School/Class News





April 26 & 27—Free Film Festival about North African Women’s Perspective on #MeToo & Other Topics

Thursday, April 26 & Friday, April 27, 2018
LaGuardia Community College/CUNY

Free and Open to the Public

What can be learned about gender identify from an exploration into how women in North Africa are reacting to #MeToo? How do North African women negotiate their social, professional, and political identities?

What can we learn from Amazigh cinema about transmission of cultural belonging and meaningful change? Can intimacy survive economic displacement? Can love sustain us?

These are some of the questions that will be addressed at the 4th annual New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF). The film festival, which is free and open go the public, will be presented over two days at the LaGuardia Performing Arts Center at LaGuardia Community College/CUNYon Thursday, April 26 and Friday, April 27, 2018.

The film festival is co-sponsored by Columbia University’s Middle East Institute, and is affiliated with the Festival International du Film Oriental de Genève (FIFOG).

The Amazigh, plural Imazighen, are a diverse people originally from North and Sub-Saharan Africa — now spread out across Morocco, Algeria, Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, and the larger diaspora. Commonly known as the Berbers (a term considered by some to be derogatory), academic researchers have identified evidence of the Amazigh as far back as 9,000 years ago.

“The Amazigh have an incredible history of fortitude and resilience. There’s much that can be learned from studying how the Imazighen have been able to hold onto language and culture, despite centuries of strife,” said NYFAF founder Habiba Boumlik, PhD, associate professor in theDepartment of Education and Language Acquisition at LaGuardia Community College/CUNY.

“We want to encourage young filmmakers to explore the rich diversity of Amazigh communities throughout the world. Last year, we featured films from filmmakers in Siwa, Egypt, and the Canary Islands; this year we’re showing short films from young filmmakers who grew up in the US, France and other areas of the European diaspora,” said Professor Boumlik, who grew up in Morocco and identifies as an Amazigh.

What: 2018 New York Forum of Amazigh Film (NYFAF)

Contemporary dramatic, documentary, and short films selected for the 2018 NYFAF explore how situations facing Amazigh women correlate to #MeToo and other topics.

Film selections include:

  • The Lock, a French-Tunisian documentary looking at the struggle between tradition and emancipation as three young women experience the tasfih, a “magical ritual that aims to protect them before marriage.”
  • Lidia Terki’s Paris la Blanche ( click here to watch a clip) tells the story of 70-year old Rekia who leaves her Algerian village to bring back her husband, an immigrant in France for 40 years.

When: 10:30am-8:30pm on Thursday, April 26; 10:30am-8pm on Friday, April 27, 2018

Thursday, April 26 — keynote speaker, Dr. Fazia Aitel from Claremont McKenna College, will present research on Amazigh expression and participate in a student-led discussion on gender issues across cultures, followed by a musical performance by Yuba, a reception and evening feature.

Friday, April 27 — audience members will vote on the Short Film Prize and meet the young women filmmakers in competition.

Click here for program

Where: The Little Theater, part of the LaGuardia Performing Arts Center at LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, 31-10 Thomson Ave., Long Island City, Queens

For more information, visit https://www.nyfaf.com/

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College, located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.


Lehman College Named a Top Producing Institution of Gilman Scholars

Lehman College was named as one of the top colleges in the nation for producing Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship winners, the U.S. Department of State announced. Lehman was tied for fourth among medium-sized colleges and universities, defined as having between 5,000 and 15,000 undergraduate students, with 13 Gilman winners in the academic year of 2016-17. The other schools with the same number of winners as Lehman included American University, SUNY New Paltz, The New School, and the University of New Hampshire.

Lehman College was one of three CUNY schools on the list, which was compiled by the department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs in collaboration with the Institute of International Education. Lehman has been recognized for its success in making international study and internships more accessible and inclusive for American students of all backgrounds through the Gilman program.

“We have spent the last two years developing and refining a strategic plan for campus internationalization,” said Dr. Harriet Fayne, interim provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. “Educating students about opportunities to study, conduct research or intern abroad is a key component of our strategic plan and one that supports the mission of the College and the expectation that Lehman graduates will be able to meet the challenges of a 21st century global economy and society. The Gilman Scholarship Program provides our students with opportunities that may otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, we recruit relentlessly and provide our students with multiple layers of support, individually and in groups, to obtain Gilman scholarships. We are thrilled by the distinction and we are most proud of our students.”

“This scholarship enabled me to expand the scope of my professional career and consider working in China,” explained Mairin Cahill, a Lehman College graudate and Gilman-winner. “I was inspired by the systems of healthcare delivery in China and was inspired to work on developing the healthcare system in the United States during my career. I see great potential for collaboration with Chinese health policymakers and their counterparts in the United States and making our system of care more equitable.”

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program, with the support of the U.S. Congress, is reshaping study abroad to make it more accessible and inclusive for American students. The Gilman Program broadens the U.S. student population that studies and interns abroad by providing scholarships to outstanding undergraduates who, due to financial constraints, might not otherwise participate. Since the program’s establishment in 2001, over 1,300 U.S. institutions have sent more than 25,000 Gilman scholars to 145 countries around the globe.

About Lehman College: The City University of New York’s only four-year college in the Bronx, serving the borough and surrounding region as an intellectual, economic, and cultural center. Lehman provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.

 

Media Contact:

Joseph Tirella

718/960-8013


RESEARCH & CREATIVITY WEEK: LISSET DURAN’S AWARD-WINNING RESEARCH ON BREAST CANCER GENETICS

Research & Creativity Week: Lisset Duran’s Award-Winning Research on Breast Cancer Genetics

 

This year’s Research & Creativity Week (April 30 – May 4) will feature John Jay’s talented student researchers, including those that are receiving awards for groundbreaking innovations in the sciences.

Lisset Duran (’18), who is part of the Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math (PRISM), is the first student at John Jay to ever receive the extremely prestigious CUNY Jonas Salk Award, which is given to graduating students for their potential to make significant contributions to medical research. The award recognized her research in genetics, which she’ll be presenting at Research & Creativity Week.

“My research has been on the regulation of genes in breast cancer,” says Duran. “By targeting certain proteins, I want to understand the expressions of genes that are beneficial to cells.”

Recognition of Duran’s research has been nationwide, and prior to earning the Salk Award, Duran attended the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) conference and the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Annual Meeting, where she was given awards for the quality of her research as well as her presentation skills. “Part of being a scientist is being able to communicate,” says Duran.

 

“My research has been on the regulation of genes in breast cancer. By targeting certain proteins, I want to understand the expressions of genes that are beneficial to cells.” —Lisset Duran ’18

 

Duran, who is graduating with an undergraduate degree in Cellular and Molecular Biology, will be attending Princeton’s Ph.D. program in biology this fall, and she eventually dreams of working with NASA. “I have crazy dreams and PRISM has always supported them,” she says. “At John Jay, I’ve been doing research on a graduate student level, and I’ve been given so much responsibility. That’s why I feel so well prepared for my Ph.D.”

But before she leaves campus, she’s prepared to impress those who want to learn more about her research. John Jay community members and visitors will be able to witness for themselves Duran’s findings on May 2.

Check the Research & Creativity Week calendar for a full listing of events.


Lehman Adds New Interdisciplinary Data Science Minor

The study of data science has been exploding on campuses throughout the country as demand for employees with skills in data analysis, modeling and statistics, and engineering and prototyping continues to increase. According to LinkedIn, data scientist is the second fastest growing job in the United States and among the highest paying.

Now, the Lehman College School of Natural and Social Sciences (NSS) has announced the creation of its own Data Science minor. The minor will officially begin in the Fall 2018 semester, but classes students have already taken will be counted toward its completion.

The minor encompasses a five-course area of study with three required classes: Mathematics 128: Foundations of Data Science; Mathematics 328: Techniques in Data Science; and Sociology 3470: Reasoning with Data. Students will also be required to take a statistics course and another elective from a list of data focused classes across different disciplines. As the program grows, more electives will be added.

“Data science is an exciting career path for people from a variety of backgrounds,” said Elin Waring, a professor in the Department of Sociology and co-coordinator of the program along Megan Owen, an assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. “Data science skills are also increasingly necessary for many different careers as the use of data grows across all sectors,” she said. “Being knowledgeable about how data is used is also an essential part of being an informed citizen in the 21st century.”

Data Science combines “statistics, coding, and domain knowledge,” according to Waring. And that knowledge is becoming necessary for professionals in engineering, chemistry, sociology, and business.

“Over the past three years, NSS has looked for ways to build intellectual and academic bridges between the natural and social sciences—and a robust interdisciplinary data science program fits seamlessly into that vision,” says Christopher Malone, associate dean of Lehman’s School of Natural and Social Sciences. “It has been truly remarkable to see our faculty come together and think through the merits and goals of data science at Lehman, and then develop a program that will benefit students across NSS and the College in their career paths.”

About Lehman College: The City University of New York’s only four-year college in the Bronx, serving the borough and surrounding region as an intellectual, economic, and cultural center. Lehman provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.

 

Media Contact:

Joseph Tirella

718/960-8013


CHAMPION OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS RASHIDA MANJOO AND PIONEERING CRIMINOLOGIST RONALD V. CLARKE TO RECEIVE HONORARY DEGREES FROM JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Champion of Women’s Rights Rashida Manjoo and Pioneering Criminologist Ronald V. Clarke to Receive Honorary Degrees from John Jay College of Criminal Justice

 

New York, NY, April 11, 2018 – John Jay College of Criminal Justice today announced that honorary degrees will be presented to Rashida Manjoo, Professor of Public Law at University of Cape Town, South Africa and former United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, and Ronald V. Clarke, University Professor at the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice  and theoretical innovator of situational crime prevention.

These internationally recognized scholars will address the Class of 2018 at the College’s 53rd Commencement exercises on Wednesday, May 30 at Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing, N.Y.

“Our 2018 honorees have demonstrated their dedication to the cause of justice through their exemplary work on women’s rights and crime prevention,” said John Jay College President Karol V. Mason, who will preside over the ceremonies. “We look forward to welcoming them as official members of our college community and as inspirations for our exceptional graduating class.”

 

Rashida Manjoo

Rashida Manjoo

For over 30 years, Manjoo has been an international human rights advocate, particularly in the area of women’s rights as human rights. She was a trailblazer in the fight for a binding global treaty to recognize extreme domestic violence against women as human rights violations. Appointed as the Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women by the United Nations Commission on Human Rights in 2009, a position that she held until 2015, Manjoo gave special attention to violence against women and girls with disabilities. Her thematic reports to the Human Rights Council and the General Assembly have focused on state responsibility to act with due diligence to promote and protect all the rights of all women.   Prior to her work at the United Nations, Manjoo had decades of experience as an anti-Apartheid activist and women’s liberation campaigner in South Africa. Trained as a lawyer, she also served as the former Parliamentary Commissioner of the Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) of South Africa, where she was involved in active research and in the monitoring of the country’s progress in promoting and protecting women’s rights.  She is currently the co-convenor of the Human Rights Program within the Law Faculty at the University of Cape Town and has authored many reports, journal articles, and books including Women’s Charters and Declarations: Building Another World.

 

 

Ronald V. Clarke
Ronald V. Clarke
One of the most important figures in criminal justice research and education, Clarke has helped to transform the study of criminology over the past four decades. His work has reshaped crime prevention strategies worldwide to focus on changing the characteristics of the situations in which crimes occur. Over the past 25 years, this concept has help lead to significant crime reduction in New York City, the United States and other nations. Clarke previously worked in various capacities for the Home Office Research and Planning Unit, the British government’s criminological research department, where he became director in 1982. While at the Home Office, Clarke helped to develop the rational choice theory on crime and to launch the British Crime Survey, the British counterpart to the U.S. National Crime Victimization Survey. He began his academic career in the United States in 1984 as a professor at Temple University and later became the Dean of the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University. Clarke is the associate director of the Center for Problem-Oriented Policing, a virtual institute supported by the U.S. Department of Justice. In 2015, he was awarded the prestigious Stockholm Prize in Criminology. The founding editor of the anthology Crime Prevention Studies, Clarke also is author or co-author of more than 300 books, monographs and papers.

 

 

 

 

Manjoo will be awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters and Clarke will receive the honorary degree of Doctor of Science. For more information about John Jay’s Commencement ceremonies, visit the Commencement site.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of researching and advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.

 


Novelist and Memoirist André Aciman (‘73) Will Deliver the Keynote Address at Lehman College’s 50th Annual Commencement and Receive the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award

André Aciman (‘73), whose bestselling novel, Call Me By Your Name, was turned into an Academy Award-winning film last year, will be the keynote speaker at Lehman College’s 50 annual Commencement ceremonies on May 31. Aciman, who earned his bachelor’s in English at Lehman, will also receive the Alumni Achievement Award. Professor Emeritus Jacob Judd will be honored with a Doctorate of Humane Letters for his decades-long devotion to the College.

“It is a great honor to welcome André Aciman and Professor Emeritus Jacob Judd, both proud members of the Lehman College family, back to campus,” said Lehman President José Luis Cruz. “It is also our pleasure to acknowledge both of these scholars for their distinguished accomplishments.”

Aciman, a distinguished professor in the Comparative Literature program at the CUNY Graduate Center, as well as the director of the Center’s Writers’ Institute, is the author of four novels, including last year’s Enigma Variations—hailed by The New York Times as “a magnificent, living thing.” In addition, Aciman has published two collections of essays; edited another volume of essays on Marcel Proust; and written a memoir, Out of Egypt, which won a Whiting Award in 1996.

The multifaceted writer has regularly discussed his writing career and undergraduate experiences at Lehman when he has returned in campus in recent years. Aciman has said that his years at Lehman were important in his development as a writer, particularly when he studied with Joseph Tusiani, a professor emeritus of the College’s Languages and Literatures department. “I went to the Bronx every day on the 4 train. I was working three jobs,” he said. “It was so pedestrian and plodding; everything about me was so plebeian. Yet I’d get to the Bronx and here we were—Tusiani and I—two minds totally committed to what was timeless, to what was great.”

Born in Alexandria, Egypt, Aciman spent much of his teens in Italy and France before moving with his family to New York City. After graduating with a B.A. in comparative literature from Lehman in 1973, he earned his master’s and doctoral degrees at Harvard University. He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a fellowship from The New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. Aciman’s work has appeared in publications including The New York TimesThe New YorkerThe New York Review of BooksThe New Republic, and The Paris Review, as well as in several volumes of The Best American Essays.

Professor Emeritus Jacob Judd, author of several books on early American history, including multiple volumes of The Van Cortland Family Papers which he edited, began teaching fulltime at Hunter College in 1963. He joined the faculty at Hunter College’s Bronx campus in 1967, a year before it was renamed Herbert H. Lehman College. He earned his B.A., as well as his M.A. and Ph.D. at N.Y.U. While at Lehman, he chaired the history department from 1980 to 1992, and also served as acting dean of arts and humanities. A specialist in New York history, and in America’s colonial era, Professor Judd has written extensively on political and economic developments within New York City and Westchester County in the 17th to 19th centuries. In addition, he was a faculty member of the CUNY Graduate Center’s Ph.D. program in history for over 15 years. After retiring in 1998, he served as the chairman of the Lehman College Retirees Association until stepping down in 2016.

Lehman College’s 50th annual Commencement ceremony will be held on May 31, 2018 at 10 a.m. on the South Field on campus. The event is free and open to the public.

About Lehman College: The City University of New York’s only four-year college in the Bronx, serving the borough and surrounding region as an intellectual, economic, and cultural center. Lehman provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.


FROM THE ASHES: DOCUMENTARY SCREENING AND DISCUSSION ON THE IMPACTS OF COAL

 

John Jay College of Criminal Justice will host a screening and panel discussion on “From the Ashes” – a documentary that captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Directed by Michael Bonfiglio, “From the Ashes” premiered at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival and the National Geographic Channel.

The screening and panel discussion will take place on Thursday, April 26, 2018 from 6:30-8:30 PM in room L.63 at 524 West 59 Street between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues.

Before the screening: Introduction by Katherine Oliver, Executive Producer of “From the Ashes,” Principal at Bloomberg Associates and Trustee of the John Jay College Foundation

After the screening: A discussion with Sidney Beaumont, Producer of “From the Ashes” and Dr. Gerald Markowitz, Distinguished Professor Department of History at John Jay College, member of the National Academy of Medicine, and author of works on occupational safety and health including Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children, co-written with Professor David Rosner of Columbia University.

To RSVP, visit: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/from-the-ashes-film-screening-tickets-43025669937

View official movie trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV0ro0uleVo

Refreshments will be served.


Librarian Co-Authors Children’s Literature Guide

Meagan Lacy

Meagan Lacy, Information Literacy Librarian

Meagan Lacy, Guttman Information Literacy Librarian, is the co-author with Pauline Dewan, Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario, of Connecting Children with Classics: A Reader-Centered Approach to Selecting and Promoting Great Literature (ABC-CLIO, 2018, ISBN 978-1-4408-4439-3).

This readers’ advisory and collection development guide identifies hundreds of books that can help children connect with books and develop into engaged readers. It enables children’s librarians, collection development specialists in public libraries, and K–8 school librarians and teachers to choose from the best in traditional and modern children’s titles.

The book focuses on readers and their needs, rather than simply categorizing books by their characteristics and features as traditional literature guides do. Taking this unusual perspective brings forth powerful new tools and curricular ideas on how to promote the classics, and how to best engage with young readers and meet their personal and emotional needs to boost interest and engagement.


Recent CCNY grad Joel Sati wins $90K Soros fellowship for graduate school

Recent CCNY grad Joel Sati is the recipient of a $90,000 Soros Fellowship.

Award supports 30 stellar immigrants and children of immigrants

Kenyan-born Joel Sati, a 2016 City College of New York alumnus, is one of 30 recipients of 2018 Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans. The program provides $90,000 each to outstanding immigrants and children of immigrants for graduate studies in the United States.

Sati and his cohort were selected from a pool of 1,766 applicants for their potential to make significant contributions to U.S. society, culture, or their academic fields. The Fellows are all the children of immigrants, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) recipients, green card holders, or naturalized citizens.

“Whether it is through scientific discovery, business, literature, medicine, or law, immigrants enrich our everyday lives in the United States in profound ways. As a country, we need to refocus our attention on immigrant contributions,” said Craig Harwood, the fellowship program director.

The new Fellows join a prestigious community of recipients from past years, which includes former US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy; Fei-Fei Li, chief scientist of artificial intelligence and machine learning at GoogleCloud and Lieutenant Governor Cyrus Habib of Washington.

“Coming from a working class immigrant background, being honored in this way is one of the best achievements I could have ever hoped for,” said Sati, who earned a BA in philosophy from CCNY.

The $90,000 fellowship will support his work toward a PhD in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program at UC Berkeley, and a JD at the Yale Law School.

Sati arrived in the U.S. at age nine with his mother, who worked hard to educate him in Georgia, Maryland, and later New York. His college years were challenging as an undocumented student. There was a measure of relief in summer 2012 when President Barack Obama authorized the DACA program, which protected individuals like Sati from deportation.

“It’s always great to make my mum proud. It’s because of her that I am where I am,” Sati thanked his mother. “I’m also thankful to The City College of New York. For years it has helped amplify the stories of immigrants like myself, and I would not be where I am without CCNY.”

He credited his success to his mentors in the Skadden, Arps Honors Program in Legal Studies, which is housed in CCNY’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership; in the Philosophy Department, and in the City College Fellowship program.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
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e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

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Forbes Ranks Queens College a 2018 America’s “Best Value” College; Recognizes its Success with Upward Mobility

— Queens Ranks Fifth Among 35 Best Value Public and Private Schools in New York State and Among the Top 25 Public Colleges Nationwide —

 Queens, N.Y., April 17, 2018—Queens College has been ranked a 2018 America’s Best Value College by Forbes magazine, with special recognition for its success with upward mobility—the percentage of students from the bottom 20% income distribution who reach the top 20% as indicated by their salaries at mid-career. With an overall showing at 51 out of 300 colleges evaluated, Queens also was ranked fifth among the 35 public and private schools in New York State recognized by Forbes and among the top 25 Best Value public colleges nationwide.

Among colleges in New York State, Queens ranked higher than Barnard, Binghamton, Cornell, and New York University, and placed near the top of all City University of New York schools. Only three schools nationally that ranked higher than Queens College have lower undergraduate resident tuition rates.

“Our inclusion on the Forbes 2018 America’s Best Value Colleges list validates what we have long known about a Queens College education,” says QC President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Its impressive combination of academic excellence and competitive affordability serves as a pathway for exceptionally talented and determined young men and women—many of modest means—toward successful and rewarding futures.”

According to Forbes, only 14% of students pay the full four-year tuition at private schools, while 77% of those attending four-year public schools received some form of financial aid in 2015-16—as did 86% of those who attended private ones. (Read the National Center for Education Statistics report here.) In the belief that “a high-value education should empower students who don’t already come from wealth,” Forbes identified and ranked its Best Value colleges based on such criteria as net price, net debt, alumni earnings, timely graduation, school quality and access for low-income students—those who are Pell Grant eligible. Only institutions offering four-year degrees were evaluated; private for-profit schools like University of Phoenix or DeVry University were excluded. For state schools, Forbes used in-state tuition. Learn more about the methodology used here.

See the full Forbes 2018 America’s Best Value Colleges list here.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a
leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received more than 60 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu

 


Office Hours with Professor Victor Goode

Professor Victor Goode If we asked you to pen your own introduction, what would you add to the “standard faculty intro” to give us the really important stuff?

In many ways, I’ve been a “legal architect” throughout my career. By that I mean that I’ve helped build several important legal institutions, including the National Conference of Black Lawyers (NCBL) and CUNY Law School. I’m proud that both continue to stand as beacons for lawyers and students seeking to do progressive legal work.

What’s new and exciting in your classroom this semester?

I have to say that after thirty-five years of teaching, there’s not much really new this semester. But my Contemplative Practice and the Law class is always different and interesting, certainly for me, and, I hope, for my students. In this course, students explore their emerging professional identity and examine how their values have evolved through this socialization process. When that happens, the discussions are always interesting and different.

The other day, a student told a story about a school desegregation lawsuit in her hometown. This was an important event in her life because her father was involved in the lawsuit, and, as a result of the case, she attended the town’s first integrated high school. She had never told this story in three years of law school and it was our discussion about values and motivation to do public interest work that opened the space for her to have that conversation. These are the kinds of “teaching moments” that the Contemplative class generates every semester.

 

If you could recruit anyone to guest lecture in your class, who would it be – and what would they talk about?

I’d love to have our former dean and my friend Haywood Burns talk to my class about his work on the Attica Defense Committee. Haywood was the first Director of NCBL and I was the third, so our life paths have crossed many times. He was also a former president of the National Lawyers Guild and was a strong believer in building coalitions. I think today many students are exploring how to do social justice lawyering and could learn much from his experience. While the Attica cases were extraordinary for many reasons, they were also a model of how progressive lawyers organized themselves to respond to the legal needs of their time.

 

You’re known as CUNY Law’s meditation guru… since 1983. Can you tell us about how your meditation practice grounds or informs your legal career?

Although I had a meditation practice when I started teaching at CUNY Law, it was not something that I shared with my colleagues and students until years later. In those early days, meditation was often associated with religious rituals, and, so, it was generally assumed to be a private matter. Not until we began our Contemplative Program at the law school in 2001 did meditation become recognized as a secular activity and a skill that could be useful in the practice of law.

Today, I would advise every new lawyer to cultivate the skill of meditation. Its impact on reducing stress is well-documented, and it has shown to be very useful in a variety of legal activities, including client interviewing and counseling, negotiating, and even conducting a trial. Being more centered and less reactive are traits that we should all cultivate.

 

Do you have any alumni in your inbox right now?

I have many. In fact, the only reason I got a Facebook page was at the urging of former students who told me it was a simple way of staying in touch. From my modest number of FB “friends,” I’d say about 200 are former students.

But the alums that are in my real daily inbox are those who have joined us as teachers and administrators at the law school. Joe Rosenberg and David Nadvorney are two that have been my colleagues for many years. But I’m happy to also count Camille Massey, Allie Robbins, and Ryan Dooley as more recent alumni colleagues whom I interact with on a regular basis.  I know I’m leaving some out, but CUNY has been very good about reaching out to its alums for adjunct and administrative positions, and they’ve all been invaluable because they bring their perspectives as former students along with their skills as accomplished lawyers to their work at CUNY.

Before teaching, did you have any other jobs or experiences that might surprise us?

I worked as a lawyer for ten years before going into teaching, but I haven’t really had any career outside of the law. I went straight from college to law school and started my first job with the Vindicate Society in Newark, New Jersey doing juvenile defense work, while also organizing for the National Conference of Black Lawyers. As a mid-westerner from the rust belt, I worked various jobs through my college years. They included a steel plant, a chemical factory, and every Christmas a temporary stint with the Post Office. The challenges of those jobs made me very determined to continue my education and pursue other options.

 

Do you have any morning rituals? Blogs or news you always check or a meditation practice you like to check in on?

I confess to being a news junkie, so I read the online version of the New York Times every morning. Frequently I’m either moved or annoyed by some story and take advantage of the “comments” section to express my opinion. Some have gained favorable responses from other readers, and a number have been NY Times picks, which means the editors thought they added something significant to the discussion. A few weeks ago, one of my comments attracted over 1,000 positive recommendations, and, on a few occasions, the Times staff suggested I transform the comment into a letter to the editor.

My meditation time depends on how I feel. But, I tend to meditate more in the evenings than in the morning. Evening meditation helps me settle the mind and let go of the day’s events before going to sleep.

 

What can’t you let go of? Is there anything that holds you enthralled, that you want to keep on people’s radar, or that is keeping you up at night?

As my mentor and friend Arthur Kinoy said, “those who aspire to greatness in the law must immerse themselves in the political turmoil of the day.” I’ve never really sought “greatness,” but I’ve always been acutely aware of the relationship between law and our political economy. And like many today, I can’t “let go” of the many ways in which our legal system has been captured by forces that are not only disparaging human rights but destroying the planet itself.

As a child of the 50s, I lived with the prospects of a possible nuclear war. Today, our students have seen the risk of that tragedy re-emerge, along with the very real prospects of catastrophic dislocations from climate disruptions. The real possibilities of these events definitely keep me up at night.

 

What’s one question you wish more students would ask you?

The question that must always be on the minds of every student is “why?”  It’s not so important that they ask me, but that they ask themselves. Ours is an evidence-based discipline, and so there must be reason and fact behind all that we do. “Why” reflects the necessary skepticism that leads us to dig deeply to find the answers we seek.  And “why” keeps us alive to the unfolding wonders of the universe.


Shaun King to Deliver Keynote Address at 2018 CUNY School of Professional Studies Commencement Ceremony

shaun king photoNew York, NY – April 17, 2018 – The CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is honored to announce that Shaun King, journalist, humanitarian, and social activist, will deliver this year’s Commencement keynote to the Class of 2018 on Friday, June 1, at David Geffen Hall, Lincoln Center.

“Commencement is one of the most important events for our students, who will be celebrating the culmination of years of hard work, and I am sure that the audience will be inspired and moved by Mr. King’s experience and insights,” said Dean John Mogulescu. “I am delighted that he will be joining us on this meaningful day, and I am looking forward to meeting him and to hearing his message to our graduates.”

A Writer-In-Residence at Harvard Law School’s Fair Punishment Project, columnist for The Intercept and former Senior Justice Writer at the New York Daily News, King is known for his humane and passionate advocacy for justice and families, and is a fundraiser for victims of brutality and discrimination.

King adopted social media to unite people of disparate backgrounds for the Black Lives Matter movement, and has now become one of the most followed activists in the United States. He uses his platform as a journalist to unearth the truth beyond local media, and to organize in purposeful and directed ways.

King was the youngest student government president elected at Morehouse College since Dr. Martin Luther King was a student there in 1947. Before he was ever known nationally, he was a high school history and civics teacher in Atlanta, then a traveling teacher and counselor at a dozen different jails, prisons, and youth detention centers in Georgia. King started and pastored a church in inner city Atlanta and launched several award-winning social good campaigns that raised millions of dollars for causes around the world.

As a speaker, King offers a historically grounded take on the most pressing problems of the day. He has now spoken in 35 states, on over 100 college campuses, in jails and prisons, and in corporate boardrooms. He has written an astounding 1,500 articles on injustice since 2014, and provides morning commentary on the Tom Joyner Morning Show heard by 6 million listeners in over 100 cities.

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


COMPETITION WINNER MONICA ZAMBRANO SAQUICELA (’18) CONFIDENTLY PURSUES A PUBLIC SERVICE CAREER

Competition Winner Monica Zambrano Saquicela (’18) Confidently Pursues a Public Service Career

 

Monica Zambrano Saquicela has always been ahead of the game. When she arrived to John Jay as a transfer student during her sophomore year, she immediately started taking graduate-level classes through the College’s combined Baccalaureate/Master’s Degree Program. This year, she’ll be graduating with an MPA in Inspection and Oversight, which allows her to pursue her dream of fighting international fraud and corruption.

Zambrano Saquicela, who is passionate about creating a just world for all, believes that inspection and oversight is essential for positive change. “There’s a lack of accountability in government,” she said. “I’m learning the mechanisms to prevent abuse and fraud.”

This year, Zambrano Saquicela and two other John Jay students attended the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA)-Batten Student Simulation, hosted at Baruch College, in order to gain an understanding of what it’s actually like to work in public administration. In a team of students from different colleges around New York, Zambrano Saquicela responded to a fictional pandemic using a computer simulation. Despite it being the first year that John Jay students attended, Zambrano Saquicela’s team won the competition. Their work will be sent to global judges that will rank it against local winners from other competition sites from all over the world.

 

Zambrano Saquicela

Monica Zambrano Saquicela

 

For Zambrano Saquicela, competing in the NASPAA-Batten Student Simulation was exhilarating, especially because she utilized skills that a real crisis would require, including quick thinking. “We were writing policy and recommendations in a one hour time frame,” she said. “Our team went in giving it our all.”

It isn’t the first time that Zambrano Saquicela has demonstrated excellence in her ability to respond to complex public administration problems. She currently sits on the executive board of the John Jay United Nations Student Association (UNSA), which has competed for over 13 years in the annual National Model United Nations event with thousands of students from all over the world. In 2016, the John Jay team earned the conference’s top honor, the Outstanding Delegation Award.

Though Zambrano Saquicela grew up in New York, it’s only because of her involvement with UNSA that she’s been able to visit the United Nations General Assembly. The experience was eye-opening in that it allowed her to understand how global governance could help people in need.

 

“There are so many global issues I care about. My parents are Ecuadorian, and I grew up traveling to Ecuador, so I’ve always wanted to travel and have an influence on other nations.”—Monica Zambrano Saquicela

 

“Working at the UN is my dream job,” she says. “There are so many global issues I care about, and I believe in the UN’s mission of influencing governance around the globe. My parents are Ecuadorian, and I grew up traveling to Ecuador, so I’ve always wanted to travel and have an influence on other nations.”

Zambrano Saquicela is doing all she can to prepare herself for that dream career and is finding the opportunities at John Jay to do so. She credits her professors as people who are deeply invested in the success of their students and have a wealth of knowledge to share. Equipped with that knowledge, Zambrano Saquicela, who is the first in her family to pursue a master’s degree, anticipates graduating so she can begin a fruitful public service career. “I have a lot of hope because I have so much interest and passion,” she says. “The challenge is finding your starting point, but I’m sure I’ll find my way.”


JOHN JAY HOSTS FIRST-EVER CONFERENCE ON WOMEN IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

John Jay Hosts First-Ever Conference on Women in Law Enforcement

 

On March 23, during Women’s History Month, John Jay hosted the first-ever Symposium on Women in Law Enforcement, sponsored by the John Jay College Department of Public Safety and the FBI-New York Office, and with generous support from Siemens Corporation. The daylong conference featured presentations from invited guests and John Jay faculty members on current topics in the field, including cybersecurity, community policing, and the opioid crisis. In attendance were alumni and students, as well as women employed in law enforcement, some of whom traveled from out of state to network and receive professional development on navigating the largely male-dominated field.

President Karol V. Mason opened the conference by recognizing John Jay’s status as a leader in criminal justice education: “As a college with over 55 percent female enrollment and many students aiming for a career in law enforcement, I can’t think of a more fitting place to have these discussions. By welcoming and encouraging more women leaders to join law enforcement, we’re more likely to make our communities safer and more just.”

“If you want to study criminal justice, you have to know not only who we deal with, but who we are. If women are underrepresented, that’s a worrisome thing.” –Professor Rosemary Barberet

John Jay faculty members Dr. Mangai Natarajan and Dr. Rosemary Barberet highlighted gender disparities in the criminal justice world, as well as the obstacles that contribute them, including maternity-leave issues and a lack of upward mobility for women. Barberet, who is editor of the journal Feminist Criminology, also announced the launch of a special issue that examines the experiences of women in criminal justice professions.

“There’s a fair amount of literature written about women as offenders and a huge amount written about women as survivors of violence,” Barberet said. “But there’s little on women in the criminal justice profession. If you want to study criminal justice, you have to know not only who we deal with, but who we are. If women are underrepresented, that’s a worrisome thing.”

Dr. Tracie Keesee

Dr. Tracie Keesee

Dr. Tracie L. Keesee, Officer of Inclusivity and Diversity at the NYPD, pointed out that today, 18% of the NYPD is comprised of women. But despite this sizable number, women still face several challenges, including being given a disproportionate amount of administrative work, regardless of their strengths and interests. The office Keesee works for, which was developed at the beginning of 2018, seeks to eliminate those obstacles.

“This is a wonderful career, but is it perfect? No,” Keesee told the audience. “But can it be perfect? Yes.”

Conference attendants also heard from women whose experiences in law enforcement opened the door to a range of related careers. Sarah Bynum, Director of Security at Siemens Energy, spoke about utilizing the skills she gained after 20 years of enforcement experience to enter the world of security. She now handles physical security, intellectual property protection, and crisis management at one of the largest industrial engineering companies in the world. “If you can solve a house burglary, you can solve anything,” Bynum said.

The idea for the conference came about when FBI-NY Supervisory Special Agent Dina Thompson contacted Dr. Diego Redondo, Director of Public Safety, with concerns that there weren’t enough training opportunities specifically for women in law enforcement. Given that the conference was the first of its kind, Barberet considers it a tremendous success and sees potential for it to grow in the future, including as a professional development resource for John Jay’s undergraduate students. “I think this is the sort of thing that our undergraduates should attend,” she said. “That way, they can see role models.”


