teaching approaches are diverse and complementary, and who are each incredibly inspiring writers on their own terms,” Adamson said. “Working with them and my peers has been the greatest joy.”

The source of the program’s overall excellence and low cost to students is its endowment – funded by Hunter alumna Rita Goldberg and her late husband, Burton. The Goldbergs’ generosity, guided by their love of great writing for the stage, now plays a vital role in theatre at Hunter and across the country. At the award ceremony on June 1, Rita Goldberg’s family joined Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab, MFA students and theatre faculty in applauding the honoree, his fellow graduates, and the program that has helped them hone their craft.


Arnhold Graduate Dance Education Program Celebrates Cross-Cultural Collaboration

In June of 2017, Hunter College’s Arnhold Graduate Dance Education Program (AGDEP) Arnhold Graduate Dance Education Program Celebrates Cross-Cultural Collaborationsent two students to Cuba for a life-changing cultural and educational exchange. Selected for their outstanding artistic ability and contributions to public dance education, Uthman Ebrahim and Sabrina Jaafar Melton, both graduate students in the AGDEP, spent a week in Camaguey, Cuba, performing, teaching, and taking master classes with Arnhold Visiting Artist in Residence Pedro Ruiz, a renowned Cuban-American dancer and choreographer.

Sponsored by The Windows Project – Ruiz’s program to encourage cross-cultural dance opportunities — in collaboration with AGDEP and the Ballet Contemporaneo de Camaguey, this project enabled Ebrahim and Jaafar Melton to take their already professional abilities to an international level. The scholars, also full time dance teachers in the New York City Department of Education, have demonstrated exceptional skills as artists, educators, and role models. In Cuba, they performed with Ballet Contemporaneo de Camaguey and also explored the dance world of Camaguey, teaching and taking classes alongside Cuban company members.

“It’s tremendously exciting to know that this successful collaboration between Cuban and American dance artists and educators, can serve as a model for how AGDEP scholars serve as leaders and ambassadors in the artistry, scholarship and education of dance, not only in New York City public schools, but worldwide,” Says Kathleen Isaac, Director of the AGDEP.

Pedro Ruiz, who had a 20 year career as a dancer at Ballet Hispanico before segueing into choreography and returning to his native Cuba, is the first Cuban-American to have created work with a Cuban dance troupe in Cuba. The two Hunter scholars worked with him in his native country as he created a full length performance for the Camaguey company and an original duet for the two of them. Their duet, set to an original score by drummer and composer Dafnis Prieto, was called Taking the Soul for a Walk, and performed as a work in progress from June 2-4 at the Allevaneda Theater in Camageuy, Cuba.

The finished ballet will perform in the United States in the fall of 2017, when the Ballet Contemporaneo de Camaguey takes the stage at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, and the Arnhold Graduate Dance Education students Sabrina Jaafar Melton and Uthman Ebrahim will have another opportunity to dance with their Cuban colleagues.

In the meantime, you can watch it here: https://youtu.be/WU9lQemJ1d0


Hunter Recognizes The Rising Stars in New York City Food Policy

The New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College Hunter Recognizes The Rising Stars in New York City Food Policy has named its annual class of New York City’s 40 individuals under 40 years old who are working to transform the food system. On June 8th, these honorees – policymakers, educators, community advocates, farmers, and innovators – gathered at the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College to celebrate the strides they are making to create healthier, more sustainable food environments.

New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College’s 40 under 40 roster reflects the Center’s broad perspective around food policy, specifically that food policies are not simply regulations imposed by government but guidelines that impact millions of New Yorkers every day, at home and at work. The individuals selected – including Hunter professor Herman Pontzer  and Kevin Froner, principal of Manhattan Hunter Science High School – are working to make New York City a model for fair, equitable, and just food policy.

The Honorees:

Morgan Ames–Policy Advisor for Food Policy, Office of the Mayor
Carla Anastasio--Director, Division of Nutrition, Cicatelli Associates Inc.
Suzanne Babb–Community Partnerships Manager, WhyHunger
Andrew Barrett–Program Director, Edible Schoolyard NYC
Drew Barrett–Co-Founder and COO, FoodWorks
Olivia Blanchflower–Director of Wholesale and Distribution, GrowNYC
Margaret Brown–Staff Attorney, NRDC NY Program
Liz Carollo–Publicity Manager, Greenmarket, GrowNYC
Cara Chard–Executive Director, City Growers
Jimmy Chen–CEO, Propel
Alice Chiang–Communications Manager, School Food Focus
Anastasia Cole Plakias–Co-founder, Vice President, and Vegevangelist at Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Farm
Rachel Dannefer–Director of Research and Evaluation, Harlem Neighborhood Health Action Centers, Center for Health Equity, NYC DOHMH
Tanya Fields–Executive Director, The BLK Projek
Kevin Froner–Principal, Manhattan Hunter Science High School
Henry Gordon-Smith–Managing Director, Blue Planet Consulting; Founder, Agritecture.com; Co-Founder, Association for Vertical Farming
Lindsay Greene–Senior Advisor to NYC Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen
Iyeshima Harris–Organizer, Youth Food Justice Network
Corey Johnson–New York City Council Member, 3rd District
James Johnson Piett–Principal and CEO, Urbane Development
Carey King–Director, Uptown Grand Central and North Harlem East Merchants Association
Mac Levine– Executive Director, Concrete Safaris
Megan Lent– Policy Director at New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Kim Libman–Director for Prevention and Community Development, Center for Health Policy and Programs, The New York Academy of Medicine
Jenna Liut–Food Consultant and Host of Eating Matters, Heritage Radio Network
Bill LoSasso– Director, NYC Parks GreenThumb
Carlos Martinez–Deputy Director, NYC Parks GreenThumb
Kris Moon–Vice President, James Beard Foundation
Saara Nafici–Executive Director, Added Value / Red Hook Community Farms
Margot Pollans–Assistant Professor, Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, and Faculty Director, Pace-NRDC Food Law Initiative
Herman Pontzer–Associate Professor of Anthropology, Hunter College
Kristin Reynolds–Lecturer, Environmental Studies and Food Studies programs, The New School; Lecturer, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Amy Richards–Health Projects Coordinator, Make the Road NY and Grove St. Farm Manager
Rosanna Robbins–Director of Retail Partnerships, City Harvest
Annette Slonim–Program Manager, Edible Schoolyard NYC
Sam Slover– Founder and CEO, the Sage Project
Jennifer Tirado– Director of Urban Agriculture Initiative and Land Improvement, Green City Force
Shulamit Warren– Director of Policy and Special Projects, Office of Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer
Alissa Wassung–Director of Policy and Planning, God’s Love We Deliver
Ariel Lauren Wilson–Editor, Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn

About the New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College

The New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College develops intersectoral, innovative and evidence-based strategies to prevent diet-related diseases and promote food security in New York and other cities. The Center works with policy makers, community organizations, advocates and the public to create healthier, more sustainable food environments and to use food to promote community and economic development. Through interdisciplinary research, policy analysis, evaluation, outreach and education, the Center leverages the expertise and passion of the students, faculty and staff of Hunter College.


Summer Reading for 2017

For ALL NEST+m students and families —

This summer we are engaging in a shared Summer Reading Text, I Am Malala. Parents/Families — please join our school-wide conversation by reading this text too.

When we return in the Fall our students will engage in cross-grade, interdisciplinary text-based conversation. You can find our differentiated summer reading assignments in the below links:


City Tech Professor Discusses New Film At New York Women’s Foundation Event

Professor Marta Effinger-Crichlow, African American Studies Department, was an invited speaker at the New York Women’s Foundation event “Neighborhood Gathering in the Bronx: Art, Gender, and Social Justice,” on June 14 at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. She was joined by Caridad De La Luz (La Bruja), spoken word artist/activist, and Victoria Sammartino, founder and executive director emeritus of Voices UnBroken.

Professor Effinger-Crichlow spoke about her new film Little Sallie Walker, a feature-length documentary that tells the story of how black women played as children. In a captivating return to childhood, a diverse group of black women, many of whom are sharing their stories for the first time, reveal with vulnerability how they have lived with play. They came of age during the birth and height of World War II, Civil Rights, and Hip Hop, and dared to create worlds where their imaginations soared.

While the title of the film is inspired by the classic circle game, the women of Little Sallie Walker, now all living in different regions of the US, admit they were not bound by one type of play. The circle games, the hand games, the dress up, the somersaults, the dolls, the skating, the infinite imagining through play, evoke memories of both pleasure and pain and shape how these women view American society and their positions within it. Effinger-Crichlow created the film with the support of an Independent Filmmaker Project JustFilms Fellowship.

Marta Effinger-Crichlow, PhD, is the author of Staging Migrations Toward an American West: From Ida B. Wells to Rhodessa Jones (University Press of Colorado). Her other writings have been published in African American Lives, Theatre Journal, African American Review, Footsteps: Children’s Magazine, Journal of Black Studies, and the Dictionary of Literary Biography.

Effinger-Crichlow is also a dramaturg, playwright, and filmmaker. In addition to Little Sallie Walker, produced works include the multi-media collage The Kitchen is Closed Startin’ Sunday and Whispers Want to Holler. She served as the project director and co-investigator for City Tech’s first ever National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant project titled Retentions and Transfigurations: The Technological Evolution and Social History of Five New York City Neighborhoods. This NEH-funded faculty development initiative was designed to strengthen teaching of humanities within technical and professional studies programs. In 2014, The Network Journal, which recognizes “Black women leaders and influencers in every field,” selected Effinger-Crichlow as one of their “25 Influential Black Women in Business.”

Effinger-Crichlow has been an invited lecturer at The Rosie the Riveter Museum of the National Park Service in Richmond, CA; Syracuse University; The CUNY Graduate Center; The African Burial Ground Museum and Monument of the National Park Service in New York City; Lane College’s NEH Summer Institute in Eugene, OR; and Xiamen University in China. In 2015, she appeared on TEDx CUNY at the TriBeCa Performing Arts Center in New York City.

About the New York Women’s Foundation: The New York Women’s Foundation creates an equitable and just future for women and families by uniting a cross-cultural alliance that ignites action and invests in bold, community-led solutions across the city.

About IFP JustFilms Fellowships: The Independent Filmmaker Project and its Made in NY Media Center offer JustFilms Fellowships to filmmakers who have a unique vision and a deep commitment to addressing inequality their work. Fellowships are open to creatives working in an array of nonfiction forms: long- and short-form film, episodic content, web-based media projects, social impact gaming, 360 video, virtual reality, and more. They seek storytellers who inspire imagination, disrupt stereotypes, and help transform the conditions that perpetuate injustice and inequality. JustFilms Fellows receive 12-month memberships at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, full-time incubator workspace at the Media Center, mentorship by industry leaders and IFP staff, and access to classes, networking events, Media Center facilities and more. These fellowships are made possible by the generous support of the Ford Foundation.


City Tech Professor Discusses New Film At New York Women’s Foundation Event

Professor Marta Effinger-Crichlow, African American Studies Department, was an invited speaker at the New York Women’s Foundation event “Neighborhood Gathering in the Bronx: Art, Gender, and Social Justice,” on June 14 at the Bronx Museum of the Arts. She was joined by Caridad De La Luz (La Bruja), spoken word artist/activist, and Victoria Sammartino, founder and executive director emeritus of Voices UnBroken.

Professor Effinger-Crichlow spoke about her new film Little Sallie Walker, a feature-length documentary that tells the story of how black women played as children. In a captivating return to childhood, a diverse group of black women, many of whom are sharing their stories for the first time, reveal with vulnerability how they have lived with play. They came of age during the birth and height of World War II, Civil Rights, and Hip Hop, and dared to create worlds where their imaginations soared.

While the title of the film is inspired by the classic circle game, the women of Little Sallie Walker, now all living in different regions of the US, admit they were not bound by one type of play. The circle games, the hand games, the dress up, the somersaults, the dolls, the skating, the infinite imagining through play, evoke memories of both pleasure and pain and shape how these women view American society and their positions within it. Effinger-Crichlow created the film with the support of an Independent Filmmaker Project JustFilms Fellowship.

Marta Effinger-Crichlow, PhD, is the author of Staging Migrations Toward an American West: From Ida B. Wells to Rhodessa Jones (University Press of Colorado). Her other writings have been published in African American Lives, Theatre Journal, African American Review, Footsteps: Children’s Magazine, Journal of Black Studies, and the Dictionary of Literary Biography.

Effinger-Crichlow is also a dramaturg, playwright, and filmmaker. In addition to Little Sallie Walker, produced works include the multi-media collage The Kitchen is Closed Startin’ Sunday and Whispers Want to Holler. She served as the project director and co-investigator for City Tech’s first ever National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant project titled Retentions and Transfigurations: The Technological Evolution and Social History of Five New York City Neighborhoods. This NEH-funded faculty development initiative was designed to strengthen teaching of humanities within technical and professional studies programs. In 2014, The Network Journal, which recognizes “Black women leaders and influencers in every field,” selected Effinger-Crichlow as one of their “25 Influential Black Women in Business.”

Effinger-Crichlow has been an invited lecturer at The Rosie the Riveter Museum of the National Park Service in Richmond, CA; Syracuse University; The CUNY Graduate Center; The African Burial Ground Museum and Monument of the National Park Service in New York City; Lane College’s NEH Summer Institute in Eugene, OR; and Xiamen University in China. In 2015, she appeared on TEDx CUNY at the TriBeCa Performing Arts Center in New York City.

About the New York Women’s Foundation: The New York Women’s Foundation creates an equitable and just future for women and families by uniting a cross-cultural alliance that ignites action and invests in bold, community-led solutions across the city.

About IFP JustFilms Fellowships: The Independent Filmmaker Project and its Made in NY Media Center offer JustFilms Fellowships to filmmakers who have a unique vision and a deep commitment to addressing inequality their work. Fellowships are open to creatives working in an array of nonfiction forms: long- and short-form film, episodic content, web-based media projects, social impact gaming, 360 video, virtual reality, and more. They seek storytellers who inspire imagination, disrupt stereotypes, and help transform the conditions that perpetuate injustice and inequality. JustFilms Fellows receive 12-month memberships at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, full-time incubator workspace at the Media Center, mentorship by industry leaders and IFP staff, and access to classes, networking events, Media Center facilities and more. These fellowships are made possible by the generous support of the Ford Foundation.


Baruch College Earns Top Money Magazine Ranking

New York, NY – July 11, 2017 – Money Magazine just announced that Baruch College ranks #1 among the “Best Public Colleges” and #2 for “Best Colleges for Your Money” in its final analysis of 711 schools across the nation.

These rankings put Baruch College ahead of such prestigious schools as Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, and University of Texas at Austin.

“This new, independent ranking from Money reinforces other recent evidence that Baruch College is an agent for social mobility, providing underserved students the academic training and professional skills they need to achieve career success, higher earnings, and a shot at the American dream,” said Dr. Mitchel B. Wallerstein, president of Baruch College. “We do this not only by providing an excellent education at a highly affordable price, but also by focusing on a student’s path to on-time graduation and delivering strong support and professional development programs throughout their college experience.”

The annual list, which is a ranking evaluating colleges on educational quality, affordability and alumni success, features colleges that “provide a boost in the job market and offer graduates the best odds of real-world success.”

In its announcement, Money pointed to Baruch College’s value, its strong job outcomes for alumni, and its nationally recognized track record in advancing social mobility among its students.

“CUNY Bernard M. Baruch College comes in at No. 2, up from No. 188 last year, above schools like Harvard, Yale and Stanford because it is highly affordable with tuition of just $6,330 and has a remarkable record of alumni success. Paychecks for recent graduates average more than $51,000 a year. And Baruch has the best record of moving low-income students into high-paying jobs of any large college in the country.”

Accolades for Affordability to its New York City Location

Money noted “About 44% of undergraduates are considered low-income, which makes the college’s affordability and graduation rate all the more impressive: 70% of students graduate within six years with an average debt load of just $8,500. This rate is all the more impressive considering that it is 32% higher than at schools with students from similar academic and economic backgrounds.”

In its profile of Baruch, Money cited the College’s New York City location which “helps Baruch draw one of the most ethnically diverse campuses in the country. Baruch students speak 128 different languages, and almost three-quarters of them are either minority or international students.” It also noted “the college’s well-known Zicklin School of Business, which benefits from being just a few miles from Wall Street and close to the headquarters of many major corporations.”

Baruch College Alumni Featured

In its coverage of its 2017 rankings, Money noted that “some other high-priced private schools scored poorly because their alumni aren’t thriving in the job market. Instead, many affordable colleges, such as the City University of New York’s Baruch College (our No. 2 college for 2017) and the University of Florida (No. 18), produce successful alumni with little debt.”

The article quoted alum Ashley Hall ’16, who told Money that she had chosen Baruch College over acceptances from New York University and Pace University. “I would have owed over $100,000 in loans, and that didn’t make any sense to me at all,” says Hall, who is a coordinator of client services for the Orchard, a division of Sony Music.”

Video of the Top 10 Schools

Watch a video of Money Magazine’s ranking of the top 10 schools, which features Baruch College, here.

METHODOLOGY:

As a basis for its rankings, Money focused on three factors that “surveys show are the most important to parents and students:” Quality of education, Affordability, and Outcomes. From more than 2,000 schools, Money looked at 2,4000 schools and compiled an initial cut of 711 colleges that met such requirements as having sufficient, reliable data to be analyzed, were not in financial distress, and having at least 500 students.For more information on Money’s methodology go here.

About Baruch College

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak 129 languages. Ranked among the top 15% of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. As a public institution with a tradition of academic excellence, Baruch College offers accessibility and opportunity for students from every corner of New York City and from around the world. For more about Baruch College, go to http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/.

 

 

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CUNY Law Mourns the Loss of Professor Cicero

Professor John Cicero passed away on July 24, 2017. He taught at CUNY Law for 28 years, bringing his passion for lawyering in service of workers’ rights through organized labor alive for the thousands of students in his Labor Law and Evidence classes.

“Professor Cicero’s death is a tremendous loss for our institution, said CUNY Law Dean Mary Lu Bilek. “He was an inspiration to many of our students, faculty, staff and alums who benefitted from his care, creativity and passion.”

John Cicero

Professor Cicero was an innovative teacher, as demonstrated by incorporating his ground-breaking teaching method “The Classroom as Shop Room Floor” into his classes.

The announcement of his death was followed by an outpouring of sadness from the CUNY Law community and countless notes of appreciation for Professor Cicero’s transformational influence.

“John’s labor law class was part-class, part-theatrical performance: he was the boss and we (the students) were his workers, remembered Alex Van Shaick ’13. “I’m proud to say that he wrote me up and then promoted me to management in an unsuccessful attempt to break our organizing. We fought back by leafleting his evidence class. The semester culminated in a walk out and negotiations over the final exam. Professor Cicero will be missed.”

“He taught a Labor Law class with such heart, wit, and intelligence,” recounted Kathryn Jones Malwitz ’94. “I remember it so well even though it was 25 years ago. He had a profound impact on all his students and I know he will be greatly missed.”

Professor John Cicero with students

Professor Cicero received the Distinguished Professor Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Classes of 1994 and 1997 and was honored by the student group, Public Interest Law Association in 2013. He was beloved by his students and colleagues.

“He was generous in answering questions from colleagues and cared deeply about his students and their learning,” said Professor Sue Bryant. Professor Andrea McArdle agreed, “John so loved teaching and he inspired and was beloved by his students.  And even with his many, many health challenges, particularly in this past year, he always maintained his good humor, steadfastness, and enthusiasm for teaching, and for CUNY and his colleagues.”

He is survived by his wife Lori Nessel ’92 and their children Jacob, Gensiana and Sofia. Nearly 30 CUNY Law community members were present at the memorial service held on July 6 at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Tenafly, NJ.

“It was clear throughout the service that John loved with his whole heart and focused on his family above all,” said Allie Robbins ’09, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. “That love permeated his teaching, and every interaction he had with students, staff, and faculty at the law school. It was clear that he loved well, and was very loved.”

Professor Cicero’s family wishes to continue his legacy of supporting CUNY Law students, through the CUNY School of Law John Cicero Memorial Fellowship in Labor Law.

A fall event celebrating Professor Cicero’s life is currently being planned.