SENIOR ISMARY CALDERON IS BOTH DREAMING AND DOING

Senior Ismary Calderon is Both Dreaming and Doing

Third from left, Ismary Calderon attends a rally in support of the DREAM Act in Washington D.C.

 

Ismary Calderon makes courage look easy, even though she describes herself as shy. During her first year at John Jay, she started an internship with the Unaccompanied Latin American Minor Project (U-LAMP), and ever since then, she’s been learning how to use her voice as a leader for change, especially in the field of immigrant rights. Through the internship, Calderon served as a pro-bono translator and interpreter to help children communicate with immigration lawyers. “It was life-changing,” Calderon says.

As an undocumented student with family in both the U.S. and Mexico, the work hit close to home. Calderon soon realized that she was driven to complete her education in order to help people in need.

“Money doesn’t matter,” Calderon says. “I can use my bilingual skills in an environment in which I am needed and have passion for. Who doesn’t want to work in an environment they’re passionate about?”

Ismary Calderon

Ismary Calderon

During her sophomore year, she became part of CUNY Dreamers, a student-led organization dedicated to supporting all CUNY students regardless of immigration status. Since then, she has become more involved in local and national activism, joining the John Jay Dreamers and frequently traveling to D.C. with the group United We Dream to support Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the federal immigration bill that has come under fire under the current administration. In D.C., she used creative ways to get the attention of legislators, even setting up a cage-like structure using PVC pipes to symbolize feeling trapped by harsh immigration policies. That action, and others that Calderon was involved with, made national headlines.

“In spite of being undocumented, in spite of being in a minority group, in spite of it all, I realize I have a lot of power,” Calderon says. “Even though I shake when I speak, or my voice wants to break, I look at the people fighting beside me and I remember their stories.”

Calderon says that thinking of the children that she provided legal help to with U-LAMP motivates her to continue her activism. “Being undocumented made me see that I could be either person—I could be the lawyer in the future, or I could be the person in the deportation proceedings,” she says.

Ismary Calderon

Last year, Calderon switched her major to Spanish in order to perfect her translation skills, so she can continue to work with immigrant communities. But Calderon continues to indulge her love for science by taking Environmental Studies classes and encouraging her classmates to think in greener ways. As someone who grew up taking walks on the Staten Island shoreline, she is committed to using what she learns to promote protecting the environment.

“My experience here has been beyond inspirational,” Calderon says of her time overall at John Jay. The community Calderon has built on campus has become like a second family, but right now, her real family is divided. While Calderon pursues her degree in New York, her mother lives in Mexico. But despite the distance, the bond between the two women is obvious. When asked to pose for the photo to run with this article, Calderon’s face lights up. “Yes!” she says, without hesitation. “My mother will be so excited to see me.”


JOHN JAY STUDENTS AND FACULTY HOSTED EVENTS FOR THE 62ND UNITED NATIONS COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN

John Jay Students and Faculty Hosted Events for the 62nd United Nations Commission on the Status of Women

 

John Jay is known as a leader in preparing students for careers in international relations, and this March, following a years-long tradition, students and faculty members participated in the 62nd United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW). The annual two-week series is devoted to exploring issues that impact women across the globe and finding solutions to gender inequity.

In past years, students have attended session events at the U.N. headquarters. For this year’s UNCSW, which was focused on empowering rural women and girls, faculty members Jodie Roure and Gabriela Ramirez-Vargas of the Latin American Studies Department received an invitation to organize a UN-sponsored panel at John Jay. According to Ramirez-Vargas, the invitation was extended for two reasons: Roure’s extensive research into the rise of domestic violence against women in Puerto Rico post-Hurricane Maria, and Roure’s commitment to involving students in her work.

Gloria Genao at U.N.

Gloria Genao

“We like to include students at every level,” says Ramirez-Vargas, who moderated the panel and recruited students to collect the data she presented. The panel explored how international law could eliminate violence, and it featured several prominent speakers from across the globe, including Rashida Manjoo, Professor at the University of Cape Town and Former U.N. Special Rapporteur for Violence Against Women. Students had the opportunity to meet and network with Manjoo and others, an experience that Ramirez-Vargas says is extremely valuable for their future careers.

“These opportunities open up doors for students,” she says. “Hearing these leaders tell their stories and how they got to their positions inspires students. Even being inside the U.N. building is empowering.”

Graduate students from the International Crime and Justice Department also partook in UNCSW events. Gloria Genao, who is completing a master’s degree in International Crime and Justice, is an intern at the International Sociological Association (ISA), an organization that she represents at U.N. General Assembly meetings. She organized a side event for the UNCSW, and while it shocked her to learn facts like half of all rural women lack basic literacy skills, the conference ultimately filled her with hope. “We’re in 2018, but a lot of women are still suffering,” she says. “It was amazing to see so many countries—from Sierra Leone to Spain—coming together to try to make a difference.”

Genao, who speaks English, Spanish, and French, earned a law degree in the Dominican Republic, where she was born and raised. When she moved to New York, she enrolled in John Jay with an interest in learning more about international law, but because she had never taken classes in English, the program was at times difficult. “For me, it wasn’t easy to get this degree because I think in Spanish,” she says.

 

“We’re in 2018, but a lot of women are still suffering. It was amazing to see so many countries—from Sierra Leone to Spain—coming together to try to make a difference.” —Gloria Genao ’18

 

Despite the obstacles, Genao exceled and will graduate in May. Genao, who is in the process of becoming a citizen, expects the opportunities she’s received at John Jay to lead to new possibilities for her career. “With this master’s, I hope I can become even more involved at UN and start working on international cases,” she says. “I’m in love with this field.”


RESEARCH & CREATIVITY WEEK: JOSEPH MAHMUD’S JOB APP FOR FORMERLY INCARCERATED INDIVIDUALS

Research & Creativity Week: Joseph Mahmud’s Job App for Formerly Incarcerated Individuals

 

This year’s Research & Creativity week (April 30 – May 4) is set to have some of John Jay’s most talented students present their latest innovations, research projects and portfolios.

One of the highly anticipated presentations comes from Joseph Mahmud (’18), who is creating an app that helps formerly incarcerated individuals find jobs. “My team members and I want to increase social equity by creating an app for iPhones and Androids that helps people with criminal records find and connect with future employers,” says Mahmud. “It’ll be similar to a LinkedIn or Jopwell, but with companies open to and looking to hire this demographic to increase their diversity and make a social impact.”

 

“My team members and I want to increase social equity by creating an app for iPhones and Androids that helps people with criminal records find and connect with future employers.” —Joseph Mahmud ’18

 

Mahmud, a Public Policy and Administration major, and his fellow team members, Steven Pacheco, a CUNY B.A. major, and Donauta Watson-Starcevic, an English major, are the inaugural fellows of the Ron Moelis Social Innovation Fellowship, and they’re in the process of submitting their app plans to the Echoing Green Social Impact Challenge competition. “It’s great having a team with diverse backgrounds,” says Mahmud, “because we all bring different perspectives to the project.”

Being a Pinkerton Fellow at The Legal Aid Society and working with the Prisoner Reentry Institute (PRI) has shown Mahmud the gaps formerly incarcerated individuals face when reaching for a second chance at success. “With my Human Resources concentration, I’m hoping to open the doors to different human resource organizations,” says Mahmud. “I’d like to help companies understand if their hiring polices are out-of-date, or if they’re indirectly detrimental to society.”

After graduation Mahmud is planning on getting his master’s degree in Public Policy and Administration through John Jay’s MPA program. But before graduation, he’s primed and ready to wow his fellow students, faculty, staff and visitors with his app presentation on May 3 during Research & Creativity Week.

Check the Research & Creativity Week calendar for a full listing of events.


DEBORAH KOETZLE, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, RECEIVES CITY & STATE NEW YORK ABOVE & BEYOND AWARD

Deborah Koetzle, Associate Professor, Receives City & State New York Above & Beyond Award

 

Deborah Koetzle, Ph.D., Associate Professor and the Executive Officer of the Doctoral Program in Criminal Justice, was in El Salvador working to help improve severe prison overcrowding, when she received an unexpected email from City & State New York, a media organization dedicated to covering local politics and policy. The email said that she would be one of their 30 Above & Beyond Award Honorees, recognizing extraordinary women in education, health, labor, law/lobbying, government and real estate. “I was shocked,” says Koetzle. “There are so many people here at John Jay, and elsewhere, doing such amazing work. And when you’re in the weeds, I think we sometimes forget that what we’re doing actually makes a difference. It was a huge validation that the work I’m doing really matters.”

Koetzle believes her biggest educational contributions center around her research on correctional rehabilitation and reducing recidivism. “A lot of my work focuses on identifying programs that are effective, and transferring that research to different agencies and practitioners, such as probation officers, correctional officers or drug counselors,” says Koetzle. Her research has added to a whole body of literature on recidivism, dating back to the 1980s. And some of her findings have been both eye opening and transformative for criminal justice practitioners.

 

“It seems counter intuitive, but we’ve found that spending your energies on high-risk offenders is actually more effective than spending your energies on low-risk offenders.” —Deborah Koetzle

 

“It seems counter intuitive, but we’ve found that spending your energies on high-risk offenders is actually more effective than spending your energies on low-risk offenders,” says Koetzle. Her research shows that low-risk offenders have strong family ties, jobs and schooling that could be negatively impacted with intensive treatment. Whereas high-risk offenders, who often don’t have strong support networks, could truly benefit from decision-making and impulse-control training. “If someone is more likely to reoffend, they probably don’t have as many positive role models in their life, and there could be some deficits,” says Koetzle. “Treatment teaches them how to engage with others, celebrate without getting high, manage without drugs and alcohol, and identify positive friends and relationships. By building up these strengths, you can significantly prevent reoffending.”

In recognition of Koetzle’s work with her Ph.D. students and research fighting recidivism, on March 28, 2018, she was honored at City & State New York’s 30 Most Remarkable Women gala at the Dream Hotel. “Looking at the list of people being honored, I was awed to be a part of the event,” says Koetzle. “And also, as a woman, I hope to serve as a role model for students, showing them that women can do a lot. We all know this, but I think it’s important to see women in leadership positions, being active across a variety of settings.”


CUNY TV WINS TWO NEW YORK EMMY AWARDS

CUNY TV, The City University of New York’s Independent television station, added two more New York Emmy® Awards at The 61st Annual New York Emmy® Awards Gala on Saturday, April 14, 2018. This brings the station’s total Emmy count to 18 over three decades of broadcasting.

“The Emmys speak to the extraordinary value that CUNY TV brings to New Yorkers who want to understand our changing world,”said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Our congratulations go to station executive director Gail Yancosek and her insightful and creative team.”

Both of the winning programs are from CUNY TV’s signature and multiple award-winning magazine series, Nueva York. Its senior producer is City College of New York professor Jerry Carlson, who was among the producers accepting the award. Several graduates of his program were involved in making these programs: Alex Lora Ceros, Sarah Foudy and Carmen Vidal.

Winning in the environment category was a Nueva York  segment, “Sure We Can,” which premiered on Jan. 5, 2017. Alex Lora Ceros was the producer. Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLPi2x5xin8&feature=youtu.be&t=10m7s

Winning in the politics/government category was the Nueva York segment “D.C. Women’s March,” which premiered on June 8, 2017. Its producer and editor was Sara Foudy; Diana Vargas and Carmen Vidal also were producers.  Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TqUt6ehXu1E&feature=youtu.be&t=2m27s

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GRAD STUDENT JENNIFER HOLST (’18) IS MOTIVATED TO MAKE THE INTERNET SAFER

Grad Student Jennifer Holst (’18) is Motivated to Make the Internet Safer

 

Studying the brain might not be what comes to mind when you think of cyber security, but Jennifer Holst did just that for her graduate level thesis. As part of her Digital Forensics and Cyber Security master’s program, she looked at raw EEG data to take what we know about the characteristics of internet traffic and apply it to the human mind. Holst graduates this year with her M.S., but because of her academic success, she’s already teaching as an adjunct professor in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department.

Bridging the gap between understanding computers and understanding the mind reflects Holst’s previous background in psychology and tech. Before coming to John Jay, she graduated with a B.S. in Psychology and went on to work in online forum moderation and visual merchandising. She learned about tech from the programmers she worked with, but other than that, her knowledge of computer science was limited.

But that didn’t stop her from pursuing her dream of learning about cyber security. In order to get up to speed for the master’s program, she took several undergraduate John Jay courses, even surpassing the number of credits needed to enroll. “I took more classes than I had to because I wanted to get a better handle of the field,” she says. “I basically had enough credits to claim it as an undergraduate major.”

Holst says there’s a shortage of people who are highly skilled in digital forensics and cyber security, and she sees great potential for her career. As platforms like Facebook are being scrutinized for what seem to be grave violations of privacy, the field of cyber security seems to be growing more rapidly than ever before. Holst is particularly intrigued by how criminal justice interacts with data security. “Companies have teams that will conduct investigations into data breaches,” she says. “Figuring out what to do once a breach has happened and doing those investigations is something I’d want to do.”

 

“Companies have teams that will conduct investigations into data breaches. Figuring out what to do once a breach has happened and doing those investigations is something I’d want to do.”
—Jennifer Holst

 

During her time at John Jay, Holst was able to work closely as a research assistant with Dr. Aftab Ahmad, Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. She wrote program files that other students were tasked with “reverse engineering” in labs, meaning they figured out exactly how Holst had written them. Holst also tutored at the Computer Science and Statistics Data Center, which helped prepare her to teach. This spring, Holst is teaching an Introduction to Programming class as well as a class in the certificate program CSIBridge, a program that is ideal for working professionals looking to learn more about computer science.

As an adjunct professor, Holst is thrilled to share her passion with other John Jay students so they can one day become leaders in the field. “Much of our lives are lived online,” she says. “We are always connected, but there’s a trade-off there between convenience and security. It’s exciting to have the opportunity to make a safer cyber environment.”


Students and Faculty Participate at CUNY Critical Pedagogies Conference

The Guttman team attending the Critical Pedagogies conference at LaGuardia. From left to right: Professor Jane E. Hindman; Argentina Maria-Vanderhorst; Roesha Biggs; Jose Hernandez; Professor Dan Collins; and Professor Nate Mickelson.

Guttman students Roesha Biggs, Argentina Maria-Vanderhorst, and Jose Hernandez gave a presentation with Guttman professors Jane E. Hindman, Dan Collins, and Nate Mickelson at the Critical Pedagogies at CUNY: Learning Through Writing conference at LaGuardia Community College on April 13, 2018. Organized by LaGuardia’s English department, the conference was a forum for sharing promising practices from across CUNY, focusing in particular on strategies for promoting critical literacy.

The Guttman team’s presentation focused on the College’s innovative approach to writing instruction. The students described their experiences with writing in the Summer Bridge program, the First Year Experience (FYE) and programs of study. Roesha and Argentina described “collage essays” they wrote in ENGL 103 Composition 1. The “collage essays” combined personal reflections and story-telling with academic research in a creative format. Roesha and Argentina explained how the “collage essay” assignment prepared them for more formal research-writing assignments in their programs of study. Jose described leading a 45-minute lesson on Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem “The Second Sermon on the Warpland” in LASC 101 City Seminar 1: Reading & Writing. He explained how leading the lesson helped him take ownership of his learning and to see the classroom from the instructor’s perspective.

Professors Hindman, Collins, and Mickelson made a similar presentation at the March 2018 national Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) in Kansas City, MO. Titled “The Messy Business of Innovation: Community, Process, and Chaos in First-Year Writing,” the presentation highlighted Guttman’s deeply experiential and process-oriented writing pedagogy. It emphasized how the Guttman approach challenges students to develop writing practices that enable them to transfer skills from one course to another and feel confident about their ability to successfully complete a range of writing tasks.


Fashion Show to Focus on Models’ Social Identity; Explore Societal Stereotypes and Personal Expression at Queens College in April 16

— This is the Fifth Annual Presentation of Fashioning Our Identities by the College’s Center for Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Understanding —

FLUSHING, NY, April 16th, 2018 —The Center for Ethnic, Racial and Religious Understanding (CERRU) will hold its fifth annual Social Identity Fashion Show: Fashioning Our Identities at Queens College, April 16, in the Student Union Ballroom, fourth floor, from 6:30 – 9:00 pm. The event is free and open to the public; donations are welcome.

In the Social Identity Fashion Show, student models work with designers to create two looks. The first look represents the implicit and explicit stereotypes that often influence society’s view of the model. The second look represents the identities that they claim for themselves.

This year’s show features 15 models whose looks are created by design students from the Queens College Textiles and Apparel program, Fordham University, as well as designers from the broader Queens and Queens College Community. After the model walk, CERRU’s Associate Director, Yael Rosenstock, will invite the audience to engage in an interactive social identity activity to experience part of the model/look process. The evening will end after a short dance class offered by choreographer TJ Jacobs, dance anthropologist and curator of Dreams and Defiance: A World Reimagined Dr. Derrick L. Washington, and Cuban salsa dancer Yael Rosenstock.

CERRU would like to thank the QC Textiles and Apparel Program and the Center of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU in partnership with Dreams & Defiance: A World Re-Imagined exhibition and program series, for their involvement and cosponsorship of the show.

Tickets are available through Eventbrite and registration is recommended in order to estimate catering needs. Please click here to RSVP.

Access directions to campus here, and a campus map here.

About CERRU:
CERRU is a diversity education center that provides nonviolent communication tools to bridge social differences and create a more equitable society. We use dialogue and undoing bias techniques to bring people together to discuss their views and listen to one another. Participants experience how to include differences, negotiate their social identities, find common ground, move forward with their own personal growth, and work with others to effect positive social change.

CERRU works with students, faculty, and staff to create a safe, vibrant, and inclusive space for communication. We offer fellowships, dialogues, and trainings at Queens College. These activities prepare participants to become leaders equipped to navigate an increasingly multicultural society. We also host events exploring multiple perspectives on controversial issues, providing context, and opportunity for dialogue.

We host events open to the public, community trainings, workshops, and work with community members and organizations to develop programs that suit the population’s needs.

About Queens College:
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s

Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Yael Rosenstock
Center for Ethnic, Racial and Religious Understanding
718-570-0482
yael.rosenstock@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY trio receives NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

Roland Maio, a computer science major from the Class of 2018, is one of three CCNY recipients of 2018 NSF Graduate Research Fellowships.

Roland Maio, a member of The City College of New York’s Class of 2018, and two recent CCNY graduates are recipients of National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships. The three awards to City College are the most among the nine fellowships to City University of New York schools.

The fellowships recognize and support exceptional students who have proposed graduate-level research projects in their fields. Selection is through a national competition.

In addition to Maio, CCNY’s other NSF fellows and their research thrusts and new schools are:

  • Stanley Ko, marine geology and geophysics, Rutgers University New Brunswick;
  • Lizhi Liu, systems and molecular biology; Columbia University.

Fellows receive an annual stipend of $34,000 and $12,000 cost-of-education allowance for graduate study that leads to a research-based master’s or doctoral degree in science or engineering.

A Marine Corps veteran, Maio is a computer science major in the Grove School of Engineering. He’ll pursue a PhD in the field at Columbia University this fall. His focus will be machine learning fairness and he will do his research in Augustin Chaintreau’s lab at Columbia.

In addition to the NSF Fellowship, Maio has received a Presidential Distinguished Fellowship from Columbia. It is awarded to a select group of outstanding incoming doctoral students and provides funding for four years.

At CCNY, the Greenwich, Connecticut, resident has been a City College Fellow and a Knight Hennessy Scholarship finalist. Maio has been mentored by  Sean Cleary, Isabel Estrada, Jennifer Lutton and Rosario Genario.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Is sleep loss a health risk? Find out April 25 at CCNY’s Mini-Medical School

Mini-Medical School presented by CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York

Getting enough sleep can be a struggle. But according to The National Center For Health Research, the gap between getting just enough sleep and getting too little may affect your health, your mood, your weight, and your ability to concentrate.

Find out why organizations like the National Football League are prioritizing sleep and you should too – on April 25 at the CUNY School of Medicine’s Mini-Medical School at The City College of New York. This informative session is free and open to the Harlem community. The evening’s topic, “Sleep Health and the Importance of Getting A Good Night’s Sleep,” will be presented by Mediha I. Ibrahim, Director of the Sleep Medicine Center, and a Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Physician at Saint Barnabas Hospital.

Dr. Ibrahim will explain in detail why she believes “Sleep plays a vital role in good health and well-being throughout your life.” And she’ll take questions from the audience about their sleep habits and health challenges.

This event will be held at 5:30pm on April 25 in the North Academic Center, Room 1/103 of CCNY at 160 Convent Avenue. Light refreshments will be served. Click here to learn more and RSVP.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@cuny.ccny.edu (347) 330-7470


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, Week of April 16, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you to the entire NEST+m community for providing such a heartfelt farewell to Mr. Bobby Durand after his decades of service to the NEST+m. This past Friday morning we had a brief but extraordinary send-off assembly for Bobby in the auditorium. What a wonderful representation of the warmth and care that each of us brings to NEST+m each day.

This past weekend NEST+m has played host to the 2nd Annual NY State Girls Chess Championship. Thank you to the NEST+m Chess Committee and PTA for coordinating this dynamic event.

Please join me in thanking NEST+m’s College Counselor Ms. Nataliya Kisina, our Guidance Team and PTA for coordinating last week’s on-site college fair. Our cafeteria was filled with college & university representatives who were thrilled to meet NEST+m’s talented and hard-working students.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


This Week

  • NESTFest Auditions:  Auditions will be held on Tuesday, April 17thWednesday, April 18th and Thursday, April 19th. NESTFest, the annual talent show, will be on Friday, May 11th from 6-8:30pm. Questions? Email PVoorhees@schools.nyc.gov
  • SLT Meeting: Tuesday, April 17 at 4:00pm.
  • Parent Workshop: “Raising Sexually Healthy Children”
    Thursday, April 19, 2018, 8:30-9:15 NEST+m Cafeteria. Ms. Rothenberg will discuss your questions and concerns about talking with your children about sex. A list of resources will also be provided. Visit: allthingsadolescent.com for additional information. All parents are welcome!
  • K-2 Family Friday: Friday, April 20th, 8:30-10:00am
  • PTA Spring Gala & Auction:  Friday, April 20, 7:00pm – 10:30pm
    Clyde Frazier’s, 485 10th Ave, New York, NY 10018.
    Visit http://www.nestmpta.org/gala.html for more info.

Important Community Event

Dear Parents and Teachers,

On behalf of Congresswoman Velazquez and Congresswoman Maloney, I would like to invite all of you and your schools to the “Know Your Rights” event our offices are hosting with the Community Educational Council of Community School District 1. We are inviting immigration advocates and experts to help individuals and families of different immigration statuses learn about their rights, available resources, ways to protect themselves and help their friends and communities. The event will be held Wednesday, April 25 from 6:30 to 8:00 PM at PS20 Anna Silver School at 166 Essex Street during the regular time of the monthly CEC meeting. Please help us spread the word and we hope to see some of you there!

Best,
Jacqueline Hsia
Community Liaison
Office of Congresswoman Velazquez
500 Pearl Street Ste 973
New York, NY 10007

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Nominate an outstanding NEST+m student to participate in the NY Urban League Empowerment Day!
As we move into our eighth year of Empowerment days, the NYUL invites  you to nominate 10-15 young women and/or 10-15 young men to represent your school/organization as student ambassadors who would benefit from this day with the New York Urban League.  We request that organizations nominating 10-15 students provide two chaperones to participate to escort students to host sites throughout the city.

Our nomination form(s) must be submitted for each organization and/or school and each student nominated to participate. All forms must be submitted by Monday, April 16th  (May 4th Empowerment day) and Monday, April 30th (May 18th Empowerment day). Students must commit to the entire day (8am-5:00pm) to be eligible to participate. Late submissions will not be accepted. DOWNLOAD the nomination form.

Attend the CEC1 (Community Education Council for District 1) Meeting
Wednesday, April 18th, 6:00pm – 8:00pm – DOWNLOAD the flyer for more information.

Visit the New York National College Fair at Javits Center on 4/22 at Jacob Javits Center

STEM Summer in the City, a free, five week for current 2nd – 10th graders that is engaging and a fun summer program designed around STEM – science, technology, engineering and math.  Visit http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/STEM/NYCSummerSTEM.htm for mote information.

Bronx Loaf is a free, week-long creative writing program for New York City teens. Since 2012, Bronx Loaf has provided close to 300 students from nearly 100 city schools (public, private, & charter) the opportunity to work closely with professional authors, publish in our anthology, Breaking Bread, and collaborate with fellow teen writers from New York City.
Apply Today! (Application deadline is April 15th)https://bronxloaf.org/

Sound Thinking NYC empowers young people as they explore how to turn a passion for music into a possible profession in New York City’s thriving music industry. Program participants will learn about the tools, technologies, and career paths that power songs, concerts, theaters and film. The program includes opportunities for students to visit recording studios, learn about the science and physics of sound, and meet fellow students and people in the music industry that share their passion. Applications due May4th! Visit: http://creativeartsteam.org/programs/sound-thinking-nyc


46th Annual CCNY Poetry Festival is Woodstock of the Spoken Word

Poet Nicole Cooley is featured guest at 46th annual poetry festival.

Prize winning poet and author Nicole Cooley will be the featured guest poet for the 46th annual City College Poetry Festival on Friday, May 4th. Dubbed “the Woodstock of the Spoken Word,” the festival has become New York’s longest-running poetry celebration.

Cooley is a poet and non-fiction writer and the author of eight books including Breach, a collection of poems focusing on Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath; Girl after Girl after Girl, and her newest collection Of Marriage. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Rumpus, Narrative and Drunken Boat. She is a professor of English and the director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Literary Translation at Queens College, The City University of New York.

Over 150 students from as many as 50 schools are expected to recite their poems at this year’s festival. The festival is “something the children always look forward to,” said Norma Dunkley, a former teacher at P.S. 368 in Brooklyn, who had been attending the festival for over 10 years.  “It’s a blessing, something that is real to them, and it’s an entire year of poetry for the children, leading up to this celebration.  The teachers and the administrators love it, too.”

“The City College Poetry Festival is the democratic voice of poetry in New York City public schools,” said Pamela Laskin, a lecturer in the City College English department and director of the CCNY Poetry Outreach Center, which produces the festival. “Its assumption is there are many poets, and they all have terrific stories to tell. This would make Walt Whitman proud.”

Some of the children who participated in the festival’s early years are now teachers who bring their classes. “In 1975, I introduced a third grade student to the audience of 400 cheering students, teachers, friends and family; in 1996, this same individual returned to the festival at City and introduced the readers from her fourth grade class,” recalls Barry Wallenstein, CCNY professor emeritus and former festival director. “Over the past four decades, this event has become a place of reunion and affirmation for City College alumni, returning teachers, student-poets and friends of the College. I hope it and the important activities of the Poetry Outreach Center continue long beyond 2016.”

In addition to the readings by students, each year the festival invites one or more prominent poet to read his or her work. Among those to have appeared are Paul Simon, Allen Ginsberg, Gwendolyn Brooks, Muriel Rukeyser, Adrienne Rich, Philip Levine, Billy Collins, Major Jackson, Kimiko Hahn, Cornelius Eady, Patricia Smith, Richard Tillinghast, Tom Sleigh Elana Bell and Aracelis Girmay, Tracy Smith Marilyn Nelson and most recently, Jacqueline Woodson.

The event commences with readings by elementary school students, followed by poets from junior high schools. Beginning around noon, the winners of the festival’s citywide high school poetry contest will recite their poems, with the top three winners receiving the Knopf Publishers Prize, which are cash prizes.

A reading by Nicole Cooley will follow. The festival concludes with college students, alumni, faculty and published poets from around the country reading their works between 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

In addition to the Knopf Publishers Prize, the festival presents a special award for the best poem in a language other than English. Reflecting the diversity of New York City and of CCNY, poems have been submitted to the festival in almost 20 different languages over its history.

The all-day, all-verse event runs from 9:15 a.m. to 5 p.m.  at City College’s Marian Anderson Theater in Aaron Davis Hall.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


46th Annual CCNY Poetry Festival is Woodstock of the Spoken Word

Poet Nicole Cooley is featured guest at 46th annual poetry festival.

Prize winning poet and author Nicole Cooley will be the featured guest poet for the 46th annual City College Poetry Festival on Friday, May 4th. Dubbed “the Woodstock of the Spoken Word,” the festival has become New York’s longest-running poetry celebration.

Cooley is a poet and non-fiction writer and the author of eight books including Breach, a collection of poems focusing on Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath; Girl after Girl after Girl, and her newest collection Of Marriage. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Rumpus, Narrative and Drunken Boat. She is a professor of English and the director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Literary Translation at Queens College, The City University of New York.

Over 150 students from as many as 50 schools are expected to recite their poems at this year’s festival. The festival is “something the children always look forward to,” said Norma Dunkley, a former teacher at P.S. 368 in Brooklyn, who had been attending the festival for over 10 years.  “It’s a blessing, something that is real to them, and it’s an entire year of poetry for the children, leading up to this celebration.  The teachers and the administrators love it, too.”

“The City College Poetry Festival is the democratic voice of poetry in New York City public schools,” said Pamela Laskin, a lecturer in the City College English department and director of the CCNY Poetry Outreach Center, which produces the festival. “Its assumption is there are many poets, and they all have terrific stories to tell. This would make Walt Whitman proud.”

Some of the children who participated in the festival’s early years are now teachers who bring their classes. “In 1975, I introduced a third grade student to the audience of 400 cheering students, teachers, friends and family; in 1996, this same individual returned to the festival at City and introduced the readers from her fourth grade class,” recalls Barry Wallenstein, CCNY professor emeritus and former festival director. “Over the past four decades, this event has become a place of reunion and affirmation for City College alumni, returning teachers, student-poets and friends of the College. I hope it and the important activities of the Poetry Outreach Center continue long beyond 2016.”

In addition to the readings by students, each year the festival invites one or more prominent poet to read his or her work. Among those to have appeared are Paul Simon, Allen Ginsberg, Gwendolyn Brooks, Muriel Rukeyser, Adrienne Rich, Philip Levine, Billy Collins, Major Jackson, Kimiko Hahn, Cornelius Eady, Patricia Smith, Richard Tillinghast, Tom Sleigh Elana Bell and Aracelis Girmay, Tracy Smith Marilyn Nelson and most recently, Jacqueline Woodson.

The event commences with readings by elementary school students, followed by poets from junior high schools. Beginning around noon, the winners of the festival’s citywide high school poetry contest will recite their poems, with the top three winners receiving the Knopf Publishers Prize, which are cash prizes.

A reading by Nicole Cooley will follow. The festival concludes with college students, alumni, faculty and published poets from around the country reading their works between 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

In addition to the Knopf Publishers Prize, the festival presents a special award for the best poem in a language other than English. Reflecting the diversity of New York City and of CCNY, poems have been submitted to the festival in almost 20 different languages over its history.

The all-day, all-verse event runs from 9:15 a.m. to 5 p.m.  at City College’s Marian Anderson Theater in Aaron Davis Hall.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


Yasmine and Zhiying are CCNY’s 2018 Valedictorian and Salutatorian

Class of 2018 Valedictorian Yasmine El Gheur and her mother Kathryn who is a senior at CCNY.

Zhiying Zhu, Class of 2018 Salutatorian.

Brooklynite Yasmine El Gheur, a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow and the first of her family to complete college, is The College of New York’s Class of 2018 Valedictorian. Zhiying Zhu, born in China and raised by a single parent after emigrating to the United States, will be the Salutatorian at CCNY’s 172nd Commencement Exercises on June 1.

Following are brief bios of the Valedictorian and Salutatorian:

Yasmine El Gheur
A first generation American from Park Slope, Brooklyn, El Gheur is graduating from the Division of Humanities and the Arts with a BA in art history and a 3.94 GPA. She received the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, which is awarded to talented students from traditionally underrepresented groups to encourage them to pursue PhDs in the humanities and social sciences. She plans to earn a PhD and become an art historian of contemporary North African and Middle Eastern Art.

Among El Gheur’s other honors, the Downer Award for Study Abroad took her to Paris in summer 2016 to study French civilization at the Sorbonne. The next summer, she was in Rabat learning Moroccan Arabic. In addition, El Gheur was a City College Fellowship recipient, winner of the Therese Ralston Connor Award for Art History, and a CCNY Kaye Scholar.

She interned at the Jewish Museum and The Frick Collection (an art museum) both in New York City and participated in the CCNY-Stanford exchange program. It was at Stanford, in summer 2015, that El Gheur began her research on contemporary Moroccan photographers that would be a component of her Mellon Mays research project.

From a melting pot New York family with a Moroccan immigrant father and Colombian/Cuban/Irish-American mother, El Gheur’s academic success and the opportunities available at CCNY inspired her mother to return to college. Kathryn El Gheur had spent a year at the New York City College of Technology when her daughter was a toddler. Kathryn is now a senior at CCNY majoring in international studies and studio art.

Zhiying Zhu
Poverty forced Zhu to work odd jobs from age 13 after arriving in New York with her mother and a young sister in 2008. Last December, the Bensonhurst resident completed her requirements for a BE in biomedical engineering from the Grove School of Engineering with a 3.91 GPA.

Zhu worked two or more part-time jobs while completing the rigorous engineering curriculum. Challenging as it was, it did not diminish her passion for research and healthcare that she had developed at CCNY.

Zhu gained both research and bedside care experiences at several institutions, including CCNY, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, the University of Texas at Austin and the National Cancer Institute. At the latter, she collaborated with clinicians and scientists and assisted in various phases of research from data acquisition to manuscript writing. She said the technical skills she acquired from these experiences prepared her for a more engineering role in medicine.

A month after commencement, Zhu will sit for her MCAT with the goal of pursuing an MD/PHD and a double career as a medical doctor and researcher. Her dream is to merge the gap between bench-side research and bedside care.

Zhu’s accolades at CCNY included a NASA New York Space Grant Fellowship, the Harold Shames Award for Undergraduate Excellence, the Charlotte and Arthur Zitrin Scholarship, a Colin Powell Fellowship in Leadership and Public Service, and the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women Scholarship.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Baruch College Named among America’s “Best Value Colleges 2018” by Forbes

#12 in National List Out of 300 Schools

Baruch College placed #12 among America’s “Best Value Colleges 2018” by Forbes in its third annual ranking of 300 schools.  Jumping ahead 52 spots from last year’s spot, Baruch College ranked ahead of MIT, Yale and Columbia.  Among all public institutions on the list, Baruch is #7.

When deciding which college to attend, Forbes said “the most important consideration is money.” Forbes added that the “Best Value Colleges 2018” list “helps students decide whether their college investments are likely to reward them with a healthy return.”

According to Forbes, Baruch College was a “standout” noting that 45% of students receive Pell Grants and “graduates earn an average of $103,000 mid-career.”

Growing Roster of National Recognitions

In addition to this Forbes ranking, Baruch has been recognized nationally for its value and low average graduating debt. Recently, Princeton Review recommended Baruch in the 2018 edition of its annual guide: “Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck,” and Baruch was named among the top 300 best colleges values of 2018 by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.

In July, Money magazine ranked Baruch College as #1 among the “Best Public Colleges” and #2 for “Best Colleges for Your Money” in a nationwide survey. CollegeNet and The Chronicle of Higher Education have also cited Baruch for providing quality education and upward mobility to students.

Methodology

The Forbes “Best Value Colleges 2018” ranking scored the 300 schools that made the list against their peers. Each school was ranked in six areas: alumni earnings, net price, net debt, school quality, timely graduation, and population of Pell Grant recipients. The list evaluates institutions offering four-year degrees and does not include private for-profit schools. Read more about the methodology here.

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Baruch College Student Wins Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship

Karishma Malhotra (’21), a Macaulay Honors student at Baruch College, was awarded the Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship.

The Watson Fellowship, an innovative three-year program, provides outstanding undergraduates from 12 New York City colleges with personal, professional, and cultural immersions in the U.S. and abroad. At the center of the program are paid summer internships at leading nonprofit, government and private enterprise organizations in New York City and around the world.

Malhotra, who is majoring in financial mathematics at the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, is the fourth Baruch College student since 2016 to become a Watson Fellow.

“I am very excited about each and every unparalleled opportunity offered by the Watson Program,” said Malhotra, “I am most looking forward to studying abroad and working with a non-profit organization overseas,”

Malhotra added, “I want to work to further women’s educational rights in developing countries as I believe that will help them gain financial independence. If I succeed in educating even a single girl, I will feel accomplished. Furthermore, I will gain a new perspective and cosmopolitan view of the world that cannot be achieved by sitting in a classroom.”

With hopes to establish her own charity, Malhotra knows that “being a Watson Fellow will help carve my career path by providing hands-on experience in different fields and continued guidance and mentorship that will open me up to new possibilities.”

“Having a strong network of inspired peers will be invaluable as I set out on my journey to creating myself. I look forward to pursuing my interests and developing new ones along the way.”

“As a first year student, Karishma is characteristic of how Baruch attracts outstanding students who are equipped to compete for and take advantage of prestigious fellowships like the Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship,” Valeria Hymas, Director of  the Office of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising.

“I hope her success for this award encourages other Baruch students to realize their potential for competitive fellowships and explore these opportunities,” she added.

 

About the Watson Foundation

In 1961, Jeannette K. Watson created the Thomas J. Watson Foundation in the name of her husband, Thomas J. Watson Sr., best known for building IBM. Through one-of-a-kind programs, the Foundation provides fellows with cultural, professional and personal opportunities that challenge them to expand their vision, test and develop their potential, and build the confidence and perspective to do so for others. In 2015, the Foundation organized as a public-facing organization, unifying its programs under the Watson Foundation.

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Baruch College’s Mishkin Gallery Exhibition – Flor Garduño: Trilogy

April 20 – May 19, 2018

 

Flor Garduño, Totem, Mexico, 1987, Carbon/giclée print, 50 x 50″

NEW YORK, NY- April 12, 2018 – The Mishkin Gallery at Baruch College will present the exhibition, Flor Garduño: Trilogy, from Friday, April 20 to Friday, May 18, 2018. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, April 19, from 6:00-8:00 p.m. This traveling exhibition was organized by Flor Garduño and the Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso and distributed by the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, California.

Born in Mexico City, the photographer Flor Garduño takes inspiration from the often solitary and desolate landscape of her native country. Although photographs were taken in locations as varied as Mexico, Poland, and Switzerland, her works are greatly influenced by the Mexican master Manuel Álvarez Bravo in their solitude and surrealist overtones. While working under another Mexican photographer who greatly influenced her, Mariana Yampolsky, Garduño developed her own unique style. Garduño’s subjects are indigenous children, women’s bodies, along with the animals and plants that have come to symbolize the sacred, surreal, and magical spirit of Mexican culture. She always works in black and white (never in color) and eschews digital photography, shooting only using film.

Flor Garduño: Trilogy presents a selection of sixty works taken over four decades of the artist’s career, including the iconic Totem, Mexico and others. Garduño’s work has received several prestigious awards, including twice winning the Swiss Federal Fund for Culture Prize, the German edition of the Kodak Award for her book, Witness of Time, and the Photo District News Award for the book, Inner Light.

Flor Garduño: Trilogy is split into three parts: Bestiarium, Fantastic Women, and Silent Natures. Each thematic section reflects the power of the feminine and indigenous traditions through depictions tied strongly to ancient myths and rituals. Many of Garduño’s images echo the literary movement of magical realism.

Bestiarium

In Bestiarium, works such as Nahual Man (1993) reveal a subject in traditional clothing, half of his face covered by an animal headdress. Nahual Man is as much as portrait as it is a timeless evocation of ritual and the pre-Hispanic concept of nahual, where the human body or spirit transforms magically into animal form.

Fantastic Women

In Fantastic Women, the photographs focus on the experience of women in the world. The female form is alternately represented as symbol of fertility and embodiment of innocence.

Silent Natures

Silent Natures presents still life and landscapes that impart surprising plays of texture and form to reveal the secret stories behind objects.

 

The Mishkin Gallery at Baruch College: Free and Open to the Public

Location: 135 E. 22nd Street at Lexington New York, NY

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Media Contacts:

Emily Ackerman, Interim Director, Sidney Mishkin Gallery, Baruch College (646) 660-6652

Suzanne Bronski, (646) 660-6093, suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu.

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AT 16, CLINTON EHIDOM ENTERED YORK COLLEGE, NOW HE HAS HIS CHOICE OF MED SCHOOLS  

Small Classes, Close Collaboration With Professors
And a Feeling of Community Helped a Dedicated, Talented Student Find His Career Path

Clinton Ehidom has come a long way in the four years since he was an ambitious but underachieving freshman at York College.

Ehidom had emigrated to the Bronx from Nigeria when he was 12 and full of promise. He’d had a strong primary education in his home country, did well enough to skip a grade and arrived here hoping to become a doctor one day. His performance in high school, though, didn’t match his aspiration. He says he was an indifferent student at Fredrick Douglass Academy III in the Bronx and graduated with a C+ average.

But something clicked when Ehidom began college at York. And now, about to turn 20, he’ll graduate as a biology major with a perfect science GPA and his dreams fully intact: He’s been accepted by six medical schools and counting.

“I knew I had to change my mindset,” Ehidom says of his entry to college at 16, and he credits York with sparking his transformation. “The more experiences I had at York College, the more I knew I was right in my decision to come here. It’s having this close collaboration with professors and small class sizes. The community feel at York College also sets it apart. The students are amazing.”

Ehidom lives in the Bronx with his father and two younger siblings, both of whom also are aspiring physicians. His mother remains in Nigeria, pursuing a doctorate in public administration. It was from that family background that Ehidom found his way forward. He became a dedicated student and looked for ways to make himself a strong contender for medical school when the time came.

“He came in with a pretty clear plan about what he wanted to do,” recalled Andrew Criss, York’s premedical adviser, who met Ehidom in his freshman year. “He was in my anatomy and physiology course and, as usual, he got an A. I also worked closely with him as he took over the presidency of the premed club during fall of 2016.”

After his sophomore year, Ehidom participated in a coveted six-week summer program at Yale School of Medicine that prepares students from underrepresented groups to successfully apply to medical school. Among other experiences, he shadowed a physician to get a fuller understanding of a doctor’s daily work and life.

Meanwhile, at York, Ehidom met Francisco Villegas, an associate professor of behavioral science who studies Alzheimer’s disease, and asked to volunteer in his lab. “Students have to give me all they have,” Villegas says. “They have to put in the hours or they don’t come back.”

Ehidom proved to be just that kind of passionate student and soon he was helping Villegas design a study testing whether a procedure known as deep brain stimulation improved the performance of rats in tasks requiring sustained attention. Villegas says Ehidom was a hands-on presence during the first round of the experiment. “Clinton is motivated and focused,” he said. “He never gives up.”

Criss adds, “Everybody raves about him, saying ‘He’s the best student I’ve ever had.’ He goes out of his way to help other students” – mentoring, tutoring in biology and chemistry, and even organizing study groups for the entire anatomy and physiology lab.

“He’s younger than his classmates, which makes his maturity and work ethic even more impressive,” Criss says. “You know he’s going on to great things.”

Ehidom’s dedication has paid off in medical school acceptance letters. So far, he’s gotten good news from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Stony Brook University School of Medicine and the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Ehidom says he’s leaning toward cardiothoracic surgery as a specialty but acknowledges that may change as his medical education progresses. Meanwhile, he looks back at his four years of undergraduate study with modesty, along with gratitude for the support of teachers like Jong-Ill Lee in chemistry and Margaret MacNeil in biology. “I got a lot of help from professors and that is why I came this far,” he says.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Serving Beyond the Uniform: A Career Event for Student Veterans

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) and the New York City Department of Veterans’ Services (DVS) will co-host a career event on April 26 for student veterans attending college in all five boroughs of New York City.

The event will be held on the BMCC main campus, 199 Chambers Street in lower Manhattan. It will present two parts: a panel of local government officials who are also military veterans at 5:30 p.m. in Theatre 2, and a networking reception at 6:30 p.m. in Richard Harris Terrace.

All college student veterans who want to attend the event must present a school photo ID, and are recommended to wear business casual attire.

The panel discussion will feature Edna Wells Handy, Acting Chief Compliance Officer, NYC Housing Authority; Jeffrey D. Roth, Deputy Commissioner, NYC Department of Veterans’ Services; James Garcia, Director of Outreach, NYC Service; Felipe C. Moon, Veterans Recruitment Program, NYS Department of Civil Service and Lisa Beatha, University Director of Veteran Affairs, CUNY.

“Student veterans have a particular understanding of what public service means,” says Wilfred Cotto, Veterans Services Specialist in the BMCC Veterans Resource Center. “For those student veterans who want to explore career options in public service that could impact the direction of local government, this event will provide key information and help them make the contacts they need, to move forward with their goals.”

“Whether they want to learn about civil service exams, management opportunities or career paths in City government, this event will be an excellent resource for student veterans. Hiring managers from city, state and federal agencies will be on hand to network with student veterans, so students should bring their business cards and come prepared to network,” says Driada Rivas, Interim Director, BMCC Center for Career Development. “It is a wonderful way to make contact with government officials who are also military veterans, and explore a vital source of opportunities.”

For more information on this event, contact Wilfred Cotto, BMCC Veterans Student Services Coordinator, (212) 220-8000 Ext 5363 or Thierry Thesatus, BMCC Associate Director for Employer Relations, (212) 776-6302.


Free Film Retrospective: “The Best Jazz in the Movies”

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Tribeca Performing Arts Center (BMCC TPAC), the longest-operating performance venue in lower Manhattan, proudly presents The Best Jazz in the Moviesa free event in the 2017-2018 Scenes Through the Cinema Lens series. The event will be held Tuesday, May 8 at 7:30 p.m. at BMCC’s main campus, 199 Chambers Street in lower Manhattan.

Nat King Cole

This unique film retrospective will feature jazz legends such as Benny Goodman, performing with his quartet and big band in Hollywood Hotel (1937); Nat King Cole (shown right) performing in The Blue Gardenia (1953) and Duke Ellington performing in Murder at the Vanities (1934).

The retrospective will be hosted by Krin Gabbard, Professor of Comparative Literature and English at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and author of Hotter Than That: The Trumpet, Jazz, and American Culture.

The Best Jazz in the Movies will be followed by a Q&A, moderated by Professor Gabbard.

No reservations necessary for this free event. For more information, visit the BMCC TPAC website.

BMCC Tribeca PAC is downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families and audiences of all ages. BMCC Tribeca PAC strives to present a broad global perspective through the presentation of high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. BMCC Tribeca PAC is located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue and West Street) and is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R/W subway lines and the New Jersey Path Train. For more information please visit the BMCC TPAC website.


BMCC Named Top Producer of Gilman Scholars

The U.S. Department of State listed Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) as a top producer of students who were awarded Benjamin A. Gilman International scholarships in the 2016-2017 academic year.

The designation recognizes BMCC for its success in making international study and internships more accessible and inclusive for students of all backgrounds through the Gilman Program.

BMCC, along with five other institutions, tied for fourth place on the list of Associates institutions nationwide. BMCC sent more students overseas on Gilman Scholarships during the 2016-2017 academic year than any other CUNY community college.

Over the years, BMCC Gilman scholars have studied in places as diverse as Greece, Argentina, Italy and China. BMCC currently has four Study Abroad programs in Italy, Spain, France and Mexico.

“Because of the Gilman Scholarship, our students have been able to have a rich and rewarding academic experience in a country that they never would have been able to afford to visit, otherwise. They were able to have a firsthand experience of various cultures, learning from experts in the host country about the history of a culture other than their own,” said BMCC Study Abroad Manager Jessica Levin.

BMCC 2016 alumnus Michael Clark says his Gilman Scholarship allowed him to explore field research, an area that has since become the bedrock of his studies.

“This research directly influenced my decision to apply for a Fulbright U.S. Student Program research grant, and as a result I am currently in Kenya continuing the work I began in Uganda,” said Clark.

When Clark returns to the United States, he plans to enter graduate school at the CUNY School of Public Health.

Clark was one of the four BMCC students included in the 2016-2017 academic year. The others included Liberal Arts major Yandeli Cabrera, Childhood Education major Shakema Martin and Business Administration major Queena Cassandra Patricio.

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program, with the support of the U.S. Congress, is reshaping study abroad to make it more accessible and inclusive for American students. The Gilman Program broadens the U.S. student population that studies and interns abroad by providing scholarships to outstanding undergraduates who, due to financial constraints, might not otherwise participate. Since the program’s establishment in 2001, more than 1,300 U.S. institutions have sent more than 25,000 Gilman scholars to 145 countries around the globe.

For more information contact the BMCC Study Abroad office.

 


Distinguished Teaching Awardees Inspire Students and Colleagues

Faculty at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) teach and mentor students, conduct research, help lead the college and serve the community. The BMCC Distinguished Teaching Awardrecognizes faculty whose sustained excellence in these areas incites intellectual curiosity in students, inspires colleagues and demonstrates innovative pedagogy with clear evidence of student learning gains.

The Distinguished Teaching Award winners for 2018 are Sharon Avni, tenured Associate professor in the Academic Literacy and Linguistics Department; Paula Field, tenured Assistant Professor of Nursing; Janice Mahinka, an Adjunct Lecturer of Music in the Department of Music and Art; and Lara Stapleton, a Lecturer in the Department of English.

The awardees were selected from nearly 400 nominations submitted by students, faculty and staff at BMCC. The winners and finalists will be celebrated at a reception in Richard Harris Terrace, 199 Chambers Street, on April 17 at 5 p.m., and all members of the BMCC community are invited to attend.

“These distinguished teachers inspire their students and their colleagues every day,” said Karrin E. Wilks, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

“The members of the Distinguished Teaching Award committee were impressed by the quality of the nominees for this award,” said Janice Walters, Chair of both the Teacher Education Department and Distinguished Teacher Award Selection Committee. “The faculty of BMCC are inspirational teachers and pedagogical leaders in their profession.”

2018 Distinguished Teaching Awardees

Sharon Avni is an Associate Professor of ESL and Linguistics in the Department of Academic Literacy and Linguistics. She has taught a variety of classes, including online, hybrid and face-to-face models of Forensic Linguistics, Language and Culture, and academic writing. In Fall 2017, she was awarded the CUNY Research in the Classroom Grant and created a special section of LIN100 (Language and Culture), in which students engaged in case study research, documenting and analyzing language use at religious sites in New York City.

BMCC Professor Sharon Avni

As of Spring 2018, Avni is the faculty mentor for the Gateway Initiative at BMCC, a three-semester program that helps faculty build the retention rates of their introductory courses. Along with Professor Heather Finn, a colleague in the Academic Literacy and Linguistics Department, she has conducted studies on academic literacy and accelerated models of teaching writing at community colleges. In addition, her scholarship addresses Hebrew language teaching and learning in public and private schools and other educational contexts in the United States. She has published widely in academic journals and edited books, and presented at a wide variety of academic conferences. Currently, she is involved in several funded studies examining Hebrew teaching in public schools and private contexts.

BMCC Professor Paula Field

Paula Field is a tenured Assistant Professor of Nursing whose experience and research focuses on maternal, newborn and women’s healthcare. In addition to teaching courses at BMCC in obstetrical and psychiatric nursing care, in 2009 Professor Field developed an interactive, web-based remediation program for at-risk nursing students, providing them with study and test-taking skills to develop critical thinking. She earned an Associate in Nursing degree from BMCC in 1986 and continued her education at Long Island University and New York University. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in nursing practice from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

In addition to serving on the faculty at BMCC, Field has practiced as a Registered Nurse, Certified Nurse Midwife and Nurse Practitioner. Her passion for education began in the health care facilities where she started her career, developing teaching staff improvement projects. She has presented widely in nursing education conferences, published in nursing journals and contributed to nursing textbooks. A commitment to equity has led Professor Field to participate in activities such as serving on a panel at a BMCC Conference on Global Health Issues. She also led students in a service-learning project with the VA New York Harbor Healthcare System, guiding and evaluating their performance during a simulated disaster drill. “Our students benefit by learning firsthand about disaster preparedness and response, as well as by participating in community service,” says Field. “I hold the bar high but they know I am on their side. When they feel overwhelmed by the rigorousness of a nursing education I remind them, ‘The expert in anything was once a beginner’.”

Janice Mahinka has been teaching music at BMCC since January 2013. She holds a Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from The Graduate Center, CUNY, and an M.A. in Musicology from Boston University. Besides teaching survey courses in Western art music and African-American music, Professor Mahinka has worked to create writing-intensive courses in world music.

“I want to empower students to become active and confident participants in the learning process, while understanding the interconnectedness of individuals within their communities—both locally and globally,” says Mahinka, who strives to create inclusive classrooms and workspaces, as well as provide relevant and inspiring curricula for students through a variety of methods, including Open Educational Resources/Zero-Cost Textbook course designs. “I think it’s important to value the knowledges and experiences that BMCC’s diverse students bring to the classroom,” she says. “I also encourage students to build learning communities, much in the way we, as faculty, have built learning communities with our colleagues at BMCC.”

BMCC Professor Lara Stapleton

Lara Stapleton, a Lecturer in the BMCC English Department, started her teaching career as a graduate student in English at New York University. She taught as an adjunct in New York City for 14 years before joining BMCC in 2009 and earning a Certificate of Continuous Employment—similar to tenure—in 2014.

“I believe in a very student-centered approach and work hard to remind students of their potential and to rise above any doubt,” says Stapleton, who has been the Faculty Advisor of the BMCC creative writing club, The Writers’ Guild, for the last eight years and inspires emerging writers with her own work as a writer and literary editor. Her collection of short stories, The Lowest Blue Flame Before Nothing, from Aunt Lute Press, is a Pen Open Book Committee Selection and her current project is a teleplay about New Orleans, for which she received sabbatical in 2015. This work examines the history of miscegenation in that city, including the trial of a woman whose family background and racial heritage came into legal question. With family and roots in both East Lansing, Michigan and the Philippines, Stapleton is an advocate for students at BMCC who are negotiating unfamiliar cultural landscapes as they complete their studies and find their voices as writers.

2018 Distinguished Teaching Award Finalists

Tess Bilhartz, Music and Art

Marcus Dargan, Speech, Communication and Theater Arts

Elisa Decker, Music and Art

Diane Dowling, Speech, Communication and Theater Arts

Melissa Eder, Academic Literacy and Linguistics

Rosemary George, Music and Art

Andrew Gottlieb, English

Alan Greenhalgh, Math

Carlos Hernandez, English

Maureen Matarese, Academic Literacy and Linguistics

Chris McCarthy, Mathematics

Frederick Reese, Mathematics

Lesley Rennis, Health Education

Gary Richards, English

Rifat Salam, Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice

Mary Sepp, Academic Literacy and Linguistics

Ioannis Tournas, Business Management

Michael Volonakis, Music and Art

Judith Yancey, Academic Literacy and Linguistics

Eugenia Yau, Music and Art

Shirley Zaragoza, Business Management

 

The Distinguished Teacher Award committee, formed by the BMCC Academic Senate, was chaired by Professor Janice Walters (Teacher Education) and included members Jim Berg, Associate Dean of Faculty, and Professors Jacob Kramer (Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice), Benjamin Powell (Speech, Communication and Theater Arts), Jill Richardson (English), Sarah Salm (Science), Brett Sims (Mathematics) and Shirley Zaragoza (Business Management).

 


Guttman Student Presents at National Conference

Student Gabrielle Blevins presenting her scientific research during the NCUR 2018 meeting.

Gabrielle Blevins presenting her chemistry research findings during NCUR 2018.

Gabrielle Blevins presented original research at the 2018 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research. The conference was held at University of Central Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, April 4-7.

Gabrielle presented her research findings about “Antioxidant of the Green Tea,” focusing on the effect of brewing temperature on the available antioxidant. A STEM/LAS major, she has been a member of the CUNY Research Scholars Program (CRSP) under Professor Chulsung Kim’s guidance since 2016.

 


$2.265 Million Mellon Foundation Grant Goes to The Graduate Center, CUNY to Transform Doctoral Education

The Graduate Center intends to create a new model for preparing humanities Ph.D. students for diverse careers and ways to serve the public

With a five-year, $2.265 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Graduate Center of The City University of New York is embarking on a comprehensive plan to transform doctoral education in the humanities. The Graduate Center intends to establish a new approach to humanities Ph.D. education — one that prepares and strengthens students for careers in the academy and beyond and encourages them to produce and share scholarship that contributes to the public good.

“We are thrilled that the Mellon Foundation is supporting our ambitious initiative to transform doctoral education for the public good,” said Joy Connolly, Graduate Center senior vice president and provost. “This grant arises from one deep belief and one aspiration. First, we believe that a strong doctoral education prepares students for careers both within and outside academe. Second, we want to place the goals of creating and circulating knowledge for the public good at the center of the way we teach and mentor doctoral students. We look forward with excitement to making our doctoral curricula more responsive to the diverse needs and hopes of our students — and of integrating their training and research into the public domain.”

Early intervention is a core part of The Graduate Center’s reform plan. The Graduate Center will select 12 first-year Ph.D. students to be Mellon Public Fellows who will be trained for a variety of careers and will pursue internships and other nonteaching activities as a central part of their doctoral education.

A select group of faculty will mentor the public fellows, advising them on integrating academic training and career preparation and acquiring skills, for example, in digitization and data analysis. Faculty and students will participate in an annual Mellon seminar designed to guide the initiative and stimulate conversation on “reforming” the humanities.

The Graduate Center is establishing a PublicsLab to coordinate and expand the reach of the project. In partnership with The Graduate Center’s humanities and humanistic social science programs, the PublicsLab will host activities to spur public engagement and curricular change. The lab will become a communal site connecting students’ academic work and public-facing scholarship, and it will serve as a home of sorts for the Mellon Humanities Public Fellows.

The PublicsLab will also host programs designed to increase students’ exposure to diverse careers paths. To catalyze a culture shift, the PublicsLab will invite professionals with Ph.D.s to teach and mentor students and offer faculty new ways to design and nuance doctoral training so that it prepares students for a variety of careers. Each year, two humanities Ph.D. students will be selected to pursue paid, one-semester external internships as an integral part of their doctoral training.

In the final two years of the grant, The Graduate Center will select two Career Postdocs from doctoral students who have participated in PublicsLab courses and events. The Career Postdocs will receive one year of funding for creative and scholarly projects that build career experience and expand their opportunities for employment.

The Graduate Center will share news and ideas about transforming doctoral education through a visually rich PublicsLab website as well as op-eds, blogs, white papers, and multimedia productions.

To learn more about The Graduate Center’s Mellon Foundation grant to transform doctoral education listen to Provost Joy Connolly discuss its details on the Thought Project podcast here.

For media inquiries, please contact Tanya Domi, tdomi@gc.cuny.edu, 212-817-7283.

About The Graduate Center
The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) is a leader in public graduate education devoted to enhancing the public good through pioneering research, serious learning, and reasoned debate. The Graduate Center offers ambitious students more than 40 doctoral and master’s programs of the highest caliber, taught by top faculty from throughout CUNY — the world’s largest public urban university. Through its nearly 40 centers, institutes, and initiatives, including its Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC), The Graduate Center influences public policy and discourse and shapes innovation. The Graduate Center’s extensive public programs make it a home for culture and conversation.


Queens College Opera Presents The Marriage of Figaro April 26-20

— Full Production of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Comic Masterpiece to be Sung in the Original Italian, with English Supertitles —

(QUEENS, NY, April 11, 2018) Love—disguise, deception, and divine melodies—will conquer all when the Aaron Copland School of Music, the Queens College Department of Drama, Theatre & Dance, and Queens College Opera present Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro from April 26 through April 29 in Goldstein Theatre. Undergraduates, graduate students, and guest artists will pool their talents in a traditional staging of one of the funniest and most popular works in the operatic repertoire. Queens College alumna Elizabeth Hastings, a veteran of the Toledo Opera, the Washington Opera, the Sarasota Opera, the New York City Opera national touring company, and the Kennedy Center, will direct this production; Queens College alumnus Alex Wen will conduct the Queens College Orchestra.

Performances will take place in Goldstein Theatre from Thursday, April 26, through Saturday, April 28, at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, April 29, at 3 pm. Seats cost $20 for general admission, $18 for seniors, and $10 for students with QC ID. Tickets are available through the Kupferberg Center Box Office at 718-793-8080, online at www.kupferbergcenter.org, or at the door one hour prior to each performance. Fees may apply.

About Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music (ACSM)
Established in 1981, ACSM has more than 500 music students enrolled in seven undergraduate and graduate degree programs. It prepares its graduates for a variety of careers in music, including performance, teaching, and composition. The school also maintains a vital presence in the cultural life of Queens and the greater New York metropolitan area by annually offering over 200 public concerts and recitals, as well as specialized programs and courses for senior citizens. In addition, its Lawrence Eisman Center for Preparatory Studies in Music, a pre-college program, serves up to 400 elementary and secondary students each year. For more information on the Aaron Copland School of Music, please visit http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/music/

About the Queens College Department of Drama, Theatre & Dance
The Queens College Department of Drama, Theatre & Dance offers a balanced combination of theory and practice, developing talent and skills in students who intend to pursue future conservatory training for a stage or dance career.

About the Queens College Opera
Queens College Opera gives performance opportunities to deserving students, providing both singers and listeners with a wide variety of repertoire. Queens College Opera is a proud member of the New York Opera Alliance.

About the Queens College Orchestra
The Queens College Orchestra, comprised of undergraduate and graduate students, serves students and the broader community with a range of musical styles from symphonic and operatic works to choral works and premieres by faculty composers.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu 


Fulbright awards for Colin Powell School’s Claire Lynch, Etienne Forbes

Claire Lynch

Etienne Forbes

Claire Lynch and Etienne Forbes, cohorts in The City College of New York’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, are headed to Europe this fall on Fulbright awards. The two graduating seniors join a select group of 2018-2019 winners nationally in the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.

A political science and Jewish studies double major in the Colin Powell School and Macaulay Honors College at CCNY, Lynch is the recipient of a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant grant. She’ll spend Sept. 2018 to June 2019, as a teacher in the Spanish capital’s bilingual education system.

“Subjects that I may teach include literature, history and, all in English, but about 50% of my time will be devoted to teaching Model United Nations in a program called Global Classrooms,” she said.

Lynch was an advisor and teacher’s assistant to the City College teams that won consecutive Distinguished Delegation awards at the National Model United Nation conference (2015-2016).

Her other honors at CCNY include the 2017 Truman Scholarship for Public Service, one of the nation’s top awards for graduate school, and a Colin Powell Fellowship in Leadership and Public Service (2015-2018).

The Bayville, Long Island, resident plans to attend law school and specialize in human rights law.

Forbes is a U.S. Navy veteran who, on his return to school, graduates from CCNY with a BA in psychology on June 1. Then a Fulbright U.S. Student grant will take him to Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in September for a one-year master’s of science degree program in culture, organization and management.

The Colin Powell Fellow returns to Vrije Universiteit (“Free University”) after a stint there in 2016 as a CCNY study abroad student. “I fell in love with the institute, the teaching methodology and the city itself,” he said, noting Amsterdam’s reputation as the most diverse city in the world.

Forbes’ long-term goal is to pursue a PhD in education and become a college professor. His research areas of interest are diversity, inclusion and educational equity. He is a resident of Crown Heights in Brooklyn.

About the Fulbright Scholar Program
Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program’s purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries. Fulbright Scholars are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and demonstrated leadership potential in their fields.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
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View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY STUDENTS AND ALUMNI WIN NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS

Nine students and alumni of The City University of New York have won $114,000 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships, and five more won honorable mentions.

Chancellor James B. Milliken said: “The remarkable achievements of CUNY’s students and alumni speak to the high quality education in STEM disciplines they receive at The City University of New York.  CUNY students study with professors who prepare them well for important careers in research that can benefit society as a whole.”

The winners are:

Monica Vanessa Avilez of Lehman College, whose award is in biological anthropology.
Ioannis (John) Eugenis, graduate of Brooklyn College, whose award is in bioengineering; now at Stanford University.
Stanley Ko, graduate of City College, whose award is in marine geology and geophysics, now at Rutgers University – New Brunswick.
Emily Lau, graduate of Hunter College, whose award is in organismal biology.
Tamar Lichter, 2017 graduate of Macaulay Honors College at Queens College, who received an NSF honorable mention in 2017. Her award is in algebra, number theory and combinatorics; now at Rutgers University – New Brunswick. She won a 2016 federal Goldwater Scholarship.
Lizhi Liu, graduate of City College, whose award is in systems and molecular biology; now at Columbia University.
Roland Maio, 2018 graduate of City College, whose award is in machine learning; to attend Columbia University..
Tannuja Devi Rozario, graduate of John Jay College of Criminal Justice, whose award is in sociology; now at theUniversity of Massachusetts – Amherst.
Mary Regis Shanley, a doctoral student at the CUNY Graduate Center, whose award is in neurosciences; her undergraduate work was at Northeastern University.

Those receiving honorable mention are:

Allegra N. DePasquale, 2017 graduate of Macaulay Honors College at CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies, whose field is in biological anthropology.
Lisa Valenti, graduate of Brooklyn College, whose field is ecology; now at University of Pennsylvania.
Mohammad Alam, graduate of Hunter College, whose field is cell biology; now at Rockefeller University.
Donovan David Trinidad, graduate of John Jay College of Criminal Justice, whose field is microbial biology; now at University of California – San Francisco.
Kelsey Niole Hom, now at the CUNY Graduate Center, whose field is neurosciences; her undergraduate work was at Brown University.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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College Celebrates AccessABILITY Month

Members of the Office of Student Engagement with Dean Pryor and President Evenbeck.

The Office of AccessABILITY with Charles H. Pryor, II, Dean of Student Engagement (far left) and Scott E. Evenbeck, President (far right)

April is officially AccessABILITY Awareness Month throughout CUNY. To celebrate its commitment to supporting students, faculty, and staff with disabilities, Guttman’s Office of AccessABILITY has planned a series of events in the spirit of embracing disability as diversity, bringing awareness to the experiences of people with disabilities, and inspiring advocacy and equitable practices so all students can be successful.

Beginning the month-long celebration was the AccessABILITY Awareness Month Kickoff on Monday, April 9, in the Atrium. Kristopher Robinson, CUNY LEADS Neurodiversity Advisor, delivered the opening remarks. Other speakers included Scott E. Evenbeck, President; Howard M. Wach, Provost; and Charles H. Pryor, Dean of Student Engagement. The kick-off event included games, activities, give-a-ways, and opportunities to learn about and celebrate AccessABILITY throughout the day.

The College’s first AccessABILITY Ally Awards Ceremony was also held. The following individuals were recipients of Outstanding Staff Ally Awards:

  • Linda Merians
  • Yvonne Rubie
  • Esperanza Martin
  • Janine Agarwal
  • Carolee Ramsay
  • Danielle Insalaco-Egan
  • Victoria Romero

The following offices and programs were recognized with Outstanding Office Ally Awards:

  • Office of Partnerships and Community Engagement
  • United Men of Color
  • Women of GRIT
  • Human Services
  • Student Support and Academic Achievement
  • Student Leadership and Campus Life
  • Counseling and Wellness Services
  • Student Conduct and Community Standards

These awards were presented to individuals, offices, and groups exemplifying a commitment to the mission of the Office of AccessABILITY at Guttman Community College in working to provide an inclusive, equitable, and accessible learning environment for those with disabilities. Through collaboration, service, and advocacy, award recipients made exceptional strides in their qualities and actions in supporting the Office of AccessABILITY and its students.

The AccessABILITY events for April include:

  • 504/ADA Awareness Staff and Faculty Roundtable: Thursday, April 12th, Room 501, 3:00pm-4:30pm
  • Working Professionals with Disabilities Panel: Tuesday, April 17th, Room 401, 5:30pm-6:30pm
  • Free Mental Health First Aid Workshop: Wednesday, April 18th, Room 401, 9:00am-5:00pm
  • The Inclusion Club- First Meeting: Thursday, April 19th, Room 409A, 3:00-5:00pm
  • Movie Screening of Call Me Crazy: Tuesday, April 24th, Room 508, 11:30am-1:00pm
  • Job and Resource Fair: Thursday, April 26th, Atrium, 3:00pm-4:30pm
  • Disability Support Webinar Series: Friday, April 27th, Room 007, 12:00pm-4:30pm

CUNY’S AGGRESSIVE CAREER-DEVELOPMENT PUSH SPARKS STUDENT-TECH FIRM MEETUP AT BROOKLYN NAVY YARD

The City University of New York’s aggressive commitment to career development has already placed thousands of students in paid internships, some leading to postgraduation jobs. In the public sector alone, the University arranges internships for 600 students in 18 city agencies. This goes a long way toward solving the city’s need for talent, while ensuring a diverse work force.