MONEY MAGAZINE PUTS 5 CUNY COLLEGES IN TOP QUARTER OF NATION’S “BEST COLLEGES FOR YOUR MONEY” – BARUCH RANKED SECOND

Money magazine’s “Best Colleges for Your Money 2017” puts five CUNY colleges in the top quarter of 711 schools, ranking Baruch College second overall, just after Princeton University and first in the country among the “Best Public Colleges.” Also among the nation’s leaders, according to the assessment, were CUNY’s Brooklyn College, Queens College, Hunter College and John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

“College rankings can vary in usefulness, but Money’s magazine’s methodology is refreshing and very practical because of its focus on student success, not just inputs.  It’s not surprising that Money magazine’s assessment confirms what so many have consistently found,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said. “CUNY schools offer high-quality education, great access and affordability, and a tremendous boost up the social ladder. CUNY has become America’s premier urban university by providing generations of low- and middle-income students the means to achieve their aspirations.”

Money magazine ranks colleges based on 27 measures of educational quality, affordability and alumni success. A key factor in the rankings was the social mobility rate developed by Stanford University professor Raj Chetty. That study’s rankings measured how effective each college was at propelling low-income students into the middle class and beyond over the past 20 years. As Money magazine explains, that critical assessment ends up “pointing to colleges that help students achieve the American dream.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


Money Magazine Ranks Brooklyn College One of the Top 50 Best Colleges in the Country

Brooklyn College made the top 50 in Moneymagazine’s 2017–18 “711 Best Colleges for Your Money” listing.

The Money magazine ranking recognizes Brooklyn College’s students’ post-graduation success in the marketplace.

Coming in at #43, the college was noted for its outstanding national academic reputation, rigorous honors collegestudy abroad programfirst-year learning communitiesdiversity, and selectivity. Additionally, Money highlighted Brooklyn College as having one of the highest rates of achievement in the country in regard to assisting its students climb the socioeconomic ladder. This is exemplified by resources like the Magner Career Center. The center’s dedicated staff provides expert career guidance and utilizes alumni networks to help students obtain valuable internship opportunities that give them an advantage in the marketplace.

Brooklyn College was the #2 ranked City University of New York (CUNY) institution, coming behind only Bernard M. Baruch College (the top-ranked CUNY school ranked #2 overall), and beating stiff competition from the likes of Rutgers University, Barnard College, the University of Chicago, Stony Brook University, Cornell University, Duke University, and Wesleyan University.

Money‘s ranking system assesses schools on educational quality, affordability, faculty, alumni success, and graduation rate, among other factors.

To see the full listing, please visit the Money website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Hospitality Management Professor Claire Stewart Interviewed by Brides

“Wedding trends come and go, and traditions have evolved right along with them—including what’s served and eaten on a wedding day. And while deciding what to feed your guests can be fun (hello, tastings!), you may not have realized that what you choose to serve can actually provide all sorts of cultural insight. That’s what Claire Stewart set out to do as she began researching her new book, As Long As We Both Shall Eat: A History of Wedding Food and Feasts.

Assistant Professor of Hospitality Management at City Tech, CUNY in New York and a trained and experienced chef herself, Stewart examined wedding food customs, from tossing rice to late night snacks, to get a peek into the conspicuous consumption that is a wedding feast. We asked the author to share a little bit of what she learned, both writing her book and as her time as a banquet chef, serving meals to newlyweds and the ones they love.”

Read the interview at Brides.com
Interviewed by Jaimie Mackey


CCNY hosts the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium, July 9-12

ACS Colloid Symposium 2017The 91st ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium will take place on July 9-12 at The City College of New York. The conference is co-sponsored by the Grove School of Engineering and the Division of Science as well as 22 exhibitors and sponsors.

The annual meeting of the American Chemical Society Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry will bring together students, faculty, developers and entrepreneurs seeking the latest developments and applications in colloids and surface science. The conference features 13 topical sessions from Colloidal Forces to Interactions to Rheology with over 500 talks and poster contributions presented in 86 sessions.

Plenary lecturers include alumna Professor Kathleen Stebe of the University of Pennsylvania and Professor Markus Antoniotti of the Max Planck Institute – Colloids and Interfaces Potsdam, Germany.

In addition, there will be a Unilever Award Lecture, the Victor K. LaMer Award Lecture and an instrument exhibition. The social program includes a Sunday evening welcome reception, a Monday evening poster session with refreshments, and a Tuesday evening Symposium Banquet.

For more information, please click here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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A Record-Breaking Spring for Hunter Student Fulbrights

The U.S. Department of State regularly names Hunter a “Top Producer” of Fulbright award-winning students . . .  and this year, the news is better than ever!A Record-Breaking Spring for Hunter Student Fulbrights Eight Hunter-educated Fulbright candidates an unprecedented number were offered the coveted grant for work and study abroad (and, in Fulbright terms, are now called Finalists).

Two graduating Hunter seniors and two recent Hunter graduates have accepted the award. Hunter is also the home campus of CUNY Fulbright Finalist Michael Clark (CUNY BA ’17).

After weighing multiple options, three members of the Hunter Class of 2017 have decided to forego the Fulbright. Valedictorian David Kanbergs has instead accepted a fellowship from The American University in Cairo’s Center for Arabic Study Abroad. Heather Armijo, with her newly minted MSW, will stay in New York to begin working in complex-care management at Mount Sinai. And Sara Clemente is headed to Stanford University, where she’ll earn an MA in Latin American studies on a full tuition scholarship.

We congratulate all eight recipients of 2017 Fulbright offers. And as four Finalists prepare for their Fulbright year abroad teaching, conducting research, and building lasting relationships with the people of their host countries we look at their backgrounds, interests, Fulbright projects, and post-Fulbright plans:

Jane Breakell, MFA ’14 – Destination: Canada

Norine Chan ’17 – Destination: Taiwan

Robert Roth, MA ’16 – Destination: Colombia

John Wetmore ’17 – Destination: Spain


Kids Reign Supreme for Two Days in August at Lehman College

The annual event owes much of its success to a core group of devoted Lehman alumni and friends.

For the past nine years, for two hot, sticky days in August, Bronx children and their families have enjoyed a festival of theatre, arts and crafts, waterslides, pony rides, face painting, and more for free. It’s the annual Kids Rule Weekend, and it’s all thanks to a group of people at Lehman College who believe that kids rule.

In celebration of the event’s 10th anniversary, and to ensure that Kids Rule continues at Lehman into the future, organizers have rounded up twelve former and current volunteers—many of whom are Lehman alumni—to help raise funds. They call themselves the Grand Jury, and they’ve each pledged to raise $1,000 each—for a total goal of $12,000.

The idea for a two-day event where kids can play in a beautiful and safe environment was, as Dante Albertie, director of Lehman Stages, puts it, a no-brainer. “There is a community of people here that want and need something like this,” he explained. Recognizing that Lehman students were its greatest asset, he got 30-40 student volunteers to put on a few theatrical shows and play with the children that first year. He brought in an electric grill to cook hotdogs.

For the second year, Albertie borrowed his parents’ grill. José Roldán (’05), now a playwright and actor, flipped burgers at that event. Communications specialist Allie Mautone (’07) remembers that the entertainment consisted of mostly tabletop carnival games. Alicia Waldie (’06), an accountant, shared her hip-hop dancing skills with the kids. Yini Rodriguez (’13), an administrative coordinator at the College, has been there since the beginning as well, and returns every year to lend a hand. Reynolds Fernandez (’13), an account manager at a marketing research firm, is a performer at heart and is happy to be part of the entertainment. Henry Ovalles (’06), now the associate director of Lehman Stages, remembers the smiling faces of the happy children during the shows.

The Grand Jury all agreed to participate in the fundraiser for the same reason: They love being part of something that is positive and gives back to the community. They have witnessed the event’s evolution over the years with attractions and attendance—an estimated 3,500 guests participate in the weekend-long event. But, most importantly, they can see the impact they have on the children and their families. “It’s a joyful event and it exposes the little ones to a college campus,” said Rodriguez.

“What is amazing about the Grand Jury is that they are people who have been with us from the beginning. Students who volunteered when they were sophomores and juniors, and now they’re out in the world, starting careers and families, and they want to give back to a specific thing that they know is important. It’s great stuff and I’m proud to be a part of it,” said Albertie.

Regard for Albertie runs high among the group, as well. Many credit him for giving them their first taste of theater and for what it means to belong to a place and a time. “It’s Dante who brings us all together,” said Alicia Waldie. “Even if we haven’t seen each other all year, we know we’ll be together the first weekend in August.”

Kids Rule will run on August 5 and 6, from Noon to 5 p.m. Admission is free. All children are welcome. To donate, go to lehman.stages.org/kids-rule.


CUNY TO HOST SPECIAL LIVE FACEBOOK SESSION ON EXCELSIOR SCHOLARSHIP

Top CUNY enrollment and admission officials will answer questions about New York State’s new Excelsior Scholarship in a special Facebook Live information session on Thursday, July 13, at 6 p.m.  The Excelsior Scholarship initiative will provide free tuition at CUNY and SUNY colleges to qualified students.

The Facebook Live information session will be hosted by James Murphy, University Dean for Enrollment Management, and University Director of Admission Clare Norton. Students, family members and others can join the session on CUNY’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/events/495782110764808/.

The deadline for applying for the Excelsior Scholarship is July 21, 2017.

 

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JOHN JAY STUDENT ‘ACES’ BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN 2 YEARS

Chancellor James B. Milliken announced that a University initiative to increase timely graduation in four-year baccalaureate programs has produced its first graduate – a 19-year-old John Jay College of Criminal Justice student who earned his bachelor’s degree in just two years.

The ACE (Accelerate, Complete and Engage) program is the baccalaureate-level offshoot of CUNY’s highly successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs), which has consistently doubled graduation rates at CUNY’s community colleges.

ACE’s first graduate, Piotr Tandek of Staten Island, earned a 2017 B.S. in criminal justice at John Jay and aims to become a New York City police officer when he turns 21. He plans to enter the College of Staten Island this fall to begin studying for a master’s in the history of education, in anticipation of a post-NYPD career as a high school or middle school history teacher.

Chancellor Milliken congratulated Tandek on his “exceptional” achievement, which he said was an indicator that “the rest of his class will finish strong.”

“Although we’re only halfway through our four-year pilot program, ACE’s results so far affirm that our robust approach to helping students graduate on time and preparing them for careers or further study works just as well on the baccalaureate level as it does in community colleges,” the Chancellor said. “This may well serve as the template that other CUNY colleges – and colleges elsewhere – may follow as they seek to improve their degree-completion rates. It will also stand as yet another piece of the extraordinary and important legacy of John Jay College President Jeremy Travis, a leader in our efforts to improve graduation rates.”

Just as ASAP aims to graduate at least half of its students within three years – a goal it has consistently exceeded – ACE, piloted only at John Jay, aims to graduate at least 50 percent of its students within four years and 65 percent within five years. ACE set the 50 percent target for the end of summer in 2019 and the 65 percent target for the end of summer in 2020.

Tandek, the son of Polish immigrants, graduated in two years by marshaling 51 credits toward his baccalaureate degree even before entering John Jay, including 12 Advanced Placement credits earned in high school; nine from taking two proficiency exams, in college algebra and college mathematics; and 12 from taking a Polish proficiency exam. In addition, he earned seven credits by joining the NYPD Police Cadet Corps, which provided the first month of Policy Academy training that also served as his required internship; and he earned two credits from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (introduction to animals in distress and introduction to hazardous materials), six from the CUNY School of Professional Studies (physical science) and three for life experience.

Tandek said he wanted to graduate quickly because “I was thinking ahead.” His goals include becoming a police officer at 21, taking the sergeant’s exam and becoming a lieutenant by 30. Why policing? “I want to be proactive,” he said. “I want to show the community that instead of hearing all the negatives we hear about police, that we are here to help you. I’m trying my best to make the community safe.”

Looking further ahead, Tandek said he plans to take the NYPD’s early retirement at 46, after 25 years of service, and then teach history. He intends to remain in New York City.

Tandek said the enhanced advisement and academic and financial support provided by the ACE program gave him “nothing to worry about” that was school-related, “so I could excel in my classes.” He added, “They treat you like family. Without a network, it’s hard to succeed in life.”

ACE provides the same proven system of supporting students as ASAP, including strong, ongoing academic and career development counseling. It offers the same financial support, including free unlimited MetroCards and a $500 textbook voucher each year. Most ACE students attend tuition-free, with a tuition-gap waiver to cover any shortfall for students who receive state TAP and federal Pell grants.

Students also are eligible for winter and summer session scholarships for up to $1,650 to cover tuition and fees (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-john-jay). The program requires internships in the junior and senior years and offers 14 majors (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-eligible-majors). Students must take at least 15 credits a semester.

The pilot is showing positive results so far. An analysis of Fall 2016 data by CUNY ASAP Research and Evaluation, the University’s internal assessment team for the ACE project, showed the Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 retention rate for the first ACE cohort at John Jay was 83 percent, compared with 78 percent for a matched comparison group of similar John Jay students. Of the students retained, 95 percent were in good academic standing at the end of the Fall 2016 semester, versus 89 percent for the comparison group, with a mean cumulative GPA of 3.07 for ACE students versus 3.03 for the comparison group. Most significantly, a higher percentage of ACE students are on track to four-year graduation, with 71 percent at or above 45 cumulative credits earned, versus 43 percent of the comparison group as of the end of the Fall 2016 semester.

CUNY launched its nationally acclaimed ASAP initiative in 2007 as a pilot, seeking to graduate more than half of its associate degree students within three years, more than double the national rate of about 20 percent. It has consistently met and exceeded that goal.

A study by the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, recently published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Higher Education, found that ASAP provides taxpayers with a big bang for the buck – a return of $3 to $4 for every dollar invested. See http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/forum/2017/05/23/cunys-associate-degree-completion-program-huge-cost-saver-over-traditional-approach-independent-study-finds/


JOHN JAY STUDENT ‘ACES’ BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN 2 YEARS

Chancellor James B. Milliken announced that a University initiative to increase timely graduation in four-year baccalaureate programs has produced its first graduate – a 19-year-old John Jay College of Criminal Justice student who earned his bachelor’s degree in just two years.

The ACE (Accelerate, Complete and Engage) program is the baccalaureate-level offshoot of CUNY’s highly successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs), which has consistently doubled graduation rates at CUNY’s community colleges.

ACE’s first graduate, Piotr Tandek of Staten Island, earned a 2017 B.S. in criminal justice at John Jay and aims to become a New York City police officer when he turns 21. He plans to enter the College of Staten Island this fall to begin studying for a master’s in the history of education, in anticipation of a post-NYPD career as a high school or middle school history teacher.

Chancellor Milliken congratulated Tandek on his “exceptional” achievement, which he said was an indicator that “the rest of his class will finish strong.”

“Although we’re only halfway through our four-year pilot program, ACE’s results so far affirm that our robust approach to helping students graduate on time and preparing them for careers or further study works just as well on the baccalaureate level as it does in community colleges,” the Chancellor said. “This may well serve as the template that other CUNY colleges – and colleges elsewhere – may follow as they seek to improve their degree-completion rates. It will also stand as yet another piece of the extraordinary and important legacy of John Jay College President Jeremy Travis, a leader in our efforts to improve graduation rates.”

Just as ASAP aims to graduate at least half of its students within three years – a goal it has consistently exceeded – ACE, piloted only at John Jay, aims to graduate at least 50 percent of its students within four years and 65 percent within five years. ACE set the 50 percent target for the end of summer in 2019 and the 65 percent target for the end of summer in 2020.

Tandek, the son of Polish immigrants, graduated in two years by marshaling 51 credits toward his baccalaureate degree even before entering John Jay, including 12 Advanced Placement credits earned in high school; nine from taking two proficiency exams, in college algebra and college mathematics; and 12 from taking a Polish proficiency exam. In addition, he earned seven credits by joining the NYPD Police Cadet Corps, which provided the first month of Policy Academy training that also served as his required internship; and he earned two credits from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (introduction to animals in distress and introduction to hazardous materials), six from the CUNY School of Professional Studies (physical science) and three for life experience.

Tandek said he wanted to graduate quickly because “I was thinking ahead.” His goals include becoming a police officer at 21, taking the sergeant’s exam and becoming a lieutenant by 30. Why policing? “I want to be proactive,” he said. “I want to show the community that instead of hearing all the negatives we hear about police, that we are here to help you. I’m trying my best to make the community safe.”

Looking further ahead, Tandek said he plans to take the NYPD’s early retirement at 46, after 25 years of service, and then teach history. He intends to remain in New York City.

Tandek said the enhanced advisement and academic and financial support provided by the ACE program gave him “nothing to worry about” that was school-related, “so I could excel in my classes.” He added, “They treat you like family. Without a network, it’s hard to succeed in life.”

ACE provides the same proven system of supporting students as ASAP, including strong, ongoing academic and career development counseling. It offers the same financial support, including free unlimited MetroCards and a $500 textbook voucher each year. Most ACE students attend tuition-free, with a tuition-gap waiver to cover any shortfall for students who receive state TAP and federal Pell grants.

Students also are eligible for winter and summer session scholarships for up to $1,650 to cover tuition and fees (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-john-jay). The program requires internships in the junior and senior years and offers 14 majors (www.jjay.cuny.edu/ace-eligible-majors). Students must take at least 15 credits a semester.

The pilot is showing positive results so far. An analysis of Fall 2016 data by CUNY ASAP Research and Evaluation, the University’s internal assessment team for the ACE project, showed the Fall 2015 to Fall 2016 retention rate for the first ACE cohort at John Jay was 83 percent, compared with 78 percent for a matched comparison group of similar John Jay students. Of the students retained, 95 percent were in good academic standing at the end of the Fall 2016 semester, versus 89 percent for the comparison group, with a mean cumulative GPA of 3.07 for ACE students versus 3.03 for the comparison group. Most significantly, a higher percentage of ACE students are on track to four-year graduation, with 71 percent at or above 45 cumulative credits earned, versus 43 percent of the comparison group as of the end of the Fall 2016 semester.

CUNY launched its nationally acclaimed ASAP initiative in 2007 as a pilot, seeking to graduate more than half of its associate degree students within three years, more than double the national rate of about 20 percent. It has consistently met and exceeded that goal.

A study by the Center for Benefit-Cost Studies of Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, recently published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Higher Education, found that ASAP provides taxpayers with a big bang for the buck – a return of $3 to $4 for every dollar invested. See http://www1.cuny.edu/mu/forum/2017/05/23/cunys-associate-degree-completion-program-huge-cost-saver-over-traditional-approach-independent-study-finds/


ICYMI: CUNY celebrates first graduate from new program

POLITICO
By KESHIA CLUKEY

Piotr Tandek recently graduated John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Manhattan with a bachelor’s degree that he completed in two years.

The 19-year-old Brooklyn native, whose parents are from Poland, started at John Jay with 12 credits from high school, but it was his enrollment in a City University pilot program that helped him finish so quickly, saving time and slashing the amount of loans he had to take out, Tandek said. “I saved $18,000 by graduating early.”

Tandek is the first graduate of CUNY’s Accelerate, Complete and Engage (ACE) program, piloted at John Jay, which provided him with additional financial and academic assistance, including an adviser who helped him navigate course requirements, getting him set up with summer and winter courses and an internship.

“Going into college is overwhelming and with this program … it helps you transition,” Tandek said. “They boost you up. They set the standards for you … It helps us excel,” he said of the ACE program.

Tandek’s story — though a bit unique because of the credits he earned in high school — is one CUNY hopes to replicate at other four-year colleges through the ACE program as it seeks to improve on-time graduation rates, chancellor James Milliken said.

“This culture of completion is a focus at each of our colleges and it is a central point of our strategic plan, of where we’re going to be focusing attention and resources in the coming years,” Milliken said in an interview. “Getting students college ready, into CUNY, [and] getting them out in a timely way with degrees.”

The move comes as college affordability and student debt have been at the center of the national discussion on higher education.

ACE is a spinoff of CUNY’s nationally renowned Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), which focuses on increasing the three-year graduation rate for students looking to earn an associate’s degree. U.S. Rep. Yvette Clarke of Brooklyn introduced a bill last month that would create a national version of the ASAP to support students attending community colleges nationally.

ASAP was launched as a pilot in 2007 with 1,100 students across six campuses and as of the 2016-17 school year has expanded to 15,400 students across nine of CUNY’s colleges, including its six community colleges and three comprehensives that offer associate and bachelor’s degrees, said Donna Linderman, who oversees the program. It is supported through funding from the state and New York City.

ACE, like ASAP, provides an array of support services for students, including ongoing academic and career development counseling, free unlimited MetroCards, a $500 textbook voucher each year, and scholarships toward summer and winter courses.