Meetups – such as the one today at the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s massive new hub for technology and food-production companies – are a key means of introducing students who may not have firm ideas about career paths to entrepreneurs who are powering New York City’s economy today and will shape it in the coming decades.

“CUNY Career Meetups is our response to build our students’ networks by visiting over 50 firms this year in a variety of industries, meeting staff and CUNY alumni, and getting the inside view into careers and opportunities,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Touring state-of-the-art facilities in manufacturing tech at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, understanding civic tech at Sidewalk Labs, learning about postproduction film and TV editing at Technicolor, and touring the city’s center for anti-terrorism and emergency management is what will inform and widen the experiences of our students. And importantly, it is the easiest way for NYC firms of any size and in any industry to get to know our talented students, and to open the door to hiring our graduates.”

Social capital and networks are what open the doors to hiring, Chancellor Milliken said, “Through our meetups, we will help tens of thousands of CUNY students build the networks and professional connections they need to navigate their careers and be prepared for the ever-changing future of work.”

Over the next academic year, CUNY will be launching meetups in these 10 areas: allied health care, art/creative media, business operations, finance, hospitality and marketing, human services, industry and construction, life sciences, public sector, and technology, with several already under way. For example, a recent public-sector meetup occurred at the city’s Office of Emergency Management in Brooklyn. A meetup at Technicolor PostWorks in SoHo, which supplies editorial and finishing services for film and television, brought together firms that operate in that sector. And students got to explore finance at Point72, an investment firm.

The CUNY Tech Meetup at the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s new 16-story, 1 million-square-foot Building 77, like the others, invites students from all 24 CUNY campuses. It starts at 5 p.m. at Building 77 at the corner of Vanderbilt and Flushing Avenues. Students will begin three tours of the facility starting at 5:15. At 7 p.m. there will be a panel discussion with tech entrepreneurs.

For their part, the entrepreneurs hope to spot upcoming and often hard-to-find talent that they can help develop through paid internships and, after graduation, even jobs.

“The two CUNY interns we had last summer were sharp and bright and willing to wear the many hats of a startup culture,” said Nick Molinski, co-founder and chief technology officer of the startup Acculis.

This semester he was able to offer one of them a part-time job, working on software that gives building contractors 3D information on their smart phones and pads to augment the 2D blueprints they traditionally have used to guide construction. “We’re very happy with these CUNY students,” he said.

CUNY’s Continuing Education and Workforce Development unit arranges the meetups as a part of the University’s Career Success Initiative. The initiative helps students learn essential workplace skills that will prepare them for internships and jobs, as well as to find academic majors that will provide the academic backgroundsbusine they will need.

Its signature program is #CUNYCodes. This is an industry-focused, co-curricular program, which for the past three years has given students advanced training in software development that aligns with local industry’s needs for entry-level talent. Over 10 weeks, the students build apps under the guidance of savvy industry mentors and then pitch their creations to an audience that includes tech businesspeople. #CUNYCodes is expected to expand to multiple campuses in fall 2018.

Stuart Smith, a 2017 College of Staten Island graduate, was in #CUNYCodes’ initial group in 2014. While he was a student, CUNY helped him secure an internship at New York City Small Business Services. “The main thing there was I learned to work in a professional environment, how to interact with co-workers and how to ask questions and to get help,”Smith said. As a result, when he interviewed for the software engineering job he now holds at JPMorgan Chase, he had solid experiences to discuss.

Smith is a firm believer in #CUNYCodes, where he now volunteers as a mentor. “We developed a mobile app to facilitate sales or trades of textbooks among students,” he said. His key takeaways were not only the nuts and bolts of conceiving and coding an app, but also how to work in teams, which is how he now works at JPMorgan.

CUNY’s Continuing Education and Workforce Development unit has two other meetups this month. One is in film, TV and media on April 24 at Harbor, a SoHo, N.Y., full-service production and postproduction studio. The other is on April 26 in trading and investing at a location to be decided. Also, it will be hosting its next #CUNYCodes Demo Night on May 2 at Fiterman Hall, Borough of Manhattan Community College.

CUNY’s career-development efforts work in tandem with those on campuses. Borough of Manhattan Community College, for example, is a leader with its Code to Work program, which recruits and places candidates from nontraditional backgrounds —first-generation immigrants, women, minorities and veterans — into technology-focused jobs. It provides computer coding “boot camps,” followed by a paid summer internship.

In addition, nearly 500 students from CUNY campuses will converge at Baruch College later this month for the fourth CUNY Hackathon, a weekend of digital brainstorming, tech teamwork and career development guided by mentors from some of the world’s most important tech companies. The twice-yearly CUNY Hackathon is equal parts experiential learning, competition, networking – and overnighter. It’s staged by CUNY Startups, an initiative begun in 2014 to encourage students to pursue careers in technology and to launch a new generation of innovative tech companies in the city.

The hackathon is co-sponsored by IBM and the tech entrepreneurial company ProtoHack. Students are mentored by experts from those companies and from Google, Facebook and JPMorgan Chase. To assist with the “Hack Gotham” theme of the coming event, the hackathon has also enlisted the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, which will provide data and mentors to help the students identify inefficiencies and inspire ideas for apps or program interfaces that could make life better for New Yorkers.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Guggenheim Fellowships Awarded to Two Baruch College Humanities Professors

Esther Allen and Alison Griffiths, Professors in the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, Among Class of 2018 Guggenheim Fellows

L to R: Esther Allen and Alison Griffiths are among 173 scholars, artists, and scientists chosen from almost 3,000 applicants awarded 2018 Guggenheim Fellowships.

New York, NY, April 10, 2018 – Esther Allen, PhD, and Alison Griffiths, PhD, faculty members in the George and Mildred Weissman School of Arts and Sciences at Baruch College, were each recently awarded renowned 2018 Guggenheim Fellowships.

Dr. Allen, a professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Comparative Literature, was named a fellow for translation, while Dr. Griffiths, a professor in the Department of Communication Studies, was named for Film, Video, and New Media Studies. Both are the only candidates selected in their respective categories.

The professors are among 173 scholars, artists, and scientists chosen from almost 3,000 applicants on the basis of prior scholarly achievement and exceptional creative ability in the arts.

One of most prestigious awards in the humanities

“We are extremely fortunate that two of our faculty members are among the ones awarded this year with the Guggenheim Fellowship,” said Aldemaro Romero Jr., PhD, dean of the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. “This is one of the most prestigious awards in the humanities worldwide. The fact that two of them will receive this accolade in the same year speaks volumes about the caliber of the professors at the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. On the other hand, it is not surprising given the quality, sustained, and innovative scholarly work they have been producing for years.”

This year’s class of fellows represented 49 scholarly disciplines and artistic fields, 69 different academic institutions, 31 states, and three Canadian provinces. The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation started the renowned competition in 1925.

Esther Allen

The Guggenheim Fellowship will allow Allen to complete the translation of two novels by the Argentinian writer Antonio Di Benedetto (1922-1986): The Silentiary and The Suicides. Allen has already translated Di Benedetto’s Zama, today considered a classic, which took her seven years to translate and publish.

“This recognition is a singular honor because so many former Guggenheim Fellows have made such distinguished contributions,” Allen said. “I’m delighted to find myself in the company of two in particular, Di Benedetto and Gregory Rabassa.”

According to Allen, Di Benedetto was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 1973, and shortly after was imprisoned and tortured during Argentina’s Dirty War. Eighteen months later, he emerged through the efforts of a group of writers and activists who used the Guggenheim Fellowship and other awards he had received as evidence of his international importance.

“Rabassa, awarded a Guggenheim in 1988, was the greatest 20th-century translator of Latin American literature,” said Allen. “Like me, he was professor at City University of New York, where he taught for four decades.”

Literary Translations: An Art Form

Allen believes translating books is a peculiar vocation that is similar to acting. Rather than using the body as a form of communication, a translator utilizes their mind and language as a form of self-expression.

Dean Romero noted that Allen’s work cannot be done mechanically, but is a complete art. “To do this work very well requires a lot of study and being multi-cultural to see all the different background behind the author and the public at a time,” explained Romero.

Alison Griffiths

Griffiths will use her fellowship to write a book titled Nomadic Cinema: A Cultural Geography of the Expedition Film, which will examine expedition filmmaking from the mid-teens through the late-thirties during the 20th century. Focusing on films shot in Borneo, Central Asia, and the American Southwest, Nomadic Cinema will look at internationally recognized organizations and privately funded anthropological research trips, including four distinct 20th-century expeditions, some famous and others less known.

“Considered a golden age in the history of museum-sponsored expeditions, the interwar period is fascinating because attempts to penetrate the last few undiscovered places on the planet took on a sense of urgency, and cinema was enlisted as an essential method of data collection,” Griffiths explained. “And yet the expedition film is enigmatic, betraying what I call an ‘anxious optic,’ never quite sure what to record and uncertain about the audience it is seeking.”

An Expansive Project

“The biggest challenge I expect to face in completing Nomadic Cinema is the scale of the project,” said Griffiths. “The book also constructs a longer intellectual history of images of exploration dating back to the Middle Ages as well as ending with a brief analysis of the role of digital technologies in documenting contemporary expeditionary travel.”

Romero pointed to Griffiths’s success in the Department of Communication Studies, where she analyzes how the media portrays different aspects of society, noting that her scholarly work is “quite an intriguing and important contribution.”

 

About Baruch College

Ranked #1 for social and economic mobility among its students, Baruch College provides graduates and undergraduates with the skills, knowledge, and perspectives to pursue their aspirations in today’s global environment. Part of The City University of New York (CUNY), Baruch also ranks among the nation’s top public colleges for academic excellence, affordability, and value. Its three schools educate more than 18,000 students, representing one of the nation’s most diverse college campuses. Strong career and support services drive Baruch’s national recognition as an engine for social and economic mobility. Through executive education, continuing studies, international partnerships, public events and arts programming, Baruch stands out as an intellectual and cultural resource for New York City and the world. Visit baruch.cuny.edu.

Media Contacts:

Suzanne Bronski, (646) 660-6093, Suzanne.Bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

Evan Nemeroff, (646) 660-6146, Evan.Nemeroff@baruch.cuny.edu

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Album recorded at CCNY’s Sonic Arts Center tops iTunes jazz chart

Sonic Arts Director Paul Kozel

For three days in April of 2017 the jazz quartet The Manhattan Transfer recorded some of their vocal parts for their album, The Junction, at the Sonic Arts Center of The City College of New York with SAC director Paul Kozel engineering. Kozel also recorded percussionist Luisito Quintero for the album. Winy Taveras provided technical assistance for the recording sessions.

The Junction was released almost a year later on March 30, 2018 and quickly rocketed to #1 on the iTunes Jazz Chart by April 5, 2018!

“Janis Siegel (a member of the Transfer) and I have been looking for opportunities to work together at the Sonic Arts Center for years,” said Kozel. “It was really great to finally have that opportunity and help to produce such a fine album.”

The album, which Jazz Weekly calls “timeless and timely”, includes hip hop and R&B synth grooves as well as patented harmonies. It’s available on iTunes, Amazon, Spotify, and Google Play. Congratulations to The Manhattan Transfer and to Kozel and Taveras on topping the charts. The Manhattan Transfer’s PBS special show with Take 6 will be airing nationwide starting April 26 and will feature songs from the new album.

About Sonic Arts

The Sonic Arts Center offers a four-year, Bachelor of Music (BM) degree in Music with a concentration in Audio Technology. The program’s balanced emphasis in music and audio technology training creates graduates who are as comfortable creating a string arrangement or a film underscore as they are tracking and mixing an album. Music and audio technology training are intertwined to create a highly marketable service provider for today’s highly competitive music and audio technology industry. Learn more.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu (212) 650-5310


Scholarly Achievement, Exceptional Promise Win Three CUNY Professors Guggenheim Fellowships

Three CUNY professors — an accomplished translator and an innovative visual-studies scholar at Baruch College and a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet at the College of Staten Island — have been awarded 2018 Guggenheim Fellowships, one of the most prestigious prizes in the humanities.

They were among 173 scholars, artists and scientists chosen from nearly 3,000 applicants in the 94th competition of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, which since 1925 has granted more than $360 million in fellowships to more than 18,000 individuals, many of them internationally recognized in their fields. Fellows are appointed based on prior scholarly achievement and exceptional promise.

Esther Allen and Alison Griffiths, faculty members at Baruch’s George and Mildred Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, were the only Guggenheim Fellows selected in their respective award categories. Guggenheim Fellow Tyehimba Jess, who garnered the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 2017, is a professor in CSI’s English Department.

Chancellor James B. Milliken said, “Esther Allen, Alison Griffiths and Tyehimba Jess exemplify the great talent of CUNY’s faculty and the world-class quality of this University. I am proud to congratulate them on the achievement of being named Guggenheim Fellows, an honor that will provide resources for them to continue their illuminating scholarship, teaching and creativity in the arts.”

Esther Allen is a professor in Baruch’s Department of Modern Languages and Comparative Literature and in the Graduate Center’s Ph.D. Programs in French and in Latin American, Iberian and Latino Cultures. As a Guggenheim Fellow she will complete the translation of The Silentiary (first published in 1964) and The Suicides (1968), two novels by the Argentinian writer Antonio Di Benedetto (1922-1986), who was appointed a Guggenheim Fellow in 1973 shortly before he was imprisoned for 18 months and tortured during Argentina’s Dirty War. Allen also translated Di Benedetto’s 1956 novel Zama, first published in English in 2016 and named by Publishers Weekly as one of the year’s 20 best works of fiction.

“This recognition is a singular honor,” said Allen, “because so many former Guggenheim Fellows have made such distinguished contributions. I’m delighted to find myself in the company of two in particular, Di Benedetto and Gregory Rabassa.” She said that Rabassa, a CUNY professor for four decades and a 1988 Guggenheim Fellow, was “the greatest 20th-century translator of Latin American literature.”

Allen worked with Michael Henry Heim to establish the PEN/Heim Translation Fund in 2003, and co-founded the PEN World Voices Festival in 2005. The French government named her a Chevalier de l’ordre des arts et des lettres in 2006.

Alison Griffiths, a professor at the Graduate Center and in the Department of Communication Studies at Baruch, was awarded a Guggenheim for Film, Video, and New Media Studies. With her fellowship, she will complete a book entitled Nomadic Cinema: A Cultural Geography of the Expedition Film which will examine expedition filmmaking during the 20th century, focusing on films shot in Borneo, Central Asia and the American Southwest.

“The biggest challenge I expect to face in completing Nomadic Cinema is the scale of the project,” said Griffiths. “The book also constructs a longer intellectual history of images of exploration dating back to the Middle Ages as well as ending with a brief analysis of the role of digital technologies in documenting contemporary expeditionary travel.”

Griffiths, the author of three monographs and more than 35 journal articles and book chapters, won the CUNY Felix Gross Outstanding Research Award in 1999 and has twice been a recipient of the Baruch College Presidential Award for Excellence in Scholarship. In 2015-16, she served as Interim Dean of the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences at Baruch. Her most recent book, Carceral Fantasies: Cinema and Prison in Early Twentieth-Century America (Columbia University Press, 2016) tells the little-known story of how cinema found a home in the U.S. penitentiary and how the prison and capital punishment emerged as settings and narrative tropes in modern cinema.

Guggenheim Fellow Tyehimba Jess, poet and professor of English at CSI, is the author of two books of poetry, Leadbelly and OlioOlio won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, The Midland Society Author’s Award in Poetry, and received an Outstanding Contribution to Publishing Citation from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. It was also nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN Jean Stein Book Award, and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Leadbelly, winner of the 2004 National Poetry Series, was named one of the “Best Poetry Books of 2005” by both the The Library Journal and Black Issues Book Review. Jess’s other awards and honors include a 2004 Literature Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and a 2004-2005 Winter Fellowship at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center. He is also a veteran of the 2000 and 2001 Green Mill Poetry Slam Team.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies. For more information, visit www.cuny.edu.

 

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CCNY’s Grove School joins $100m NSF-funded wireless revolution

The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering is a partner in a $100 million National Science Foundation-funded wireless revolution designed to push mobile technology to the limits. In addition to faster downloads, it could pave the way for surgeons operating remotely on patients, cars that rarely crash, and events that can be vividly experienced from thousands of miles away.

Over the next five years, NSF will fund a set of wireless networks for researchers to test new ways of boosting Internet speeds to support data-intensive applications in robotics, immersive virtual reality and traffic safety. New York and Salt Lake City are the first cities set to each receive $22.5 million from NSF to build testbeds under its Platforms for Advanced Wireless Research (PAWR) initiative.

Led by researchers at Rutgers, Columbia and New York University, and in partnership with City College, New York City, Silicon Harlem and IBM, the “COSMOS” platform will be a proving ground for a new generation of wireless technologies and applications.

COSMOS is the acronym for Cloud Enhanced Open Software Defined Mobile Wireless Testbed for City-Scale Deployment. It will cover one square mile in West Harlem, with City College to the north, Columbia University’s Morningside Heights campus to the south, the Hudson River to the west, and Apollo Theater to the east. Home to about 30,000 residents and the busy Broadway-125th Street shopping corridor, this vibrant neighborhood is seen as an ideal place to push the bandwidth and latency limits of 4G, and even fifth-generation wireless technology (5G), which carriers are starting to roll out in some cities now.

Five testbed nodes will be deployed at CCNY, said Myung Jong Lee, professor in both the Grove School’s electrical and computer engineering departments.

A component of the project is to provide hands-on STEM training for students and West Harlem residents who will be among the first to see and touch technologies that are still years away from appearing on the market. Silicon Harlem will involve K-12 students from the community in the experiments and City College will partner with researchers to involve its engineering students and support the testbed installation.

NSF estimates that the number of Internet-connected devices is expected to grow to 20 billion by 2020, creating an urgent need in the U.S. and abroad for infrastructure that can rapidly process all that data.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Colin Powell School double major Amelia Smyth wins Watson fellowship

Amelia Smyth, a double major in CCNY’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, is a 2018 Watson Fellow winner.

Amelia J. Smyth, a sophomore in The City College of New York’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, is a 2018 Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship winner. Created in 1999, the program provides outstanding undergraduates from 12 New York City colleges with three years of personal, professional and cultural immersions in the United States and abroad. It is supported by the Thomas J. Watson Foundation.

“In this milestone year, our 50th Anniversary as a foundation, we are excited that our campus and global partnerships are stronger than ever”, said Chris Kasabach, executive director of the Watson Foundation. “The new class of Jeannette K. Watson Fellows represents the diversity, creativity, openness, and ambition of New York City’s most remarkable students. We look forward to welcoming them to the Watson Community and crafting a three-year experience that develops their unique aspirations.”

A member of the CCNY Honors Program, Smyth is one of 15 undergraduates in the 19th Class of Jeannette K. Watson Fellows. The Baldwin, NY, resident is an international studies and economics double major, with a 4.0 GPA.

This is her second notable fellowship. In December 2017, Smyth was one of 25 students nationwide awarded UNA Emerging Leaders Fellowships that recognize emerging leaders. Fellows are required to complete a human rights awareness project to be

presented in Washington, DC during the UNA leadership summit this June.

Her UNA project is a workshop on homeless rights and the UN. “What motivated me to go into this field was learning about the Holocaust,” said Smyth. “I was captivated from a very young age and as I began to learn about other genocides I knew that I had to do something. For me international policy and economic development are two of the best ways to work towards prevention of genocide.”

Smyth is also on the City College Dean’s List.

About the Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship
Jeannette K. Watson Fellows are chosen through a nomination process from freshman and sophomore students at 12 New York City partner institutions. The fellowship’s comprehensive programming includes three summers of internships at leading organizations around the world, a cohort of supportive peers and ongoing mentorship. Over 250 Jeannette K. Watson Fellows have been named since the fellowship’s start in 1999.

About the Watson Foundation
In 1961, the Watson Foundation was created as a charitable trust in the name of Thomas J. Watson Sr., best known for building IBM. Through one-of-a-kind programs, and over 100 global partnerships, the Foundation provides students with personal, professional and cultural opportunities to expand their vision, develop their potential, and build their confidence and perspective do so for others.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY SPS Student Wins CUNY Student Photo Challenge for March 2018

April 4, 2018 – New York, NY – The CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is proud to announce that Yerelyn Nuñez, a current online BA in Communication and Media student, has won the CUNY Student Photo Challenge for March 2018 with her self-portrait “Two Worlds Collide.”

Nuñez’s photo, which is part of a larger outdoor photo series, provides a rare glimpse into the daily life of an online student with a moment that depicts the accessibility and convenience of distance learning. The juxtaposition of the vibrantly colored graffiti with the black and white mural in “Two Worlds Collide” serves as a visual metaphor for the way that student life and the surrounding world come together for online learners.

“I lived in Astoria for four years, but this artwork really spoke to me,” says Nuñez. “It showcases the flexibility of being an online student; the fact that you can make the sidewalk your classroom if you’d like.”

Shot with an iPhone and the assistance of her brother, Nuñez’s main goal was to share the concept of online learning with the rest of the CUNY community in a relatable way. Nuñez is anticipated to graduate from CUNY SPS this June after which time she plans to become a social media manager for a media company. To catch a glimpse of Nuñez’s social media work, visit the CUNY SPS Instagram page where Nuñez currently serves as its main student contributor for the Spring 2018 semester.

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Letter To NEST+M Students & Families, Week Of April 9, 2018

Dear NEST+m families,

We are hoping that you and your families have had a wonderful and rejuvenating Spring Break. This week we begin the formal assessment season for students in Grades 3-8.

  • ELA state testing takes place on Wednesday April 11th and Thursday April 12th.
  • Looking ahead, the state Math exam takes place on May 1st and May 2nd.

Please join our teachers and faculty as we say thank you to a longtime member of our school’s Custodial Team, Mr. Bobby Duran, who will be retiring at the end of this week after 25 years of service to our school community.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

This Week

  • It’s NESTFest time! On Wednesday, April 11th at noon, NESTFest Audition sign-up sheets will go live. An email will be sent to K-12 families with details. Auditions will be held on Tuesday, April 17th, Wednesday, April 18th and Thursday, April 19th. NESTFest, the annual talent show, will be on Friday, May 11th from 6-8:30pm.
  • The College Fair will be held on Thursday, April 12th at 3:00pm in the Cafeteria. All Upper Grade students are invited to attend!

Important Community Event

Dear Parents and Teachers,

On behalf of Congresswoman Velazquez and Congresswoman Maloney, I would like to invite all of you and your schools to the “Know Your Rights” event our offices are hosting with the Community Educational Council of Community School District 1. We are inviting immigration advocates and experts to help individuals and families of different immigration statuses learn about their rights, available resources, ways to protect themselves and help their friends and communities. The event will be held Wednesday, April 25 from 6:30 to 8:00 PM at PS20 Anna Silver School at 166 Essex Street during the regular time of the monthly CEC meeting. Please help us spread the word and we hope to see some of you there!

Best,
Jacqueline Hsia
Community Liaison
Office of Congresswoman Velazquez
500 Pearl Street Ste 973
New York, NY 10007

Opportunities for NEST+m students

STEM Summer in the City, a free, five week for current 2nd – 10th graders that is engaging and a fun summer program designed around STEM – science, technology, engineering and math.  Visit http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/STEM/NYCSummerSTEM.htm for mote information.

Bronx Loaf is a free, week-long creative writing program for New York City teens. Since 2012, Bronx Loaf has provided close to 300 students from nearly 100 city schools (public, private, & charter) the opportunity to work closely with professional authors, publish in our anthology, Breaking Bread, and collaborate with fellow teen writers from New York City.
Apply Today! (Application deadline is April 15th)https://bronxloaf.org/

Sound Thinking NYC empowers young people as they explore how to turn a passion for music into a possible profession in New York City’s thriving music industry. Program participants will learn about the tools, technologies, and career paths that power songs, concerts, theaters and film. The program includes opportunities for students to visit recording studios, learn about the science and physics of sound, and meet fellow students and people in the music industry that share their passion. Applications due May4th! Visit: http://creativeartsteam.org/programs/sound-thinking-nyc

 


Another accolade for CCNY’s Model UN team

Jasmine Park, co-head delegate of CCNY’s 2018 Model UN team that earned Honorable Mention for representing Norway.

CCNY’s 2018 Model UN team.

Representing Norway in an unprecedented 10 simulated UN committees, The City College of New York’s 12-member delegation earned an Honorable Mention at the 2018 National Model United Nations (NMUN) Conference in Manhattan. More than 5,000 university students from some 215 schools around the world participated in the competition, discussing current global issues in a real world context.

The accolade from the National Collegiate College Association continued the winning streak over the years by NMUN teams mentored by City College’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership.

Faculty advisor Rafal Szczurowski, from whose Model UN course in the Colin Powell School the CCNY team is recruited, praised his charges.

“CCNY took an ambitious task of representing Norway in ten different committees. The range of topics our students had to research and prepare for was truly mind-blowing,” noted Szczurowski, who teaches international studies. “They succeeded and delivered an outstanding performance. But more important than winning was the transformation from students to global leaders. Our Model UN program with its courses and conferences is uniquely positioned to facilitate that process.”

Co-head delegate Jasmine Park explained what it meant to participate in the Model UN. “It was an amazing and great experiential learning activity. It was a privilege to work with students from around the world.”

Personally, the international studies/political science double major said the Colin Powell School’s Model UN program prepared her really well for the conference and gave her the courage to be a leader.”

The other CCNY student delegates (all international studies unless stated) were:

  • Shelley-Ann Pitterson, political science;
  • Thana Hamed;
  • Masuf Ahmed, undeclared major;
  • Bineta Sall;
  • Thanjinia Haque;
  • Lucia Lopez, history/political science (Macaulay Honors College);
  • Derek Basler;
  • Adja Bambi Sow;
  • Raneem Elsayed, history/political science;
  • Aichatou Nimaga; and
  • Fred Machado (head delegate).

Supporting the 2018 delegation were CCNY MUN alumni acting as advisors and volunteers: Nancy Larcher, Emma Sata Laparam, Sushmita Lamsal, Arieanna Jainarain, and Amanda Jimenez.

About the CCNY Model United Nations Program
CCNY’s MUN program prepares students for simulations of the United Nations in class and in local competitions, leading to the annual National Model United Nations Conference. Over two semesters, students examine major issues facing the United Nations, learn about the work of its specialized agencies, and explore the world of multilateral diplomacy. Students also engage in research applying the case study method. They are introduced to the practice of international diplomacy through presentations and experiential learning activities. CCNY MUN Program with its two academic courses are designed to prepare students for the national conference as well as to provide general knowledge about international organizations.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

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CCNY’s Grove School hosts Discover Engineering Apr 11

On April 11, more than 60 female high school students from the NYC metro area will attend Discover Engineering, an event hosted by the Grove School of Engineering at the City College of New York. Attendees will be immersed in the world of engineering and the exciting possibilities it offers as a career.

During the event, which is offered in partnership with Young Women In Bio (YWIB), attendees will be engaged in lively discussions and activities demonstrating the many ways engineers are helping to meet the great challenges of our times.

The young women will spend time with Grove School and Zahn Innovation Center students who will showcase their current projects. They’ll also learn about the cutting edge research being done at City College in a range of fields from energy and sustainability nanotechnology, and materials engineering to transportation and remote sensing. And about the full compliment of engineering degrees offered by the Grove School.

“Exposure is fundamental to sparking that life-long interest and passion in the STEM fields,” says Gilda Barabino, dean and Berg Professor in the Grove School of Engineering. “And we are thrilled to partner with YWIB to do so for these young women.”

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu (617) 417-2810 m


New York City Political Leaders Selected for 2018 Lindsay Fellowship in Government Leadership and Practice  

Fifteen recently elected members of the New York City Council and state legislature have been selected as 2018 recipients of the Lindsay Fellowship in Government Leadership and Practice, the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG) announced today.

Named for former Mayor John Lindsay, the fellowship engages promising New York City leaders who have been elected to the city and state legislative bodies in the past four years. The program, which began in 2017, aims to deepen their understanding of the pressures and concerns that influence government decision-making and build the skills necessary to make an impact on the future of New York City.

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, one of five Lindsay fellows in last year’s inaugural class, credits the program with helping him rise to his leadership position on the council.

“The Lindsay Fellowship program helps advance the talents and gifts of New York City’s emerging public servants, and I congratulate this year’s recipients,” Speaker Johnson said. “I am honored that CUNY selected me as a fellow in 2017. The program enhanced my skills as a legislator and gave me the opportunity to learn from my colleagues in government, a gift that I draw upon every day. Because of the Lindsay Fellowship, I became a sharper elected official and the lessons learned ultimately helped me become Speaker of the New York City Council.”

The 2018 class of Lindsay Fellows includes:

  • Assembly Member Michael Blake, Bronx
  • Assembly Member Ronald Castorina, Staten Island
  • Assembly Member Latoya  Joyner, Bronx
  • Assembly Member Latrice Walker, Brooklyn
  • Senator Marisol Alcantara, Manhattan
  • Senator Jamaal Bailey, Bronx
  • Senator Brian Benjamin, Manhattan
  • Senator Leroy Comrie, Queens
  • Senator Jesse Hamilton, Brooklyn
  • Senator Roxanne Persaud, Brooklyn
  • Council Member Adrienne Adams, Queens
  • Council Member Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Brooklyn
  • Council Member Justin Brannan, Brooklyn
  • Council Member Keith Powers, Manhattan
  • Council Member Carlina Rivera, Manhattan

The Lindsay Fellowship seeks to recognize Mayor Lindsay’s legacy of attracting young talent to local government. The fellows meet about 10 times a year to exchange ideas with business, civic and academic leaders, experts in sectors including media and technology and former government officials.

Kicking off this year’s program, the fellows will spend Friday in a day-long opening summit focused on key policy areas confronting New York’s elected leaders: city and state budgeting, land use and issues facing the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Michael Jacobson and Marc Shaw, the co-founders of CUNY ISLG, will host the day and moderate panel discussions. Going forward, the fellows will meet monthly with public and private sector experts to dig more deeply into key issues such as criminal justice reform, housing, health care and social services.

The Lindsay Fellows were selected by an advisory board of former government officials who provide guidance to the program. The advisory board includes Gordon Davis, chair, (Venable LLP); Gail Benjamin, (former city council staff); Fred Cerullo, (Grand Central Partnership); Robert Esnard, (Donald Zucker Co).; James Kagen, (retired health care management consultant); Jay Kriegel (The Related Companies); Peter Madonia, (former Rockefeller Foundation); Elsie McCabe, (NYC Mission Society); Haeda Mihaltses, (NY Mets); Pam Silverblatt, (CUNY); Forrest Taylor, (former city council staff); and Ann Weisbrod, retired, (Hudson Yards Development Corporation).

“Newly elected individuals bring new energy and new ideas to governing and public service. The Lindsay Fellowship supports and builds on that potential—providing opportunities to interact with leaders from different sectors and bringing clarity to complex decision making processes within government—so that these new leaders remain engaged, informed, and dynamic public servants throughout their careers,” said Michael P. Jacobson, executive director of the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance.

“The fellowship was a great opportunity to hear different perspectives from business leaders, non-profit heads, and those in government before us. I found it rewarding for the simple fact that I could ask questions that I otherwise may not have mentioned in a public forum. Sometimes it’s good to just break down the barriers and have real conversations,” said Council Member Joe Borelli, one of five Lindsay fellows in last year’s inaugural class.

“CUNY’s Lindsay Fellowship offers an incredible opportunity and exchange of ideas between city and state legislators from across the political spectrum. As an inaugural fellow, I am grateful for these growing partnerships and look forward to working with the newest cohort of public servants,” said Assembly Woman Nily Rozic, one of five Lindsay fellows in last year’s inaugural class.

New members of the New York City Council and the New York State Legislature elected within the past four years are invited at the beginning of the year to apply to become Lindsay Fellows. Applicants are asked to submit a resume and complete an interview with ISLG leadership and Lindsay Fellowship Advisory Board members about what they hope to gain from the program, what issues compelled them to run for office, and the greatest obstacles they face as elected officials.

The Lindsay Fellowship in Government Leadership and Practice is administered by the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance.

About the Lindsay Fellowship in Government Leadership and Practice

The Lindsay Fellowship in Government Leadership and Practice was created on the 50thanniversary of the election of John Lindsay as mayor of New York City. The program honors his many years of public service as a member of the U.S. House of Representative, during which he played a leading role in the enactment of such historic legislation as the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the 1965 Immigration Reform Act, and as the mayor of New York City, during which he emphasized recruiting young talent, especially minorities, and sought ways to encourage their growth, increase their skills, and advance their careers. The Lindsay Fellowship honors his public service by supporting young city and state legislators in broadening their understanding of key constituencies and the pressures and concerns that impact government deliberations and decision making, as well as providing Fellows with opportunities to build relationships with civic leaders and former government officials, as well as with leaders from academia, the media, business, and a wide range of not-for-profits.

About the Institute for State and Local Governance

The Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG) is a nonpartisan research and policy institute within the City University of New York (CUNY). The Institute’s mission is to work with government and non-government organizations to improve systems to produce better results worthy of public investment and trust. We aim to advance data-driven approaches that influence policy and operations and that support work in diverse communities. In short, we help government—and organizations connected to it—do better. We focus on working with cities and states because they are ideal laboratories for developing new approaches to longstanding social problems, and are ripe with opportunities and momentum for real, sustainable change. For more information, please visit islg.cuny.edu.

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CUNY AND SUNY CAMPUSES TO COMMEMORATE DR. KING’S LIFE AND LEGACY

College campuses across New York will observe the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. tonight by ringing bells and taking to social media. The King family has called on college campuses, places of worship and other institutions across the country to toll their bells 39 times at 6:01 p.m. CST (7:01 p.m. EST) to honor Dr. King and commemorate the number of years he lived.

“The City University of New York is proud to participate in the tolling of the bells across our college campuses in observance of the 50th anniversary of the death of Martin Luther King Jr., who fought courageously for fairness, social justice, and educational opportunity for students of all races, religions and national backgrounds, regardless of means,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken.

“On the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, we are especially reminded of his legacy, his influence on civil rights, and unwavering stance on championing diversity,” said SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson. “By tolling their campus bells, participating SUNY campuses come together to honor the influence Dr. King has left on institutions of higher education. Through his legacy, SUNY campuses and campuses across the nation have forever transformed how we discuss and educate our students on diversity, inclusion, and equity. I applaud Governor Cuomo’s office in leading the charge on this statewide initiative so we can all pay homage to Dr. King.”

Perhaps nowhere will the memorial be more poignant than at Queens College, where the bells will peal at the Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner Clock Tower, which honors three young civil rights workers who were murdered while registering voters during Freedom Summer in Mississippi in 1964. At the time of their death, Andrew Goodman was a Queens College student. Michael Schwerner was a student at Cornell University and James Chaney volunteered with the Congress of Racial Equality.

City and State University of New York campuses that will toll bells include:

  • Binghamton University
  • Brooklyn College
  • City College
  • The College at Brockport
  • Empire State College
  • Farmingdale State College
  • Lehman College
  • Maritime College
  • Medgar Evers College
  • Monroe Community College
  • Morrisville State College
  • Nassau Community College
  • Queens College
  • SUNY Albany
  • SUNY Delhi
  • SUNY Fredonia
  • SUNY Maritime
  • SUNY Morrisville
  • SUNY New Paltz
  • SUNY Oneonta
  • SUNY Oswego
  • SUNY Potsdam

Other campuses without bells are commemorating the occasion by broadcasting bells over their intercom, including:

  • Hunter College

About CUNY

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies. For more information, visit www.cuny.edu.

About SUNY

The State University of New York is the largest comprehensive system of higher education in the United States, with 64 college and university campuses located within 30 miles of every home, school and business in the state. In 2015–16, SUNY served nearly 1.3 million students, including nearly 600,000 in credit-bearing courses and programs and more than 700,000 through continuing education and community outreach programs. SUNY students and faculty across the state make significant contributions to research and discovery, resulting in nearly $1 billion of externally sponsored activity each year. There are 3 million SUNY alumni worldwide, and one in three New Yorkers with a college degree is a SUNY alum. To learn more about how SUNY creates opportunity, visit www.suny.edu.

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New CCNY titles tackle transportation, psychotherapy, “TrumpMania” and more

Books on decision making in transportation investment, mentalization in psychotherapy, “TrumpMania” and the art and craft of PR are some of the new publications by City College of New York faculty and staff.

Joseph Berechman, professor of economics in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, is the author of “The Infrastructure We Ride On: Decision Making in Transportation Investment.” The book explores the various economic and institutional factors that explain why huge investments are made in unworthy transportation mega-projects in the United States and other countries.

It is based on research, the general literature, economic analyses, and results from a specifically collected database showing that a significant proportion of implemented mega-projects have been found to be inferior ex-ante or incapable of delivering the returns they promised ex-post.

In “War Isn’t the Only Hell: A New Reading of World War I American Literature,” Keith Gandal, English professor in the Division of Humanities and the Arts, seeks to put American literature written after the Great War in its proper context—as a response to the shocks of war and meritocracy.

The list of other spring publications by CCNY faculty includes:

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


BMCC First College in CUNY System to Offer Apple’s Everyone Can Code Curriculum

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students in the college’s Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development will have the opportunity starting in May to learn Swift, Apple’s easy-to-learn programming language that gives anyone the ability to create world-class apps..

BMCC is the first college in the CUNY system to offer the App Development with Swift curriculum, a full-year course designed by Apple engineers and educators to teach coding and app design to students of all levels and backgrounds. More than 50 BMCC students this year will gain the opportunity to become proficient in the powerful Swift programming language and build the fundamental skills they need to pursue careers in the booming app economy, which has created more than 1.6 million jobs in the U.S. and generated $5 billion in revenue for American app developers in 2017. Popular apps including Airbnb, KAYAK, TripAdvisor, Venmo and Yelp are all created with Swift.

“The courses are designed to accommodate students with little or no entry-level coding knowledge,” says Steve Nunez, Senior Program Coordinator in the Department of IT Programs, BMCC Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development. “It is also aligned with national curriculum standards for computer science, so it strengthens the STEM skills of students who want to continue their education in computer science.”

“This program will take students from basic proficiency to advanced applications using Swift and Xcode. It will tap into their creativity, as they turn business ideas and strategies into viable apps. It will also enhance their collaboration and problem-solving skills, and students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to enter and compete in New York City’s rapidly changing gig economy,” said Sunil Gupta, Dean of the BMCC Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development.

“This BMCC initiative is in alignment with the College’s mission and strategic goal to prepare students for 21st-century careers and contribute to workforce development in NYC,” said Antonio Pérez, President of BMCC. “We’re also expanding the STEM pipeline, and leveling the playing field for underrepresented students.”


BMCC VITA Students Provide Free Tax Assistance

The deadline to file taxes is April 17 and more than 50 Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students are helping New Yorkers make the deadline by providing free assistance in preparing their 2017 tax returns as part of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program.

Since January, the volunteers have been working at both Food Bank for New York City as well as Urban Upbound locations scattered throughout the city. This is the first year, BMCC’s VITA program has partnered with Urban Upbound.

In order to volunteer, the students must successfully complete the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) certification exam. The college offers VITA training workshops during winter break to prepare for the test.  BMCC is the only community college in New York City that offers VITA training workshops.

“This kind of volunteer experience is beneficial because the students are meeting a very vital need and at the same time, gaining invaluable professional tax preparation experience,” said Accounting Professor Angela Jervis, who along with Accounting Professor Joel Barker, oversees the VITA program.

After one year of volunteer work preparing tax returns at the advanced level, students are eligible to apply for paid employment opportunities preparing tax returns. The program is open to all academic majors, not just students from the accounting department.

Jervis says the experience students gain not only enhances future employment opportunities, it strengthens critical thinking and communication skills.“Everyone is a potential taxpayer and needs to file a tax return each year,” Jervis said, “so this is useful knowledge for personal, family and friend’s needs.”

For more information, call the BMCC Accounting Department at (212) 220-8185.


Women’s Resource Center Celebrates 25 Years of Serving the BMCC Community

(L-R) Daniela Parker-Rivas, Amanda Rios, Janice Ortiz-Gonzalez, Deborah Parker, Karina Ramirez, Victoria Apostol-Marius and VIctoria Conover

The BMCC Women’s Resource Center (WRC) celebrated its 25th Anniversary on March 29. Activities co-sponsored by the WRC and the Gender and Women’s Studies Program included four workshops led by BMCC alumni: a phone photos workshop led by Heidi Avila; a laughing yoga workshop led by Michelle Payne; asalsa workshop led by Amanda Rios and a henna painting workshop led by Varsha Jagjit.

Also, the WRC held an open house all day on March 29, and guests were invited to tour its spaces and exhibits.

1983: The WRC begins

For the last 17 years, the WRC has been led by its Director, Deborah Parker, and supported by BMCC staff, students and faculty including Olivia Cousins, BMCC Professor of Health Education.

A co-founder of the WRC, Professor Cousins says it began with an invitation from BMCC President Augusta Kappner. Faculty, staff and students, coordinated by Audrey Hutchinson, “came together with a mandate to develop a program that would address the needs of the BMCC women’s community,” she says. “We wanted a designated safe space where we all could come together to address what we felt were the important issues that all of us shared.”

Over time, those first steps led to the creation of the Sister to Sister mentoring program, Leadership Development Programs, Inspirational Annual Women’s Retreat, Annual Women’s Herstory Conference, Women’s Herstory Month, presentations on Domestic Violence and How to Develop Healthy Relationships, and other programs.

The WRC evolves

Over the years, says Aimee Record—a lecturer in the BMCC English Department who has mentored students through the Women’s Resource Center and helped organize its events—”I have noticed that more women (and people) have used the resource center as a means of support. The programs the Center has created for LGBT, Domestic Abuse and Leadership have brought students and faculty together to strengthen women’s and all human’s rights.”

“The Women’s Resource Center offers important programming for students, both women and men, regarding issues of health and well-being, social activism, leadership development, gender identity and domestic violence, to name a few,” says Precious Sellars-Mulhern, Counseling Psychologist in the BMCC Counseling Office.

Among other roles, Counselor Sellars-Mulhern has participated in WRC activities including the annual Women Student’s Leadership Conference and Retreat.

“This three-day program gives students an opportunity to receive leadership training in a rural camping environment,” she says. “Many of the young women who attend this program have never before left their families and neighborhoods to spend a weekend out in nature. This experience gives them a new psychological perspective and broadens their worldview.”

The WRC looks ahead

Vice President of Student Affairs Marva Craig has a perspective on the WRC that goes back earlier than its creation and takes into account how it has adapted to serve the college as it changed over the years.

“BMCC has a majority female student population today, about 58 percent,” says VP Craig. “Our Women’s Resource Center has served as a key contributor to our college community by providing special programs, services and workshops that are extremely valuable; not only in advancing the health and well-being of our female students, but in educating the entire college community on topics such as domestic violence and gender identity. Over the years, the center has changed its menu of offerings to meet the changing needs of students. We are proud that the Women’s Resource Center has remained relevant on its 25th anniversary, and continues to provide highly valuable services to the BMCC community.”

Patricia Matthews, Professor of Anthropology and Latin American Studies in the Center for Ethnic Studies and a long-time friend of the WRC, also has a perspective that extends over time. “The Women’s Resource Center has grown and become stronger over the years,” she says. “It has expanded in its reach to students, faculty and staff and become a hub of various forms of engagement and support.”

As for what has helped the WRC be successful over the years, “It’s the commitment and hard work of its staff,” says Professor Matthews. “The passion of its Director Debbie Parker is contagious and a model for how staff can work with faculty to build meaningful projects. Also, faculty who have engaged in WRC initiatives have put a lot of their passion and extra hours into the Center, sharing positive energy with all.”

For more information on the BMCC Women’s Resource Center, call (212) 220-8165.


BMCC Partners with NYC High Schools to Create Associate Degree Pathway

BMCC and DOE CTE staff and educators at March 27 meeting

BMCC and DOE CTE staff and educators at March 27 meeting

A joint effort between the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Office of Academic Affairs and Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development has resulted in a partnership between BMCC and the New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) that will serve the students of 30 Career and Technical Education (CTE) high schools throughout all five boroughs.

In short, high school students will have the opportunity to gain stackable credits that can be applied toward an Associate in Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology at BMCC.

The partnership was recognized at a breakfast meeting in the Fiterman Hall Conference Center at BMCC on March 27. High school staff and principals, as well as representatives from the NYC DOE Office of Career and Technical Education were in attendance, and met with BMCC administrators, staff and faculty. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed by the principals of participating high schools, and a brief speaker program was introduced by Erwin Wong, Dean of Academic Programs and Instruction at BMCC.

“This partnership reflects BMCC’s strategic goal to strengthen the college readiness of our students and build access to careers that will widen their opportunities in the 21st-century economy, as well as reflect workforce trends,” said Dean Wong. “We are starting by linking CTE students with IT careers through our Computer Information Systems department; specifically, through our Associate degree program in Computer Network Technology. We are also looking at other degree programs at BMCC that could benefit students of New York’s career-centered high schools and speak to their career aspirations and strengths.”

“We are excited to move forward with this inaugural partnership and expand the pipeline for New York City CTE students to gain access to higher education at BMCC and CUNY,” said John Widlund, Executive Director of Career and Technical Education, NYC DOE. “College isn’t just in our kids’ futures; it’s now. By creating a credentialed pathway to an Associate in Applied Science degree in Computer Network Technology at BMCC, we are providing our students with the tools to thrive in high-demand careers that meet their interests and goals. We look forward to joining with BMCC as we guide our ambitious and hard-working students on that pathway, and help them access academic programs as well as the admissions and support services available to help ensure their success at BMCC.”

A group effort

Sunil Gupta, Dean of the Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development at BMCC, spoke at the MOU event about the genesis of the partnership, “which took place almost a year ago when I was introduced to John Widlund at the Department of Education by one of our corporate partners at CISCO Systems, Inc., Marie Zwickert.”

In subsequent meetings and discussions with Dean Erwin Wong; BMCC Computer Information Systems Department Chair Don Wei; DOE Senior Director of Industry Engagement and Strategic Partnerships Harini Venkatesh and others, Dean Gupta says, “We focused on creating this Career Pathways Initiative with stackable credentials that build a credit-articulation toward a BMCC major while providing individuals with in-demand skills, making them viable in the workforce.”

Janice Zummo, Assistant Dean for Academic Support Services at BMCC, spoke about services and programs at BMCC that support students in their transition to college, including the BMCC Immersion Programs.

“We work to improve college readiness wherever we can, including the support we provide even before they enroll at BMCC,” said Dean Zummo. “The Immersion courses are free, and they prepare students for the level of work that will be expected of them in college. Immersion programs take place in the beginning of the fall and spring semesters as well as during mid-semester. This summer, there will also be a Fit for College program to support students entering BMCC in the fall.”

Services for college readiness and enrollment support

Peter Williams, Director of College Now at BMCC, spoke about that program’s role in building “not just college readiness, but the college awareness of high school students.” Computer Information Systems Chairperson Ching-Song (Don) Wei and Professor Mohammad Azhar spoke briefly about the academic program that this first wave of CTE students will be prepared to enter.

“Students will receive in-depth instruction in operating systems concepts, telecommunication networks and network Security,” said Chairperson Wei. “Graduates of the program will be prepared for entry-level jobs as IT technicians, or for transfer to a bachelor’s degree program to continue their higher education.”

Diane K. Walleser, BMCC Vice President for Enrollment Management, talked about the college’s function to connect students with services and enroll in classes. “We want to connect directly with you, at the high schools themselves, to bring your students on board and ensure their smooth transition to BMCC with the right academic services, financial aid, scholarship opportunities and other resources. We look forward to welcoming New York City’s CTE students to our college and helping them be successful in reaching their goals.”

Lisa Kasper, Director of Admissions and Outreach out of the BMCC Office of Enrollment Management, also spoke about onboarding services at BMCC. “More than 700 prospective students, their families and friends attended our last BMCC Admissions Open House,” she said. “We had representatives from a wide range of support services, as well as professors ready to share information about their degree major, on hand to talk to the attendees. There is a large and diverse community at BMCC ready to meet new and prospective students.”

The BMCC/DOE CTE partnership is slated to start in Fall 2019. For more information, contact Dean Erwin Wong, ewong@bmcc.cuny.edu or Dean Sunil Gupta, sbgupta@bmcc.cuny.edu.


Shawn L. Rickenbacker named Director of J. Max Bond Center for Urban Futures

Shawn L. Rickenbacker is new Director of J. Max Bond Center for Urban Futures

Shawn L. Rickenbacker has been named director of the J. Max Bond Center for Urban Futures, The City College of New York’s research and design center focused on Cities. Rickenbacker’s appointment was announced by City College President Vince Boudreau and Gordon Gebert, Acting Dean, The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture. The Bond Center honors the legacy of J. Max Bond, renowned African American architect and former architecture dean at CCNY, and his extraordinary accomplishments of integrating urban innovation with societal and cultural concerns.

As Director of JMBC for Urban Futures, Rickenbacker will oversee and guide the Center’s mission. The Center was established in 2009 and until 2015 it focused its resources and research efforts on initiatives including Design for the Just City, Legacy City Design, and Inclusion in Architecture. In 2018 and beyond, the Center will move to expand its research focus and organizational network to work toward actionable innovation that addresses the unique urban challenges facing today’s and tomorrow’s cities. The Center will build on transdisciplinary research and design with world class researchers throughout the City University of New York and beyond as well as strategic public and private partnerships. The Center’s partnerships and sponsors will help to ensure an effective dissemination of new knowledge, tools and implementation strategies that seek to improve the quality of life and opportunities available throughout cities.

“I owe much to Max Bond,” said Rickenbacker. “He was such an inspiration to me and others with his commitment to socially responsible design and the championing of CCNY’s intellectual resources as a city-wide asset for improving life in the city through research and design. I am honored to help build upon his legacy. The City College of New York is an amazing resource of some of the world’s best talent and minds with a strong history of social engagement and social innovation. And I am excited to leverage these assets on behalf of organizations, agencies and communities seeking to effectively address the challenges and mine the opportunities of the continued urbanization of cities.”

Born and raised in New York City, Rickenbacker is a trained architect, urbanist and systems technologist whose work has focused on the convergence of physical space and digital systems within the built environment, how we can learn from it and its relationship to the human experience. He is the co-founder of the privately held research and design consultancy, Urban Data + Design.

Rickenbacker will assume the role of Director of the J. Max Bond Center, as well as Associate Professor of Architecture. His addition to faculty will extend the range of expertise offered by The Spitzer School and allow for advanced research and educational opportunities associated within the Bond Center.

“The J. Max Bond institute is a unique feature of CCNY—a place designed to mobilize the campus’s architectural expertise in service to the community that surrounds us,” said President Boudreau. “In bringing Shawn Rickenbacker in to direct the Center, we have selected someone who, in his preparation, disposition and commitments is a perfect fit. Professor Rickenbacker thinks about the built environment in terms that engage structural aspects, ideas about technology and social questions of race, gender, opportunity and disparity.  In this most public of architectural centers, he is an emphatically public architect and will be a superlative director.”

Rickenbacker, most recently served as the Gensler Visiting Professor at Cornell University School of Architecture and prior to that appointment the Favrot Visiting Chair in Architecture and a Senior Research Fellow at the Taylor Institute for Social Innovation at Tulane University. He has served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Design and held academic appointments at The Ohio State University, Architectural Association, Syracuse University, and the University of Virginia.

“We are delighted to have Shawn Rickenbacker join the City College Community and lead the Bond Center’s mission going forward,” said Dean Gebert. “He not only brings a breadth of knowledge and experiences related to urbanization but also a vision that will help galvanize diverse resources and talent around the Bond Center’s mission.”

Rickenbacker received his Master of Architecture from The University of Virginia, with a Certificate in American Urbanism. He earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Syracuse University and a Certificate in Advanced Digital Interaction Design, from New York University, Center of Advanced Digital Applications.

An Advisory Board will be named to advise the Bond Center on matters of strategic and financial planning, future partnerships and management pertaining to the Center’s mission.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


Shawn L. Rickenbacker named Director of J. Max Bond Center for Urban Futures

Shawn L. Rickenbacker is new Director of J. Max Bond Center for Urban Futures

Shawn L. Rickenbacker has been named director of the J. Max Bond Center for Urban Futures, The City College of New York’s research and design center focused on Cities. Rickenbacker’s appointment was announced by City College President Vince Boudreau and Gordon Gebert, Acting Dean, The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture. The Bond Center honors the legacy of J. Max Bond, renowned African American architect and former architecture dean at CCNY, and his extraordinary accomplishments of integrating urban innovation with societal and cultural concerns.

As Director of JMBC for Urban Futures, Rickenbacker will oversee and guide the Center’s mission. The Center was established in 2009 and until 2015 it focused its resources and research efforts on initiatives including Design for the Just City, Legacy City Design, and Inclusion in Architecture. In 2018 and beyond, the Center will move to expand its research focus and organizational network to work toward actionable innovation that addresses the unique urban challenges facing today’s and tomorrow’s cities. The Center will build on transdisciplinary research and design with world class researchers throughout the City University of New York and beyond as well as strategic public and private partnerships. The Center’s partnerships and sponsors will help to ensure an effective dissemination of new knowledge, tools and implementation strategies that seek to improve the quality of life and opportunities available throughout cities.

“I owe much to Max Bond,” said Rickenbacker. “He was such an inspiration to me and others with his commitment to socially responsible design and the championing of CCNY’s intellectual resources as a city-wide asset for improving life in the city through research and design. I am honored to help build upon his legacy. The City College of New York is an amazing resource of some of the world’s best talent and minds with a strong history of social engagement and social innovation. And I am excited to leverage these assets on behalf of organizations, agencies and communities seeking to effectively address the challenges and mine the opportunities of the continued urbanization of cities.”

Born and raised in New York City, Rickenbacker is a trained architect, urbanist and systems technologist whose work has focused on the convergence of physical space and digital systems within the built environment, how we can learn from it and its relationship to the human experience. He is the co-founder of the privately held research and design consultancy, Urban Data + Design.

Rickenbacker will assume the role of Director of the J. Max Bond Center, as well as Associate Professor of Architecture. His addition to faculty will extend the range of expertise offered by The Spitzer School and allow for advanced research and educational opportunities associated within the Bond Center.

“The J. Max Bond institute is a unique feature of CCNY—a place designed to mobilize the campus’s architectural expertise in service to the community that surrounds us,” said President Boudreau. “In bringing Shawn Rickenbacker in to direct the Center, we have selected someone who, in his preparation, disposition and commitments is a perfect fit. Professor Rickenbacker thinks about the built environment in terms that engage structural aspects, ideas about technology and social questions of race, gender, opportunity and disparity.  In this most public of architectural centers, he is an emphatically public architect and will be a superlative director.”

Rickenbacker, most recently served as the Gensler Visiting Professor at Cornell University School of Architecture and prior to that appointment the Favrot Visiting Chair in Architecture and a Senior Research Fellow at the Taylor Institute for Social Innovation at Tulane University. He has served on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Design and held academic appointments at The Ohio State University, Architectural Association, Syracuse University, and the University of Virginia.

“We are delighted to have Shawn Rickenbacker join the City College Community and lead the Bond Center’s mission going forward,” said Dean Gebert. “He not only brings a breadth of knowledge and experiences related to urbanization but also a vision that will help galvanize diverse resources and talent around the Bond Center’s mission.”

Rickenbacker received his Master of Architecture from The University of Virginia, with a Certificate in American Urbanism. He earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Syracuse University and a Certificate in Advanced Digital Interaction Design, from New York University, Center of Advanced Digital Applications.

An Advisory Board will be named to advise the Bond Center on matters of strategic and financial planning, future partnerships and management pertaining to the Center’s mission.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


Lower School Open House Sign-Up 2018

NEST+m Lower Grades Open House Sign-Up 2018

Register for the NEST+m Lower Grades Open House and tours on:

  • Monday, April 9, 2018 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Tuesday, April 10, 2018 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM

PLEASE RSVP HERE: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/8050b45afaa2ca64-nestm1

Daytime tours will be offered later in the spring, after admissions offers have been made. If your child is admitted to NEST+m, you will then have a chance to tour during school hours.

You must bring your child’s G&T score report indicating a combined score of 97% or above, and your picture ID, in order to be admitted to the tour. Families without a valid score report will not be allowed on the tour. An electronic copy of the score report is valid for entry.

Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to your scheduled tour.

NEST+m Auditorium
111 Columbia Street
New York, NY 10002


CUNY PROFESSORS’ INVENTION HELPS VISION-IMPAIRED TODDLERS TO WALK SAFELY

Toddler Cane’ Can Help Prevent Speech and Motor Skill Developmental Delay Stemming From Childhood Blindness

Professors’ Invention Another Example of ‘Genuinely Life-Changing Research’ Being Done by CUNY Faculty, Says Chancellor Milliken

Professors from two colleges at The City University of New York have developed a wearable cane that allows blind and severely vision-impaired toddlers to walk safely long before they develop the cognitive skills and manual dexterity needed to use a traditional handheld white cane. The wearable “toddler cane” fastens around the waist, positioning two attached white shafts joined with a U-shaped bumper on the ground two steps ahead, providing the child with continuous next-step warning.

The cane may do more than help toddlers avoid falling over objects and walking into walls and trees. Research has found that childhood blindness also can lead to delays in speech, motor function and the ability to play and socialize. Ongoing research by the professors indicates that better connecting vision-impaired toddlers with their world through the wearable toddler cane may well reduce or avoid those complications.

“Vision-impaired toddlers want to run and explore the world just like sighted kids, but they trip over unseen objects, fall and walk into walls,” explains toddler cane inventor Grace Ambrose-Zaken, who coordinates Hunter College’s master’s in rehabilitation teaching and orientation and mobility (O&M) programs. “Those who can’t move around independently without hurting themselves tend to avoid moving. They don’t play by themselves, but lay on the floor and twirl around because they are prisoners in their space and moving is fraught with danger.”

“This simple, yet extraordinary device is yet another example of the genuinely life-changing research going on at CUNY,” says Chancellor James B. Milliken. “I could not be prouder of our faculty and more pleased for the children and families who will benefit from this wonderful invention.”

One stunning effect of the cane that is readily apparent in video footage that Ambrose shot is that youngsters suddenly walk – indeed, run – straight ahead.

All that happens instinctively and in a snap, says Brooklyn parent Karen Dunlap, who in her work life sources and sells tea. “My daughter’s O&M specialist shared a video of Grace demonstrating a very early prototype and I contacted her immediately.” Léa has a little-known condition, cortical visual impairment, from a stroke after birth, which primarily impacts her safe mobility, “I just had to have one for Léa and “from the first time she wore the toddler cane, there were dramatic differences in her being able to walk upright. Before, Léa’s head was always down and she couldn’t walk straight,” Dunlap says. “But when she wore her cane, she walked upright and straight.”

Ambrose explains: “Vision-impaired toddlers slow down and walk sideways because their bodies are telling their brains to protect them and keep them upright no matter what comes. But after they put on the toddler cane, they naturally associate the tactile warning it provides with the information they need to walk faster. The body deals with the cognitive request for more speed by demanding that they walk upright and straight, which is the most efficient way to get through space.”

For Dunlap, the instant change in posture was convincing evidence that Léa’s tilted stance was vision-related. It also showed that the physical therapists who had sought to remedy her stance with restrictive garments and a wheeled gait trainer (designed for people who can’t walk independently) were the ones headed in the wrong direction. The toddler cane, Dunlap says, “helped the physical therapists understand her vision deficit.”

Before age 5, the typical child with visual impairment cannot understand how to use a traditional cane, which Ambrose calls “a small point of tactile information that works very well when you position it correctly and sweep it back and forth each time you take a step.”

Younger children – especially 2-year-olds who are bursting with energy and the desire to explore and grasp things – need something else, particularly because they don’t yet command enough language to give and receive complex information, e.g., “There’s a flight of stairs ahead of you.” But with the wearable toddler cane, Ambrose says, “They’ll get the warning that something’s ahead, and they’ll be the masters of their universe.”

The basic idea for the wearable toddler cane came in 2014, when Ambrose was commuting to Hunter on the subway. “I was trying to figure out what we could do to improve toddlers access to safe mobility, and it hit me,” Ambrose recalls. “They have to wear it like a Southern belle hoop skirt.” She made prototypes in her garage and submitted her idea to the CUNY Institutional Review Board (IRB), which protects the rights and welfare of human research subjects, in order that she might begin testing them.

When City College biomedical engineering professor Marom Bikson learned about Ambrose’s work, he volunteered to help her perfect the design, produce prototypes and ramp up for manufacturing. Bikson remembers, “as a father of two toddlers, I saw the absolute necessity for this device, so I offered to help make it.” At City College’s Grove School of Engineering, Bikson manages a program that develops medical devices; his special focus is treating neurological and psychiatric disorders, like depression and development delays.

Since then, the project won a grant from the U.S. Department of Education for Phase 1 testing, allowing the team to conduct prototype development trials using state-of-the-art, rapid-prototyping facilities, including 3-D printers, in fabricating the toddler canes, which are currently custom-made to fit each child.

“We thought we’d have to train children how to use this, but they get it immediately,” Bikson says. “The toddlers start to run for the first time in their lives, and, when you take it off them, they’re crying in protest. These kids have been scared and held back, and they’ve been waiting for it.”

Ambrose and Bikson have found that the wearable toddler cane may well minimize or help avoid developmental, emotional, and social delays – findings they continue to document with the families using the device. “Subjects who wore the toddler cane walked further without prompting and spoke more words, more frequently compared to the long-cane condition,” they wrote (2017). “When wearing the toddler cane, the subjects spoke spontaneously about destination, locating and traveling to people, objects and places. The learners’ posture, gait and pace were visibly better. In addition, subjects were more animated and engaged in preschool antics, for example spontaneously starting games of chase and tag and defying authority.”

Collaborating with Sahar Ghaheri, Safe Toddlers’ creative director of app design, the professors also are developing an app to help families and professionals teach vision-impaired children to safely navigate the world, while also logging usage data that the cane automatically reports.

Dunlap is enthusiastic about the app: “If you’re not visually impaired, you really don’t know how to coach your kid on how to find your house or do a task in a house that has stairs. The app gives pointers to parents on how to walk on your street, things to pay attention to and how to give audio cues, like ‘Let’s go wash our hands in the sink.’ These develop scanning and mapping skills that visually impaired kids have to learn that come naturally to sighted people.”

The CUNY professors now seek additional government and foundation funding for Phase 2 development, including reducing the cost of manufacturing the custom-fit wearable toddler canes. There also will be further clinical trials to collect more data on the benefits of the toddler cane, not simply on mobility but also on general measures of well-being and development. Through support from CUNY foundations and the U.S. Department of Education, canes are provided cost free to users participating in the clinical trials.

Meanwhile, word about their work has spread across the United States and internationally, including to Australia, Canada, France, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Panama, Poland, South Africa and the United Kingdom. “We’re looking for regional partners, such as charities, to support the costs of canes for kids. If they can sponsor custom-fit toddler canes for a local school for the blind, or even for one child, it would mean the world to those children,” Bikson says. “We believe that every vision-impaired toddler deserves a wearable white cane, so our goal is simple: building and delivering the best cane for every kid in need.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###


Guttman Professor and Co-Author Conduct Q&A Interview

Chet Jordan, Assistant Professor

Chet Jordan, Guttman Assistant Professor

Chet Jordan, Assistant Professor at Guttman Community College, and Anthony G. Picciano, Professor of Urban Education at Hunter College, the CUNY Graduate Center, and the CUNY School for Professional Studies, held a March 29, 2018, Q&A interview with Gotham blog editor Nick Juravich about the book they co-authored: CUNY’s First Fifty Years: Triumphs and Ordeals of a People’s University.

About the book CUNY’s First Fifty Years:

Providing a comprehensive history of The City University of New York, this book chronicles the evolution of the country’s largest urban university from its inception in 1961 through the tumultuous events and policies that have shaped it character and community over the past fifty years. Reflecting on its uniqueness and broader place in U.S. higher education, Picciano and Jordan examine in depth the development of the CUNY system and all of its constituent colleges, with emphasis on its rapid expansion in the 1960s, and the end of its free tuition in the 1970s, and open admissions policies in the 1990s. While much of CUNY’s history is marked by twists and turns unique to its locale, many of the issues and experiences at CUNY shed light on the larger nationwide developments in higher education.

About The Gotham Center:

The Gotham Center is a university-based research and educational center, devoted to advancing scholarly and public understanding of New York City’s rich and living past. The organization was founded in 2000 by Mike Wallace, Distinguished Professor of History at John Jay College and The Graduate Center, CUNY, after his landmark work Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898, co-authored with Edwin Burrows, won the Pulitzer. For nearly twenty years, it has been the one academic institution devoted exclusively to promoting this critical field of study.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sustainability and the City: A Panel Discussion on Urban Sustainability with a Focus on New York City and State

WHAT:
A panel discussion with four experts on urban sustainability, including Rob Craudereuff, CEO of Crauderueff Associates; Annel Hernandez, Resiliency Planner, NYC Environmental Justice League; Jesse Scott, Customer Development Manager, New York Power Authority; and Tria Case, Director, Sustainable CUNY. Dr. Michael Wolfe, Dean of Social Science at Queens College, will be the moderator.

Free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Public RSVP deadline is March 21.

Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5210, or register online here.

Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background: Launched in 2005, the QC Business Forum brings together the business community, local government, academia, and students to provide an opportunity for town and gown to interact. Influential leaders in a number of fields serve as keynote speakers at its breakfast and lunchtime lectures, touching on issues vital to the local business community.

“The Business Forum series is just one of the many vital partnerships Queens College maintains with the community,” says President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “We are particularly proud of our record in championing sustainability-related initiatives both in our campus operations and through faculty research.  These include recent findings by microbiologist Gregory O’Mullan on increased levels of pharmaceuticals in the Hudson River and the resulting discussion on the best ways for the public to discard used medications.”

Panelist Bios:

Rob Crauderueff, CEO and Founder of Crauderueff & Associates (C&A), brings more than a decade of experience advancing green economic development projects in New York City and across the nation. Prior to founding C&A, he successfully led the NYC-based Stormwater Infrastructure Matters coalition’s efforts to advance NYC’s $1 billion-plus green infrastructure plan. He is an internationally recognized expert in green infrastructure, receiving the 2009 Green Roofs for Healthy Cities International Award of Excellence for Civic Engagement and serving as a delegate in 2013 to study green roof design and policy in Switzerland. He has held positions as Senior Researcher for the NYC Soil & Water Conservation District and as Policy Director at Sustainable South Bronx, where he supervised land use planning, workforce development and environmental infrastructure initiatives. Mr. Crauderueff holds a Master in City Planning degree from MIT and his B.A. from Columbia University.

 

Annel Hernandez is the Resiliency Planner with the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance. She currently works on both city and statewide climate policy issues, focusing on local advocacy that furthers equitable investments in coastal protections, green infrastructure, and renewable energy. She also works on various coalition campaigns to push for more aggressive climate legislation—with equity as a central focus. Previously, she worked with the Urban Climate Change Research Network at Columbia University’s Earth Institute where she collaborated with scholars, experts, and advocates on pushing forward new climate change resources for cities. Ms. Hernandez also worked in the NYC Mayor’s Office as Social Innovation Fund Advisor managing the program implementation of a multi-city initiative focused on economic opportunity programs. Ms. Hernandez received an MPA in Energy and Environment from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, and a B.A. in Political Science and Latino Studies from Fordham University.

Jesse Scott is the Manager for Customer Business Development and Program Manager for the Five Cities Program at the New York Power Authority. In this role Mr. Scott is the liaison between the cities of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and Yonkers and program stakeholders. He also provides support for the K-Solar and BuildSmart NY programs and performs business development for NYPA’s Customer Energy Solutions division. Prior to joining NYPA, Mr. Scott worked as a project and planning manager at Lockheed Martin and as an energy consultant. He is a Certified Energy Manager and is currently pursuing his MBA in Management at the University of Connecticut.

Tria Case, Esq., is the University Director of Sustainability and Energy Conservation for the City University of New York (CUNY). Since 2006 Ms. Case has led the development and the implementation of multiple U.S. Department of Energy, NY-Sun, and New York City funded solar programs on behalf of New York City and New York State, leading to a significant growth in solar capacity and installation companies. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy Ms. Case formed the Smart Distributed Generation Hub with city, state, and federal participation in an effort to integrate solar+storage and DG into emergency power and resiliency deployment. In addition, Ms. Case coordinates and provides resources to CUNY’s 24 institutions of higher education to meet the goal of reducing CUNY’s energy consumption through the Sustainable CUNY Conserves program. Ms. Case received her undergraduate degree from Union College and earned her JD from Brooklyn College.