Most ACE students attend tuition-free. They must take at least 15 credits a semester and are required to complete internships.

The first cohort of the ACE pilot at John Jay began in fall 2015 with 262 students. The retention rate at the end of the fall 2016 semester was 83 percent, compared with 78 percent for similar students. Of those retained, 95 percent of ACE students were in good academic standing, according to CUNY data.

And a higher percentage of ACE students are on track to graduate within four years, with 71 percent at or above 45 cumulative credits earned compared to 43 percent of the comparison group as of the end of the fall 2016 semester, according to CUNY.

An additional 350 students entered the program in fall 2016, Linderman said. “The early outcomes are so promising, with significantly more students on track to graduate at the four- or five-year level,” she said.

The goal is to graduate at least 50 percent of ACE students within four years and 65 percent within five years.

But the program doesn’t come without a cost to the college.

ACE currently costs about $4,000 per student per year over and above what it costs for regular full time equivalent students services, Linderman said. This includes having more advisers, as well as paying for the additional tuition, books and transportation aid. The ACE program currently is funded through the Robin Hood Foundation, Office of the Mayor’s NYC Opportunity, and the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women.

But even though its more expensive per student, it actually costs less per degree than if the student were to take additional years to graduate, and allows the college to graduate twice the number of students, she said.

CUNY currently is looking into a sort of public-private partnership to fund the ACE program at additional schools, Linderman said.

While there is an additional cost, it’s an “investment worth making,” Milliken said. “If it is successful, which we believe it will be, then yes, we will look at ways to expand that across CUNY.”

“The goal is not obviously just to increase enrollment. The goal for us at CUNY and at all large public universities, is to make sure that those students are successful,” he said. “That’s something where I don’t think we’ve had enough focus in recent decades and so we’re going to turn that around at CUNY.”

http://www1.cuny.edu/portal_ur/news/in_news/2017/POLITICO_Piotr_Tandek_7.6.17.pdf


Class of 2017 Grad Ryan Beckford Heads to CNBC

Even before he walked down the aisle at Barclays Center for the 2017 Brooklyn College Commencement Ceremony, Ryan Beckford ’17 had already scored a coveted position as a post-production prep tech at CNBC, thanks, in no small part, to the resources and training he received from the Magner Career Center.

Ryan Beckford ’17 said that the Magner Career Center was crucial in helping him hit the ground running on his post-graduation career track.

Beckford, who received his Bachelor of Arts in television and radio, said that his first week at CNBC Global Media Operations, which began the Monday following commencement, was “busy and hectic,” but it was the kind of busy and hectic he had been working toward for his entire college career and he was glad to be finally living it.

“I was getting trained by numerous employees from within the department that knew how to handle the workflow and were willing to show me what to do,” says Beckford. “During the peak of my first week, I was sending shows out for captioning, digitally delivering shows to 30 ROCK, screening USA Network promos, applying fixes to close captions, and taking in live show feeds for Oxygen and Telemundo.” Currently, Beckford is being trained to perform quality checks on regional and national sports programs for the NBC Sports Network, ensuring the shows meet standards before they air.

A Kingston, Jamaica native who now lives in Queens, New York, Beckford is the first person in his immediate family to attend college. His family’s economic situation required that he receive financial aid and take out a loan to attend college. He enrolled at Brooklyn College because of its affordability and rigorous curriculum. Given his financial challenges, Beckford felt a special responsibility to himself and his family to take full advantage of the opportunities afforded to him. This is what led him to the Magner Career Center, where his path to CNBC began as an internship inquiry.

“The center helped me attain my internship at NBCUniversal (CNBC’s parent company) by allowing me to take advantage of the resources offered before having to go in for my interview,” Beckford says. “When I found out that CNBC wanted to interview me, I reached out to my career adviser Michael Sarrao at the center, who reviewed my resume and made changes. During our meetings, my adviser provided me with sample questions, which I could ask my interviewer at the end of my interview to show them my interest. The center was an important resource for me because the friendly staff were always available to answer my questions, whether by e-mail or by phone.”

Beckford began his internship in fall 2016. Because he had performed so well in his duties—which included video editing, social media management, researching celebrity guests of the network, and pitching show topics—by spring 2017, CNBC offered him an entry-level position in its cable network division.

“The most important tip for any intern wanting to be hired is to believe in yourself,” says Beckford. “Take in as much as possible from the internship experience. Teach yourself new skills and have fun. Always ask questions, stay busy, and complete any tasks that are asked of you. Have conversations with your supervisor. Discuss your goals and where you see yourself in the future with the company. You want to let your supervisor know you want to be a part of the company months before you graduate. Finally, network and make friends.”

Of the Magner Career Center, Beckford adds, “Having a center on campus where students can go and seek their career is very important. The services the center offers would be expensive and out of reach just about anywhere else. For these reasons, I thank Marge Magner [founder of the Magner Career Center], center director Natalia Guarin-Klein, and Michael Sarrao for thinking about Brooklyn College students, putting their career goals first, and for wanting to provide a value to help change students’ lives.”

Beckford says Brooklyn College prepared him for the job market through classroom lessons, hands-on activities, career fairs, and off-campus research. “The classes are designed to provide every student with a real-world understanding for broadcast media. Faculty like Michelle Ciulla-Lipkin and Claire Serant provide students with vision through talks of their experiences working in the industry.”

Beckford’s ultimate goal is to become an executive producer and senior video editor, which he says will put him in a better position to pay Magner’s efforts forward.

“As I proceed through my career, I plan to give back to Brooklyn College by advising students on how to achieve their career goals” say Beckford. “I plan to serve as a mentor for students hoping to achieve careers in broadcast media.”

 

The Magner Career Center, founded by Marge Magner ’69, is able to provide students like Ryan Beckford with the assistance, skills, values, and opportunities essential to fulfilling their career aspirations thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To make a charitable donation to the Magner Career Center, please visit the center’s website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 718.951.6377 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Bronx Community College Hosts Announcement of Big Bucks for the Bronx

Bronx City Council Delegation Will Unveil $8,196,000 in Capital Spending for the Borough in the Next Fiscal Year


What
: The New York City Council Bronx Delegation’s Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Press Conference

When: Thursday, June 29, 2017, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Where: Gould Memorial Library, Bronx Community College, 2155 University Avenue, Bronx, New York
About: The Bronx Delegation to the New York City Council will hold a press conference announcing $8,196,000 in capital spending for the borough in the Fiscal 2018 budget.  The event will be held in the Rotunda of Bronx Community College’s Gould Memorial Library, itself the recipient of $2,000,000 in City Council funds towards the restoration of the historic Bronx landmark. Following welcoming remarks from BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe, the speakers will include:

  • Council Member and Chair of the Bronx Delegation Annabel Palma (District #18) with an overview of the budget
  • Council Member Andy King (District #12), announcing $1,000,000 funds to renovate and upgrade the NYPD’s 47th precinct
  • Council Member Ritchie J. Torres (District #15) announcing $5,000,000 for the Construction of a new worker’s operation center at the New York Botanical Garden
  • Council Member Vanessa L. Gibson (District #16) announcing $1,000,000 for a permanent facility At Mill Pond Park for the Bronx Children’s Museum and $400,000 to provide Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility for the Roscoe Brown Student Center of Bronx Community College

For further information, contact David Levers at 718.289.5157 or david.levers@bcc.cuny.edu.


Lehman College/CUNY Partners with NYU in the First Publicly Funded VR/AR Lab in the U.S.

When the City of New York was considering how the region could be a center of excellence for virtual and augmented reality they turned to New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and asked them to partner with Lehman College.

The private university won a $6 million grant from New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) and the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment (MOME) to develop and build the new lab for the city’s emerging VR/AR sector as part of the de Blasio’s Administration plan to create 100,000 good jobs. Lehman, which opened its own VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in a public-private partnership with EON Reality in May, will serve as a workforce development center in the Bronx.

“The milestone we observe here today, evidences the strength of your character, the depth of your dedication, and the firmness of your purpose,” Cruz told the graduates.

“Creating a virtual reality hub here in New York City will expand education and career opportunities in the high-tech sector for residents, and Lehman College is proud to have been chosen to participate the workforce development component of this initiative,” said President José Luis Cruz of Lehman College. “The College’s Virtual and Augmented Reality Training Academy is introducing students now to a fast-paced world filled with innovation and entrepreneurship. By fully establishing an avenue from the classroom and lab to the workplace, it is easy to see the potential for success and economic growth, here in the Bronx and across the city.”

NYU will develop a new lab in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and by partnering with Lehman’s College’s VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in the Bronx, will connect New Yorkers with VR/AR jobs. The Brooklyn lab is expected to open in late 2017.

“VR/AR is one of the most exciting new technologies out there and is a rapidly growing sector with significant opportunities for innovation,” said Council Member James Vacca, chair of the New York City Council Committee on Technology, who represents District 13 in the Bronx. “The creation of the VR/AR lab in Brooklyn and the establishment of a workforce development center in the Bronx will ensure New York City is at the forefront of this quickly expanding field, and that a diverse range of local companies and residents have the resources they need to succeed. I’m really excited to see what kinds of new technologies come from this forward thinking investment.”

According to a 2016 report by Citigroup, the VR/AR sector has seen nearly $3 billion in investments nationally over the past two years. The report also projects that the global VR/AR market could grow to $2.16 trillion by 2035 as different industries and applications make use of the technology.

New York City is uniquely positioned to become a leader in VR/AR due to its diverse talent pool and strong anchor industries with opportunities for crosspollination. A 2016 Goldman Sachs report identified six New York City anchor industries—healthcare, education, real estate, retail, live entertainment and video entertainment—as being among the most impacted by VR/AR.

For more information regarding the Lehman VR/AR Academy and Lab, please see http://www.lehman.edu/vr.

About Lehman College:

CUNY’s only senior college in the Bronx, Lehman College enrolls over 12,000 students and offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Lehman is home to 12 CUNY doctoral programs (most in conjunction with the CUNY Graduate Center) and has a long-standing collaboration with the New York Botanical Garden. Lehman is a Hispanic-Serving Institution where students speak 91 languages, 40 percent hold two passports, and all have a global outlook. In recent years students have won Fulbrights, Soros Fellowships, and fellowships from the National Science Foundation and the Organization of American States.

In 2015 Washington Monthly selected Lehman as the No. 3 “Best Bang for the Buck” college in the Northeast. Its tree-lined, 37-acre campus once housed the United Nations Security Council, where in 1946, diplomats drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In recent years, Lehman has added a number of new buildings to its historic campus, including Science Hall, a $70 million, state-of-the-art research and teaching facility, and a $16 million all-digital Multimedia Center.


Lehman College/CUNY Partners with NYU in the First Publicly Funded VR/AR Lab in the U.S.

When the City of New York was considering how the region could be a center of excellence for virtual and augmented reality they turned to New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and asked them to partner with Lehman College.

The private university won a $6 million grant from New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) and the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment (MOME) to develop and build the new lab for the city’s emerging VR/AR sector as part of the de Blasio’s Administration plan to create 100,000 good jobs. Lehman, which opened its own VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in a public-private partnership with EON Reality in May, will serve as a workforce development center in the Bronx.

“The milestone we observe here today, evidences the strength of your character, the depth of your dedication, and the firmness of your purpose,” Cruz told the graduates.

“Creating a virtual reality hub here in New York City will expand education and career opportunities in the high-tech sector for residents, and Lehman College is proud to have been chosen to participate the workforce development component of this initiative,” said President José Luis Cruz of Lehman College. “The College’s Virtual and Augmented Reality Training Academy is introducing students now to a fast-paced world filled with innovation and entrepreneurship. By fully establishing an avenue from the classroom and lab to the workplace, it is easy to see the potential for success and economic growth, here in the Bronx and across the city.”

NYU will develop a new lab in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and by partnering with Lehman’s College’s VR/AR Training Academy and Development Lab in the Bronx, will connect New Yorkers with VR/AR jobs. The Brooklyn lab is expected to open in late 2017.

“VR/AR is one of the most exciting new technologies out there and is a rapidly growing sector with significant opportunities for innovation,” said Council Member James Vacca, chair of the New York City Council Committee on Technology, who represents District 13 in the Bronx. “The creation of the VR/AR lab in Brooklyn and the establishment of a workforce development center in the Bronx will ensure New York City is at the forefront of this quickly expanding field, and that a diverse range of local companies and residents have the resources they need to succeed. I’m really excited to see what kinds of new technologies come from this forward thinking investment.”

According to a 2016 report by Citigroup, the VR/AR sector has seen nearly $3 billion in investments nationally over the past two years. The report also projects that the global VR/AR market could grow to $2.16 trillion by 2035 as different industries and applications make use of the technology.

New York City is uniquely positioned to become a leader in VR/AR due to its diverse talent pool and strong anchor industries with opportunities for crosspollination. A 2016 Goldman Sachs report identified six New York City anchor industries—healthcare, education, real estate, retail, live entertainment and video entertainment—as being among the most impacted by VR/AR.

For more information regarding the Lehman VR/AR Academy and Lab, please see http://www.lehman.edu/vr.

About Lehman College:

CUNY’s only senior college in the Bronx, Lehman College enrolls over 12,000 students and offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Lehman is home to 12 CUNY doctoral programs (most in conjunction with the CUNY Graduate Center) and has a long-standing collaboration with the New York Botanical Garden. Lehman is a Hispanic-Serving Institution where students speak 91 languages, 40 percent hold two passports, and all have a global outlook. In recent years students have won Fulbrights, Soros Fellowships, and fellowships from the National Science Foundation and the Organization of American States.

In 2015 Washington Monthly selected Lehman as the No. 3 “Best Bang for the Buck” college in the Northeast. Its tree-lined, 37-acre campus once housed the United Nations Security Council, where in 1946, diplomats drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In recent years, Lehman has added a number of new buildings to its historic campus, including Science Hall, a $70 million, state-of-the-art research and teaching facility, and a $16 million all-digital Multimedia Center.


Three CCNY Black Studies majors awarded Mellon Fellowships

Mellon Mays Fellows 2017

2017 Mellon Mays Fellows. From left: Naajidah Correll, Bryan Guichardo and Nana Minder.

Naajidah Correll, Bryan Guichardo and Nana Minder, from the Black Studies Program at The City College of New York, are 2017 Mellon Mays Fellows.  The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program is the centerpiece of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s initiatives to increase diversity in the faculty ranks of institutions of higher learning.

Fellows have demonstrated academic ability and an aspiration to pursue a doctoral degree in selected humanities, social sciences and physical sciences. The fellowship provides fellows with structured programming; faculty mentoring; support for research activities; and repayment of undergraduate loans up to $10,000.

“The MMUF program is preparing me for my life goal of becoming a professor within the humanities, “ said Correll, who is also a Colin Powell Fellow and fellow of the Skadden, Arps Honors Program in Legal Studies. “Upon graduating, it is my hope to join Stanford’s Modern Thought in Literature and Law JD/PhD program, which is directed by Mellon Mays Fellow and professor Bernadette Meyler.”

2017 Mellon Fellows and their research topics are:

  • Naajidah Correll (junior, literature, Black Studies minor) will be at the University of California, Los Angeles this summer for a six-week program to work on her research topic the resurgence of African spirituality in New York City, specifically among Black and Latin communities and seeing the correlation between certain political movements.
  • Bryan Guichardo (junior, anthropology and Black Studies) is researching racial and ethnic identity through hair, within Afro-Latinx communities, with a focus on Dominican Studies.
  • Nana Minder (junior, sociology and Black Studies, Women’s Studies minor) is researching Black girls in schools, particularly girls in the school-to-prison pipeline with high expulsion rates. She is doing research alongside Dr. Terri Watson at A. Phillip Randolph Campus High School and will be writing a book chapter with her on their work.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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FORMER ACTING ASST. U.S. EDUCATION SECRETARY APPOINTED ASSOCIATE VICE CHANCELLOR TO GUIDE IMPLEMENTATION OF CUNY STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

Chancellor James B. Milliken today announced the appointment of Amy B. McIntosh, acting Assistant Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education in the Obama administration, as Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Strategy, a new role where she will be responsible for guiding implementation of the University’s Strategic Framework and other important CUNY strategic objectives.

Ms. McIntosh will work closely with the Chancellor, Presidents and other senior university leadership in the planning, oversight and implementation of the vision for CUNY’s future development. She will provide strategic advice and coordination across the University to support progress on priority initiatives. She will help identify priorities, set benchmarks and time frames, and determine the financial and human resources needed to achieve the goals that will renew CUNY’s mission for the 21st century. The vision will enhance student preparedness for college, significantly improve graduation rates and give graduates more workplace experience to launch them on promising careers.

“CUNY has set an ambitious agenda with our Strategic Framework, and a comprehensive implementation plan is required to achieve its goals of academic excellence, expanded access, and improvement in student progress to graduation,” Chancellor Milliken said. “Amy McIntosh’s extensive and deep expertise as a key executive and manager in the federal, New York State and New York City education departments, and her many accomplishments in both the public and private sectors, will be helpful in navigating clear paths to achieving CUNY’s critical goals.”

Ms. McIntosh has deep experience as a leader in education. Her responsibilities during the Obama Administration included policy development, creation and implementation of Education Department budgets, and advancement of financial aid programs for low-income college students.

Ms. McIntosh served in the U.S. Department of Education from January 2014 to this past January, most recently as acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development. In that post, she led a team shaping policy development from Pre-K-12 to higher education. She also developed and implemented two annual Education Department budgets of approximately $78 billion in discretionary funding, forged policy around the new P-12 Every Student Succeeds Act, advanced financial aid and grant programs to improve college access, affordability and completion for low-income college students, and navigated across multiple agencies including the White House and Office of Management and Budget.

Previously, she was Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for P-12 Policy, where she launched a new 50-state teacher-equity planning requirement to improve poor and minority students’ access to excellent educators, and launched a Preschool Development Grant program to increase state-funded preschool in 18 states.

Ms. McIntosh worked in the New York State Education Department from October 2010 to December 2013 as a Senior Fellow with the privately funded Regents Research Fund, providing policy and strategic leadership to the New York State Education Commissioner and the Board of Regents. She transformed management of teachers and principals through several initiatives to improve preparation, development and retention of excellent teachers and principals across the State, including initiating a grant program to establish differentiated compensation and career ladder incentives, with awards going to 221 districts and 42,000 teachers.

Ms. McIntosh holds a B.A. in Economics from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. She worked in the private sector from 1984 to 2004 at companies including American Express, where her last position was Senior Vice President-Marketing for the Consumer Card Group; Verizon, where she was President/General Manager, Consumer Internet Business; Zagat Survey, where she was CEO; and D&B, where she was Senior Vice President.

CUNY’s new Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Strategy will report to the Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost and work closely with the Chancellor and other senior University leaders. Ms. McIntosh will also lead in the development and execution of a communications campaign to increase awareness of and participation in Strategic Framework-related activities and accomplishments.


City Tech Professor Earns Prestigious Math Award

Professor Satyanand Singh of the Department of Mathematics was awarded the prestigious “Distinguished Teaching Award in Mathematics” on April 29, in recognition of extraordinarily successful teaching and commitment to students. The Mathematics Association of America New York (MAA NY) Metro Section conferred the award. 

“It is a privilege to challenge and help my students grow in their studies and impact their lives in a positive way,” said Singh, “Winning this distinguished award further validates my teaching and its influence on them.”

Professor Janet Liou-Mark, Professor Satyanand Singh

In addition to his award-winning teaching, Singh has mentored several students through Emerging Scholars and other programs at City Tech. Many of his students went on to present their work at the national level and have achieved or are pursuing advanced degrees in Mathematics.

Singh has coauthored papers and published in highly-ranked and respected peer-reviewed journals such as The Electronic Journal of Combinatorics, The International Journal of Number Theory, CMJ and International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology. The three sequences (A224920, A274628 and A274629) are linked to some of his work on OEIS (The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences). Singh is also a coauthor of Visualizing Calculus by Way of Maple: An Emphasis on Problem Solving (McGraw-Hill 2011).

As a trustee of the Belle Zeller Scholarship Fund, Singh awards talented CUNY students with merit-based scholarships. He is a faculty advisor to the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) student chapter at City Tech and is the secretary-elect of the MAA NY Metro Section (2015-2018).

Singh received his Ph.D. in 2014 from the CUNY Graduate Center under the direction of Professor Melvyn B. Nathanson, and has been teaching at City Tech since 2001. His research interests are in number theory, cryptography, probability, and algebra.

http://sections.maa.org/metrony/news 


The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and The Advanced Science Research Center of the City University of New York Launch Inter-Institutional Glial Biology Initiative

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) and the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) today announced the creation of an Inter-Institutional Glial Biology Initiative, a collaboration designed to catalyze and strengthen scientific interaction and create a multidisciplinary research and clinical program focused on glial biology between the two institutions.

The complexity of brain function relies on networks of many billions of cells communicating via transmission of electrochemical signals, metabolite exchanges, and communication with blood vessels. The function of glial cells, which outnumber neurons, is only beginning to be addressed. Traditionally viewed as “support cells,” glial cells have begun to take the stage as intriguing sensors of the environment and as major players in disease mechanisms.

The Inter-Institutional Glial Biology Initiative, the first of its kind in New York City, will focus on the study of glial cell development and function. Investigators from both institutions will collaborate to foster the growth of robust research programs while sharing ideas, resources, and core facilities at both institutions.

“This partnership—scientific discovery led by world-class researchers leveraging outstanding facilities—is an exciting development for neuroscience research,” said Joy Connolly, Provost and Senior Vice President at the Graduate Center. “The collaborations this agreement makes possible will advance the important work currently being undertaken independently by the teams at CUNY and Mount Sinai. Efforts such as these help us fulfill our commitment to do great science for the public good.”

The partnership brings together two institutions that are leading the way in modern scientific research.

“We are delighted to launch this joint initiative to capture the many synergies between our two institutions focused on the essential role played by glial cells in health and disease,” said Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD, Nash Family Professor of Neuroscience and Dean for Academic and Scientific Affairs at ISMMS. “We believe that a greater understanding of the brain and insight into fundamentally new approaches to treatment will result from this novel affiliation.”

ISMMS is an international leader in medical and scientific training, biomedical research, and patient care. It is the medical school for the Mount Sinai Health System, an integrated health care system which includes seven hospitals and an expanding ambulatory network serving approximately 3.7 million patients per year. The School has more than 1,800 students in MD, PhD, and Master’s programs and post-doctoral fellowships; more than 5,600 faculty members; over 2,000 residents and fellows; and 36 clinical and research institutes. The Graduate Center’s ASRC is the scientific research hub of the CUNY system, providing cutting-edge research tools necessary to push the limits of scientific exploration. CUNY, the largest urban university system in the United States, serves more than 270,000 students, including the 4,100 graduate students enrolled in 30-plus doctoral degree programs at the Graduate Center.

The new initiative will be led by Patrizia Casaccia, MD, PhD, Director of the ASRC Neuroscience Initiative at the Graduate Center, CUNY and an internationally-recognized scientist focused on myelin and oligodendrocyte biology and Anne Schaefer, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and an outstanding scientist in microglia biology

“Thanks to the cutting-edge instrumentation that is being installed at the ASRC, including our MRI, Epigenetics and Live Imaging Facilities, and the considerable resources and expertise available at Mount Sinai, investigators at both institutions will only be limited by their imaginations,” said Dr. Casaccia.

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About the Advanced Science Research Center at the Graduate Center, CUNY
The Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) is the Graduate Center’s University-wide venture that elevates CUNY’s legacy of scientific research and education through initiatives in five distinctive, but increasingly interconnected disciplines: Nanoscience, Photonics, Structural Biology, Neuroscience and Environmental Sciences. The ASRC is designed to promote a unique, interdisciplinary research culture with researchers from each of the initiatives working side by side in the ASRC’s core facilities, sharing equipment that is among the most advanced available.

About the Icahn School of Medicine
The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is an international leader in medical and scientific training, biomedical research, and patient care. It is the medical school for the Mount Sinai Health System, an integrated health care system which includes seven hospitals and an expanding ambulatory network serving approximately 4 million patients per year. The School has more than 1,800 students in MD, PhD, and Master’s programs and post-doctoral fellowships; more than 5,600 faculty members; over 2,000 residents and fellows; and 23 clinical and research institutes and 34 academic departments. It is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per principal investigator. The School was the first medical school in the country to create a progressive admissions approach for students who seek early assurance of admission through the FlexMed program. The Graduate School of Biomedical Science trains PhD and MD/PhD students, and offers master’s-level programs in areas such as genetic counseling, clinical research, biomedical sciences, and public health, and an online master’s degree in health care delivery leadership. The seamless connections between our medical school, graduate school, and hospital campuses provide an extraordinary environment for translating scientific discoveries into clinical treatments.


City Tech Offers New Degree Program in Applied Computational Physics

This last decade has witnessed historically rapid advances in science, technology, and education driven by a dramatic increase in the power and usage of computers. In the past, undergraduate physics students were often taught exclusively analytical and theoretical skills; scientific computations were left as “black boxes” whose content was only revealed in graduate school. However, our increasing reliance on computer-based tools, both in science and in everyday life, makes this less true today, and much less likely to be true in the future.

This fall, the Physics Department at City Tech will offer a Bachelor of Science degree program in Applied Computational Physics (ACP). This program places a unique emphasis on task-oriented rather than theoretical or formal aspects of physical sciences, and on the use of advanced computational techniques to solve problems. As a result, it differs substantially from Physics Bachelor’s programs already in existence at other CUNY (The City University of New York) colleges.

“The program has been designed to equip students with skills that are in demand on the job market while, at the same time, conveying the excitement of exploring and testing the fundamental laws of our universe,” said Professor Giovanni Ossola, coordinator of the ACP degree program. “It took a few years to find the right combination of courses. We sought the advice of physicists employed in industry and finance, and I think we succeeded in providing the right blend. We want our graduates to have a scientific approach to study advanced problems, as well as the ability of applying their skills to practical tasks.”  

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Applied Computational Physics will fulfill the growing need for researchers, educators, and information professionals who perform in roles requiring programming and problem-solving skills, as well as technological proficiency. It will provide students with strong technical skills, critical thinking and problem-solving abilities, all of which are highly rated by companies in their hiring process.

Graduates will be equipped with a solid foundation in physics, computer science, and mathematics. This will enable them to pursue careers in a variety of STEM disciplines such as aerospace engineering, applied mathematics and computer science, finance, environmental science, chemistry, biomedicine, or conduct research in academia, industry, or national laboratories. Graduates of the program will gain access to a wide spectrum of employment opportunities in the private and public sector, as well as to advanced degree programs.

The Physics Department currently has twelve award-winning tenured or tenure-track faculty qualified to teach all the classes related to the program. In particular, many faculty members are active in research involving advanced computational techniques and their applications to various physical systems. Their research includes the use of theoretical and computational methods for the study of particle physics, condensed matter systems, cosmology and astrophysics, gravitational physics, and optics. In addition, there are several faculty members in other Departments within City Tech who can provide support and bring their expertise to the proposed curriculum, in particular in the Mathematics and Computer Systems Technology Departments.

“A degree in Applied Computational Physics will provide students with a strong level of motivation to solve complex computational problems in the different fields of physics, engineering, applied mathematics, and finance. It also opens a wide avenue to pursue graduate studies at any high-quality academic institution,” said Professor Roman Kezerashivili, Chair of the Physics Department.

Advanced courses developed specifically for the ACP major, such as Computational Dynamics, Machine Learning for Physics and Astronomy, and Computational Methods will help students build a readily usable toolbox of mathematical, problem-solving, and programming skills. Those will be put to the test in an internship/real research experience, another unique component of this program. This program-specific section of the curriculum will provide students with a diverse skill set to either proceed to graduate school, or to enter the job market and access careers in technology, engineering, data science, and financial sectors.

For more information about the ACP degree program, contact Professor Giovanni Ossola, program coordinator, at 718.260.5569 or by email at acpcoordinator@citytech.cuny.edu


KEVIN D. KIM APPOINTED TO CUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES BY GOVERNOR CUOMO; FIRST PERSON OF KOREAN DESCENT TO SERVE ON CUNY BOARD

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo named Manhattan attorney and small-business owner Kevin D. Kim to the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York effective July 1, 2017. He replaces Wellington Z. Chen, who served from 2000 to 2017.

Kim received a B.A. in East Asian Studies and a M.A. in sociology (organizational behavior) from Stanford University, both in 1993, and a JD from Columbia University School of Law in 1999, where he was an editor of the Columbia Law Review. He is an alumnus of the first graduating class of the “new” Townsend Harris High School at Queens College (1988). Professionally, he clerked for then-U.S. District Judge Denny Chin, worked as a corporate attorney at Davis Polk & Wardwell, and served as the deputy director of community affairs for Rep. Gary L. Ackerman. Kim was also an adjunct professor at Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Kim co-founded Tactile Brain LLC, which brought to the United States an innovative Korean mental math program designed by Master Jeonghee Lee, one of the world’s foremost mental mathematicians. The program aims to improve concentration, focus and confidence with numbers for people of all ages. He also was the first Asian-American to serve as a commissioner of the New York State Liquor Authority – from 2014 to 2016. Among other accomplishments, Kim was awarded a 2015 Ellis Island Medal of Honor by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations.

Kim is the third Asian and the first person of Korean descent to sit on the CUNY Board of Trustees. There were two previous trustees of Chinese descent, Wellington Chen and Thomas Tam, who became the first Asian board member in 1989.

“Kevin Kim brings a unique and welcome perspective to the CUNY Board, and we look forward to working with him,” said William C. Thompson Jr., chairperson of the Board of Trustees.

“This CUNY Board appointment means a lot to me personally,” said Kim. “As a proud product of the New York City public school system from kindergarten to high school, I know first-hand the critical role public education plays in the pursuit of the American Dream. Part of CUNY’s statutory mission – to be ‘a vehicle for the upward mobility of the disadvantaged in the City of New York’ – exemplifies what is so great about this city and country. During my term, I hope to secure even greater access and affordability to a world-class education for anyone in New York City who is willing to work hard for a better future for themselves and their families.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.


Finding Common Ground Through Art—Young Muslim Teacher Inspires and is Embraced by Young Israel of Queens Seniors

— Free Public Exhibition and Performance of Seniors’ Work from this Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College-Sponsored Program Takes Place June 30 —

FLUSHING, N.Y., June 27, 2017— A community arts engagement program at Young Israel of Queens Valley (YIQV) in Flushing that’s geared toward seniors has helped more than just the participants’ creativity flourish—it has fostered an unlikely friendship between a young Muslim teacher and a group of older women, most of whom are Jewish. The Creating Senses of Self through Poetry program has deepened the friendship between Queens College alumna Saira Chaudhry—who wears the hijab—and her students, who range in age from 65 to 90. Introduced in March 2017, the program is presented by Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College through a grant from the SU-CASA program.

Chaudhry, who has worked with the group since January 2016, notes that they made their first––and one of their most compelling––connections over her name. “When I introduced myself as Saira,” says Chaudhry, “many of the participants were pleasantly surprised because it is such an important name in the Hebrew faith, Sarah being the wife of Abraham.” What followed was a two-hour conversation on their religious commonalities and differences, during which Chaudhry and the seniors shared what the name means in their respective languages—“happy” and “traveler” in Arabic and “princess” in Hebrew.

SU-CASA community arts engagement programs place artists in senior centers across the five boroughs of New York City. The YIQV Creating Senses of Self Through Poetry program centers on the concept of word play and poetic themes with a visual art component. Chaudhry introduced a wide range of craft elements related to memoir-writing and teaches her students about different types of poetry, including spoken word and Haiku, figurative language, and how to identify poetic devices and the elements of a poem. The dozen participants—some who struggle with visual and physical disabilities—covered such themes as family, identity, nature, memory, love, time, wisdom, and loss in their work. A free public exhibition of performances of their work will take place at the YIQV center—located at 141-55 77 Avenue—on Friday, June 30, from 10 am to 12 noon.

“It’s a great program. I love Saira, we’ve become friends. She’s so helpful and has wonderful ideas,” says program participant Chaya Brandwein. Beverly Siller agrees. “Saira is an excellent teacher. The poetry was universal—it encompassed different types of countries and backgrounds and we learned from each other, as well as from the various different books. In addition, it connected us to each other.”

“We’ve connected on many different levels, but in particular through religion and culture—we’re all walking-talking stories,” says Chaudhry, who holds a bachelor’s degree with double majors in secondary education and English literature from Queens College. “Although we cover all forms of poetry, I wanted to make it culturally significant for my students, so I brought in a Hebrew poem for us to translate. This led to a discussion of the overlapping meanings of Arabic and Hebrew words, which I find fascinating.”

Chaudhry—who is Pakistani—and her students have also connected on the theme of food, with her students bringing in homemade baked goods. “We eat dates to break the Ramadan fast; they’re a food that I eat every day, and yet surprisingly, I was able to learn new and creative ways to use them from my students in recipes they shared,” says Chaudhry. Other cross-cultural topics they discussed included the similarities in dress codes among conservative Muslim and Jewish women.

The SU-CASA program, funded by the New York City Council—with support from Council Member Rory Lancman—began as SPARC: Seniors Partnering with Artists Citywide, which the Department of Cultural Affairs and the Department for the Aging developed and operated in partnership with the city’s five local arts councils. It is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Materials for the Arts also supports this program.

“It has been a privilege for me to partner with the Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College again this year to provide local seniors with quality arts programming,” says Council Member Lancman. “The expert instruction provided enables seniors to learn new skills and participate in engaging activities. I look forward to working with Kupferberg Center next year to ensure seniors have new opportunities to explore the arts.”

“Our seniors are grateful for the opportunity of having a poetry program at our center, thanks to a charismatic and talented instructor who was able to relate to our constituents. Saira had the teaching ability to develop creative poetry while making it pleasurable and educational for our membership,” says Alan Gombo, YIQV director. YIQV is a place where anyone over 60 can enjoy programs targeting diverse backgrounds and interests. Programming includes low-impact exercise sessions as well as arts and crafts and lectures on health, finance, safety, politics, and elder law.

Kupferberg Center for the Arts (KCA) is the largest multidisciplinary arts complex in Queens, which was named “Best place to visit in 2015” by Lonely Planet. With performances by world-class artists in our on-campus venues; regional and local talent in our off-site neighborhood performances; and professionally produced shows by Queens College’s students and faculty, KCA provides high-quality, accessible, and affordable cultural attractions to the Queens College community and the borough’s 2.3 million residents. In addition to the star-studded events that take place at its home at Queens College, Kupferberg Center connects the communities of Queens by presenting diverse programming throughout the borough. With over 50 free yearly concerts by international acts and exhibitions by local artists in many of our neighborhoods, KCA seeks to cross cultural boundaries and link the diverse populations of our borough as well as attract people from outside Queens to our parks, libraries, schools, and plazas. Visit www.kupferbergcenter.org for more information.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu

 

 


CUNY ENACTS BROAD SERIES OF REFORMS TO ENSURE FISCAL AND ETHICAL INTEGRITY OF ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

The Trustees of The City University of New York passed a sweeping package of reforms of the university’s governance and administrative policies, creating greater transparency and accountability and putting CUNY in the vanguard of reform efforts in higher education, Board Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr. and Chancellor James B. Milliken announced.

The changes are the product of an extensive review of administrative practices and financial management at CUNY led by Chancellor Milliken, in collaboration with the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, to address concerns raised by New York State Inspector General Catherine Leahy Scott.

In an interim report issued last year, the Inspector General recommended that “CUNY implement centralized spending policies to increase organization and uniformity of action and reduce the potential for fiscal mismanagement.” She also recommended that CUNY institute more “stringent controls over the relationships between all of CUNY-based foundations and their affiliates to ensure fiscal oversight of the foundation funds managed by the institutions.”

Chairperson Thompson said: “These important changes enacted by the Trustees, including more rigorous spending controls and a revamping of how CUNY foundations are managed, will help ensure the fiscal and ethical integrity of CUNY in all of its administrative operations.  I want to thank the Chancellor and his staff, as well as the trustees, who put considerable time into these reform efforts, placing CUNY at the forefront of good governance in higher education.”

Chancellor Milliken said: “These measures will have a positive impact on CUNY for many years by ensuring the university lives up to the highest administrative and ethical standards and allowing CUNY to focus on fulfilling its special mission for the people of New York. I am grateful to the trustees for their leadership in strongly supporting reforms that will help us realize our new vision of making CUNY even more accessible to New Yorkers, sharply improving the quality of the education and our graduation rates and making sure our graduates are well prepared for the demands of the workplace.”

Under the direction of Chancellor Milliken, the university’s staff reviewed administrative practices and financial management at CUNY. As part of this review, the staff, working closely with members of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, worked with the Inspector General to address the concerns she had identified. Additionally, the Inspector General met with the Board to discuss her findings, and her staff held training sessions with University staff.

These collaborative efforts have resulted in several changes already approved by the Board, including establishment of a standing Audit Committee and revised Procurement Guidelines for the university. The new reform package will further increase transparency, especially in spending and funding sources, establish an improved accountability structure, institute more stringent controls over relationships with outside foundations, help the operations of the University perform more productively and modernize the University’s Executive Compensation Plan.

Max Berger, president of the foundation at CUNY’s Baruch College, The Baruch College Fund, who helped negotiate the new guidelines along with Barry Bryer, chairperson of The Queens College Foundation, and Cathy Weinroth, chairperson of The Hunter College Foundation, said, “The foundations appreciate the recognition by the Chancellor, CUNY’s Trustees and the Inspector General of the essential role CUNY college foundations play in supporting and enhancing the educational mission of CUNY. We are pleased to have been able to help reach an agreement on revised financial and oversight guidelines that do not inhibit our foundations in fulfilling our important mission of support to our colleges and students.”

The reforms include:

  1. Revised college foundation guidelines – last revised in 2007, the guidelines have been updated to reflect changes in law and to strengthen requirements for governance, accountability, transparency and financial controls.
  2. CUNY will renegotiate its 1983 agreement with the Research Foundation to ensure oversight and compliance in fiscal and legal matters, increase transparency in operations and reporting and improve communications regarding policies and procedures.
  3. New vehicle policy to align the CUNY policy with State of New York policies and limit the use of fleet vehicles to an as-needed basis, significantly reducing the size of the University fleet and redirecting the savings to core mission activities.
  4. A new policy on the use and reporting of non-tax levy funds by college presidents.
  5. The Executive Compensation Plan has been changed to eliminate compensation for Chancellor Emeritus and to adjust salary ranges for managerial employees along the same lines that the collectively bargained employees were adjusted last year.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Hostos In The New York Times

Commencement may have signaled the end of the school year, but that doesn’t mean that academic activity on campus came to a stop; students merely slipped into sandals and shorts and signed up for a wealth of fun—but challenging—summer courses. Some of those courses are part of CUNY Start, which provides intensive preparation in academic reading/writing, pre-college math, and “college success” advisement for students entering CUNY with significant remedial needs. It’s a program that’s playing a significant role in rewriting the game book for remedial learning.

Jessica Mingus, director of CUNY Start at Hostos, was prominently featured in a New York Times article. “Ending the Curse of Remedial Math,” written by David L. Kirp, appeared in the June 10th edition of the paper. Kirp examined the ways in which CUNY Start is improving the math skills—and, therefore, the chances of graduating—at Hostos and other CUNY schools…and beyond. Kirp writes of CUNY Start:  “Its track record shows that, with good teaching and I-have-your-back counseling, youths who otherwise would likely drop out have a solid shot at making it.” Hostos Math Instructor Erica Fells was also quoted in Kirp’s article. It’s heartening to see Jessica and Erica’s superlative work so widely celebrated.

Read full New York Times Article here.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, week of June 26, 2017

 

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Here We Are: We have reached the final days of our 2016-17 school year! I am so proud of our K-12 school community and grateful for the Students, Teachers, Faculty and Families whose collaborative commitment to every NEST+m student has made our 2016-17 school year so successful.

This week’s schedule:

  • Monday June 26: School Closed— Eid al-Fitr
  • Tuesday June 27: Full instructional Day
  • Wednesday June 28: Half Day; students released at 11:30am

Please know that end-of-year report cards/transcripts will be provided on Wednesday. For any family that is unable to receive this in person, please be in touch with Parent Coordinator Melissa Hernandez, MHernandez92@schools.nyc.gov.

As you know, this summer we are engaging in a shared Summer Reading Text, I Am Malala. Parents/Families — please join our school-wide conversation by reading this text too.