Michael Wolfe, Queens College History Professor and Social Sciences Dean, received his Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University in 1986. A specialist of European history, his research interests have ranged broadly across topics in the late medieval and early modern eras, principally of France, focusing on the intersection between politics and religious belief, technology and craft practices, cities and siege warfare, and landscapes and cartography. While at Pennsylvania State University, Dr. Wolfe held a joint appointment in environmental studies. Prior to coming to Queens College he also taught at St. John’s University and the University of Southern California.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Sustainability and the City: A Panel Discussion on Urban Sustainability with a Focus on New York City and State

WHAT:
A panel discussion with four experts on urban sustainability, including Rob Craudereuff, CEO of Crauderueff Associates; Annel Hernandez, Resiliency Planner, NYC Environmental Justice League; Jesse Scott, Customer Development Manager, New York Power Authority; and Tria Case, Director, Sustainable CUNY. Dr. Michael Wolfe, Dean of Social Science at Queens College, will be the moderator.

Free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Public RSVP deadline is March 21.

Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5210, or register online here.

Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background: Launched in 2005, the QC Business Forum brings together the business community, local government, academia, and students to provide an opportunity for town and gown to interact. Influential leaders in a number of fields serve as keynote speakers at its breakfast and lunchtime lectures, touching on issues vital to the local business community.

“The Business Forum series is just one of the many vital partnerships Queens College maintains with the community,” says President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “We are particularly proud of our record in championing sustainability-related initiatives both in our campus operations and through faculty research.  These include recent findings by microbiologist Gregory O’Mullan on increased levels of pharmaceuticals in the Hudson River and the resulting discussion on the best ways for the public to discard used medications.”

Panelist Bios:

Rob Crauderueff, CEO and Founder of Crauderueff & Associates (C&A), brings more than a decade of experience advancing green economic development projects in New York City and across the nation. Prior to founding C&A, he successfully led the NYC-based Stormwater Infrastructure Matters coalition’s efforts to advance NYC’s $1 billion-plus green infrastructure plan. He is an internationally recognized expert in green infrastructure, receiving the 2009 Green Roofs for Healthy Cities International Award of Excellence for Civic Engagement and serving as a delegate in 2013 to study green roof design and policy in Switzerland. He has held positions as Senior Researcher for the NYC Soil & Water Conservation District and as Policy Director at Sustainable South Bronx, where he supervised land use planning, workforce development and environmental infrastructure initiatives. Mr. Crauderueff holds a Master in City Planning degree from MIT and his B.A. from Columbia University.

 

Annel Hernandez is the Resiliency Planner with the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance. She currently works on both city and statewide climate policy issues, focusing on local advocacy that furthers equitable investments in coastal protections, green infrastructure, and renewable energy. She also works on various coalition campaigns to push for more aggressive climate legislation—with equity as a central focus. Previously, she worked with the Urban Climate Change Research Network at Columbia University’s Earth Institute where she collaborated with scholars, experts, and advocates on pushing forward new climate change resources for cities. Ms. Hernandez also worked in the NYC Mayor’s Office as Social Innovation Fund Advisor managing the program implementation of a multi-city initiative focused on economic opportunity programs. Ms. Hernandez received an MPA in Energy and Environment from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, and a B.A. in Political Science and Latino Studies from Fordham University.

Jesse Scott is the Manager for Customer Business Development and Program Manager for the Five Cities Program at the New York Power Authority. In this role Mr. Scott is the liaison between the cities of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and Yonkers and program stakeholders. He also provides support for the K-Solar and BuildSmart NY programs and performs business development for NYPA’s Customer Energy Solutions division. Prior to joining NYPA, Mr. Scott worked as a project and planning manager at Lockheed Martin and as an energy consultant. He is a Certified Energy Manager and is currently pursuing his MBA in Management at the University of Connecticut.

Tria Case, Esq., is the University Director of Sustainability and Energy Conservation for the City University of New York (CUNY). Since 2006 Ms. Case has led the development and the implementation of multiple U.S. Department of Energy, NY-Sun, and New York City funded solar programs on behalf of New York City and New York State, leading to a significant growth in solar capacity and installation companies. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy Ms. Case formed the Smart Distributed Generation Hub with city, state, and federal participation in an effort to integrate solar+storage and DG into emergency power and resiliency deployment. In addition, Ms. Case coordinates and provides resources to CUNY’s 24 institutions of higher education to meet the goal of reducing CUNY’s energy consumption through the Sustainable CUNY Conserves program. Ms. Case received her undergraduate degree from Union College and earned her JD from Brooklyn College.

Michael Wolfe, Queens College History Professor and Social Sciences Dean, received his Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University in 1986. A specialist of European history, his research interests have ranged broadly across topics in the late medieval and early modern eras, principally of France, focusing on the intersection between politics and religious belief, technology and craft practices, cities and siege warfare, and landscapes and cartography. While at Pennsylvania State University, Dr. Wolfe held a joint appointment in environmental studies. Prior to coming to Queens College he also taught at St. John’s University and the University of Southern California.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Urban Park Executive Leadership Program Led by CUNY School of Professional Studies and Central Park Conservancy Welcomes Park Professionals from Around the World

leader speaks to participants of the executive parks program at central park

Pictured (L): Doug Blonsky, Senior Advisor to the President & CEO, Central Park Conservancy, talks to a group of park professionals in Central Park as part of the Urban Park Executive Leadership Program.

New York, NY — March 28, 2018 – Park professionals from across the country, as well as from several major non-US cities, convened March 19-23, 2018, for the first-ever Urban Park Executive Leadership Program, a new program led by the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) and the Central Park Conservancy.

The immersive five-day program equips participants with the skills needed to manage an urban park as part of a public-private park partnership. Featuring classroom learning as well as hands-on fieldwork with Central Park Conservancy staff, the program covers a variety of topics, including park operations and partnership management. The program is made possible by generous support from the JPB Foundation. Eighteen high-level managers in established public-private partnerships and agencies working in urban parks and open spaces were part of the inaugural cohort.

“We are delighted that such a diverse and talented group of park professionals attended the first Urban Park Executive Leadership Program,” said CUNY SPS Dean John Mogulescu.  “As a leader in professional development in New York City, I am proud of our partnership with the Central Park Conservancy and look forward to our work together to enhance the stewardship of urban parks.”

“As the world leader in urban park management, the Central Park Conservancy is uniquely positioned to teach what we have learned to park managers around the world. We are thrilled to kick off our Urban Park Executive Leadership Program and to welcome so many talented park professionals to Central Park,” said Elizabeth W. Smith, President and CEO of the Central Park Conservancy.

To learn more about the Urban Park Executive Leadership Program, visit centralparknyc.org/about/institute.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

About the Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks

The mission of the Central Park Conservancy — a nonprofit organization founded in 1980 — is to restore, manage, and enhance Central Park in partnership with the public, for the enjoyment of all.

The Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks educates urban park professionals, visitors, students, and educators on best practices that promote public stewardship for, and world-class management of, urban parks. The Institute for Urban Parks provides opportunities for people of all ages to better understand, experience, and enjoy urban parks. Institute programs underscore the role urban parks play as cultural and environmental treasures that have extraordinary capacity to educate, enrich, and inspire people in the development of healthy, vibrant urban communities.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Urban Park Executive Leadership Program Led by CUNY School of Professional Studies and Central Park Conservancy Welcomes Park Professionals from Around the World

leader speaks to participants of the executive parks program at central park

Pictured (L): Doug Blonsky, Senior Advisor to the President & CEO, Central Park Conservancy, talks to a group of park professionals in Central Park as part of the Urban Park Executive Leadership Program.

New York, NY — March 28, 2018 – Park professionals from across the country, as well as from several major non-US cities, convened March 19-23, 2018, for the first-ever Urban Park Executive Leadership Program, a new program led by the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) and the Central Park Conservancy.

The immersive five-day program equips participants with the skills needed to manage an urban park as part of a public-private park partnership. Featuring classroom learning as well as hands-on fieldwork with Central Park Conservancy staff, the program covers a variety of topics, including park operations and partnership management. The program is made possible by generous support from the JPB Foundation. Eighteen high-level managers in established public-private partnerships and agencies working in urban parks and open spaces were part of the inaugural cohort.

“We are delighted that such a diverse and talented group of park professionals attended the first Urban Park Executive Leadership Program,” said CUNY SPS Dean John Mogulescu.  “As a leader in professional development in New York City, I am proud of our partnership with the Central Park Conservancy and look forward to our work together to enhance the stewardship of urban parks.”

“As the world leader in urban park management, the Central Park Conservancy is uniquely positioned to teach what we have learned to park managers around the world. We are thrilled to kick off our Urban Park Executive Leadership Program and to welcome so many talented park professionals to Central Park,” said Elizabeth W. Smith, President and CEO of the Central Park Conservancy.

To learn more about the Urban Park Executive Leadership Program, visit centralparknyc.org/about/institute.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

CUNY SPS provides online and on campus degree and certificate programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 8% of U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2017 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs.  Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York City and 2nd in New York State.

About the Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks

The mission of the Central Park Conservancy — a nonprofit organization founded in 1980 — is to restore, manage, and enhance Central Park in partnership with the public, for the enjoyment of all.

The Central Park Conservancy Institute for Urban Parks educates urban park professionals, visitors, students, and educators on best practices that promote public stewardship for, and world-class management of, urban parks. The Institute for Urban Parks provides opportunities for people of all ages to better understand, experience, and enjoy urban parks. Institute programs underscore the role urban parks play as cultural and environmental treasures that have extraordinary capacity to educate, enrich, and inspire people in the development of healthy, vibrant urban communities.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Guttman Model Cited in Editorial

Guttman Community College’s co-requisite model and high graduation rates are praised in a March 27, 2018, editorial from Southwestern College in Chula Visa, CA, about the need to eliminate remedial courses.


Scholar-activist Vince Boudreau takes the helm at City College

Dr. Vincent Boudreau, CCNY’s 13th President

Dignitaries set for Presidential Investiture ceremony, March 29

In a transformative moment for the nation’s first tuition free public college, scholar-activist Vincent Boudreau is to be sworn in as 13th President of The City College of New York in an investiture ceremony starting 5:30 p.m. on March 29 in CCNY’s Great Hall. He is the second faculty member there to rise to the position of CCNY president in the institution’s 171-year history. Fredrick Bertrand Robinson, CCNY’s 5th president (1927-1939), was the first.

A professor of political science at CCNY who’s also on the faculty at the Graduate Center, CUNY, Boudreau was appointed president by the City University of New York Board of Trustees on December 4, 2017. He previously served as interim president for one year.

“City College occupies a very special place in the history of this city, and it continues to be an irreplaceable beacon of opportunity for high quality education for New Yorkers,” said James B. Milliken, Chancellor of the City University of New York. “Vince Boudreau is steeped in the CCNY tradition and reflects its values, first as a faculty member, then as dean of the Colin Powell School, and now as President. During his time as interim President Dr. Boudreau demonstrated steady, accountable, and wise leadership, and I am absolutely convinced he will provide the leadership as president that City College and the many it serves deserve.”

William C. Thompson Jr., Chairperson of the CUNY Board of Trustees, said: “As interim president and, before that, inaugural dean of the Colin Powell School, an administrator, scholar and champion of the college, Dr. Boudreau has exemplified the leadership and dedication that City College needs to chart its future course. The City College that he leads — and envisions — is one that hews to its core historic mission of access, inclusion and excellence.”

General Colin L. Powell USA (ret.), a distinguished member of CCNY’s Class of 1958, joined in hailing Boudreau.

“Vince Boudreau brought to the Colin Powell School a passion and a dedication to infuse our students not only with a degree but also a commitment to serve others and to be leaders,” noted the former U.S. Secretary of State. “I am sure he will do the same for all of City College. He is a distinguished academic and a powerful leader.”

Boudreau said the appointment is the greatest honor of his life: “From the first days that I stepped onto the City College campus, its vitality and potential captivated me. To be charged with stewarding what the college has been, and what it can become, is a sacred thing and the greatest honor of my life.”

He assumes leadership of CUNY’s flagship institution after serving as founding dean of CCNY’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. During his tenure, he led an effort that raised more than $50 million in support of the Colin Powell School and campus-wide programs.

Prior to leading the Colin Powell School, he headed the Colin Powell Center for Leadership and Service at City College from 2002 through 2013.

​As president, Boudreau invigorates CCNY, with its legacy of access, opportunity, and transformation, with renewed purpose and dynamism. A specialist in the politics of social movements, particularly in Southeast Asia, he’s an advocate for the rights of undocumented students.

In addition, Boudreau has declared CCNY as a campus where all people are welcome, protected, and celebrated.

His latest book is “Resisting Dictatorship: Repression and Protest in Southeast Asia” (Cambridge University Press).

Boudreau is a graduate of Cornell University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 1991.

Click here for more information on the investiture ceremony.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Global experts at CCNY conference study historic Spain-N. America links

For the fourth consecutive year, more than 100 hundred scholars and researchers from 50 universities around the world, meet at The City College of New York’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education to discuss the historical ties between North America and Spain, April 11-13.

Felipe Fernández-Armesto, William P. Reynolds Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, delivers the keynote address 7 p.m., Thursday, April 12, at the Instituto Cervantes, located at 211 East 49th Street, Manhattan. It is entitled: “Spain and North America: New Perspectives on a Shared Past.”

“The aim of the conference is to provide a meeting place for academics and professionals with an interest in other disciplines related to this subject as well as to interact with other members within and outside their own disciplines in the areas of Humanities and Social Sciences,” said Juan Carlos Mercado, dean of the CWE.

The emerging new cultural cartographies cannot be studied or discussed outside the framework of these connections. CWE, the Instituto Cervantes of New York, and the Instituto Franklin of the Universidad de Alcalá have organized the conference, which brings together different disciplines and areas of study with an emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to the historical links between Spain and North America.

The conference is organized in sections with different focal points. Topics covered include: new cultural cartographies, colonial studies, post-colonial studies, links in education, cultural studies, international relations, economy and labor/corporations in the 21st century, science and technology, as well as military and security policy. The event has attracted scholars from Europe, Africa, Canada, USA and Latin America.

All panel discussions will be held at CWE, 25 Broadway, 7th Floor, in Manhattan. Click here for more information.

About The Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at CWE
The Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education (CWE) is on the Downtown Campus of the City College of New York/CUNY. Founded in 1981, it is one of the leading working adult educational institutions in New York City. It provides working adults with small classes, flexible schedules, individualized attention, an innovative curriculum, and all the resources of a world-class academic institution. Life Experience credits are available. CWE offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences and a Bachelor of Science degree in Early Childhood Education; Global Labor Studies; History, Politics, and Society; Literary, Media, and Visual Arts; Social Welfare; Urban Studies and Public Administration, the Study of the Americas. CWE also offers a Master’s Degree in the Study of the Americas, with a BA/MA option, which enables students to complete both degrees in a shorter time period.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Brooklyn College to Award Judy Heumann Honorary Doctorate at Its 2018 Commencement Ceremony

The pioneering disability rights activist will also be the keynote speaker at the event on May 31 at the Barclays Center.

Judith E. “Judy” Heumann, a disability rights activist whose social justice leadership is recognized globally, will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters at the 2018 Brooklyn College Commencement Ceremony held on May 31 at the Barclays Center. She will also be the keynote speaker at the event.

Known as the Mother of the Independent Living Disability Rights movement,” her work has had a significant impact on the implementation of legislation and policies that benefit and protect people with disabilities. For over 45 years, her pioneering efforts in the nonprofit sector, with the World Bank, and the Bill Clinton and Barack Obama administrations, led the charge for the mainstream recognition of disability rights.

Born in 1947, Heumann grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were German Jewish refugees who came to the United States in the 1930s. In 1949, Heumann contracted polio, resulting in her being a quadriplegic and using a wheelchair for mobility. At five years old, she and her family began to experience a world that did not intend to allow her to be an equal citizen. When her mother took her to enroll in P.S. 197 in East Flatbush, she was shocked and dismayed that the school could deny her daughter admission solely based on her inability to walk. The New York City Board of Education deemed it sufficient to provide Heumann with only 2.5 hours a week of home education until the 4th grade, at which time she was allowed to go to P.S. 219 special education classes.

Her mother, a community activist, would not stop advocating for her daughter’s right to public education. Heumann’s mother and other mothers banded together to force New York City’s Department of Education to make some of their high schools accessible so that students like Heumann, who rode in a wheelchair, would not have to go back to home instruction. Judy went on to be enrolled in Sheepshead Bay High School because it was a newly constructed accessible school.

Heumann attended Long Island University (LIU) graduating in 1969. The 1960s created an opportunity for disabled people with all types of disabilities to learn from the civil rights movement which had been gaining momentum. She learned the importance of activism and bringing the voices of disabled people together to demand revolutionary changes. She and other students worked with LIU to establish a disabled students services office. After graduating from LIU with a bachelor’s degree in speech and a minor in education, she founded Disabled in Action with Brooklyn College disability activists and alumni Fred Francis (founder of S.O.F.E.D.U.P.) and Pat Figueroa, which sought to end discrimination against people with disabilities.

<p>Heumann's groundbreaking political activism has significantly impacted legislation affecting people with disability.</p>

Heumann’s groundbreaking political activism has significantly impacted legislation affecting people with disability.

When Heumann applied to become a teacher in the New York City public school system, she was denied a teacher’s license due to “paralysis of both lower extremities.” She filed a lawsuit against the Board of Education and was fortunate to have Constance Baker Motley as her judge. Motley directed that Heumann be given another medical exam resulting in her obtaining a license. By the time the suit was settled in 1970, Heumann became the first public school teacher in the New York City system to use a wheelchair. The book, The Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation, by Doris Fleischer and Frieda Zames, details Heumann’s activism and discusses how important her lawsuit was in ensuring that disabled people had a right to education in the United States.

Heumann taught at P.S. 219 for three years before being recruited in 1973 to attend the University of California at Berkley School of Public Health. There, she helped establish the Berkeley Center for Independent Living, now the CIL of Berkeley. The CIL was the first of its kind in the world empowering the voices of disabled people, inter-generationally and across disabilities, through advocacy, public policy, and direct services.

She co-founded the World Institute on Disability with Ed Roberts and Joan Leon and served as it’s deputy from 1981–1993. During the Clinton presidency, Heumann served as assistant secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services in the Department of Education. She then served as the World Bank’s first adviser on disability and development, and was also the director for the Department on Disability Services for the District of Columbia.  In the Obama administration, she was appointed as the very first special advisor for International Disability Rights in the U.S. State Department from 2010 to 2017.

Heumann continues to advocate on behalf of disabled people globally, participating in protests and giving lectures, including a popular TED Talk titled “Our Fight for Disability Rights and Why We’re Not Done Yet.” Heumann frequently lectures at universities, discussing her belief that disabled people need to become more proactive in the field of education, particularly higher education, in order to become fully integrated into the fabric of society.

In 2017, she was named a Ford Foundation Senior Fellow. As such, she works to advance the inclusion of people with disabilities in both traditional and new media platforms. She also founded The Heumann Perspective, a social media project intended to deepen and widen discussions of disability rights.

Heumann was the first recipient of the Henry B. Betts Award in 1990, in recognition of efforts to significantly improve the quality of life for people with disabilities. She is also the recipient of the Max Starkloff Lifetime Achievement Award and the InterAction Disability Inclusion Award. Heumann continues to express her gratitude for being raised in Brooklyn because it instilled in her the strong fighting spirit that would allow her to challenge and break down the obstacles that she and disabled people in the United States and around the world continue to face.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Brooklyn College to Award Judy Heumann Honorary Doctorate at Its 2018 Commencement Ceremony

The pioneering disability rights activist will also be the keynote speaker at the event on May 31 at the Barclays Center.

Judith E. “Judy” Heumann, a disability rights activist whose social justice leadership is recognized globally, will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters at the 2018 Brooklyn College Commencement Ceremony held on May 31 at the Barclays Center. She will also be the keynote speaker at the event.

Known as the Mother of the Independent Living Disability Rights movement,” her work has had a significant impact on the implementation of legislation and policies that benefit and protect people with disabilities. For over 45 years, her pioneering efforts in the nonprofit sector, with the World Bank, and the Bill Clinton and Barack Obama administrations, led the charge for the mainstream recognition of disability rights.

Born in 1947, Heumann grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were German Jewish refugees who came to the United States in the 1930s. In 1949, Heumann contracted polio, resulting in her being a quadriplegic and using a wheelchair for mobility. At five years old, she and her family began to experience a world that did not intend to allow her to be an equal citizen. When her mother took her to enroll in P.S. 197 in East Flatbush, she was shocked and dismayed that the school could deny her daughter admission solely based on her inability to walk. The New York City Board of Education deemed it sufficient to provide Heumann with only 2.5 hours a week of home education until the 4th grade, at which time she was allowed to go to P.S. 219 special education classes.

Her mother, a community activist, would not stop advocating for her daughter’s right to public education. Heumann’s mother and other mothers banded together to force New York City’s Department of Education to make some of their high schools accessible so that students like Heumann, who rode in a wheelchair, would not have to go back to home instruction. Judy went on to be enrolled in Sheepshead Bay High School because it was a newly constructed accessible school.

Heumann attended Long Island University (LIU) graduating in 1969. The 1960s created an opportunity for disabled people with all types of disabilities to learn from the civil rights movement which had been gaining momentum. She learned the importance of activism and bringing the voices of disabled people together to demand revolutionary changes. She and other students worked with LIU to establish a disabled students services office. After graduating from LIU with a bachelor’s degree in speech and a minor in education, she founded Disabled in Action with Brooklyn College disability activists and alumni Fred Francis (founder of S.O.F.E.D.U.P.) and Pat Figueroa, which sought to end discrimination against people with disabilities.

<p>Heumann's groundbreaking political activism has significantly impacted legislation affecting people with disability.</p>

Heumann’s groundbreaking political activism has significantly impacted legislation affecting people with disability.

When Heumann applied to become a teacher in the New York City public school system, she was denied a teacher’s license due to “paralysis of both lower extremities.” She filed a lawsuit against the Board of Education and was fortunate to have Constance Baker Motley as her judge. Motley directed that Heumann be given another medical exam resulting in her obtaining a license. By the time the suit was settled in 1970, Heumann became the first public school teacher in the New York City system to use a wheelchair. The book, The Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation, by Doris Fleischer and Frieda Zames, details Heumann’s activism and discusses how important her lawsuit was in ensuring that disabled people had a right to education in the United States.

Heumann taught at P.S. 219 for three years before being recruited in 1973 to attend the University of California at Berkley School of Public Health. There, she helped establish the Berkeley Center for Independent Living, now the CIL of Berkeley. The CIL was the first of its kind in the world empowering the voices of disabled people, inter-generationally and across disabilities, through advocacy, public policy, and direct services.

She co-founded the World Institute on Disability with Ed Roberts and Joan Leon and served as it’s deputy from 1981–1993. During the Clinton presidency, Heumann served as assistant secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services in the Department of Education. She then served as the World Bank’s first adviser on disability and development, and was also the director for the Department on Disability Services for the District of Columbia.  In the Obama administration, she was appointed as the very first special advisor for International Disability Rights in the U.S. State Department from 2010 to 2017.

Heumann continues to advocate on behalf of disabled people globally, participating in protests and giving lectures, including a popular TED Talk titled “Our Fight for Disability Rights and Why We’re Not Done Yet.” Heumann frequently lectures at universities, discussing her belief that disabled people need to become more proactive in the field of education, particularly higher education, in order to become fully integrated into the fabric of society.

In 2017, she was named a Ford Foundation Senior Fellow. As such, she works to advance the inclusion of people with disabilities in both traditional and new media platforms. She also founded The Heumann Perspective, a social media project intended to deepen and widen discussions of disability rights.

Heumann was the first recipient of the Henry B. Betts Award in 1990, in recognition of efforts to significantly improve the quality of life for people with disabilities. She is also the recipient of the Max Starkloff Lifetime Achievement Award and the InterAction Disability Inclusion Award. Heumann continues to express her gratitude for being raised in Brooklyn because it instilled in her the strong fighting spirit that would allow her to challenge and break down the obstacles that she and disabled people in the United States and around the world continue to face.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Panel of reproductive activists and scholars examines radical reproductive justice

Lynn Roberts. Photo by Bob Gore for the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Lynn Roberts. Photo by Bob Gore for the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Dr. Lynn Roberts was featured as part of a panel discussion last week on the radical reproductive justice movement, held at the Schomburg Center for Research and Black Culture, in Harlem, New York City.

The panel brought together activists working towards reproductive rights, healthcare and education, particularly for women of color.

During the panel, Roberts, who co-edited an anthology that documents the movement called Radical Reproductive Justice and published by Feminist Press in November, explained, “There is a different level of care afforded to people of color, indigenous people, poor people and trans people. I think that is systemic. And that devaluing and that stigmatizing gets in the way of quality care.”

 

The event was covered by the news website Mic.com.

Cover of Radical Reproductive Justice book


1L Advice: How I got the Fellowship

When Victor Cheng ’18 was an undergraduate, he studied marketing and international business, inspired by his Chinese immigrant father’s entrepreneurial spirit and drive. A few short years later and everything had changed; Victor came to CUNY Law to alter the face of Immigration Law as we know it. Below, he shares how his singular focus drove his work in our INRC and landed him the fellowship he has wanted since Day One.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Something is wrong when a nation denies its long history of immigrants – immigrants who built our infrastructure, evolved our culture, and created irreplaceable art. At the same time, something is right when a nation is moved to collective action to provide high-quality legal assistance for immigrants seeking citizenship, fighting deportation, advocating for DREAMers, and working hard to ensure families can remain intact and be part of our nation’s future. These are the time we live in: a country founded by immigrants struggling to escape a narrative of good immigrants vs. bad immigrants (not to mention struggling with the recognition that those founders might be the latter).

Not long ago I accepted that my purpose in life is to help immigrants – and help reframe the narrative that stands to cripple our country. Though I spent my undergraduate years focused on marketing and international business, thanks in no small part to my Chinese immigrant father’s entrepreneurial spirit, the childhood fear that my parents could be separated from me had lasting impact. I set my sights on a prestigious opportunity: the Immigrant Justice Corp (IJC) Fellowship, the nation’s first and only immigration legal fellowship program that seeks to expand access to counsel by increasing the quantity of immigration laws and the quality of the immigration bar. And then I set about building the knowledge, skills, and experience to get me there.

I sought to attend CUNY School of Law not only because of its focus on public interest lawyering, but also because of the school’s Immigrant and Non- Citizens’ Rights Clinic (INRC), a clinic devoted to giving students hands-on, real-time experience in immigration law. Though I didn’t gain admission with my first application, I participated in CUNY Law’s Pipeline to Justice program, an initiative focused on helping under-represented minorities bolster their applications and LSAT scores to both level the admissions playing field and advance the diversity of the legal profession. When I went through the admissions cycle with a new, higher LSAT score I got acceptance letters from several high-ranking institutions – but my time with Pipeline had confirmed CUNY Law was the right place for me. While at first I was frustrated that I had to wait to begin school, now I feel that the current anti-immigrant climate and new policies under the current administration have created a unique opportunity to analyze the current roadblocks with my clinic professors and peers and to come up with solutions.

Once in law school, despite my exposure to many other forms of advocacy work, I stuck to my goal of becoming an immigration attorney and sought every opportunity to learn and work on immigration issues before my clinic experience. In my second semester, I requested Nermeen Arastu to be my academic advisor because she leads the Immigration and Non- Citizens’ Rights Clinic (INRC). I expressed to her my interest in becoming an immigration attorney and she responded by mentoring me throughout my time at CUNY Law. In my non-immigration classes, I found every opportunity to write on immigration issues so I could research and learn more about immigration law. During the spring of my second year, I interned at the Immigration Court’s Executive Office for Immigration Review and then during the summer I interned at the New York Immigration Coalition, which is the leading immigrant advocacy organization that IJC is a member of. I worked on headline issues such as the Muslim Ban, ICE arrests at New York courthouses, and Trump’s pursuit of transnational gangs in immigrant communities on Long Island. To learn and collaborate with a diversity of advocates on pressing immigration issues, I joined and became active in the New York City Bar’s Immigration and Nationality Law Committee, too.

When time came to choose a clinic, I made the Immigrant and Non- Citizens’ Rights Clinic (INRC) my first choice and thankfully was accepted. Once in the INRC clinic in 2017, there was full-on attack on immigration under the new Trump administration. From the Muslim Ban to the refusal to extend DACA, as well as the use of gang allegations against immigrant communities and plans to build the border wall, the war on immigration confirmed my purpose to help immigrants. I was in the right place to analyze the policies and tactics of the Trump administration and come up with solutions that can immediately be put into practice.

My clinical experience has prepared me to be a better immigration attorney in the future. The clinic is taught by leaders in the immigration advocacy realm, Talia Peleg from Brooklyn Defenders Services’ New York Immigrant Family Unity Project, Mark Doss of the International Refugee Assistance Project, and Nermeen Arastu a former staff attorney at the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund. One of the biggest lessons I have learned is that to be an attorney, I need to step out of my prior roles as an intern handling specific tasks and begin to see things from a lawyer’s perspective – that is, learn to be responsible for bringing everything together. In addition to the technical skills of immigration lawyering, my clinical experience has informed my approach to race, privilege, and other systems of oppressions in the legal system we operate in. This real work experience has prepared me to avoid perpetuating or exploiting the narrative of the “good versus bad immigrant.”

For my work in the clinic, I elected a docket that involved defending people with past convictions because they have become the first targeted for removal by the administration. I see these clients as especially deserving of help because they are often black and brown people who have been swept up in the criminal justice system due to racial profiling and Broken Window Policing. Because they have served sentences they are exposed to an even harsher punishment: banishment.

I am thankful that in my first case, I succeeded in persuading the judge to allow a green card holder who had lived in the United States for nearly three decades (since the age of seven!) to remain in New York City. I helped the judge find that an overwhelming number of positive factors in the person’s life that outweighed his past conviction. My first success saved a family from being torn apart.

As I look ahead to starting as an IJC fellow, I am thankful CUNY Law, INRC, and my peers have prepared me to enter into a fight that shows no signs of stopping. Looking back at my time here, I’m proud to be able to say I achieved my goal of being awarded an IJC Fellowship – and I’m also proud to have learned along side so many others who have held onto their drive to become the kind of lawyer that can change everything for one person, one family, one nation.


Scholar-activist Vince Boudreau takes the helm at City College

What

Presidential investiture ceremony at The City College of New York.

Who

Dr. Vincent Boudreau, 13th President of CCNY; James B. Milliken, Chancellor of the City University of New York; General Colin L. Powell, CCNY Class of 1958.

Where

The City College of New York’s Great Hall, Shepard Hall, 160 Convent Avenue, Manhattan.

When

5:30 P.M. Thursday, March 29, 2018

Contact

Jay Mwamba, CCNY Communications, 212.650.7580,  jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

Ashley Arocho, CCNY Communications, 212.650.6460, aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu

Susan Konig, CCNY Communications, 914.525.1867, skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

In a transformative moment for the nation’s first tuition free public college, scholar-activist Vincent Boudreau is to be sworn in as 13th President of The City College of New York in an investiture ceremony starting 5:30 p.m. on March 29 in CCNY’s Great Hall. He is the second faculty member there to rise to the position of CCNY president in the institution’s 171-year history. Fredrick Bertrand Robinson, CCNY’s 5th president (1927-1939), was the first.

A professor of political science at CCNY who’s also on the faculty at the Graduate Center, CUNY, Boudreau was appointed president by the City University of New York Board of Trustees on December 4, 2017. He previously served as interim president for one year.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.


CAREER & INTERNSHIP FAIR GIVES STUDENTS INVALUABLE NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES

Career & Internship Fair gives students invaluable networking opportunities

 

On March 15, over 900 John Jay students took full advantage of the Career & Internship Fair produced by the Center for Career & Professional Development. “Each semester, the Career Center works hard to bring in a diverse group of employers to help students think about future career opportunities,” says the Career Center’s Senior Director, Will Simpkins. “It is clear that local and national employers place John Jay College at the top of their list of recruitment sites, and they routinely tell us that our students are the most prepared, most curious, and most driven.” Walking through the event, it was impossible not to notice the infectious enthusiasm the students had with the 101 employers in attendance. Here’s a sampling of thoughts, interactions and aspirations found at this year’s Career & Internship Fair:

 

U. Renee Hall, Chief of Police, Dallas Police Department 
“It’s a blessing being the first woman Chief of Police in the Dallas Police Department. And, it’s been amazing at this career fair because I’ve talked to so many young ladies who are excited about joining the police. At first they didn’t think being the Chief was possible for them, but now they know that they can reach for that goal. If I could use one word to describe this fair at John Jay, that word would be ‘phenomenal.’ John Jay is committed to ensuring that all their students have access to every facet of law enforcement.”

U. Renee Hall, Chief of Police, Dallas police department
Renee Hall

 

Rawsan Jackson, junior at John Jay 
“This was my first time meeting the Dallas Chief of Police, and all the information she provided me was really great and helpful. I’m actually thinking about going to Dallas. Once I graduate from John Jay, I’m willing to go wherever the money is good, the cost of living is good, and I can start a new life.”

Rawsan Jackson
Rawsan Jackson

 

Emily Tarrats, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, John Jay ’93
“I’m an alumna from John Jay, and it’s nice to be back because I was in these students’ footsteps a while ago. I had just earned my degree, and I came to the career fair looking for a job. There were a bunch of law enforcement agencies, and I was intimidated by them because I wasn’t the law enforcement type. But I liked the work that the postal inspectors did, and I was impressed with them when they spoke to me. It was the only organization I applied to, and here I am 17 years later. This is where it happened for me, so I’d like to do the same for these students.”

Emily Tarrats
Emily Tarrats

 

Quanishia Mosely, Recruiter with the Metropolitan Museum of Art 
“We are an iconic institution within the New York area, and we have a large security force within the museum. We’re looking for people in the metropolitan area who are committed to public service, want to be part of a non-profit, and enjoy security. The students here are super professional and really enthusiastic about law and criminal justice. I’m pretty sure we’ll be hiring some John Jay students, we’ve got a good amount of resumes, and they’re quality candidates.”