When we return in the Fall our students will engage in cross-grade, interdisciplinary text-based conversation.Our differentiated summer reading assignments are attached to this message:

On a separate note, congratulations to the NEST+m Math team for their individual and collective success during their final competition of the 2016-17 school year. On June 10th students from grades 3-6 were award winners at the Stevens Math Olympiad at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey. More than 300 students participated from grades 3-12 from New York and New Jersey. Winners from 3rd grade to 6th grade include: Anish Sundraraj (3rd grade-2nd place); Harrison Zhang (4th grade-3rd place); Patrick Allen Eleazar (5th grade-1st place); Nada Hameed (6th grade-2nd place); Julia Kozak (6th grade-1st place); and Daphne Qin (6th grade-2nd place). We are proud of these Mathematicians and their accomplishments.

Parents, Families: Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

We hope that your summer is filled with great fun and continued exploration!

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


CUNY NAMES PETER M. COHEN AS INTERIM PRESIDENT OF KINGSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

The City University of New York today named Peter M. Cohen as interim president of Kingsborough Community College following the recent announcement that Farley Herzek, the president since 2014, is retiring. Cohen will serve while the Board of Trustees conducts a search for a permanent replacement.

Cohen has been Kingsborough’s Vice President of Student Affairs since 2014 and has served in a variety of student-service capacities since 1987.

“We’re lucky to have someone from Kingsborough’s own family who can step seamlessly into the top leadership post,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Vice President Cohen’s deep experience with the needs and aspirations of Kingsborough’s students and faculty will provide an essential bridge to the next administration.”

“Peter Cohen brings a keen, student-centered orientation to the post of interim president, which will serve the students and faculty well during this transitional period,” said William C. Thompson Jr., chairperson of CUNY’s Board of Trustees.

As vice president for student affairs, Cohen has implemented science, technology, engineering and math initiatives and managed innovative enrollment programs.  He has overseen a broad range of services, including disability services, counseling, career development, athletics and veteran affairs.

Earlier, Cohen developed the Freshman Year Experience Program and managed freshman services. These efforts provided new and continuing students, in both day and evening divisions, timely and useful advice about courses, programs, careers and the adjustment to college life. He began his professional life as a psychiatric social worker at Coney Island Hospital, providing individual, family and group psychotherapy as well as educational and preventive outreach to the community. He has a bachelor’s degree in English from New York University and a master’s degree from NYU’s School of Social Work.

Under the leadership of retiring President Herzek, Kingsborough launched the innovative AssistMe app, designed to help first-year students keep on track with information about financial aid, academic support, food and housing assistance, residency, child care and, if needed, provide an easy way to contact people who could address problems and help them succeed. An educator with wide experience in K-12 schools and higher education, President Herzek exemplifies the CUNY success story. He is a Brooklyn native and the son of a Holocaust survivor – the first in his family to graduate from college – and a graduate of New York City public schools, who earned his B.S. degree from The City College of New York.

Kingsborough prides itself on promoting student learning and development as well as strengthening and serving a highly diverse borough. It offers a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into the workforce. Serving approximately 16,000 full- and part-time students annually in credit- and non-credit bearing courses in liberal arts and career education, Kingsborough also serves an additional 20,000 students in its expanding continuing education and workforce development programs on- and off-campus.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, the University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, the William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, the CUNY Graduate School and University Center, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, the CUNY School of Law, the CUNY School of Professional Studies and the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students.  College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Climate Change and National Security: New Study Suggests Americans Willing to Modify Voting and Lifestyle Decisions

Climate Change and National Security: New Study Suggests Americans Willing to Modify Voting and Lifestyle Decisions

New York, NY, June 20, 2017 – Researchers from the Center on Terrorism at John Jay College of Criminal Justice reported new data concerning how the American public views the relationship between climate change and security.  Working with GfK Custom Research, LLC (GfK), the study’s authors,  Professor Charles B. Strozier and Research Fellow Kelly A. Berkell, designed questions to begin quantifying public familiarity with the idea of climate change as a security threat, along with the potential impact that increased or changed awareness might exert on individual lifestyle and voting decisions.

Findings of the Public Perceptions of Climate Change and Security report suggest that the public – even those who believe that climate change is happening and that human actions are causing or contributing to it – remains largely unfamiliar with the idea of a connection between climate change and security.  About 38 percent of all respondents, and 42 percent of those who think human-caused climate change is occurring, expressed familiarity with the general idea that climate change may multiply global threats such as political violence or mass migrations, or act as a catalyst for conflict.  Even fewer, only about 14 percent of all respondents, had ever heard or read that a severe drought in Syria, likely caused or worsened by climate change, was one of many factors that helped spark the initial conflict that continues there today.

Nevertheless, respondents indicated openness to changes in behavior if they came to believe that climate change and security were causally interrelated.  Participants reported the greatest willingness to take action if U.S. national security, rather than global security, were at stake.  Taking an inclusive approach to “openness,” encompassing “definitely,” “probably,” and “maybe” responses, researchers found that 90 percent of those who think human-climate change is happening were open to modifying their voting priorities, and 93 percent were open to seriously considering lifestyle changes, if they perceived a threat to national security.  When excluding “maybe” responses, willingness to “probably” or “definitely” adapt behavior along the same lines measured at 66 percent and 67 percent among those who think that human-caused climate change is occurring.

While the national security and intelligence communities, as well as academic researchers, have explored the connections between climate change and security for years, relatively little priorresearch has probed public perceptions in this area.  The new data could hold significant implications for climate change communication, particularly if reinforced and expanded upon by further research.

The survey was conducted using the web-enabled KnowledgePanel®, a probability-based panel designed to be representative of the U.S. population, and fielded to 1002 male and female adults.  GfK weighted the interviews to ensure accurate and reliable representation of the total population.  The margin of error on weighted data is plus or minus three percentage points.  This research was supported by the Research Foundation of the City University of New York.
The Center on Terrorism was launched in late 2001 after the September 11 attacks. The goals of the Center are to study terrorism conceptually in ways that are familiar and appropriate for a university and to identify the practical applications of that knowledge in the search for alternative forms of human security. Such a blend of scholarship and commitment is particularly relevant for John Jay College, the leading institution in the country in the field of criminal justice and public safety, and one of the few institutions to offer M.A. students a certificate in the critical study of terrorism.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.


NYC Mayor’s Roadmap to Closing Rikers Island: President Travis Named to Advisory Group

 NYC Mayor’s Roadmap to Closing Rikers Island: President Travis Named to Advisory Group

Jeremy Travis, President of John Jay College, was named as a member of the Research and Learning Advisory Group to help implement the roadmap to closing Rikers Island. Mayor de Blasio launched the “Smaller, Safer, Fairer: A Roadmap to Closing Rikers Island,” 18 concrete steps the City is taking now to make it possible to close Rikers Island and replace it with a smaller network of modern, safe, and humane facilities. As noted in the announcement from the Office of the Mayor. The initiative includes a roadmap, a Justice Implementation Task Force, and $30 million in new investments to drive progress towards closing Rikers Island.

To ensure effective implementation of the roadmap, the Justice Implementation Task Force will coordinate the work of the many groups inside and outside of government, including government agencies, service providers, and community representatives, that are vital to achieving a smaller, safer and fairer jail system. Working groups will focus on safely reducing the jail population; improving culture for both staff and incarcerated individuals; and designing and siting safe, modern and humane jails. The Research and Learning Advisory Group includes President Travis, Bruce Western, Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Professor of Criminal Justice, Harvard Kennedy School, and Emily Wang, Assistant Professor at the Yale School of Medicine and Co-Founder of the Transitions Clinic Network.

“Closing the jails on Rikers Island is an important milestone in the work to improve fairness in New York City’s criminal justice system,” said President Travis. “New York City has already made great strides in reducing crime and incarceration, and I look forward to working with the Justice Implementation Task Force to reduce both even further as we implement the plan to close Rikers Island.”

Read the complete announcement from the Office of the Mayor.

Read Closing Rikers: Statement by President Travis


Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation Supports Center for Policing Equity’s Leap Program

Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation Supports Center for Policing Equity’s Leap Program

On Tuesday June 20, President Travis, First Deputy Police Commissioner Benjamin Tucker, Dr. Phillip Goff, Joanne Hill, and members of the Hill family gathered at John Jay to dedicate a lecture hall in memory of Joanne’s father, alumnus Arthur Hill, and celebrate a generous gift from the Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation to support the Leadership in Empowering Advocates Program (LEAP), through the Center for Policing Equity (CPE).

View a photo gallery of the dedication event.

Arthur Hill ’66, MPA ’73, was a prominent John Jay College alumnus, having received both his B.A. and M.P.A. from the College. Through his 27 years of exemplary service in the New York Police Department, he left an indelible mark on the community. He retired as Assistant Chief Inspector in 1973, and over the years received numerous awards, commendations, and citations for his law enforcement work and community service.

Arthur HillDuring the course of the ceremony, thoughtful remarks by Travis, Tucker, and Goff reminded the audience of the fragile time period during which Hill served – the late 60s and 70s when the city was torn by racial tension and desperately in need of compassionate leadership within the police department and local communities. Hill, one of the very first graduates of John Jay College and among the first African Americans to hold a leadership position in the NYPD, set the example for that type of leader.

Commissioner Tucker, also an alumnus, BS ’77, described the moment he first encountered Hill back in the 60s, when he was a young officer on desk duty at the 81st precinct in Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. When Hill marched in to take over as commanding officer, cigar in hand and a look of determination on his face, Tucker said, “It blew my mind. Knowing that we were going to have a black man as Assistant Chief was extraordinary.”

Joanne Hill, a trustee of the Arthur and Patricia Hill Foundation, said she first conceived of the idea of memorializing her father at John Jay five years ago, when she ran into President Travis in their home neighborhood of DUMBO. The feeling of finally seeing his name up on the wall was “Unbelievable,” she said. “I can’t even explain how exciting it is.” She added that being able to support the College and the CPE’s new LEAP initiative was the perfect fit. “It’s a very happy time for the Hills.”

The CPE works collaboratively with law enforcement, communities, and political stakeholders to identify ways to strengthen relationships with the communities they serve. Dr. Goff, the inaugural Franklin A. Thomas Professor in Policing Equity at John Jay, is the co-founder and president of the CPE, and an expert in contemporary forms of racial bias and discrimination, as well as the intersections of race and gender. He describes justice as a second language, and said, “One of the major goals for CPE is developing a language that helps both my generation and the next generation make sense of where we ended up.”

Arthur HillThe CPE is the largest think tank in the world that looks at race and policing, and will implement the LEAP initiative to train students through research and experiential learning to allow them to become champions of justice. Said Goff, “We’re hoping the LEAP program allows us to get really committed, talented young folks who want to come in and get exposure to how justice is being produced, so they can help us do that better.”

Interested students can get involved by applying for a paid internship with LEAP, and they can also volunteer in the lab or take an independent study for credit.

“A lifelong fierce advocate for justice, Arthur Hill embodied John Jay’s core values as he helped to shape a better New York City for all,” said Joanne Hill. “By providing support for the LEAP initiative, we are helping Dr. Goff provide an incredible and practical learning experience for John Jay students who are committed to being leaders in the field of criminal and social justice reform.”


Attorneys Muhammad Faridi ’04 and Brendan McGuire Join the John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees

Attorneys Muhammad Faridi ’04 and Brendan McGuire Join the John Jay College Foundation Board of Trustees

On May 25, the Board of Trustees of the John Jay College Foundation elected two new members: Muhammad Faridi and Brendan R. McGuire.

Muhammad Faridi ’04, is currently a partner at the law firm Patterson Belknap. Faridi’s journey began when he was seven years old and came to the U.S. from Pakistan. Faridi understood that in order to succeed in his new country he would need to master the English language. This determination led him at the age of 18, to take a job as a cab driver so that he could listen to CDs to improve his English. Faridi says that a life changing moment was when he gave a ride to a former U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, who through the course of the cab ride inspired him to become a lawyer. Shortly after, he enrolled at John Jay, graduating in 2004, and later graduated from CUNY School of Law in 2007. He went on to become the recipient of the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 Outstanding Young Lawyer Award for having rendered outstanding service to both the community and the legal profession. Faridi has also received The Legal Aid Society’s Pro Bono Publico Award for multiple years, MFY Legal Services, Inc.’s Partner in Justice Award, the Brooklyn Bar Association Volunteer Lawyers Project’s TD Bank Champion of Justice Award, and has been recognized for multiple years as a Rising Star in the New York-Metro edition of Super Lawyers. From 2007 to 2008, Faridi served as a Law Clerk to the Hon. Jack B. Weinstein of the United States District Court, Eastern District of New York. At John Jay’s Law Day on March 24, Faridi talked about his experience as a young immigrant and the struggle to stay true to oneself: “I loved working at my firm and representing my corporate clients, but I also felt an obligation to the community that I came from… So how do I measure my success as a lawyer and as a human being? I measure it in terms of the people I have helped.”

Brendan R. McGuire is a lawyer at the firm WilmerHale, where he advises clients on issues related to white-collar enforcement, as well as money laundering, national security, cybersecurity and privacy, and export controls and economic sanctions. Said McGuire, “I am delighted to be a part of such a distinguished group that serves such a worthy institution.  I very much look forward to it.”  An accomplished trial lawyer and litigator, he joined the firm after serving for more than 10 years in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York.  During his tenure, McGuire was appointed to lead the two most sensitive units within the Southern District’s Criminal Division. First, he served as Chief of the Public Corruption Unit for three years, and then as Chief of the Terrorism and International Narcotics Unit. McGuire handled some of the most significant terrorism cases within the Department of Justice, including the 2009 kidnapping of Captain Richard Phillips by Somali pirates on the Indian Ocean, the 2010 prosecution of Faisal Shahzad for the attempted bombing of Times Square, and the 2011 prosecution of Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout for conspiring to kill Americans.  He also clerked for the Honorable Peter K. Leisure of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. McGuire graduated from Williams College in 1998 and earned his law degree at New York University School of Law in 2002.


Two Guttman Professors Honored as Outstanding Educators of the Year

Guttman Professors Karla Smith Fuller (L) and Lori Ungemah.

Karla Smith Fuller, Assistant Professor of Biology, and Lori Ungemah, Assistant Professor of English, were among the Outstanding Educators of the Year 2017. They were honored at Education Update’s annual awards ceremony held June 23 at the Harvard Club.


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN

“For decades, it has been a matter of pride and policy that The City University of New York has been among the most inclusive universities in the country, welcoming and benefiting enormously from our diversity, which includes every underrepresented group and especially the LGBT community. CUNY and the university community have been solid supporters of what was initially called gay liberation, and, more recently, for marriage equality, on behalf of our students, faculty and staff, for our city and for our country. Our classrooms explore our changing society and the struggle to realize our country’s promise of freedom for all, our campuses offer a rich array of services and support to all of our students, and our students have created vibrant LGBT organizations across our campuses that recognize and promote their valuable role in the success of our mission.

“In a significant new step, CUNY’s Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy announced this week its leadership role in a federally funded, $7.5 million collaboration with Albert Einstein College of Medicine and The Rockefeller University aimed at preventing HIV transmission and ending the AIDS pandemic. CUNY will design strategies to create, deliver and scale up evidence-based programs for preventing and treating HIV infection, regardless of socioeconomic, racial and ethnic background.

“CUNY joins all of New York in recognizing the immense contributions of our LGBT community and celebrating the rich diversity of our great university and the city. It is one of the great sources of our pride and, we all hope, yours as well.”

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Middle States Grants Accreditation to the College

Stella and Charles Guttman Community College of The City University of New York is now accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104. (267-284-5000) The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

The College’s multiyear accreditation process began with the draft submission of an accreditation readiness report (ARR) in 2013 and then the final ARR submission in 2014, with advancement to candidate status and approval to proceed to self-study. The College then moved to the design of a self-study (2015) and the production of a full self-study 2016–2017 report. The self-study culminated with an evaluation team visit in late March 2017 and the Middle States Commission’s vote on June 22, 2017, to grant accreditation to Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

In addition to its vote to grant accreditation, the Commission requested a monitoring report, due September 1, 2018, documenting further evidence to meet certain standards. Based on the monitoring report, the Commission may schedule a small team visit to the College following the submission of the report. The next evaluation visit is scheduled for 2020-2021.


President Cruz’s “Students First” Leadership Hailed by the Gates Foundation

President José Luis Cruz was hailed for his innovative leadership of Herbert H. Lehman College, part of The City University of New York in a Huffington Post article by a top official in the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The piece, written by Allan Golston, the President of U.S. Program at the Gates Foundation, praises Lehman College as “a bright example of a higher institution that listens—and responds—to the needs of students particularly from low-income backgrounds.”

As evidence of the College’s ability to realize its mission, Golston cites the recent Equality of Opportunity Project (published in The New York Times) that ranked Lehman fourth in the nation for moving students up the economic ranks and into the middle class.

Golston credits President Cruz for his leadership style that puts “students first.” Since arriving at Lehman in August 2016, President Cruz has worked to improve student success and supported the innovative work of the College’s outstanding faculty—such as investing in the expansion of service hours to accommodate student needs and celebrating Lehman’s GenChem flipped classroom program, which has resulted in a 50 percent increase in pass rates. President Cruz has also sought to address long-term solutions for the community’s needs, especially his ambitious 90×30 program, which would double the number of high quality, market-ready degrees and certificates to 90,000 by 2030.

What’s more, Golston acknowledges President Cruz’s personal connection to the many challenges Lehman students face. He writes how he was captivated by President Cruz’s insights at a New America panel discussion on higher education last month in Washington D.C. and later learned of President Cruz’s discussion of his own academic struggles as a child attending public school in Florida after his family moved there from Puerto Rico. For Cruz, a defining moment came when his first grade teacher told him in his native Spanish, “I’ll help you.” That encouragement made all the difference in the world to him.

“Throughout his professional career, Cruz dedicated himself to carrying that promise forward—to listen to students and help them on their path,” writes Golston. “That mindset is an integral part of Lehman’s culture, approach, and recent successes.” Golston concluded, “I applaud the work of Lehman College and encourage other institutions to follow their lead in thinking big and helping all students succeed.”


Enjoy Free, Live Music—Complemented by a Waterfront View—in Queens This Summer at “Live at the Gantries”

— Kupferberg Center for the Arts Announces Live at the Gantries 2017,
Tuesdays at 7:00 pm from July 11 – August 29 at Gantry Plaza State Park —

Queens, N.Y., June 19, 2017—Enjoy free, live music complemented by a waterfront view along the East River this summer at the Gantry Plaza State Park “Live at the Gantries” series. These outdoor performances, which will take place on Tuesdays at 7 pm from July 11 through August 29, will feature Queens-based musicians that mirror the borough’s legendary diversity. The 2017 Season line-up includes jazz standards, blues, Afro-Cuban, country and Peruvian folk music.

Gantry Plaza State Park is a 10-acre oasis located between 49th and 50th Avenues along the East River in Queens. The end of each show is scheduled to coincide with sunset at the park.

Live at the Gantries is presented by Kupferberg Center for the Arts, the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, and Queens Theatre. It is sponsored by Plaxall, the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, and NYC City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer.

The Live at the Gantries 2017 Full Performance Schedule

JULY 11:                D.B. Reilly: Country Zydeco, Blues

JULY 18:               Alex Cummings Ensemble: Straight-ahead jazz

JULY 25:               Conjunto Guantanamo: Afro-Cuban jazz ensemble

AUGUST 1:           Samba New York! Brazilian music and dance with a little capoeira to liven things up

AUGUST 8:           Dance Entropy: Modern dance adapted for family audiences

AUGUST 15:         High and Mighty Brass Band: New Orleans-style jazz

AUGUST 22:         Dan Martin Ensemble: Standards, jazz

AUGUST 29:         Inkarayku: Peruvian folk music

Event Information and Directions
Live at the Gantries is free and open to the public.

Subway: 7 train to Vernon/Jackson (first stop in Queens). Walk west toward the river on 50th Avenue.

Ferry: East River Ferry to Hunter’s Point. Walk north on 2nd Street.

More information is available at www.kupferbergcenter.org or by calling the Kupferberg Center box office at 718-793-8080.

About Kupferberg Center for the Arts
Kupferberg Center for the Arts comprises eight distinguished institutions at Queens College that offer outstanding programming in music, dance, drama, literature, and the visual arts. Since 1961 Kupferberg Center Performances has provided accessible and affordable world-class cultural entertainment to the New York City region. From classical and pop performances, to concerts and school residencies for children in kindergarten through high school, to a wide range of family events, over 350,000 individuals attend events at Kupferberg Center for the Arts each year. Located on the campus of Queens College, we are easily accessible from the Long Island Expressway at Exit 23 & 24.