Quanishia Mosely
Quanishia Mosely (left) and Aimes Vasquez (right)

 

Jess Bishenkevich, Recruiter with the United States Tennis Association (USTA)
“We come here to hire people for our access-control positions—which is security and credentialing, making sure people have the right credentials to be in appropriate areas. A lot of John Jay students are great candidates. They know what they’re looking for, everyone’s prepared with a resume. They know what questions to ask.”

Jess Bishenkevich
Jess Bishenkevich

 

Shannese Atkinson, senior at John Jay 
“Last year the career fair helped me get a bunch of interviews. So I’m hoping to get a job this time. I’m looking for a job in counseling.”

Shannese Atkinson
Shannese Atkinson

 

Charles Vaughn, Officer with the Dallas police department
“John Jay students are prepared because their instructors actually spearhead them in the direction for success. They don’t sugarcoat anything. John Jay students understand that they have to put the work in, and they’re really mindful about where they want to go and the process that they have to go through to get there. The students can only be as good as the instructors, and John Jay’s instructors are fantastic at preparing their students for success.”

Charles Vaughn
Charles Vaughn

 

Dannerys Fuccillo, Human Resources Generalist 1-800-Flowers
“Our founder, Jim McCann, graduated from John Jay, so that’s one of the main reasons why we always want to be here. Also, there’s a lot of great students asking insightful questions and inquiring about internships. Right now, we’re mostly recruiting for summer internships in all of our departments, including marketing, finance, IT, human resources and merchandising. But we also have full-time roles, primarily entry-level in IT and marketing.”

Dannerys Fuccillo
Dannerys Fuccillo

 

John Mitchell, Officer with the Baltimore County Police Department, Baltimore County, Maryland
“We come here twice a year, and this is our eighth time. John Jay students are hard working, dedicated and well educated. They’ve been very beneficial to our agency. If you’re a John Jay student looking to join the Baltimore County police department, I suggest that you keep a clean record, and realize that everything you learn here benefits you when you enter law enforcement. It’s also important to know that we take all different educational backgrounds, it’s not just one particular college major that we’re fixed on. Diversity is very important to us, we’re focused on getting a reflection of our communities, which entails all genders, races, and religious backgrounds. Everybody’s welcome.”

John Mitchell
John Mitchell

 

Sergeant First Class Mariecha Rowe-Watson, New York Army National Guard, John Jay ’03 
“I was a freshman right here at John Jay College and I met a recruiter at the job fair. He introduced me to the benefits of the Guard, and here I am 18 years later. The students are talking to me about what their goals are in the future. I liked that a lot of them were dressed for success today. And, they were walking up to every table and talking to people.”

Mariecha Rowe-Watson
Mariecha Rowe-Watson

HSI SPEAKER SERIES IS CREATING A COMMUNITY DIALOGUE

HSI Speaker Series is Creating A Community Dialogue

 

This spring, John Jay College proudly announced the 2018-2019 HSI speaker series. The series, which celebrates and promotes the College’s federal designation as a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), is part of an ongoing conversation about how the College can develop policies and best practices to help Hispanic students succeed.

The College has been an HSI since the 1980s, and in recent years, the number of Hispanic students on campus has grown to nearly half the student body at 47%. Ensuring that these students have the programs and services they need to graduate is among the College’s top priorities. In a formal letter addressed to the John Jay community, President Karol V. Mason emphasized this commitment.

“I am tremendously proud that John Jay became a federal HSI as a direct result of Hispanic students expressly choosing to be a part of the John Jay community,” she said. “In my eyes, promoting and celebrating our HSI status is a vital key for the success of all our students. We’ve got a lot of work ahead of us, but a key first step in these efforts is to engage in a community conversation about what our HSI status means.”

Watch President Mason talk about the importance of diversity at John Jay.

Mason also thanked a core group of faculty, staff, and students that have been dedicated to deepening John Jay’s HSI status. In 2017, faculty members from the Latin American and Latina/o Studies Department wrote a comprehensive position paper to identify the challenges that Hispanic students face, as well as recommendations on how the College community can address them. Professor José Luis Morín, who coauthored the paper, said that focusing on improving the graduation and retention rates of Hispanic students would have a positive effect on all John Jay students. “By implementing the best practices outlined in the position paper, we would also benefit students facing similar challenges that many Latinx students encounter, including many low-income and first-generation college students,” he said.

The speaker series is only one part of the effort to embrace and expand upon John Jay’s HSI designation beyond enrollment numbers alone. There are six events scheduled in the series this spring, and more will be announced in the fall. The events are open to the public, and all John Jay community members are invited to attend.

In January, the series opened with David Rice, Associate Provost for Integrative Learning and Academic Accountability at Morehouse University, who attested to the importance of making visible the contributions of people of color in order to heighten their sense of belonging on campus. “The idea of visibility is about how attached to the community students are, and how valued they feel within it,” he said. “How can we create the type of social space where everyone is of value?”

Gina A. Garcia, Assistant Professor at the University of Pittsburgh and the second speaker in the series, delivered a powerful lecture on how institutions can create equitable learning environments by implementing anti-racist policies. “The mission is to disrupt systems of oppression,” she said.

Among the topics explored in the series are the intersections of personality and pop culture, the effect of government policies on college access and completion rates, culture and practices toward identity development, and harnessing social capital and ethnic resources.

To see the remaining lectures this spring, visit the HSI speaker series calendar.


GRAD STUDENT ROBERT RYAN (’18) IS READY FOR A CAREER IN NATIONAL SECURITY

Grad Student Robert Ryan (’18) is Ready for a Career in National Security

 

Robert Ryan grew up in a family of law enforcement and when he graduated from Loyola University Maryland with a bachelor’s degree in biology and psychology, he knew he wanted to tie his clinical background to national security. In September of 2017, he enrolled in John Jay’s graduate program in Criminal Justice and now plans to graduate in December.

“John Jay has a reputation in the law enforcement world,” Ryan said. “There’s an emerging field of applying psychological insight to criminal investigation, and the best place to do that is here.”

Before starting the program, Ryan kept busy working as a volunteer firefighter and full-time EMT, and later became an intern at the U.S. Marshals Service NY/NJ Regional Fugitive Task Force. Once he started taking classes, he began working at the Research and Evaluation Center (JohnJayREC) as a Graduate Research Fellow, an opportunity available to academically strong graduate students who want to deepen their applied research skills. With support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, he worked closely with director Jeffrey Butts to evaluate community-based programs. “It’s a wonderful office that is doing really meaningful research,” Ryan said.

From there, Ryan has continued to find opportunities to develop his career. In November, he was offered a prestigious position at the United States Postal Service Office of Inspector General as part of a student cooperative program offered to John Jay graduate students. This paid position is distinct from an internship in that it demands a similar level of work as a criminal investigator. Since starting, Ryan has gained real-world investigative experience.

“As soon as I saw the opportunity at the Inspector General, I jumped all over it,” he said. “I’m getting an inside look at what’s going on in the office. I’m learning how to produce reports and conduct investigations.”

That firsthand experience is being supplemented by an unparalleled opportunity to study with leaders in the field. Ryan says that what distinguishes John Jay’s program from other colleges is not only the faculty’s past experience as analysts and agents, but their continued engagement with justice issues. “John Jay professors haven’t sat in an ivory tower since getting their doctorate. They’re actually out there in the field and they know the applied side of the material they teach. That translates to the classroom,” he said.

Learning from faculty and staff who continue to contribute to the world of national security is important for Ryan, who is getting advanced certificates in Criminal Investigation and Terrorism Studies in addition to his master’s degree, and who plans to later pursue a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at John Jay.

“At John Jay, I can see what these people have done to get to where they are in their careers, and how the results of their work impact national security,” Ryan said. “I’d like to be in the field one day too as an investigator, but also as a researcher. It’s that aspect of giving back—of having a fruitful career and contributing to the scientific community later—that inspires me.”


ALUMNA KATHLEEN CARTERMARTINEZ CREDITS JOHN JAY FOR A HOLISTIC EDUCATION

Alumna Kathleen carterMartinez Credits John Jay for A Holistic Education

 

Alumna Dr. Kathleen carterMartinez is a testament to the interdisciplinary power of a John Jay education. In the early ‘80s, she was working as a radiology technician at a hospital, and had an associate’s degree in law enforcement. She was looking to enroll in a program where she could satisfy her interest in healthcare as well as in criminal justice, but her search was getting her nowhere. “I was consistently told that the kind of program I wanted didn’t exist,” she says. “And I believed that until I found John Jay.”

As an older professional working full-time, carterMartinez wasn’t the typical undergraduate student, but that didn’t prevent her from becoming completely immersed in her John Jay classes in forensic psychology. When she graduated in 1985, she continued her education in clinical psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson and did her practicum in a hospital emergency room as part of a crisis intervention team. carterMartinez, who knew that law enforcement officers often did the work of first responders, was excited to apply what she had learned at John Jay in the hospital setting.

“At John Jay, there was a recognition that certain issues like addiction or mental health couldn’t be understood unless we made connections between psychology and law enforcement,” she said. “When I was working in psychiatric emergency services, I made those connections, and I became the forensic specialist for crisis calls from local prisons and jails.”

carterMartinez went on to receive her doctorate from Nova Southeastern University and has continued to work with different communities that struggle with mental illness and trauma. One of the positions she is most proud of holding was on the Passamaquoddy Native American reservation in Maine, where she became the Director of Mental Health and Substance Abuse. As director, she worked with law enforcement and emergency services agencies in order to create holistic responses to mental health issues.

Now, carterMartinez works at the CheyWind Center for Trauma and Healing, and she has synthesized all that she’s learned in a new book titled Permission Granted: The Journey from Trauma to Healing. carterMartinez, who is also a certified rape crisis and sexual assault counselor and has taught classes at SUNY Plattsburgh in the Gender and Women’s Studies and Psychology departments, hopes that the book can serve as a resource for clinicians to better understand the experience of trauma following sexual assault. She also proposes new ways for the legal system to interact with survivors of traumatic events. “We expect that if someone hurt you, you will want to put them in jail. But the reality is that’s not a choice for everyone,” she said. “We need to respect those individual choices.”

carterMartinez is delighted to see that John Jay continues to be a leader in justice, and especially in forensic psychology. She reflects on her John Jay experience fondly, and even remembers waiting in line for the payphone in Haaren Hall. “Whenever I got an ‘A’ I would call my parents,” she said. “John Jay helped me go in the direction I wanted to go in. I was always excited about my work.”


SIMON BAATZ LOOKS INTO THE WORLD OF CRIME DURING AMERICA’S GILDED AGE

Simon Baatz Looks into the World of Crime during America’s Gilded Age

 

Students fascinated by infamous crimes are likely to enjoy Simon Baatz’s history classes. Baatz has been a professor at John Jay since 2006, where he teaches U.S. history from 1865 to the present, as well as crime and punishment in America. He’s the author of several bestselling books on true crime cases, and this year, he published The Girl on the Velvet Swing (Little, Brown Co.), an engrossing account of the life of Evelyn Nesbit, whose tragic story sheds light on the legal, political, and cultural landscape of early 20th century New York.

In 1906, the young Evelyn Nesbit found herself entangled in the criminal justice system after her husband, Harry Thaw, murdered one of the most powerful men in New York, the renowned architect Stanford White. Nesbit’s testimony, in which she claimed that White had raped her as a teenager several years before Thaw fatally shot him, helped make the murder one of the most sensationalized crime cases at the turn of the century.

Evelyn Nesbit

For years, the murder was written about in major newspapers in New York and around the country, as one shocking development followed the next. But despite the abundance of documentation, Baatz knew that telling the story would require meticulous research. Most of the information he needed would be found on rolls of microfilm that contained scaled-down reproductions of the news articles that covered the years before and after the murder and its subsequent series of trials.

“It was the golden age of American newspapers from 1890 to 1929,” Baatz explains, “and there were at least 14 newspapers just in New York that were competing for readership, many of which have now gone out of business.” For years, Baatz sifted through endless pages from those and other publications in order to piece together an unbelievably detailed portrait of Nesbit’s life—one that even included quotations from private conversations. “People might think, how on earth did you know such and such was said,” says Baatz. “But it’s there printed in the newspapers.”

The case of Stanford White’s murder illuminates the way in which the criminal justice system operates in conjunction with a number of political and social institutions, and is influenced not only by cultural norms, but also by power and wealth. In the wake of the #MeToo movement, Nesbit’s testimony, which led to her simultaneous stardom and disrepute, might serve as an illustrative example of the challenges faced by women who make allegations of sexual assault against influential men.

Evelyn Nesbit

In February, Baatz was invited to speak at the University of Oxford and Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV on the ubiquity of sexual deviance and rape in New York during the Gilded Age. Despite his profound knowledge of the subject, Baatz says that his role as a historian is to omit his own analysis and present information as objectively as possible. “The truth is a question mark,” he says. “Who am I to say what really happened, or to tell you what to believe? I want people to make up their own minds.”


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of March 26, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

This week brings a host of onsite activities.

Please join us this week for our March Principal’s Coffees. All coffees take place from 8:30am to 9:30am in our Cafeteria.

  • Monday, Grades K-5
  • Tuesday, Grades 9-12
  • Wednesday, Grades 6-8

On Thursday March 29th our 4th grade students will have their Alvin Ailey Dance Performance.

Thank you to all of the families who have participated in the DOE’s annual Learning Environment Survey. This survey has been extended through Thursday March 29th. Our Family Completion rate is presently reporting as 42% participation. If you have not yet done so, please complete the DOE’s Annual School Survey today! (Last year we had 65% family completion rate. Let’s Soar past 80%!)

For those of you who did not pick up your survey at Parent Teacher Conferences, you should have received the green envelope via the mail. You can also fill it out online; you will be able to look up your survey code once you start the process. Be sure to list our school as “New Explorations Into Science Technology and Math”. CLICK HERE to fill out the Parent Survey online today!

Though confidential in nature, your voice and feedback become part of the public’s understanding of how every member of our K-12 school community contributes to our students’ success. Questions are aligned to the DOE’s Framework for Great Schools. If you have any technical questions, please see Julie Longmuir or our new parent coordinator Lisa Seale Cruz.  For more on the survey, please see: http://schools.nyc.gov/Accountability/tools/survey/default.htm

Please note there will be no After-School Activities on Thursday March 29th

Schools are Closed for Spring Recess Friday March 30th; and April 2nd to April 6th. We wish you and yours a wonderful vacation.

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


The Week Ahead

Monday, March 25th – Whole Child Committee will meet briefly in the Courtyard at 8:00am (prior to the 8:30am LG Principal’s coffee)

March Principal’s Coffees. All coffees take place from 8:30am to 9:30am in our Cafeteria.

  • Monday, Grades K-5
  • Tuesday, Grades 9-12
  • Wednesday, Grades 6-8

Thursday March 29th  – 4th grade students will have their Alvin Ailey Dance Performance

Monday, March 26th – March 28th – BioBus K-2 In House Field Trip

Friday, March 30th – No school


Opportunities for NEST+m students

Summer STEM Institute at the Grove School of Engineering 
We are running two programs this summer:

  • The STEM Institute which will run from July 2, 2018 to Friday, August 10, 2018, Monday to Thursday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.  Application deadline is April 20th, 2018. Apply HERE: https://stem.ccny.cuny.edu/

  • The #Bossgirls Bootcamp-Entrepreneurship from July 9, 2018 to August 16, 2018, Monday to Thursday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

Apply here: http://www.zahncenternyc.com/bossgirls-bootcamp/

Both of these two summer programs are free of charge for all NYC high school students who meet the program requirements: Metro-card and free lunch will be available for eligible students.

The MFSC (Manhattan Field Support College Expo) is on Friday, May 11th 10am to 2pm.
The MFSC college expo offers to juniors and all transfer school students exposure to over 50 colleges and universities, including technical programs. This Expo focuses on college and career readiness as students and counselors ask questions and learn about individual opportunities at institutions of higher education.
More info HERE: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1CUM4I5PFyycewag2ZidN7gvfhcd9lKMedxx-lzrYPa8/edit#
Register HERE: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSexnm_1kr8KIwkdRLbTGnp81WhxLQ_uYtTSX8c2nIIFhWzSbA/viewform

Summer Shakespeare
Summer Shakespeare is a five-week theater acting program for students who receive free or reduced lunch. Prior experience with Shakespeare is not required.
For more information CLICK HERE. https://stellaadler.com/outreach/summer-shakespeare-program/

There’s still time to get in SHAPE!
We extended our application deadline for the Columbia Engineering SHAPE program to March 30. Don’t miss your opportunity to become part of our special program featuring college-level courses in robotics, computer science, electrical and biomedical engineering.
https://outreach.engineering.columbia.edu/content/shape-summer-high-school-academic-program-engineers

The Quad Manhattan Summer Program
The Quad Manhattan is an integrated recreational and educational summer program designed for Twice-Exceptional (2e) learners, children who are gifted intellectually or artistically, who also require extra support to socialize, organize, regulate emotions, and learn.
Our next open house will be Thursday April 12th from 6-8 PM. You can also visit our website https://www.thequadmanhattan.com/ for more information.

Summer Journalism at NYU
Visit our website, Summer Journalism at NYU, to find out more about us and be sure to connect with us on Facebook! Like our page to interact with current and prospective students, ask questions, and to keep up with the latest news about Summer Journalism.
Questions: Email us at: journalism.summer@nyu.edu

Marist College Summer Pre-College
There are still spots available in Marist’s Summer 2018 Pre-College Programs!\What is Marist Summer Pre-College?

  • An academic program offered to rising high school juniors and seniors
  • 16 different courses offered on our New York campus
  • Choose 2 or 4 week options
  • Students will earn 3 to 6 transferable college credits
  • Students can get a head start on college and benefit from the following:
  • Experience residential life on a college campus
  • Meet like-minded students from around the world
  • Work in a small classroom environment led by Marist faculty
  • Have your interested students apply today to secure their spot in the 2018 Marist Summer Pre-College Program!

For more information, including a list of programs, visit: www.marist.edu/precollege

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Pratt Young Scholars
Pratt Young Scholars  is a need-based, three-year scholarship program providing instruction in art and design with college preparation to motivated high school students. Through innovative and challenging studio experiences in the Institute’s youth programs, this scholarship provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to pursue advanced studies in art and design.

Scholars will participate in three years of required studio classes and electives exposing students to higher educational opportunities and careers in the creative fields. This scholarship, valued at $7,000, covers three years of studio instruction, all art materials for courses taken, year-round college access program, Summer Scholars courses in July, and guidance through the college application process.

Students entering 10th grade in the 2018-2019 school year are eligible to apply if they:

  • Attend a New York City public school
  • Demonstrate an interest in art and design
  • Are academically prepared, highly motivated, and have demonstrated persistence
  • Commit to attending classes on Wednesdays after school and Saturdays for three years (no exceptions), as well as July summer programs
  • Meet the income eligibility guidelines

APPLY ONLINE by March 29th, 2018.
For additional information and application instructions, visit www.pratt.edu/scholars.

Institute for Environmental Journalism
We’re proud to announce that InsideClimate News is launching the Institute for Environmental Journalism this summer in New YorkCity. The intensive three-week program is open to high school students and recent graduates and will take place July 9-27. If you are a motivated and curious teen who wants to learn reporting from award-winning journalists, please consider this program. We are currently accepting applications. Deadline is May 1, 2018.

Bronx Loaf 2018
Bronx Loaf 2018 is open and ready for business! This year the conference will be held Monday, July 9th to Saturday, July 14th. This will be our sixth summer (!)  providing students of all backgrounds a golden opportunity to:
-Workshop their creative writing with professional authors
-Collaborate and socialize with students from public, private, and charter schools
-Publish their writing in our anthology Breaking Bread 

This year we have workshops in Poetry, Memoir, Fiction, and Graphic Novel. Each workshop can accommodate up to 12 students. Act fast before all the seats fill up.

Students can apply at our website: www.bronxloaf.org, or by clicking on the following link: Bronx Loaf.  The deadline for applications is April 15th.

3T Summer Style Workshop
Naked Angels Theater Company’s (nakedangels.com) 6th annual free 3T Summer Style workshop will take place July 9-19th.  There will be an intro to filmmaking week and a week of writing for the theater.  Professional actors will be acting in the student writers’ work.  It is fast, fun, free, and freeing!  Please email 3T@nakedangels.com for more info and an application.  First come, first accepted!  Click here for more information.

NY Center for Children
The New York Center for Children is a non-for-profit, child-friendly center, providing free, comprehensive evaluation and therapy services to victims of child abuse and their families. We are currently accepting referrals for a 10-12 week support group beginning mid-March for adolescent female’s (ages 14-16) who have experienced sexual abuse. Participants must attend an intake appointment prior to beginning group and commit to attending every session. Please note that our services are completely free and confidential.
Attached is our flyer with more information about the group. For further information, please contact Leah Mansback at (212) 517-3012 ext 34.

Here are a variety of summer job listings:

Summer Jobs:
NYC Gov Jobs & Internships   American Camp Association

Girl Scout Camp Counselor Jobs….
http://www.gsneny.org/en/camp/summer-camp.html

92nd Street Y
https://external-92y.icims.com/jobs/1498/camp-counselors-%28summer-2018%29/job?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic&mobile=false&width=940&height=500&bga=true&needsRedirect=false&jan1offset=-300&jun1offset=-240

Paid Summer Intern: Tech Camp/entrepreneur
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=ldxBYXD8bSH9vAikAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Junior Summer Camp Counselor (NYC Parks)
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=bNfxa5d0noEU-kZNAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

NY Healing Justice-Liberation Summer Camp Internship
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=nbMjvPRVwyF3-v4VAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Downtown Camp-Manhattan Youth http://www.manhattanyouth.org/camps.aspx

Binghamton University Summer College
This summer, Binghamton University will hold two Binghamton Summer College sessions for academically talented students who have completed their sophomore or junior year:
Session 1: Sunday, July 8-Saturday, July 21
Session 2: Sunday, July 22- Saturday, July 28
The deadline to submit an application is May 1, but earlier applications are encouraged since programs have limited enrollment.

Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs 

For schedule, registration, and scholarship information, please visit our website. Deadline is April 1st.

Camp Cardiac and Camp Neuro
Scholarship and standard applications have just opened up for Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro 2018!

Run by medical students in over 30 cities nationwide with locations in Manhattan and Westchester County, Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro are 1-week summer day camps for high school students interested in exploring careers in medicine.

Students may learn more and apply by visiting http://www.campcardiac.org andhttp://www.campneuro.org.

In addition, you may download PDF flyers by clicking on the following links:
Camp Cardiac 2018 Flyer
Camp Neuro 2018 Flyer

Duke University Summer Session
Improve your college application and go to college while still in high school!

At Duke Summer Session, we are committed to providing high school students with the opportunity to be a college student over the summer at one of the world’s premier universities.  By attending our Summer College program, you will not only have the authentic college experience of living in Duke University’s dorms and taking credit-bearing classes alongside undergraduate students, but also the opportunity to accompany your college application with a letter of recommendation from a Duke instructor and transcript from Duke University – two substantive indicators that you have what it takes to thrive in an elite academic setting.

Courses fill up quickly, so apply online today:

Application for US Students

Columbia University Asian American Alliance
Columbia University Asian American Alliance is a nonprofit student-run organization at Columbia University.

We would like to invite NEST+m students to the 2018 Crossroads High School Conference: CONVERGE, our annual, one-day leadership conference for young Asian Americans. At Crossroads, we hope that Asian American youth of all Asian identities including Pacific Islanders will be given the opportunity to question, explain, and discuss aspects of their identity through workshops, a panel, and conversations with their peers. Our mission is to provide youth with the knowledge and skills necessary to organize their communities for social change and create communities to feel supported with it.

Please register at the following link: https://tinyurl.com/y85e9vmu. You can learn more about our conference at our website: aaacrossroads.com.

YMCA – Teen Summer Paid Internships
The Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs give curious kids an opportunity to dive into an architecture topic of interest and test out their own design ideas. Each program explores a different theme through art and building activities, design challenges, and special site visits. Summer Programs run five days (Monday-Friday), 9:00am-4:00pm at the Center for Architecture. A limited number of need-based scholarships are available.
2 weeks of professional development training (sessions are facilitated by industry professionals from Colgate, Univision, Uber, Memorial Sloan, HBO etc)
6 weeks at internship (participants are placed in their industry of choice*)
Each participant is paired to a mentor for the duration of the program
Participants receive 2 monthly metrocards + $300 clothing stipend + $1500 “working” stipend
www.teencareerconnection.org

NYU Journalisam – Summer 2018
Build your skills! Report, write, shoot, post…food, fashion, culture
Enrollment opens February 12
Visiting students welcome.
Classes for precollege and college students.
Courses scheduled to allow time for internships.
Housing available–come experience New York City!

Paid High School Internships
We are pleased to announce that Wave Hill is now accepting applications for our two paid High School Internship programs, the Forest Project and the Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship.
The Forest Project is open to current sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The seven-week program meets Mondays through Fridays from late June through August 21st, 2018. Interns work in small, supervised crews to help restore woodland areas at Wave Hill. The application deadline for this program is March 18th, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/forest-project/.

The Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship (WERM) is open to current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. This 14-month program provides a unique opportunity to work with local ecologists and participate in ecological research projects. WERM students learn content and develop basic research skills during their first summer through hands-on projects and coursework.  After building on their skills at weekend workshops during the academic year, students embark on a final research project under the guidance of a science mentor for their second summer. The application deadline for this program is April 1st, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/woodland-ecology-research-mentorship/
We have Scholarships for students for our Summer Programs in New York!!
We are glad to offer students a special 40% scholarship and discount (tuition is then $1,490 instead of $2,450) on our Summer 3-Week Summer Program “Discover New York Business and Finance”, which combines top level courses, company and financial institutions visits and guests speakers lectures.

Click here for more information:
https://www.cognitoforms.com/LCapital4/BFMSNYALLPROGRAMS2

Please find hereafter the brochure for our 3-Week Program:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0ikwJKoF7dTWGl3eFdDYU5MUXM/view?usp=sharing

August Writers’ Workshop
The School of The New York Times is excited to announce our new end-of-summer August Writers’ Workshop for rising middle and high school students (grades 7-12) of all writing abilities on August 13–17 in New York City. This week-long program helps students enhance their writing skills under the tutelage of some of the best writers in the world. Students will emerge with strengthened communication skills, confidence in their writing and a profound sense of the power of the written word and visual communication—all right before school starts! The August Writers’ Workshop is the perfect way to kick off the academic year and occurs right after our NYC Summer Academy.

Workshop Quick Facts
Date: August 13–17, 2018
Grade Eligibility: Rising 7-12
Click here for more information.
Click here to register.

Summer 2018 College Credit Courses at Baruch College
Current 10th and 11th graders can apply to enroll in one of the following college credit bearing courses for FREE:
Business Fundamentals – BUS 1011 (3 Credits)
Journalistic Writing – JRN 3050 (4 credits)
Cultural Anthropology – ANT 1001 (3 credits)
Critical Health Issues – HED 1911 (3 credits)
Program Details:
All courses will take place at Baruch College from July 5th – August 16th
Courses will be from Monday through Thursday from 9am – 2pm
Eligibility:
Be a current NYC public high school 10th or 11th grader
Have the following test scores: PSAT/SAT Verbal (Min. 480) OR English Language Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR  ACT English Score (Min. 20),  OR  Overall 80+ English average
Online Application: www.baruch.cuny.edu/collegenow. Deadline for application and ALL supporting documents: April 13th, 2018

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

Interested in medicine or engineering? 
We’re very excited to announce an upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, NY. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments.

We are now seeking applicants for our New York, NY program. Participants should be women in grades 10 and up with an expressed interest in science, medicine and/or engineering.

Applicants should fill out our online application in advance of the March 21, 2018 application deadline. Additional information can be found on our website: www.perryinitiative.org — The application may be accessed directly using the following link:http://perryinitiative.org/programs/student-online-application/ — More information and a printable flyer for this event can be found here.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C. Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life!

Please click here for more information: https://summer.gwu.edu/precollege
Please click here to apply: https://summer.gwu.edu/apply-precollege

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
College Search Seminar (FREE) – 3/17, 10am-12pm – Register Here
May 5 SAT Prep Starts 3/17 – Enroll Here
Practice SAT/ACT Exam (FREE) – 3/24 – Register Here
Study Skills Seminar (FREE) – 4/21, 10am-12pm – Register Here
June 2 SAT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
June ACT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 4/28 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 5/19 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 6/2 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Finding Your Right Path Seminar (FREE) – 6/16, 10am-12pm – Register Here
Common App & Essay Workshop – 8/14 & 8/16, 6-9pm – Enroll Here
– Making College Affordable Seminar (FREE) – 9/8, 10am-12pm – Register Here

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog


Immigration book by CCNY’s Hidetaka Hirota wins national award

City College of New York historian Hidetaka Hirota’s seminal maiden book, “Expelling the Poor: Atlantic Seaboard States and the Nineteenth-Century Origins of American Immigration Policy,” is winner of the Immigration and Ethnic History Society’s Best First Book Award.

The national prize recognizes the work of early career scholars in the field of U.S. immigration and ethnic history. “Expelling the Poor” was judged to be the best book on any aspect of the immigration and ethnic history of the United States and/or North America. Other considerations were its substantial primary research, its presentation of a major new scholarly interpretation and, of course, it being Hirota’s first academic monograph.

Published by Oxford University Press, “Expelling the Poor” is the first sustained study of immigration control conducted by states prior to the introduction of federal immigration law in the late nineteenth century.

The 320-page work fundamentally revises the history of immigration restriction in the United States, especially deportation policy. Challenging the conventional understanding that the introduction of federal laws to restrict Chinese immigration in the late nineteenth century was the beginning of American immigration control, the book demonstrates how the states of New York and Massachusetts regulated immigration since the 18th century and locates the roots of American immigration control in anti-Irish nativism and economics on the Atlantic seaboard.

A substitute assistant professor in City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts,

Hirota’s areas of research and teaching include: American immigration, 19th century   U.S. history, the Civil War and Reconstruction eras, wealth and poverty in America, and transnational/international history.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Former U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. to Deliver the 49th Annual Herbert H. Lehman Memorial Lecture

John B. King Jr., one of the nation’s strongest voices in advancing educational excellence and equity for all students, will deliver the 49th annual Lehman Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, April 10th. King’s speech is entitled “Leveling the Playing Field: Closing the Achievement Gap in the Nation’s Schools and Universities.”

Throughout his career, King has developed a sterling reputation for his dedication as a teacher, principal, and leader of schools and school systems.

President Barack Obama called King an “exceptionally talented educator” with a strong commitment to “preparing every child for success” when appointing him as the 10th United States secretary of education in 2016. Currently, King serves as president and CEO of the Education Trust, a non-profit organization that aims to identify and close opportunity and achievement gaps.

“It is only fitting that John B. King Jr, who has devoted his career to increasing educational equity and ensuring access for all students, regardless of the zip code in which they live or the size of their bank account, will deliver the 49th annual Lehman Memorial Lecture as we take on the challenge to expand opportunity within the Bronx and beyond,” said President José L. Cruz.

Before serving as U.S. secretary of education from 2016 through 2017, King served as deputy secretary, overseeing all preschool through 12th grade education policies, and also directed department operations. He joined the department in January 2015, after becoming the first African-American and Puerto Rican to serve as New York State education commissioner. He held that post from 2011 to 2015.

King grew up in Brooklyn, where education transformed his life. He credits his childhood teachers for saving his life by providing rich, engaging, and transformative educational experiences. Both of his parents were educators who died when King was just 12 years old.

He began his educational career as a high school social studies teacher and middle school principal in Puerto Rico and Boston. King later received his bachelor’s in government from Harvard University, a Juris Doctor degree from Yale Law School. and a master’s in the teaching of social studies, and a doctorate in education from Teachers College at Columbia University.

Since leaving the federal government, King has been an outspoken critic of the current administration’s proposed budget cuts to education.

“We need action in matters that affect millions of lives, including the reckless rollbacks on civil rights and harmful cuts to vital programs by the Trump administration….It’s time to defend the American dream and not defer it for any of our children. We need more champions for our kids who take action—because they care, not because of who they can call to showcase their goodwill. Now is the time to act,” he wrote in a CNN.com opinion piece that he co-authored in 2017.

The Lehman Lecture is on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 4 p.m. at Lehman College’s Lovinger Theatre.

Media Contact:

Joseph Tirella

718/960-8013


Lehman Establishes Educational Partnership with the UB Pharmacy School

Lehman College and the University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences have formed a partnership that will enable students to earn a doctor of pharmacy degree in a shorter amount of time.

Rather than taking four years to complete a bachelor’s degree and another four years to complete the doctor of pharmacy degree, students will complete both programs in seven years. The pharmacy program will guarantee spaces each year for qualified Lehman College students.

A memorandum of agreement was formally signed on last month by Lehman College Provost, Dr. Harriet Fayne, and Dean of the University of Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. James O’ Donnell.

“It is exciting for Lehman College to affiliate with a top-flight pharmacy school,” said Provost Fayne. “We anticipate that this partnership will advance our plan to increase the number of Lehman graduates who earn high-quality degrees and then move on to postgraduate studies and professional careers. A large number of Lehman undergraduates are interested in the health professions. We hope that well-prepared University of Buffalo alumni return to the Bronx and improve the quality of health care in our community.”

Under the 3+4 agreement, students will complete three years of undergraduate study in Lehman College’s biochemistry program and then apply to UB’s pharmacy program. Once accepted, students will have their first-year pharmacy courses applied toward completion of their bachelor’s degree at Lehman College.

“The University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences values our strong collaboration with Lehman College, and this 3+4 agreement will further solidify this partnership. We look forward to having their best and brightest students as members of our PharmD program,” said Dean O’Donnell.

About Lehman College: The City University of New York’s only four-year college in the Bronx, serving the borough and surrounding region as an intellectual, economic, and cultural center. Lehman provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.

About the University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences: For over 130 years, the University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has continually been a leader in the education of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, renowned for innovation in clinical practice and research. The school is accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE) and is the No. 1 ranked school of pharmacy in New York State and No. 22 in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.


Lehman Establishes Educational Partnership with the UB Pharmacy School

Lehman College and the University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences have formed a partnership that will enable students to earn a doctor of pharmacy degree in a shorter amount of time.

Rather than taking four years to complete a bachelor’s degree and another four years to complete the doctor of pharmacy degree, students will complete both programs in seven years. The pharmacy program will guarantee spaces each year for qualified Lehman College students.

A memorandum of agreement was formally signed on last month by Lehman College Provost, Dr. Harriet Fayne, and Dean of the University of Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. James O’ Donnell.