Follow
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KupferbergCenterArts and facebook.com
Twitter Handle: @KupferbergArts
Website: www.kupferbergcenter.org

Media Contact
Jennifer Zanca
Director, External Affairs and Audience Development
Kupferberg Center for the Arts
jennifer.zanca@qc.cuny.edu

 


Macaulay Honors College Class of 2017 Commencement Highlights

(l-r) William Macaulay, Garry Trudeau, Dean Mary C. Pearl and alumni speaker Ayodele Oti

The Class of 2017 proudly celebrated the end of their years of scholarship at Macaulay Honors College at The City University of New York on June 12, 2017. A highlight of their commencement was the keynote speaker Garry Trudeau, creator of the Doonesbury comic strip and the first such artist to win a Pulitzer Prize. Trudeau also received a Honorary Doctor of Letters degree following his address.

Said Macaulay Dean Mary C. Pearl, Ph.D.: “With a keen eye and sharp sense of humor, Trudeau has tackled difficult subjects ranging from mental health to military intervention to the battle lines of personal and political conflict that have challenged our society over the past five decades. His thoughtful approach, his sensitivity, and his deep civic engagement exemplify Macaulay’s highest ideals.”

Among the other noteworthy speakers was William Thompson, the new Chairman of the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York; student speakers Stephin Jose (City College) and Aissatou Diallo (Hunter College); and alumna Ayodele Oti ’12 (City College).

Macaulay’s commencement this year took place at the United Palace Theater in Upper Manhattan and accommodated hundreds of graduates and their families. Performers and music for the ceremony included the Lehman College Wind Ensemble and The Macaulet Triplets singing group. Macaulay seniors also were selected as valedictorians and salutatorians at their home campus, including:

Valedictorians

Ellianna Schwab (City College)

Palwasha Syar (CSI)

Daniela Mikhaylov and Rina Schiller (Hunter)

Caitlin Larsen (Baruch College)

Salutatorians:
Michael Franco (Brooklyn)

Naomi Gaggi and Vincent Jost (CSI)

About Macaulay Honors College

Macaulay Honors College at The City University of New York offers exceptional students a uniquely personalized education with access to the vast resources of the nation’s largest urban university and the largest city, New York City. Selected for their top high school records and leadership potential, Macaulay students receive a full tuition scholarship*, a laptop and technology support, and exclusive access to apply for grants from a Macaulay fund to pursue global learning, research and service opportunities. Macaulay students enroll in one of eight CUNY senior colleges: Baruch, Brooklyn, City, Hunter, John Jay, Lehman, and Queens Colleges and the College of Staten Island. For more information, see macaulay.cuny.edu.

*Students must meet CUNY NYS residency requirements for in-state tuition to receive the Macaulay tuition scholarship.

Contact: marcomm@mhc.cuny.edu

 

 


BWRC Conference Focuses on Moving Goods and People Along the Brooklyn Waterfront

City Tech’s Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center (BWRC) held its first-ever full day conference at the Brooklyn Borough Hall on March 31, with support from the New York City Economic Development Corporation and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. The conference explored the challenges of “Moving Goods and People to, from, and along the Brooklyn Waterfront” with panels and keynote speaker Congressman Jerrold Nadler.

l to r: Hanley, Nadler, Kamga

The conference opened with introductions by City Tech Professor Richard Hanley, BWRC director, and Camille Kamga of the University Transportation Research Center. BWRC project coordinator Inna Guzenfeld provided a historical overview, followed by Christopher Clott, of SUNY Maritime College, who outlined New York’s shipping and maritime context. The morning panel, titled “Moving Goods Along the Brooklyn Waterfront” assembled a group of industry professionals, with strong representation from Red Hook. 

Robert Hughes of Erie Basin Bargeport, Michael Stamatis of the Red Hook Container Terminal, and Gregory Brayman of Phoenix Beverages all emphasized the importance of retaining an active port in Brooklyn. Council Member Carlos Menchaca discussed strategies to preserve manufacturing jobs in Southwest Brooklyn. Panelists also raised the issues of waterfront zoning and conflicts between residential development and maritime use. Edward Kelly who heads the Maritime Association of the Port of NY-NJ, moderated the discussion.

Keynote speaker Congressman Jerrold Nadler, a longtime supporter of the working waterfront, spoke about the Cross-Harbor Rail Tunnel. Congressman Nadler cited a startling statistic: Over 40 percent of freight moves by rail in Midwestern cities, but in the New York region, which is highly truck-dependent, rail accounts for less than one percent of all goods movement. Congressman Nadler alluded to the environmental impacts of trucking and the need for cleaner, more sustainable ports. 

Afternoon panel discussions focused on passenger transportation and included representatives of two community groups, Alan Minor of Neighbors Allied for Good Growth and Ryan Chavez of UPROSE; and two others from larger organizations: Eliot Matz from the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation and Andrew Hoan from the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce. The panelists discussed the need for resilient transit that serves community needs, while responding to climate change on the Brooklyn waterfront. Eliot Matz revealed that the Brooklyn Navy Yard expects to be housing 20,000 jobs by 2020, and outlined the Yard’s plan to provide greater mobility for employees.

Another panel discussed the roles that different modes play in moving people to, from, and along the Brooklyn waterfront and how (semi) private transportation can supplement public transit. Providing a truly multi-modal perspective was Dani Simons, of Motivate, which operates CitiBike; Franny Civitano, of NYC Ferry by Hornblower; Adam Giambrone, who directs the Brooklyn Queens Connector (BQX) project; and Matthew Daus, the former Taxi & Limousine Commissioner and expert on Transportation Networking Companies.

The closing discussion and Q&A, moderated by Roland Lewis of the Waterfront Alliance, included the BQX, which led to a lively discussion about funding, development, and resiliency. Attendees also raised the issue of community involvement in the rollout of new transportation modes, such as ferries and streetcars. Richard Hanley announced the topic for next year’s conference: coastal resiliency along the Brooklyn waterfront.

Brooklyn Eagle Article 1
Brooklyn Eagle Article 2


The National Network for Safe Communities Hosts National Conference on “Race, History, and Policing”

The National Network for Safe Communities Hosts National Conference on "Race, History, and Policing"

New York, NY, June 13, 2017 – The National Network for Safe Communities (NNSC) is hosting its third national conference at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice on June 15 and 16, 2017. More than three hundred national and international stakeholders and practitioners will convene to showcase innovations in violence prevention and trust building, discuss new research from the field, and build relationships among peers.

In recent years, calls for equity, dignity, and fairness in the criminal justice system have grown in both force and substance, elevating this issue to the level of national discourse. To reflect this movement, the theme of this conference will be “Race, History and Policing: A New Vision for Public Safety.” The first plenary session will feature a frank conversation between prominent police executives and community organizers. They will address the ways police departments and communities can forge a path, on equal footing, towards reconciliation, thus bolstering legitimacy, and enhancing public safety.

Over the course of the two-day event, conversations will cover a range of topics, including harnessing community action to reduce violence, tailoring support and outreach to those at the highest risk of offending or victimization, developing frameworks for police-community reconciliation, and addressing the harm caused by certain criminal justice practices. There will also be a special screening of “The Force,” a documentary film that follows the Oakland Police Department during a tumultuous three-year period.

“Criminal justice reform is at the heart of America’s renewed civil rights movement,” said NNSC Director David Kennedy. “We can’t get that right without being honest about the nation’s history of oppressing communities of color through the law and policing—and making a real commitment to owning that and correcting it going forward. We’re tremendously excited about this national convening of people—police, other criminal justice actors, community representatives, service providers, advocates, and others—to get this right, and together produce the kind of public safety and police-community relationships our communities deserve.”

Although the registration deadline for the event has passed, many of the conference panels will be livestreamed—to tune in, visit the NNSC website on Thursday and Friday beginning at 9:00 AM EST. Videos from the conference will also be posted to the NNSC YouTube channel. To follow the proceedings on Twitter, follow @NNSCommunities.

The National Network for Safe Communities, a project of John Jay College of Criminal Justice, was launched in 2009 under the direction of Kennedy and John Jay College President Jeremy Travis. The National Network focuses on supporting cities implementing proven strategic interventions to reduce violence and improve public safety, minimize arrest and incarceration, strengthen communities, and improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities it serves. For more information, please contact the NNSC’s Heather Conley at hconley@jjay.cuny.edu.


Huffington Post Hails President Cruz’s Leadership of Lehman College

In some ways, the end of a graduation ceremony marks a fork in the road for the people on stage. The students head off to careers, further education, and life beyond college, putting their hard-earned diplomas to good use. The college presidents, deans, and other academic leaders return to the work of planning, teaching, challenging, supporting—and getting more of their students to walk across that same stage the following year.

Given the evolving profile of today’s college students, effective higher ed leaders know the importance of listening to students—and to the data. Listening unlocks insights that allow leaders to reimagine how to serve the needs of all students, not just the so-called “traditional” students who enroll immediately after high school, live on campus, and take classes full-time. While our nation continues to struggle with persistent, national achievement gaps in higher ed—including by income and by race—there are several pioneering institutions and leaders who are transforming how they operate with the goal of widening the bridge to opportunity for their students.

For example, I was struck by the insights of Lehman College’s President José Luis Cruz at a recent New America panel discussion on higher education. Lehman College—a college of The City University of New York (CUNY)—is a bright example of a higher education institution that listens—and responds—to the needs of students, particularly those from low-income backgrounds, students of color, and those who are the first in their family to go to college.

Lehman College’s social mobility rate—that is, the rate at which students move up the economic ladder—was recently ranked 4th nationally by the Equality of Opportunity Project. But it wasn’t until I heard President Cruz’s own story about how an educator listening and supporting him changed his life trajectory that I understood the motivation that drives him.

As a young child, Cruz moved from Puerto Rico to Florida with his family so his father could work at a telephone company. Cruz’s English was poor, and he struggled in the classroom. To avoid humiliation, he hid and kept quiet. It got to the point where Cruz, as a first-grade student, decided he wouldn’t return to school.

Thankfully, his mother convinced him to give it another shot. After he returned to his first-grade classroom, Cruz’s peers laughed at him when he couldn’t quite find the right word. During a particularly embarrassing incident, Cruz remembered wanting to walk away again until his teacher hugged him and, in broken Spanish, made him a promise: “I’ll help you.”

Throughout his professional career, Cruz dedicated himself to carrying that promise forward—to listen to students and help them on their path. That mindset is an integral part of Lehman’s culture, approach, and recent successes. Many Lehman students—like college students nationwide—have competing responsibilities such as full- or part-time jobs, lengthy commutes to campus, and partners or children. These students are hungry to succeed, but busy schedules mean getting to campus is challenging and they may need some additional academic help.

Guided by these insights, Lehman expanded their hours of operation and identified gateway courses where students struggled. Gen Chem, where the passing rate was only 35 percent, was one such course that often delayed or derailed student progress. In 2015, Lehman took an innovative approach that allowed faculty to flip the course from a three-hour-a-week lecture to two hours of online courses and an hour-long workshop.

The new model allowed students to complete most of their work from anywhere—including engaging in instructor-made videos and podcasts; viewing and downloading materials online; and completing homework assignments. Then, during class time, instructors use digital tools to quiz students on content in real-time.

Throughout the course, Lehman kept listening—to students, to faculty, and to the data. “Flipping” the course to provide more flexible digital options proved not only popular—with 90 percent of students approving of the new model, it worked. Instructors saw that students were often watching the at-home videos multiple times and rewinding back to key parts. Most importantly, the passing rate soared from 35 percent to more than 85 percent.

Cruz is rightly encouraged when these types of innovations help more students be successful, but he knows there’s still much work to be done. Just recently, Lehman College announced an ambitious goal to double the number of students receiving high-quality degrees and credentials to 90,000 by 2030.

Cruz’s commitment to expanding opportunity isn’t limited to Lehman’s students either. As a member of a consortium that exchanges data and best practices, Lehman College shares knowledge and best practices with other institutions that similarly take a student-centric approach so they can learn successful strategies from each other.

While institutions vary, the importance of listening, innovating, collaborating and measuring is universal. Strong leaders apply these principals to every facet of an institution’s work. They create a student-centered culture that uses new approaches, tools, and information to keep a simple commitment to each hardworking student—“I’ll help you.”

I applaud the work of Lehman College and encourage other institutions to follow their lead in thinking big and helping all students succeed.

—Allan Golston, President of U.S. Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (originally published in The Huffington Post).


BMCC Students Show Business Acumen at Goldman Sachs Final Challenge

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students participated in a number of external volunteer opportunities, internships and also real world training exercises throughout the past academic year.One group of students took part in the Goldman Sachs Local College Collaborative Program, a six-month exercise where teams from select colleges are assigned a Business Case Challenge and the team’s decisions impact a hypothetical corporation.

BMCC, along with student teams from Hudson County Community College, New Jersey City University and St. Peter’s University, participated in the program, which took place from November 2016 through May 2017.

Students on each team assumed a corporate role such as chief executive officer, chief financial officer or marketing and branding according to Won Kang, Director of the Center for Career Development at BMCC.

This year’s Business Case Challenge culminated on May 5 at Goldman Sachs global headquarters in New York when team members took the stage and made their final business strategy presentations before a mock board of directors.

Among the questions the teams considered were, “How will results be measured and communicated to shareholders?” “How do you boost employee morale in the face of economic challenges?”

The BMCC team’s corporation was a multinational technology company that designs, develops and sells consumer electronics, computer software and online services.

For its final presentation, the BMCC team developed a plan to circumvent a business crisis in which news about the company’s groundbreaking, solar-powered mobile phone had been leaked to the media before its much anticipated, and highly promoted launch date.

Team members had to devise damage control tactics and come up with a plan that would still build excitement and buzz around the company and its new product.

As Computer Science major Babatunde Ogunniyi made his way with the other students to the auditorium before the presentation, he said one of the skills he and his teammates strengthened during the course of the program was how to put aside personality differences and work as a unit for the greater goal, the product’s success.

“At the end of the day, you have to make everybody mesh, and use everyone’s best ideas for the group,” said Ogunniyi.

BMCC was the first team among the four schools to present. Presentations were made before a mock board made up by Goldman Sachs company officers, including managing directors. Each student spoke about a specific component of the proposal. After each team had completed its presentation, the mock board offered candid feedback, critiques and asked questions.

Overall, the Goldman Sachs Local College Collaborative Program was a unique experience for BMCC team member and Science major Tesfamichael W. Demeke. “The experience gave us an introduction to the corporate world and lessons about business etiquette,” he said. “It inspired me to take a Business Administration class this semester and I’m exploring summer internship opportunities at companies like Goldman Sachs.”

The BMCC team worked with BMCC staff including Michael Hutmaker, Dean for Student Affairs and Thierry Thesatus, Senior Career Advisor. They also worked closely with Goldman Sachs Mentors Karina Suryan, Analyst, Finance, and Ochelle Drysdale, Analyst, Technology.

BMCC student participants included Diagna Camilo (Modern Languages), Natalia Corletto (Multimedia Programming and Design), Tesfamichael Demeke (Science), Olesia Hyka (Business Administration), Hyun-Shin Lee (Accounting), Karol Malachowicz (Engineering Science), Ching Hei Mok (Business Administration), Henry Noble, (Business Administration), Babatunde Ogunniyi (Computer Science) and Una Radakovic (Criminal Justice).


$1.4 Million Grant Helps Upward Bound Soar Higher


BMCC Upward Bound End of Year Celebration 2017

 

The BMCC Upward Bound program has received a five-year, $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to build on its work making college a reality for low-income high school students and those from families in which neither parent has earned a bachelor’s degree.

The program will continue working with two Manhattan high schools — Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers and Murray Bergtraum High School — and will add Landmark High School and the Leadership and Public High School. It will serve about 65 students, ages 13 through 19.

“In addition to scaling up the program, the grant will enable us to use more technology in the classroom,” says Antonette McKain, who led the BMCC Upward Bound program for 17 years and recently assumed the role of Director of Evening, Weekend and Off-Site Programs at BMCC. “By accessing online resources, students will research and explore career fields and academic areas they might not have been aware of. We will also do more targeted outreach as we meet the technology needs of this generation of students who communicate through Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and other platforms.”

Upward Bound students also work closely with instructors who are high school teachers or guidance counselors. In small groups after school, they prepare for New York State Regents examinations and bolster their skills in algebra, physics, biology, earth science, English and other subjects.

A ‘family vibe’

“Upward Bound is a very close-knit program,” says Janice Zummo, BMCC Assistant Dean for Academic Support Services who oversees the program. “The students come together as a small group every day after school for up to four years, and they become an important resource and support for each other.”

Zummo also says the program has also evolved to have a strong alumni network.

Keiran Miller, who attended Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis High School for International Careers, was part of BMCC’s Upward Bound program from 2008 through 2011. He attended Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on a Posse Foundation Scholarship and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English and Creative Writing in Spring 2015.

“I started a spoken-word poetry group on campus and served on editorial boards,” Miller says. “I also tried to help other students by doing college access and college success work — and I made all those connections because of my experience with Upward Bound.”

Looking back on his experience with the BMCC Upward Bound program, he says, “People are willing to go the extra mile for you and give you the tools and resources you need, but you have to have confidence and faith in yourself, too.”

Miller and his fellow Upward Bound members took college tours together and attended cultural events such as a performance of Cirque du Soleil. “There was always some kind of meal component. Upward Bound has a family vibe,” Miller says.

“One of the staples of Upward Bound was Antonette McKain’s ‘tough love’ approach,” he says. “She treated us like adults. We stumbled and made mistakes but in our own ways, we all learned responsibility, time management and the importance of following up with people — if someone connects you to someone or some opportunity, it’s important to keep that person in the loop.”

In Fall 2018, Miller will start work on his master’s degree. In the year prior to that, he will work as a counselor at Anatolia College in Thessaloniki, Greece, guiding students as they consider college in the United States.

Guiding students into college is central to the mission of Upward Bound. “We take the students on college tours, both interstate and intrastate, so they begin to think critically about their options,” says McKain. “We help them grapple with questions such as, ‘What size school will I feel comfortable in? Do I want an urban or suburban setting? Do I want to be in a homogenous school, or one that is more diverse? Do I want to live on campus or off?’”

Celebrating the end of a dynamic year

On June 17 in Theatre 2 at 199 Chambers Street, the BMCC Upward Bound program held its End-of-Year Celebration. Special guest speakers include Key Note speaker Maggie Howard and BMCC’s Dean Janice Zummo. A surprise tribute was made in honor of the program’s exiting Director, Antonette McKain. “She didn’t even know it was coming,” says Zummo. “The alumni had prepared a video in which they spoke about their experience of working with Antonette, and others spoke in person. They also gave her a beautiful engraved vase.”

Awards were distributed by the following Upward Bound workshop leaders: Jennifer Springer, Composition and Literature; Celeste Farmer, Algebra and Geometry; Subhra Goswami, Living Environment/Earth Science; Dominique Ceniceros, Trigometry/Pre-Calculus; Linda Barber, SAT/ACT Math; Marjorie Antoine and Yolanda Simancas, Road to College, and Serena Fong, Senior Transition to College.

The event celebrated Upward Bound seniors heading off to college: Angelica Diaz, Marist College; Valentino Gordon, Alfred University; Junior Holguin, Ithaca College; Shuzel Lide, University at Buffalo; Rashel Loaiza-Duarte, SUNY Brockport; Allyssa Martinez, Queens College, CUNY; Maireni Paulino, Ithaca College; Jarleny Pichardo, Skidmore College; Caitlyn Santander, SUNY Brockport; Da’Sandra Stephens, Marist College, Susanie Seecharan, SUNY Albany and Michelle Sun, Hamilton College.

 

 

 

The Upward Bound Project is an externally funded program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education under the category of Federal TRIO programs in partnership with Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY).

 


GC Faculty to Edit ASA Book Series

GC Faculty membersSix GC sociology professors have been named the editors of the American Sociological Association (ASA) Rose Series books beginning in January 2018.

The editorial team, to be led by Associate Professor Leslie Paik (GC/City College), includes professors Amy Adamczyk (GC/John Jay) and Lynn Chancer (GC/Hunter), distinguished professors Richard Alba and Nancy Foner, and Presidential Professor Philip Kasinitz.

The Rose Series is ASA’s only book series and competition to edit it is stiff, according to Paik. She points out that the six GC editors have collectively published 43 books and won numerous awards. With different areas of expertise, the new editors “represent the breadth of the discipline,” Paik adds.

She calls the selection “an honor and a recognition of CUNY’s strength and impact in our field and in our society.”

With the Rose Series of books, the ASA aims to make leading sociological research accessible to policymakers and lay readers as well as sociologists and other academics.

“We’re trying to translate and disseminate our research to a broader audience beyond sociology because we think it has value to all of our lives and the important social problems of today,” says Paik.

She adds that the GC editors chose “intersections of inequality” as the series’ next theme with the goal of addressing “how we can try to fix this issue as individuals, as communities, as societies.”

Photo: GC faculty members Lynn Chancer, Leslie Paik, Philip Kasinitz, Richard Alba, Nancy Foner, and Amy Adamcyzk will be the new editors of the ASA Rose Series.


New Issue of Techne Focuses on the Solar Decathlon and Digital Fabrication

City Tech’s Department of Architectural Technology is proud to announce the publication of the new issue of Techne, an annual journal of student and faculty work. This is the fourth issue of the publication and features the extraordinary work of our students and faculty, such as the Solar Decathlon—a project that exemplifies experiential learning.

Contributors also discuss the impact of new digital fabrication tools on the way architecture is conceived, practiced, and taught. These explorations and inspirations expand the field of architecture, increasing the number of trajectories upon which one can embark. And, as a result, these tools and processes are redefining the role of architects.  

Faculty Advisors: Ting Chin, Michael Duddy, Jason Montgomery


York College Professor Co-Authors Article for Museum Publication

Professor Timothy Paglione, chair of the Department of Earth and Physical Sciences, co-authored an article for the Rubin Museum’s new publication, Spiral. The article is now published and accompanies a video in their upcoming World of Sound exhibit. The project was contracted through the American Museum of Natural History, where Dr. Paglione has served as a project scientist on their Space Show and Big Bang Theater Show.

Professor Paglione’s expertise includes Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science.

http://rubinmuseum.org/spiral (click on “One Verse: A Chorus of Light and Sound”)


CCNY sociology professor to head ASA Rose Series editorial team

Associate Professor Leslie Paik to be lead editor on sociological book series

The City College of New York’s Leslie Paik has been named lead editor for the American Sociological Association’s (ASA) Rose book series. “I am especially proud to be part of this series,” said Paik, a sociology professor in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, “because it features innovative sociological research with significant policy relevance on a wide range of topics such as economic inequality, the environment, race and ethnic relations, and justice reform.”

The ASA Rose Series in Sociology chose the City University of New York to be its new editorial home, starting January 2018 for a three-year period. The editorial team, to be led by Paik, includes five other editors on a three-year tenure that officially starts in January 2018.
“We are delighted to have the ASA Rose Series editorship come to CUNY,” said Paik. “This series strives to make the most cutting edge research in sociology accessible to multiple audiences across the academy, policy world and general public alike. I am looking forward to honoring and continuing that tradition in the years to come.”
Paik’s fellow CUNY editors are: Amy Adamcyzk (John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, CUNY), Richard Alba (the Graduate Center, CUNY), Lynn Chancer (Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY), Nancy Foner (Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY) and Philip Kasinitz (the Graduate Center, CUNY).
The ASA is the nation’s main sociological professional association and volumes published in the Rose Series have recently been recognized with such honors as the Grawemeyer Award for the Best Book in Education and the Otis Dudley Duncan Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Social Demography.
Paik who teaches courses at CCNY and the CUNY Graduate Center on social problems, law and society, deviance, and juvenile justice, called her selection as leading editor “a prestigious honor.”
About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Senator Golden and Borough President Eric Adams Attend Ribbon Cutting at City Tech to Celebrate the Infor Center of Excellence

Senator Martin J. Golden and Eric Adams, Brooklyn Borough President, joined City Tech and Infor to celebrate the launch of the College’s new Infor Center of Excellence (CoE) at a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Friday, May 19. A reception commemorating the opening took place at the Center of Excellence, room 216, Voorhees Building, 186 Jay Street, in Downtown Brooklyn, followed by a program that included remarks from Senator Golden; Eric Adams; Martine Cadet, Infor; Russell Hotzler, President, City Tech; and City Tech student Shanardo Sharpe.

l to r: Senator Golden; John Parham, Infor; Martine Cadet, Infor; Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams; City Tech President Russell Hotzler. Credit: A. Vargas

The CoE is an exciting technology partnership that offers Infor’s industry-specific software solutions and training to City Tech students and students from other CUNY (The City University of New York) Colleges.

Senator Golden thanked Infor and City Tech for helping to develop well-trained, educated young men and women ready to start careers in the tech industry. “These partnerships are extremely important and there’s no better place than Brooklyn—there’s so much to offer here,” said Golden.

“Infor has been a phenomenal partner,” said President Hotzler, commending Charles Phillips, Infor’s CEO, and his team on developing the CoE. “We have a real-world partner with a very strong commitment to all CUNY students, giving them the opportunity to engage in experiences that are truly door-opening.”

“I’m excited and very thankful,” said Martine Cadet, Vice President of Global Talent Enablement at Infor, “There is real value in a partnership that gives students the ability to hit the ground running, and this is a passion project not just for CUNY but for Infor as well.”

“More than a tree grows in Brooklyn,” said Eric Adams, “great scholars grow in Brooklyn.”

City Tech’s partnership with Infor, through its Education Alliance Program (EAP), led to the development of the Center of Excellence, an innovative lab and learning environment where participants enjoy access to cutting-edge software, such as Infor’s Mongoose, as well as guidance from faculty who collaborate with students on projects. The hands-on experience gained through the CoE will prepare participants to enter a number of career paths, including system analyst, developer, integration consultant, and application developer.

Infor, a leading provider of beautiful business applications specialized by industry and built for the cloud, has developed a curriculum that empowers students and professionals at every level to gain critical skills that will set them apart in the job market by developing proficiency using these industry-specific business tools. Through the EAP program, participants gain exposure to Infor Mongoose, Infor Enterprise Asset Management, Infor Cloudsuite Industrial, Infor ION, and Infor Supply Chain Management.


STATEMENT FROM CHANCELLOR JAMES B. MILLIKEN ON RESTORATION OF YEAR-ROUND PELL GRANTS  

“The City University of New York applauds the federal government’s restoration of year-round Pell Grants, which have, for decades, provided essential assistance to lower income students.  This is great news for current and prospective CUNY students.  It will enable many students to attend summer school with reduced tuition or no tuition, and it will give them needed support to achieve their academic goals without having to take on debt.

“CUNY is proof that Pell Grants work and provide extraordinary opportunities to some of our city’s most talented students. With approximately 117,000 Pell-eligible undergraduates attending CUNY colleges, this restored benefit – providing up to 150 percent of a student’s maximum Pell award for the academic year – is critically important in allowing students to maintain their academic momentum, in many instances by continuing their studies through the summer.  Fifty-seven percent of CUNY undergraduates attend college tuition-free due to full tuition coverage by Pell Grants and New York State TAP awards.  Combined with Governor Cuomo’s new Excelsior Scholarship program, year-round Pell Grants will increase the number of students attending college tuition-free and obtaining the diplomas that can change lives and accelerate careers.

“The restoration of year-round Pell Grants will help expand college access, raise graduation rates and improve career prospects for our graduates as they enter the 21st-century workforce.”


Japanese Mayor leads pilgrimage honoring CCNY founder | The City College of New York

Townsend Harris image by James Bogle

Yusuke Fukui, Mayor of Shimoda City, joins the long list of Japanese pilgrims that have traveled to The City College of New York to pay homage to its founder Townsend Harris when he visits the institution on July 12. Since 1986, top civic officials from Shimoda have made annual pilgrimages to City College to honor Harris. This year marks CCNY’s 170th anniversary.

After establishing what was then known as The Free Academy in 1847, Harris, a prominent New York merchant, went on to forge U.S.-Japan relations. He arrived in Shimoda on August 21, 1856 to open the first American consulate in Japan.

“As the first consul general there, he negotiated the treaty that is credited with opening the Japanese Empire to foreign trade and culture,” said City College archivist Sydney Van Nort. “Owing to his goodwill, openness and honesty, Harris quickly gained the respect and affection of the Japanese people, and is revered there to this day.”

Mayor Fukui’s visit on CCNY’s 170th anniversary is confirmation of this, said Van Nort.  The Mayor’s delegation will attend a presentation by Van Nort on the life and career of Harris and view documents from the Townsend Harris Papers Collection in CCNY’s Morris Raphael Cohen Library.

For more information on the Mayor’s visit to The City College of New York, please call the CCNY Archives at (212) 650-7609.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Source: Japanese Mayor leads pilgrimage honoring CCNY founder | The City College of New York


CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York

CCNY’s HIV researchers Hari Akula [left] and Mahesh Lakshman.

As the HIV/AIDS epidemic approaches its fourth decade, each year brings promising news of pioneering research to alleviate the scourge. Add City College of New York scientists to the list with a rapid method to access new molecules that could inhibit the virus that causes AIDS.

The CCNY research led by Mahesh K. Lakshman, vice chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Ph.D. student Hari Akula, focuses on the modification of nucleosides.  These are genetic building materials in all living organisms and because of this they possess great potential as antiviral agents.

The ability to rapidly modify the structures of natural nucleosides is at the core of developing potential pharmaceutical agents. This is likely to yield diverse compounds that can then be tested to gain insight into structural effects on biological activity. “Such is the case with modifying pyrimidine nucleosides, including AZT (zidovudine), a drug used in the control of HIV infections,” said Lakshman, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

In this context, Lakshman and Akula have developed a simple and fast method for preparing new pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, a family in which AZT belongs, and for modifying AZT itself.  Along with their collaborators at the Rega Institute for Medical Research, they have identified several new compounds that are active against the more virulent HIV-1 and the less common and less pathogenic HIV-2.

Their research appears in the Royal Society of Chemistry publication “Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry.”

According to the Geneva-based UNAIDS, as of 2015, an estimated 35 million people have died globally from AIDS-related illnesses since the start of the epidemic.

HIV, however, is no longer considered a death sentence following the development of antiretroviral therapy. As a result, UNAIDS estimates that more than 18 million people around the world are living with HIV.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit

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Source: CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York


CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York

As the HIV/AIDS epidemic approaches its fourth decade, each year brings promising news of pioneering research to alleviate the scourge. Add City College of New York scientists to the list with a rapid method to access new molecules that could inhibit the virus that causes AIDS.

Source: CCNY researchers produce molecules with potential against HIV | The City College of New York


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, week of June 19, 2017

 

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

I am hoping that today has been a day of meaning for you and your families.

Hats off to you Dads!

In this final full-week of our school year, we have much to celebrate.

This week marks the completion of elementary school for NEST+m’s 5th Grade students, the completion of Middle School for NEST+m’s 8th Grade students and the completion of High School for NEST+m’s 12th Grade students.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.
Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


The Week Ahead

Monday June 19th

  • 4th Grade Music Concert in the auditorium, 8:45am
  • 4th Grade Celebration in classrooms, 9:15am
  • Second Language Proficiency Exams, 9:00am
  • LOTE – Languages Other than English Exams, 1:00pm

Tuesday June 20th

  • Second Grade Celebration in classrooms, 9:00am
  • Regents Chemistry Exam, 9:00am

Wednesday June 21th

  • 5th Grade “Moving Up/Graduation” Ceremony & Celebration in the NEST+mauditorium, 8:30am
  • 5th Grade Dance Celebration in the Cafeteria, from 5-8 pm

Thursday June 22th

  • 12th Grade Graduation Ceremony at The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 9:00am
  • 8th Grade Stepping Up Ceremony, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 12:30pm

Friday June 23rd

  • Kindergarten End of Year Concert in auditorium, 8:45am
  • Kindergarten Celebration in classrooms, 9:30am

Middle Grades Announcements
To ensure that students have access to course-specific support beyond that which is provided within our regular instructional periods, please see the following link which specifies when academic supports for Grades 6-12 will be provided with an eye toward Summative Assessments:
Open Classroom Tutoring & Regents Review Schedule – Grades 6-12

Middle Grades Summative Assessments: (End-of-Year Projects, Papers, Final Exam Schedules, and Regents).

6th Grade:

  • ELA: Final Exam on 6/19/2017
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/21/2017
  • Theater/Literacy: Final Project on 6/23/2017

7th Grade:

  • Science: Final Project Presentation the week of June 19th
  • Social Studies: Final Exam on 6/23/2017

8th Grade:
Please Review the June 2017 Regents and SLP Schedule. Passing the Regents course and corresponding exam is necessary to earn high school credit in 8th Grade. If a family makes a choice to opt-out of a Regents exam or SLP, students will not be able to earn high school credit for that course.
Regents exams are non-attendance days for students participating in the exams. Students will come in to take the exam only and then will be dismissed. 8th Grade Courses will not be in session on the following date: 6/19/2017

For 8th grade students and families:

  • 6/19 – Report for World Languages Second Language Proficiency (SLP) exam only
  • 6/20 – Normal day
  • 6/21 – Normal day, 8th Grade Cruise at night
  • 6/22 – Report for Graduation only at Cooper Union
  • 6/23 – Report to school normal time. 8th grade Field Day Field Trip.

Upper Grades Announcements
This week features the continuation of our June Regents Examination Cycle. Please Review the June 2017 Regents SLP and LOTE Schedule and note the following:

  • Regents exam days are non-attendance days for Upper Grade Students. Students will come to school only if they are taking an exam and then will be dismissed from school when finished. Students taking two exams on a single day should be prepared with food and snacks as they will have limited break time (45 minutes) between tests.
  • For morning Regents Exams students should arrive to school by 8:45am and be seated in their exam room by 9:00am for attendance and test directions
  • For afternoon Regents Exams students should be seated in their Exam Room by 1:00pm
  • Students who finish a morning exam early may not leave the Regents Exam room before 10:30am. Students who finish an afternoon exam may not leave the Regents Exam room before 2:30pm.
  • All students taking Regents Exams should bring a copy of their Regents ticket and school ID with them on Exam Days.
  • Student Cell Phones must be powered off and stored in hallway lockers before the beginning of any Regents Exam. Cell Phones brought into an Exam room must be given to the testing room proctor before the exam begins and will be held by the testing room proctor until the test’s conclusion. Students may NOT wear or use any electronic device during a Regents Exam– this includes Smart Watches and bluetooth enabled fitness bands.

Monday, June 19

  • Second Language Proficiency Exams (9:00am)
  • LOTE – Languages Other than English Exams (1:00pm)

Tuesday, June 20

  • Chemistry Regents (9:00am)

Wednesday, June 21

  • Regents Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students

Thursday, June 22

  • Upper Grades Commencement at Cooper Union Great Hall
  • Regents Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students

Friday, June 22nd

  • Regents Rating Day
  • Non-Attendance Day for NEST+m Upper Grade Students

Looking ahead

  • June 26: Eid al-Fitr. All schools are closed.
  • June 27: Regular instructional day. Upper Grades classes are in session (Normal School Day)
  • June 28: Final Day of School (½ day with dismissal at 11:30am)
    • UG students, please be sure all textbooks have been turned in and that your locker is clean / without lock

 


Raquel Chang-Rodríguez wins prestigious Imbert Prize

Professor Raquel Chang-Rodriguez receiving the Enrique Anderson Imbert Prize

Distinguished Professor Raquel Chang-Rodriguez receiving the Enrique Anderson Imbert Prize.

Raquel Chang-Rodríguez, Distinguished Professor of Hispanic literature and culture at The City College of New York, is the recipient of the Enrique Anderson Imbert Prize from the North American Academy of the Spanish Language. This distinction recognizes the achievements and scholarship of individuals who have contributed to the understanding, appreciation and promotion of Hispanic culture in the United States, especially in the fields of language and literature.

“This  award holds a particular significance because of the prestige of the institution conferring it and because I personally knew Enrique Anderson Imbert, the Harvard professor whose name the prize carries,” said Chang-Rodríguez.

A specialist in Colonial Literary Studies with emphasis on the Andean area and Mexico, Chang-Rodríguez has authored, edited and co-edited more than twenty books treating the chronicles of the early contact period and native historians, as well as colonial drama and poetry.

Her most recent book is “Cartografía garcilasista” (Universidad de Alicante, 2013). In 2017, The University of New Mexico Press published her translation and edition (with Nancy Vogeley) of Luis Jerónimo de Oré’s 17th century “Account of the Martyrs in the Provinces of La Florida.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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President Cruz Commits Lehman College to the Paris Agreement

Lehman College President José Luis Cruz is one of the many United States educational leaders to sign on as part of the “We Are Still In” pledge on the Paris Climate agreement. The pledge was publically submitted on June 5, demonstrating the ongoing commitment of American leaders, despite President Donald J. Trump’s announcement that the U.S. would withdraw from the accord.

“The Paris Agreement reflects international recognition that climate change is real and concerted action imperative,” said President Cruz. “We must redouble our efforts to reduce fossil-fuel emissions, as well as improve our collective economic well-being through new and better energy sources and technologies. Consequently, I am willing to support this initiative on behalf of Lehman College.”

Cruz joins 205 other college and university presidents, along with governors, mayors, businesses, and investors, who have, according to the pledge, “declared their intent to continue to insure the U.S. remains a global leader in reducing carbon emissions.”

The goal of the “We Are Still In” pledge is to send a “strong signal to the international community and the 194 other parties to the Paris Agreement about the continued commitment of the U.S. to ambitious action on climate change absent leadership at the federal level. Trump’s announcement to exit the Paris agreement came in a White Rose Garden speech on June 1.

The “We Are Still In” effort was organized by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, in conjunction with numerous philanthropic and environmental groups, including Bloomberg Philanthropies, Center for American Progress, The American Sustainable Business Council, and the Sierra Club; other supporters of the effort include CUNY Chancellor James Milliken and New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio; as well as hundreds of corporations such as Facebook, Amazon, Adidas, Microsoft, and Apple.

The Paris Climate agreement was signed in December 2015 and was the first global commitment to climate change. The agreement allows each nation to set its own emission reduction targets.


CCNY Architecture Historian Wins International Book Award

Marta Gutman's urban history "A City For Children"

CCNY Professor Marta Gutman has been recognized on an international level for her urban history, A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850–1950 (The University of Chicago Press, 2014). The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) awarded the book the 2017 Spiro Kostof Award, given to interdisciplinary studies of urban history that make the greatest contribution to our understanding of the growth and development of cities. A City for Children focuses on the use and adaptive reuse of everyday buildings over a hundred year span in Oakland, California, to make the city a better place for children.

The Society, which promotes the study, interpretation, and conservation of architecture, design, landscapes, and urbanism worldwide, announced the winners of the 2017 Publication Awards at the SAH 70th Annual International Conference Awards Ceremony held June 8 in Glasgow, Scotland. Gutman called her book’s selection, “an incredible honor.”
Gutman is an historian and licensed architect. She is Professor of Architecture and Coordinator, History & Theory, Spitzer School of Architecture at CCNY and is also Professor of Art History, Doctoral Faculty in Art History, The Graduate Center/CUNY.
The Society of Architectural Historians is a nonprofit membership organization that serves a network of local, national, and international institutions and individuals who, by profession or interest, focus on the history of the built environment and its role in shaping contemporary life. SAH promotes meaningful public engagement with the history of the built environment through advocacy efforts, print and online publications, and local, national, and international programs.
About The City College of New York
The City College of New York is an established leader in sustainability, with an expert faculty conducting groundbreaking research and providing innovative, interdisciplinary opportunities for students to engage in emerging approaches in architecture, engineering, science and the social sciences.
CCNY’s response to a rapidly urbanizing global community consists of courses on climate response, resilient design, water resource management and energy, with engineering, science and architectural degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate level that address the sustainability challenges of the 21st century.
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today more than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship.  Now celebrating its 170th anniversary, CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Hunter College-Led Scientists Develop Molecular Code for Melanin-Like Materials

Published on June 8, 2017 in Science Magazine, aHunter College-Led Scientists Develop Molecular Code for Melanin-Like Materials study led Einstein Professor of Chemistry Rein V. Ulijn shows an exciting new approach to making substances with the properties of melanin, a compound that scientists have been unable to effectively synthesize in the lab. Melanin’s disordered molecular structure makes it impossible to fully replicate, which has been scientifically frustrating; it has numerous useful qualities that scientists have long tried to harness. Melanin gives the color to our skin, hair, and eyes – but it also absorbs light, providing UV-protection and energy storage.

Now, with this new process to create melanin-like substances, scientists can harness these usefulnesses, while maintaining control over the ways the pigments and properties express themselves. This innovative discovery could enable the development of a new range of cosmetic, skin care, and biomedical products, and the commercialization opportunities may lead to near-term possibilities for the researchers.

“We took advantage of simple versions of proteins—tripeptides, consisting of just three amino acids—to produce a range of molecular architectures with precisely controlled levels of order and disorder,” said Professor Ulijn, also director of the Nanoscience Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center, CUNY. “We were amazed to see that, upon oxidation of these peptide structures, polymeric pigments with a range of colors—from light beige to deep brown- were formed.”

Subsequent, in-depth characterization of the approach demonstrated that further properties, such as UV absorbance and nanoscale morphology of the melanin-like materials, could also be systematically controlled by the amino acid sequence of the tripeptide.

The findings published in Science build on Professor Ulijn's previous research. His lab will now turn its attention to further clarifying the chemical structures that form and expanding the resulting functionalities and properties of the various melanin-like materials they produce.

“We are very proud of Professor Ulijin’s work,” said Jennifer J. Raab, President of Hunter College. “Our students are fortunate to learn from a scientist on the cutting edge of such impactful advances, and we anticipate broad implications of this and future discoveries.”

In addition to Professor Ulijn, the research team also included Hunter Professors Steven G. Greenbaum, Sunita Humagain , and Barney Yoo; Ayala Limpel, Scott A. McPhee, Tai-De Li and Rinat R. Abzalimov of the ASRC; Christopher Bettinger and Hang-Ah Park, Carnegie Mellon University; Tell Tuttle and Gary G. Scott, University of Strathclyde; Doeke R. Hekstra, Harvard University; Pim W.J.M. Frederix, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; and Chunhua Hu, New York University.

Funding for the research was provided in part by the U.S. Air Force. Additional funding was provided by the Israeli Council of Higher Education (Postdoctoral Fellowship).

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New Art Exhibit by Hunter MFA Students Finds Home in Lobby of 5 Bryant Park

Beginning today, June 7, 2017, a new exhibitionNew Art Exhibit by Hunter MFA Students Finds Home in Lobby of 5 Bryant Park of paintings and large-scale works on paper will be shown in the lobby of 5 Bryant Park, located on 6th Avenue between 40 and 41st Street – all created by current Hunter College Master of Fine Arts students: Talia Levitt, Madhini Nirmal, Leonard Reibstein, and Andy Van Dinh.

This yearlong installation inaugurates an ongoing partnership between Hunter’s nationally ranked MFA program in Studio Art and Blackstone, owner of the building and of Equity Office, a national leader in property management, real estate development, and construction.

Curated by Hunter College Professor Carrie Moyer in collaboration with José Gonzalez of Gonzalez Architects for Equity Office, this exhibition gives students a prominent space to showcase their work and engage with an audience of thousands every day. The building has a history as a home to art – in 1958, notable mosaic artist Max Spivak completed a mural of quarter million hand-cut tiles for the building’s entrance. Covered for many years and meticulously restored in 2015, the mural will now act as a welcome sign, inviting visitors to the contemporary work inside.

“We are very grateful to Blackstone and Equity Office for offering their space to some of our very talented graduate students and increasing the visibility of our artists’ work in the heart of Midtown Manhattan,” said Jennifer J. Raab, President of Hunter College.  “We appreciate the commitment Blackstone and Equity Office have shown to future artists offering them exposure while giving their tenants and visitors opportunities to appreciate new art.”

The largest public graduate program in Studio Art in New York, the Hunter College MFA provides exceptional opportunities for students from around the world to develop as artists in an environment that encourages experimentation, production, and critical dialogue. The Hunter College MFA at 5 Bryant Park initiative was spearheaded by Simon Wasserberger, Senior Vice President of Equity Office, and Debi Wisch of the Hunter College Art Advisory Board.


A Soaring 215th Commencement: Hunter Hawks Flying High!

“The steely determination I see in this audience is a testament to you, and to Hunter College,”A Soaring 215th Commencement: Hunter Hawks Flying High! said Alphonso David, chief counsel to Governor Cuomo, as he addressed the Class of 2017. “You represent the best of New York. Now, as you stand on the edge, ready to dive into a world that needs you, take pride in your accomplishment.”

David had begun his speech with a personal account of Liberia’s 1980 military coup. In stark, terrifying detail, he recalled his family fleeing gunmen who invaded their home in the middle of the night; the imprisonment of his father, Monrovia’s democratically elected mayor; the assassination of his uncle; and, during the family’s house arrest, his immense pride as his mother, facing rampaging troops and a gun to her head, barred the door and protected the women inside.

The family eventually found asylum in the U.S. But here, David faced new kinds of assault – first, racial epithets and exclusion by his young classmates, and years later, a work environment that drove him to be a closeted gay lawyer.

“Each of you in this room will face defining moments. You will find the power of your own fear, and find the great power of your own courage,” he told the graduates, adding, “Be unabashedly you, without denigrating anyone else. Be proud of who you are: you the immigrant, the woman, the Muslim, the Jew, the LGBT person, the single mother, the single father, the person living on public assistance, the person with HIV.” At the same time, he acknowledged that by gaining entry to Hunter and earning their degrees, the graduates had already chosen not to be defined or defeated by difficulty or circumstance.

The heroic achievements of a number of graduates had already been highlighted by President Raab. In her welcoming remarks, she also noted that the highly diverse Class of 2017 represented more than 150 countries, and that family members had traveled from five continents to celebrate that afternoon. Looking ahead, she asked the graduates to commit themselves to the Hunter motto, Mihi Cura Futuri (The Care of the Future is Mine), with a reminder that Thomas Hunter began building a great college because he believed in his own obligation to the future.

[See ABC 7 NY's coverage here.]

In a moment that paid tribute to another historic Hunter figure and to three new graduates, Dina Buitrago, Hajaru Hamza and Saipriya Iyer were officially named Hunter’s first Women in Science Mildred Dresselhaus Scholars. Dresselhaus, the renowned physicist and 2014 recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, always credited her teachers and mentors at Hunter College High School and Hunter College for her resolve and success in a challenging field so unwelcoming to women.

Commencement honoree Sandra Wilkin, a CUNY trustee and Hunter alumna, remembered how well the College taught her about “the value of hard work and perseverance” – wisdom that enabled her to succeed as a woman in the construction industry. She also expressed her pride in CUNY’s being “the most diverse university in the world.”

The afternoon’s final major address came from valedictorian Daniela Mikhaylov, who was speaking not for herself alone but also for the Class of 2017’s four other valedictorians: Victoria Lau, Qin Lin, Rina Schiller and Clarissa Torres. Mikhaylov began by mentioning her background as the daughter of Uzbekistani immigrants who fled anti-Semitism to give their children a better life. Now headed to the Icahn School of Medicine and a career as an oncologist, she thanked Hunter for helping her know for sure that medicine was her calling, for professors who “have pushed us beyond what we thought was possible,” and for classmates she predicts will be her lifelong friends.

“Have faith in yourself, and know that as a Hunter graduate, you have the tools to succeed,” she told her fellow graduates. “As Hunter Hawks, we are destined to fly high!”

Click here to view photos from Hunter's 215th commencment.


New Exhibition at Queens Museum Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Queens Pride Parade

The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens: June 10 to July 30, 2017

Draws from records of City Council Member Daniel Dromm who co-founded Queens Pride, and explores how the 1990 hate crime murder of Julio Rivera impacted the LGBTQ movement in Queens

—Presented by the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at
LaGuardia Community College—

Queens Museum Exhibition

Queens, NY (June 12, 2017)—Marking the 25th anniversary of the Queens Pride Parade, a new multimedia exhibition at the Queens Museum spotlights the largely unknown history of LGBTQ activism in Queens from the 1990s to the present. The exhibition runs through July 30 and is located in the Museum’s famed Panorama Room. The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens , draws largely from the Collection of Queens City Council MemberDaniel Dromm, recently acquired by the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College, which is presenting the exhibit.

This exhibition curated by LaGuardia commercial photography faculty Thierry Gourjon and Javier Larenas, and by LaGuardia’s Gardiner-Shenker Student Scholars, marks the first-ever showing of materials from the Dromm Collection. The exhibition’s title celebrates lavender as both a symbol of the original gay liberation movement and the color of a line marking the Queens Pride Parade route in Jackson Heights.

Following a series of anti-gay incidents in the early 1990s, including the brutal murder of Julio Rivera, and controversy over references to same-sex couples in the Children of the Rainbow Curriculum, Dromm and fellow activist Maritza Martinez co-founded the Queens Lesbian & Gay Pride Committee, Inc., known as Queens Pride. One of their first acts was to organize a march to take their advocacy to the streets. The first Queens Pride Parade in 1993 drew 1,000 marchers. Today it’s an annual tradition that attracts crowds of over 40,000, and draws support of politicians and corporate sponsors.

With both historical and contemporary work, The Lavender Line comprises photographs, flyers, video footage, and audio recollections, illustrating the pride and protests of a community unknown to most New Yorkers. The title celebrates lavender not only as a symbol of the original gay liberation movement but also as the color of the line painted on the Queens Pride Parade route along 37th Avenue, from 89th Street to 75th Street.

The contemporary photographs in the exhibition by LaGuardia’s Gardiner-Shenker Student Scholars chronicle a range of Queens LGBTQ social organizations and cultural institutions. These include centers that offer social and counseling services as well as bars that function as leisure and entertainment spaces. What results is a representation of struggle and pride that continues today.

“Queens has its own unique lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) history and people should know about it,” said NYC Council Education Committee Chairperson Daniel Dromm (D - Jackson Heights, Elmhurst). "We didn’t just one day wake up and have same sex marriage. It’s been a long struggle for LGBT acceptance especially in the borough once known for being the home of Archie Bunker. This exhibition highlights a dynamic period in the history of the Queens LGBT rights movement. The anti-gay murder of Julio Rivera and the battle over the Children of the Rainbow Curriculum are Queens’ equivalent of the Stonewall Rebellion.”

Through his work on Queens Pride, Dromm came out publicly as gay. Dromm, who at the time was a public school elementary teacher in Queens, was called before a school board disciplinary hearing where he was "ordered never to discuss his homosexuality with his fourth-grade students.” He stood firm and refused to be silenced; this activism helped seed his decision to leave teaching for public office.

City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer contributed materials from his personal archives to TheLavender Line: Coming Out in Queens. Van Bramer, then a student at St John’s University, drew attention in the 1990s for his activism work encouraging members of the LGBTQ community to stand proud and in public, and for raising awareness of the AIDS epidemic and bias crimes.

“For far too long, the stories, experiences, trials, and victories of the LGBTQ movement in our country and in Queens have often gone untold,” said Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer. “The history of the LGBTQ movement in Queens is a deeply human story of ordinary people fighting for the right to openly and freely love without fear. I’m thankful and honored for the opportunity to contribute personal pieces to the new Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens exhibition at the Queens Museum.”

"The Queens Museum is very proud to be a part of the celebration of such an important milestone for the history of LGBTQAI advocacy and rights. Our involvement exemplifies our commitment to the communities that find a home here at the Museum, and our desire to address with urgency the factors that threaten freedom and diversity," said Laura Raicovich, Executive Director of the Queens Museum.

“Most New Yorkers don’t know that Queens was the first outer borough to publicly support gay rights by holding a parade. We developed this exhibition to share the remarkable stories of LGBTQ activism in Queens, which have been largely absent from the historical narrative,” said Richard Lieberman, PhD, professor of history and director of the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives. “It’s an incredible story of activism in the face of tremendous opposition.”

“This is an important exhibition to both the history of New York City and the story of LGBTQ activism in Queens, and we’re enormously proud of the work of our faculty, staff, and students that went into creating it,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “The opportunity for our students to learn valuable research and curatorial skills, while working on this significant exhibition, is sure to benefit their professional careers. And it showcases our LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, the only archives of its kind to document NYC’s social and political history.”

Lavender Line Group Shot

“The project gave me an excellent opportunity to get to know the Queens LGBTQ community,” said Jham Valenzuela, a LaGuardia student who worked on the exhibition. “And as a gay man, this project was deeply fulfilling to me on a personal level.”

“I am proud to have contributed my papers and artifacts from the last 25 years to help create this commemoration. I thank the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College and the Queens Museum for producing this extremely important display,” added Dromm.

To capture additional information about the LGBTQ movement in Queens from the 1990s to today, the Queens Memory project at the Queens Library conducted interviews with members of the Queens LGBTQ community and will encourage The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens visitors to use their mobile app to contribute their memories. Additionally, an audio booth will be set up at the Museum where visitors can contribute their memories of this period to this archival collection.

To supplement the Queens Pride celebrations, the Queens Museum will screen Julio of Jackson Heights, a documentary about Julio Rivera’s murder, on June 18.

After the conclusion of the exhibition at the Queens Museum, The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens will travel to all five CUNY campuses in Queens, dates TBD.

The exhibition is made possible through generous support from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, and the New York City Council through the office of Daniel Dromm.

• • • •

About the LaGuardia and Wagner Archives at LaGuardia Community College
The LaGuardia and Wagner Archives, established in 1982, serves as a repository for NYC’s social and political history, which includes the largest collection of New York City mayoral papers. Archive records include the personal papers and official documents of Mayors Fiorello H. LaGuardia, Robert F. Wagner, Abraham D. Beame and Edward I. Koch, the records of the New York City Housing Authority, the piano maker Steinway & Sons, The Council of the City of New York and a Queens Local History Collection. Assets from these collections are regularly referenced in news stories, and studied by journalists, policy makers, and other researchers. The Archives regularly produces public programs exploring its collections, including an annual calendar produced in partnership with The New York Times and the City University of New York. Each year, the calendar is devoted to a theme of importance to the Greater New York Metropolitan area. The 2017 calendar is devoted to housing in NYC. Click here to learn more.

About LaGuardia Community College
LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more. Or on Twitter at @LaGuardiaLIC.

About the Queens Museum
The Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows Corona Park features contemporary art, events of hyperlocal and international impact, and educational programs reflecting the diversity of Queens and New York City. Changing exhibitions present the work of emerging and established artists, both local and global, that often explore contemporary social issues, as well as the rich history of its site. In November 2013, the Museum reopened with an expanded footprint of 105,000 square feet, a soaring skylit atrium, a suite of daylight galleries, nine artist studios, and flexible event space. The Museum works outside its walls through engagement initiatives ranging from multilingual outreach and educational opportunities for adult immigrants, to a plethora of community led art and activism projects. The Museum's educational programming connects with schoolchildren, teens, families, seniors as well as those individuals with physical and mental disabilities. The Queens Museum is located on property owned in full by the City of New York, and its operation is made possible in part by public funds provided through the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Visit www.queensmuseum.org. On Twitter at @queensmuseum.

About the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation
The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, established in 1987, primarily supports the study of New York State history. Robert David Lion Gardiner was, until his death in August 2004, the 16th Lord of the Manor of Gardiner’s Island, NY. The Gardiner family and their descendants have owned Gardiner’s Island since 1639, obtained as part of a royal grant from King Charles I of England. The Foundation is inspired by Robert David Lion Gardiner’s personal passion for New York history.

  • The purpose of the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation is:
  • To educate and inform the general public in the State of New York, particularly in the area of the Town of Islip and more generally in Suffolk County, concerning the culture, art and tradition of the locality;
  • To cultivate, foster and promote interest in, and understanding and appreciation of the societal heritage of Town of Islip, particularly during the nineteenth century;
  • To encourage and sponsor the creation and perpetuation by existing and future historical societies of collections and repositories for the deposit, collection and examination of documents and artifacts of various kinds relevant to such heritage and traditions; and
  • To sponsor and encourage the preservation, restoration and exhibition by existing and future historical societies of at least one facility appropriate to such purpose.

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Exhibition Listing

The Lavender Line: Coming Out in Queens

What:  Marking the 25th anniversary of Queens Pride Parade is a new multimedia exhibition at the Queens Museum that spotlights the largely unknown history of LGBTQ activism in Queens from the 1990s to the present.

The exhibition explores the impact of the 1990 hate crime murder of Julio Rivera, and the blocked “Children of the Rainbow” curriculum, on the LGBTQ movement in Queens. The exhibition draws from records of City Council Member Daniel Dromm who co-founded Queens Pride, and from the personal archives of City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer.

Why:  While Manhattan is well-recognized as the birthplace of NYC’s LGBTQ movement, the remarkable stories of LGBTQ activism in Queens are largely absent from the historical narrative. It's an incredible story of activism in the face of tremendous opposition, and helped motivate Council Member Danny Dromm's career shift from teaching to public office.

The New York region has the highest number of people who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, nationwide. A recent survey found that nearly 800,000 New Yorkers identify as LGBTQ.

Who:  Curated by LaGuardia Community College/CUNY commercial photography faculty, as well as by LaGuardia students, the exhibition uses photographs, flyers, video footage, and audio recollections to illuminate the pride and protests of a community unknown to most New Yorkers.

Coming Out in Queens is made possible through the generous support of the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, and the New York City Council, through the office of Daniel Dromm.

Where:  Queens Museum, Panorama Room

Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Corona, NY 11368

When:  June 10 through July 30, during museum hrs: Wednesday—Sunday 11AM-5PM


City Tech Foundation Hosts 2017 Best of New York Award Dinner at the Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge

The City Tech Foundation held its 2017 Best of New York (BONY) Award Dinner on Monday, May 8, at the New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge, 333 Adams Street, Downtown Brooklyn, New York. In addition to honoring friends of the College, the 2017 BONY event celebrates City Tech’s 70th anniversary. The evening began with a Guest of Honor Reception at 6:00 p.m., followed by dinner and the award presentations at 7:15 p.m.

Founded in 1947 as the New York State Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences, this year marks the 70th anniversary of the College. The theme of the 2017 dinner was “Building Toward the Next 70 Years.” Honorees included Frank J. Sciame, Jr., CEO/Chairman and Joseph Mizzi, President/COO of Sciame Construction; Joseph Aliotta, Principal, Perkins Eastman; and DonnaMarie Russo, President, New York Concrete Corporation.

Special recognition was accorded to Professor Janet Liou-Mark, Department of Mathematics, an award-winning teacher, City Tech’s 2017-2018 Scholar on Campus, and the director of City Tech’s Honors Scholars Program. Dr. Liou-Mark received the 2011 CUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Mathematics Instruction and the 2014 Mathematical Association of America Metro New York Section Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics.

The City Tech Foundation was chartered in 1981 to raise funds for the College. Proceeds from the annual dinner continue to help fund Foundation-sponsored scholarships and other student financial assistance and student/faculty professional development programs.


15th ANNUAL CUNY CITIZENSHIP NOW! FREE AND CONFIDENTIAL IMMIGRATION HOTLINE

The 15th annual Citizenship NOW! hotline, a free, confidential citizenship and immigration information service helping thousands of callers, will open June 19, according to the New York Daily News and The City University of New York, which sponsor the event.

“The New York Daily News is pleased to partner with CUNY to support immigration and citizenship issues in New York City and around the nation by together providing important, confidential and free information and referrals to assist those immigrants who may qualify for citizenship,” said Eric Gertler, co-chairman and co-publisher of the Daily News. “Citizenship Now! is the most comprehensive university-based immigration legal service program in the country,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “It’s an important reminder to all that at CUNY, immigrants matter.”

In anticipation of a record number of calls due to the current political climate, the hotline has expanded to 80 phone lines from last year’s 48. It will be open June 19 through June 23, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and staffed by more than 400 volunteers. Calls will be answered in English and Spanish, as well as Mandarin, Cantonese, Russian, Korean, Italian, Haitian Creole, Bengali, Polish, French, Yiddish and Arabic.

Permanent residents who want to become U.S. citizens, or those seeking permanent residency or who have other immigration concerns, will be referred to organizations that can help with applications at low or no cost.

“The outpouring of volunteer support for this year’s call-in from community activists, attorneys, students and others is inspiring,” said attorney Allan Wernick, director of Citizenship Now! and a law professor at Baruch College. Wernick also writes the “Immigration” column for the Daily News.  "We will provide the information and referrals needed by immigrants to naturalize and for other immigration goals,” he said. “For undocumented immigrants, the best defense to deportation is getting legal status and we are here to help.”

Citizenship NOW! – the largest program of its kind in the nation –was co-launched by the Daily News and CUNY in April 2004 to address the lack of access to free and confidential i