“It is exciting for Lehman College to affiliate with a top-flight pharmacy school,” said Provost Fayne. “We anticipate that this partnership will advance our plan to increase the number of Lehman graduates who earn high-quality degrees and then move on to postgraduate studies and professional careers. A large number of Lehman undergraduates are interested in the health professions. We hope that well-prepared University of Buffalo alumni return to the Bronx and improve the quality of health care in our community.”

Under the 3+4 agreement, students will complete three years of undergraduate study in Lehman College’s biochemistry program and then apply to UB’s pharmacy program. Once accepted, students will have their first-year pharmacy courses applied toward completion of their bachelor’s degree at Lehman College.

“The University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences values our strong collaboration with Lehman College, and this 3+4 agreement will further solidify this partnership. We look forward to having their best and brightest students as members of our PharmD program,” said Dean O’Donnell.

About Lehman College: The City University of New York’s only four-year college in the Bronx, serving the borough and surrounding region as an intellectual, economic, and cultural center. Lehman provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.

About the University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences: For over 130 years, the University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has continually been a leader in the education of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists, renowned for innovation in clinical practice and research. The school is accredited by the American Council of Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE) and is the No. 1 ranked school of pharmacy in New York State and No. 22 in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.


College Hosts “Hackathon” Workshop

#AnthroHack Guttman 2018 faculty and student team winners.

(L to R): Adjunct IT Professor Raul Nedd; Andrea Lausevic; Professsor Kristina Baines; Eddy Vittini; Jacqueline Li; and Ronny Forbes

The College hosted an innovative workshop on March 17– #AnthoHack Guttman 2018. The goal of this “hackathon” event was to make an anthropology research tool called a “pile sort” as a WordPress plugin to be used as a digital, open educational and research tool. Although this tool has its origins in cognitive anthropological research, it will be used in Cool Anthropology’s interactive web documentary, Shifting Stereotypes, and made internationally available to social researchers and educators in the CUNY and WordPress repositories.

The event fostered collaboration between the social and computer sciences in a setting conducive to working out solutions to problems. A group of Guttman’s Programming II students were joined by participants from institutions such as Lehman, York, Medgar Evers, Borough of Manhattan Community College, and Columbia University. The students formed teams to develop the plugin.

#AnthroHack was organized by Kristina Baines, Guttman Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Victoria Costa, Project Manager for community partner Cool Anthropology.; Major League Hacking also served as a community partner. Raul Nedd, Guttman Adjunct IT Professor, served as a judge and mentor to the students. The workshop was funded by the Guttman Innovation Grant (GIG) program. Guttman IT student Ronny Forbes and Eddy Vittini, Guttman Class of 2016 and current Lehman student, were members of the winning team. All participants received T-shirts and swag items.


John Jay College Researchers Develop First of its Kind School Shootings Database

John Jay College Researchers Develop First of its Kind School Shootings Database

March 20, 2018, New York, NY – Researchers at John Jay College of Criminal Justice are creating a first of its kind national, open-source database to track shootings on K-12 school grounds and sharpen the public’s understanding of these tragedies. In partnership with University of Texas at Dallas and Michigan State University, the project is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Justice’s Comprehensive School Safety Initiative – a research-focused initiative that seeks to develop knowledge about the root causes of school violence and to foster and evaluate strategies for increasing school safety.

“At this crucial time in our national discussion on school violence, John Jay College is proud to be at the forefront of academic research that will support local, state and national efforts to tackle this problem with evidence-based policies and interventions,” said Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice.“

Joshua Freilich

Professor Joshua Freilich

The dearth of empirical data on school violence in the United States and the almost complete absence of quantitative data on perpetrators and incidents will be remedied by the production of this database and the analysis of data on the risk factors of school shootings,” said Professor Joshua Freilich, who is the principal investigator of the project and a member of the Department of Criminal Justice at John Jay College.

Research on the individual, institutional, and community factors related to school violence has been hindered by lack of reliable data. The goal of this project is to address this gap and to inform potential policy responses tailored for individuals and communities. The database will include data about all publicly known school shootings that resulted in at least one injury from 1990 to December 31st, 2016 and will be completed and made public in the spring of 2019. Three major objectives of the project are to:

  • document the nature of the problem and clarify the types of shooting incidents occurring in schools;
  • provide a comprehensive understanding of the perpetrators of school shootings and test causal factors to assess if mass and non-mass shootings are comparable; and
  • compare fatal shooting incidents to events where only nonfatal injuries resulted to identify intervention points that could be used to reduce the harm caused by shootings.

In addition to fatal shooting attacks that targeted students or teachers, the database will include cases that resulted in injuries but no deaths; domestic violence, work place violence, or any other shootings occurring on school grounds; and suicides on school grounds involving a firearm.

Researchers will use quantitative, multivariate analyses and qualitative case studies to document where and when school violence occurs. They will highlight key incident and perpetrator characteristics to help law enforcement and school administrators differentiate between the kinds of school shootings that exist to aid in the development of prevention strategies and policy initiatives at local and federal levels.

Several graduate students from the John Jay master’s and doctoral programs in criminal justice are part to the College’s research team. Future research plans include expanding the study to attacks on college campuses and also examining foiled plots – planned shooting attacks that were thwarted by the law enforcement and others.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of researching and advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.


Office Hours with Professor Babe Howell

Professor Babe Howell has been teaching Criminal Law, Trial Advocacy, Criminal Procedure, and Lawyering at CUNY Law for nearly nine years, work she approaches with a focus on the reality behind criminal law and our legal system – particularly the racial and class disparities. When not teaching, the self-proclaimed luddite can typically be found reading.

 

Professor Babe Howell with students

Professor Babe Howell, left, with members of the Class of ’18 in Albany last spring lobbying for education rights

If we asked you to pen your own introduction, what would you add to the “standard faculty intro” to give us a the really important stuff?

When I went to law school, it seemed to me that my professors thought our system was good or even great. They may have been highly critical of the system but they shielded their views from the class. I try to be transparent about decisions that I find painful, dishonest, or distasteful. I also try to be egalitarian — my opinions are just those — and I encourage students to learn from and educate each other.

I love to mentor students and junior colleagues. I get this mentoring gene from both parents. My father is a black man who served in the segregated military during WWII,  went from international development work into business, and has always helped minorities (whether women or people of color) to succeed. My mother learned programming and went back to work in her 40s to help put their five children through college, and she protected and nurtured those she eventually supervised. The two of them opened their home to refugees, foreign students, and others in need of help and are among the most social people I know.

My only real hobby is reading but I do it all the time.

What’s new and exciting in your clinic this semester?

My whole clinic is new and incredibly exciting. This year, we have paired Criminal Trial Advocacy with the Student Advocacy Project – a clinic representing Queens primary and secondary school students (K-12) in superintendent suspension hearings. CUNY 2Ls get to study and practice trial skills in the context of criminal cases, but then see those skills in action as they assist parents and kids in superintendent suspension hearings. The class is very demanding but goes right to the core of CUNY Law’s educational mission. I’m co-teaching the linked classes with alumna and Skadden Fellow Annemarie Caruso ’17, who is a former teacher and is engaged in a larger project to reduce punitive responses to children in schools in Queens. It’s wonderful and exhausting experimenting with Annemarie and the 2Ls in Trial Advocacy/SAP to juggle both simulations and suspension hearings.

Do you have any alumni in your inbox right right now?

I have an email folder just for communications from alumni and love to hear from them!

I collaborate regularly with Anthony Posada ’12 who was a 1L in my lawyering seminar in the fall of 2009, my first semester at CUNY.  Anthony works at the Legal Aid Society and, after a few years in the criminal trial division, is now one of the leaders of the Community Justice Unit at Legal Aid. Like me, he is working with community groups to gain transparency on the ways in which the NYPD has moved from collecting data via stop-and-frisk, to collecting data based on allegations of gang and crew affiliation.

New York State Senator Jamaal Bailey ’12 (also a member of that first, fabulous lawyering seminar), had both Anthony and me to meetings to discuss his proposed criminal discovery reforms.  Jamaal also made time to join the Community Forum on gang raids in Bronx Eastchester Gardens last fall.

Sabina Khan ’13 stopped by to judge oral arguments and to inspire my current trial advocacy class last week. Sabina and a cabal of CUNY Law grads and (Lauren Curatolo, Madeleine Portas) and others were responsible for bringing writs that prevented NYPD and NYC Departmentt of Corrections from incarcerating individuals on ICE detainers alone.

It was terrific to see the inseparable Jory Charles & Shawn Cohen honored at the Pipeline for Justice party last December.

I do get LinkedIn requests from students that I love to hear from, including one from Dalourny Nemorin just this week, but haven’t succumbed to that platform yet. So email or call!

It’s Women’s History Month. What’s top of mind for you right now?

Every month, at the top of my mind, is the disproportionate targeting of people of color for conduct that is not policed in more privileged communities. I’m grateful that many women and allies are fighting the many injustices women face in our society but almost no other legal academic is questioning the mass surveillance and labeling of our youth, so I cannot shift focus in March.

If you could recruit anyone to guest lecture in your class, who would it be – and what would they talk about?

Neil deGrasse Tyson. He’d talk about whatever he wanted to talk about. I’m a geek and I think even lawyers – especially lawyers – need to understand science and need to be very curious. We won’t achieve justice following the rules that have given us a society that reproduces inequality in every generation. I try to encourage my students to think beyond the law that they see in the books and I’ve no doubt that Neil deGrasse Tyson would inspire us to do that. (To be clear, I don’t claim to understand astrophysics yet, but I like talks that push you far beyond what you know and even what you typically think about).

Some of the best guests I’ve had have been those touched most harshly by the criminal justice system. Without choosing among them, many former gang members, convicts, and community activists are doing incredible work with vulnerable kids as credible messengers around the city and across the country to help them avoid the system and violence. I don’t care all that much about getting big names in criminal justice – we can read their books and articles or hear them on podcasts – but those who are doing the complicated work within communities are the best examples for our students.

 

The people can’t get enough True Crime – from podcasts to documentaries to the American Crime Story series, folks are eager to get the narrative behind the scenes of a case. If you could bring one case to the public, what would it be?

I’m working on that “one case” now and it’s taking the initial form of a rather dry report. I’m unpacking the results of the prosecutions that flow from the mass gang raids that the NYPD and state and local prosecutors have made in Harlem and the Bronx. Journalists are currently creating documentaries and podcasts to highlight particular stories but data complements these individual accounts.

Before teaching, did you have any other jobs or experiences that might surprise us?

I’m pretty much the typical CUNY Law person. I grew up wanting to do social justice work, I did social justice work before law school, and I kept doing it after law school. I did deliver newspapers beginning when I was 12 and opened a newspaper/stationery school on summer mornings at 6 a.m. when I was about 15. I sold a lot of cigarettes along with the Post, the Daily News, and the New York Times.

Do you have any morning rituals?

I set my coffee maker to go off about 15 minutes before I need to wake up, so I wake to the smell of coffee slightly before my alarm goes off.  I’m usually so busy during the day that I have no time for my gang policing and prosecution research. I’m trying to make it a habit to do gang research (now pouring through a 10,000 page trial transcript) with my first cup of coffee, before turning to the New York Times, NPR, BBC, & the Washington Post for the news. After my morning with coffee and the news, I’m done for the day with coffee and don’t get a chance to look at the news again until evening.

What can’t you let go of? Is there anything that holds you enthralled, that want to keep on people’s radar, or that is keeping you up at night?

The gang stuff keeps me up twenty-four/seven. But I’m getting redundant.

I worry a lot about the fact that people never ever unplug. I guess that I’m a luddite but I think being quiet and thinking when alone, and being engaged and listening when with other people are important.

Do you have any favorite places on or around campus?

For the 10-minute get-away – there’s often a great exhibit in the small public gallery on the ground floor of the Citibank building. I walk through it whenever I’m headed to the 7 train or on a walk in the neighborhood. Most recently they’ve had fabulous photography exhibits and it’s always empty.

What’s one question you wish more students would ask you?

I actually encourage my students to ask questions of each other and of themselves (“put it on TWEN” will ring familiar to my students). We need to construct knowledge, work together as peers and colleagues, and particularly struggle to understand perspectives that are different from ours if we are to improve our world. If the prior generation had all the answers, things would already be fixed.

 

 

 

 

 

 


JOHN JAY COLLEGE RESEARCHERS DEVELOP FIRST OF ITS KIND SCHOOL SHOOTINGS DATABASE

John Jay College Researchers Develop First of its Kind School Shootings Database

 

March 20, 2018, New York, NY – Researchers at John Jay College of Criminal Justice are creating a first of its kind national, open-source database to track shootings on K-12 school grounds and sharpen the public’s understanding of these tragedies. In partnership with University of Texas at Dallas and Michigan State University, the project is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Justice’s Comprehensive School Safety Initiative – a research-focused initiative that seeks to develop knowledge about the root causes of school violence and to foster and evaluate strategies for increasing school safety.

“At this crucial time in our national discussion on school violence, John Jay College is proud to be at the forefront of academic research that will support local, state and national efforts to tackle this problem with evidence-based policies and interventions,” said Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice.“

Joshua Freilich

Professor Joshua Freilich

The dearth of empirical data on school violence in the United States and the almost complete absence of quantitative data on perpetrators and incidents will be remedied by the production of this database and the analysis of data on the risk factors of school shootings,” said Professor Joshua Freilich, who is the principal investigator of the project and a member of the Department of Criminal Justice at John Jay College.

Research on the individual, institutional, and community factors related to school violence has been hindered by lack of reliable data. The goal of this project is to address this gap and to inform potential policy responses tailored for individuals and communities. The database will include data about all publicly known school shootings that resulted in at least one injury from 1990 to December 31st, 2016 and will be completed and made public in the spring of 2019. Three major objectives of the project are to:

  • document the nature of the problem and clarify the types of shooting incidents occurring in schools;
  • provide a comprehensive understanding of the perpetrators of school shootings and test causal factors to assess if mass and non-mass shootings are comparable; and
  • compare fatal shooting incidents to events where only nonfatal injuries resulted to identify intervention points that could be used to reduce the harm caused by shootings.

In addition to fatal shooting attacks that targeted students or teachers, the database will include cases that resulted in injuries but no deaths; domestic violence, work place violence, or any other shootings occurring on school grounds; and suicides on school grounds involving a firearm.

Researchers will use quantitative, multivariate analyses and qualitative case studies to document where and when school violence occurs. They will highlight key incident and perpetrator characteristics to help law enforcement and school administrators differentiate between the kinds of school shootings that exist to aid in the development of prevention strategies and policy initiatives at local and federal levels.

Several graduate students from the John Jay master’s and doctoral programs in criminal justice are part to the College’s research team. Future research plans include expanding the study to attacks on college campuses and also examining foiled plots – planned shooting attacks that were thwarted by the law enforcement and others.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of The City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of researching and advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.


U.S. News & World Report Names Baruch College Among Nation’s 2019 Best Graduate Schools

Zicklin School of Business and Marxe School of Public and International Affairs

Rank #1 Among New York’s Public Institutions

 

NEW YORK, NY March 20, 2018 – Baruch College continues to be recognized among the nation’s outstanding higher education institutions for graduate studies, with the Zicklin School of Business and the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs both named in the just-released U.S. News & World Report’s “2019 Best Graduate Schools” list. The schools each placed #1 in their respective categories among public institutions in the state.

Zicklin’s full-time Master of Business Administration (MBA) program received its highest all-time ranking of #55 out of 480 colleges surveyed throughout the country, moving up one spot from last year. Additionally, Zicklin’s part-time MBA jumped 22 places to #56 nationally.

Among public institutions, both MBA programs placed #1 in New York State, and, for the third consecutive year, #1 in New York City.

The Marxe School of Public and International Affairs received a national ranking of #34 out of 282 schools surveyed in the U.S., up 11 spots from the last time U.S. News & World Report released its public affairs list in 2016. U.S. News will now evaluate schools of public affairs annually, rather than every four years.

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) program ranked #1 among public institutions both in New York State and New York City.

Zicklin School of Business: Multiple and Diverse Graduate Programs

In addition to the full-time and part-time (called Evening MBA on the Zicklin School website) MBA programs, the Zicklin School offers an accelerated One-Year MBA, and MS programs in accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, financial risk management, information systems, marketing, quantitative methods, real estate,  statistics, and taxation.

Zicklin also recently launched an Executive Doctorate in Business with a customized curriculum to enable senior executives to thrive in the C-suite.

“Graduates of the Zicklin School of Business lead major businesses around the globe,” said H. Fenwick Huss, PhD, Willem Kooyker Dean of the Zicklin School of Business. “Our student success is based on an ever-evolving curriculum that today includes data science and analytics, machine learning and cybersecurity along with experiential learning opportunities for real-world problem solving and strategic planning.”

Marxe School of Public and International Affairs: Preparing Students for Leadership Roles

Prospective graduate students can enroll in three programs at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs: MSED in Higher Education Administration, MPA, and Master of International Affairs (MIA). The hallmark MPA program at Baruch College started 66 years ago, while the MSED program began in 1994, and the MIA launched last fall for students who want to find their success in the global arena.

“Through their dedication to evidence-based policy making, in the preparation of leaders as diverse as the populations they serve, the Marxe School’s students, faculty, and staff prove every day that excellence and access go hand-in-glove,” said David Birdsell, PhD, Marxe Dean. “Marxe grads go on to outstanding careers in the public and nonprofit sectors, lifting communities through their innovative work in public finance, philanthropy, higher education, trade policy, social welfare, public health, and the emerging complexities of global governance.”

At a Glance:

In analyzing the U.S. News & World Report 2019 rankings, both the Zicklin School of Business and the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs secured top spots in such key categories as New York City, New York State, and among public institutions.

Zicklin School of Business

Full-Time MBA

  • #55 nationwide
  • #29 nationwide among public institutions
  • #1: New York City among public institutions
  • #1: New York State among public institutions
  • #3 in New York City, overall
  • #5 in New York State, overall

Part-Time MBA

  • #56 nationwide
  • #34 nationwide among public institutions
  • #1: New York City among public institutions
  • #1: New York State among public institutions
  • #3 in New York City, overall
  • #3 in New York State, overall

Marxe School of Public and International Affairs

Public Affairs

  • #34 nationwide
  • #23 nationwide among public institutions
  • #1: New York City among public institutions
  • #1: New York State among public institutions
  • #3 in New York City, overall
  • Tied #4 in New York State, overall

Specialties:

Public Management and Leadership

  • #35 nationwide
  • #1: New York City among public institutions
  • #2: New York State among public institutions
  • #2: New York City, overall
  • #4: New York State, overall

Urban Policy

  • #10 nationwide
  • #1: New York City among public institutions
  • #1: New York State among public institutions
  • #2: New York City, overall
  • #3: New York State, overall

 

Methodology: Each year, U.S. News & World Report ranks professional school programs in business, education, engineering, law, medicine and nursing. The Best Graduate Schools rankings in these areas are based on two types of data: expert opinions about program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students. More information on U.S. News & World Report’s methodology for ranking graduate business schools can be seen here.  The methodology on how U.S. News & World Report ranks the graduate public affairs programs can be read here.

About Baruch College

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 168 countries and speak 104 languages, making it one of the most diverse student bodies in the U.S.  Baruch consistently ranks among the nation’s top public colleges for academic, excellence, affordability, and value. Strong career and support services also drive Baruch’s national recognition as an engine for social and financial mobility of its students.

About the Zicklin School of Business

Backed by a long tradition of excellence in higher education, the Zicklin School of Business is located within Baruch College—an institution that is consistently ranked among the top performers in areas such as academic excellence, diversity, and value. Zicklin is proud to be a leader in providing superior undergraduate, graduate, and executive business education for the twenty-first century. Our programs are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), and our classes are taught by faculty who are thought leaders, active researchers, and experts in their fields. Integrated both physically and philosophically into the fabric of New York City, the world’s financial capital, the Zicklin School of Business is committed to delivering relevant, affordable, academically rigorous business education that is both world-class in quality and reputation and worldwide in its impact.

About the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs

 The Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs (Marxe) has established an unparalleled reputation for quality, capacity, and access. Among the top-50 programs in the United States and the leading public program in New York City, Marxe provides aspiring leaders in the public and nonprofit sectors with the skills and worldviews they need to succeed in a rapidly evolving, globalizing environment for policy development and service delivery. With a student body among the most diverse anywhere in the world, Marxe’s graduates are changing the face of public service leadership. Our commitment to excellence is matched by our commitment to access and affordability: students who come to Marxe know that they can receive the highest quality education, shoulder-to-shoulder with peers every bit as talented and ambitious as they are, without incurring the kind of debt that can derail a career serving the common good. Marxe prepares professionals for a wide spectrum of purposes and institutions, including government at every level, nonprofits of every mission and size, health care providers, K-12 schools, universities, and trans-national organizations.

Media Contact: Suzanne Bronski / 646-660-6093 / Suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

 

# # #


U.S. News ranks six CCNY graduate programs among the nation’s best

The City College of New York boasts six of the best graduate programs in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report.

Six master’s programs at The City College of New York are listed among the top in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Graduate Schools 2019” rankings released today.

Fine arts, offered by City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts, ranks in the top 60 nationwide in the survey of more than 2,012 programs by the newspaper.

The other CCNY programs – three of them in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership — earning national recognition are:

Each year, U.S. News ranks professional school programs in business, education, engineering, law, medicine and nursing, including specialties in each area. The rankings are based on two types of data: expert opinions about program excellence and statistical indicators that measure the quality of a school’s faculty, research and students.

The data for the rankings in all six disciplines come from statistical surveys of more than 2,012 programs and from reputation surveys sent to more than 20,500 academics and professionals, conducted in fall 2017 and early 2018.

This is the latest recognition of City College’s academic credentials by U.S. News & World Report. In fall 2017, the publication named CCNY of the top 100 Best Regional Universities in the North and a Top Public School in the North.

In its 2016 rankings, U.S. News maintained CCNY’s listing as one of the nation’s most ethnically diverse institutions, ranking it #2 among regional universities in the north.

Overall, City College is one of more than 800 institutions with graduate schools surveyed by U.S. News on an annual basis.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS


KEEPING COUNSEL: Richard Celestin ’06

ADVICE FOR ALUMNI, BY ALUMNI ON HOW TO BECOME YOUR OWN CAREER INSPIRATION

By Richard Celestin ’06

Richard Celestin, Esq

While at CUNY Law, Richard focused his studies on criminal defense and juvenile justice while nurturing his love for education. After graduation, Richard became an entrepreneur, creating programs to advocate for underrepresented youth in the not-for-profit sector. His private company has engaged more than 40 elementary, middle, and high schools in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens. This work is supported by a “Race to the Top” grant from the U.S. Department of Education and earned Richard acknowledgment with the 2014 Distinguished Public Interest Award for his work with young people. In addition, Richard is very active within his community. He offers his knowledge and insight into the juvenile and criminal justice areas by participating in panel discussions throughout New York City addressing the rising incarceration rates of youth of color and other issues and concerns affecting communities of color. You can follow Richard on Instagram @The_Inspirational_Lawyer.

 

Claim what you love

My greatest concern when graduating law school was whether I would find a job that appealed to my passions. I entered CUNY Law with a love of working with youth and education and by the end of my three years there, I was eager to find a career that inspired me to the zealous representation I’d anticipated putting into practice. Right after graduation, I began working at a community organization focused on youth education. I knew working to equalize opportunity and promote access to education would be rewarding for me. I knew my education had prepared me to be the kind of fierce advocate students from underserved communities need. But I soon realized that this wasn’t the full picture of my passion; I needed the legal context that would allow me to go beyond advocacy and into the system that needed reforming.

…And what you don’t

The next position I took on empowered me to create a juvenile justice program designed as an alternative to a detention program. I spent time in court, I worked alongside fellow attorneys, and I felt focused on justice – but really I was at the extreme opposite of the spectrum. Due to the high demands of the population, as well as limited funding support, educational programming played a minimal role. Though now I can see that identifying what wasn’t working for me was all part of the process, at the time it felt like an impossible quest to appease my seemingly opposing interests.

Find ways to zero in on the good stuff.

I was concerned that there would be a constant imbalance with my passions. I wanted to develop a way to be in a classroom with youth while also playing a role in court as an advocate. After much thought and debate, I realized that I would need to create what I wanted and then live it for myself. I took on a program director position for an alternative to detention program so that I’d be able to be in court regularly, advocate on the record, conference with fellow attorneys, and meet with Judges – all things I knew grounded me through a strong sense of purpose.  And at the same time, I began to set my plan in motion.

And launch!

My first step was to secure a full-time position which would allow me to develop my “side” business. Once I secured a court-based position, I dove head first into entrepreneurship by creating an educational consulting business. It was incredibly difficult to work full-time while also finding time to visit schools and grow my business. Despite the longer and busier days, for the first time I truly felt happy and a sense of purpose. My passion for both education and the law were so powerful that I was ready, willing, and able to do whatever was necessary to make it work. The amazing thing is I never felt it was work because I was having so much fun doing what I loved.

The perfect job for you may not exist now, but that does not mean that it can’t be created. It goes without saying that we should love the work that we do and find purpose and meaning in it. If you cannot find a position that you love, there is no reason to settle. Although it seems like a daunting task, and one with many risks, the ultimate reward is doing what you love. I am a strong believer that the worst type of lawyer, or any other professional, is one who knowingly continues to work a position while being burned out, unmotivated or disinterested.

Start your own practice and mold it to what you want; create that program that allows you to channel your energy into something you are passionate about; become an entrepreneur and focus your time and energy on promoting a brand you create rather than promoting someone else’s brand.


IN THE BALANCE: Ting Ting Cheng

How CUNY Law alumni are pursuing liberty and justice

 

It’s been a whirlwind twenty-four months for Ting Ting Cheng, currently serving as an attorney for the New York City Commission on Human Rights.  During that time, she helped the NYCCHR host the first public forum on sexual harassment in the workplace in over twenty years, co-founded and the Women’s March on Washington and its offshoot March On, brought a child into the world, and meditated on the subway (we feel this is no small feat). For Women’s History Month, the trailblazer shares how she gets it done.

Ting Ting Cheng is an attorney at the NYC Commission on Human Rights and the Legal Director of the Women’s March on Washington. She’s also on the Ambassador Board of Young New Yorkers, a multi-agency effort to turn Criminal Court into a positive experience in a young person’s life. She also [family/hobby note].

 

On a typical morning:

I love to spend time with my 20-month-old in the morning. We have breakfast and play. Family time is so grounding and helps to focus me throughout the day. I like to be productive during my commute. I browse through headlines or sometimes switch it up and listen to political and cultural podcasts (I love The Daily, Hidden Brain, The Ezra Klein Show, Still Processing, Long Form, WTF with Mark Maron, and On Being, among many others). If I can get a seat and situated comfortably, sometimes I meditate.

I am an attorney at the NYC Commission on Human Rights where I investigate and litigate discrimination claims so my mornings are varied depending on what the priorities are. For example, when I am prepping for a trial I get very focused. But on a typical work morning, I usually have a few meetings and interviews relating to my cases as well as research and writing.

On the role of digital media in organizing and Human Rights:

I remember our first conversation about getting permits for the Women’s March where we were aiming for maybe 20,000 marchers. The march was originally imagined just for D.C., but the idea grew from a moment to a movement and took on a national and international character because of the way technology connects people, builds communities, disseminates information, facilitates conversations, and provides access to the most far reaching corners (there was a Women’s March on Antarctica!). It is an extremely powerful organizing tool – the Women’s March is considered the largest mass mobilization effort ever.

As one of the Founders and Board Members of March On, one of the many outgrowths of the Women’s March using technology platforms to focus on electoral politics, I have been focusing on technology as a tool to help local communities organize and grow the movement from the ground up so that people can both have a voice and be able to crowdsource their agenda.

We are also living in a moment where social media is all-pervasive and the technology industry has been mythologized to the point of being regarded as the saviors for human kind (it’s not – and Bryan Stevenson has powerfully articulated why in his TED talk). It’s important to keep in mind that what we have is a tool – not something driven independently by ethics or values. I think about what drives the markers of success on social media and tech platforms a lot. How does meaningful engagement really happen?  Sometimes I think the movement is being co-opted by social media and that doesn’t feel genuine to me, maybe because I do not think the revolution is happening on Twitter. I think the organizing efforts of Abahlali baseMjondolo, the radical poor people’s movement of shack dwellers based in Durban, South Africa, is a great example of what success can look like in organizing around human rights campaigns.

NYCCHR’s work focusing on sexual harassment in the work place:

We are experiencing a powerful moment of reckoning with gender inequality, sexual harassment, abuse, and misconduct. I think the #MeToo movement and Time’s Up’s Legal Defense Fund are amazing extensions of that – and they are backed by very powerful women in Hollywood. What we want to do at the Commission is to create a platform for the rarely seen or heard, most vulnerable – low wage workers, immigrants, domestic workers, LGBTQ workers, and workers of color who have experienced sexual harassment in the work place and are trying to access justice. We had a public hearing in December and heard testimony from diverse industries and communities. In April, we will be launching a public awareness campaign on protections against sexual harassment in the work place under our Human Rights Law. We have in-depth sexual harassment in the workplace trainings and plan to increase our capacity for education and awareness.

It’s really encouraging to see how the broad standard for sexual harassment under our Human Rights Law can be used to envision more expansive protections for victims beyond our jurisdiction in New York City. Williams v. NYC Housing Authority articulates our sexual harassment standard as instances when an individual is “treated less well than other employees because of gender [beyond] petty slights and trivial inconveniences.”  We are pushing against the narrow federal standard of “severe or pervasive” and the trend is spreading, with California considering formulating alternative standards in their legislation. The Williams standard has been applied by the Second Circuit in Mihalik v. Credit Agricole, these are all exciting movements in the right direction.

On organizing the Women’s March:

What the Women’s March represented for me was the collective consciousness of millions of people who woke up the day after Election Day feeling like they had to do something. A lot of these people they were first-time organizers and engaging in community activism in a way that they’d never done before. The brightest thing that has come out of all this darkness is the new radicalization and heightened level of engagement across the country. Communities are being built to protect vulnerable populations and fight against injustice — and women are leading the charge.

Organizing the March was like a massive sprint. But it didn’t ever feel daunting because as the organizing efforts grew, so did the community of people contributing. It was a very organic process that began in a decentralized way. I loved the energy and the inclusiveness. Kimberly Crenshaw’s work on intersectionality was at the forefront of our discussions. The leadership was representational and our explicit intent was to have a march that centered the voices of the most marginalized.

As a result of this powerful collective consciousness converging, what started out as a single march in D.C. then inspired hundreds of Women’s Marches to be organized across the world. There was substantial coordination, but for the most part the other marches were organized independently had their own women visionaries leading the organizing efforts. Many of those Marches (L.A., Boston, Chicago, Oklahoma) have now turned into non-profit organizations working to shape local elections and impact local politics.

On staying sane in the current political era:

This comes up a lot, particularly within social justice, human rights, and activist circles. Of course, the political climate contributes to the heightened sense of intensity in the work that I do. In the context of my work with gender activism, the question of how to balance being reactive versus proactive, how to not only be a platform for collective outrage but to have impact through building a road map for what comes next – that keeps me sane and saves me from falling down the rabbit hole of despair or rage. I think that’s why people feel so deeply connected to their experience at the march on January 21, 2017 or one year later at the anniversary march. The energy that was was uplifting, hopeful, and defiant in a way that brought people together rather than split them apart …unlike much of the rhetoric that we are bombarded with in politics and the media.

On keeping “Justice” top of mind:

First of all, I feel extremely fortunate to have had the education and mentors that I had throughout my life. Being at CUNY Law provided a haven and space to understand what a justice framework can mean. Clerking at the South African Constitutional Court for Justice Albie Sachs and Justice Edwin Cameron gave me the opportunity to see how the theory and practice of human rights merge in the context of transitional justice. That human rights framework, especially around socio-economic rights, was getting defined and expanded on the ground while the Court used the Constitution and frameworks in foreign and international jurisdictions to deliver justice in real time. Because the Court considered laws of other nations and international human rights law, my role as a Foreign Law Clerk was to provide the international human rights, foreign law, and comparative legal perspectives. It was a profound work and learning experience on how to build a justice framework in a newly emerging democracy.

Upon returning to New York, I worked on global poverty issues, on criminal and immigrant defense in Brooklyn, on gender activism through organizing the Women’s March, and now anti-discrimination law at the New York City Commission on Human Rights. These are all experiences that engage human rights and justice in extremely specific ways. Pursuing “justice” means constantly learning, engaging and honing one’s skills while also taking a big picture approach to understanding how different systems, histories, communities, and human rights models interface and align.

Then there’s being prepared for the unknown. We know that a great amount of injustice exists in the world, the powerful will always seek to exploit and oppress the marginalized. For the most part our institutions have historically supported these systemic forms of oppression. So there will never be a lack of work for social justice lawyers!  I keep that big picture perspective when thinking about what it means to be a life-long movement lawyer: its more than a career or a passion, it’s a frame of mind. It’s knowing that when some grave injustice happens whether we can anticipate or not, that every experience and every lesson I have gained along the way has prepared me for the fight.


MARCH BOOKMARK: OUTlaws Edition

This month, our Bookmark feature is brought to you by OUTlaws, CUNY Law’s intersectional queer community for people of all genders, sexual orientations, and HIV statuses. OUTlaws strives for collective liberation in solidarity with other student groups and empowers community members to deconstruct legal barriers and effect legal & social progress.

 

“Trans Day of Visibility is a time to celebrate folks who are trans, non-binary, and intersex, as well as a time to encourage more positive representation of those same folks in the media. Often, rising visibility comes at cost to the community, where we become more susceptible to hate and violence, especially those of us who identify as people of color. It is so crucial to remember to uplift, spotlight, and celebrate transgender, non-binary, and intersex folks and their achievements. The articles listed below share stories from trans authors and the larger community.”

 

The Murder Rate Of Transgender Women In The U.S. Isn’t Declining

By Lauren Holter

Meet the 8 transgender candidates who won elections on Tuesday

By Zack Ford

Young People Get Trans Rights. It’s Adults Who Don’t.

By Janet Mock

Why All Bathrooms Should Be Gender-Neutral

By Jacob Tobia


Acclaimed Poet Rowan Ricardo Phillips at Baruch College on Tuesday, March 20

Rowan Ricardo Phillips, sitting, blue shirt, gray background  

Phillips is the Spring 2018 Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence at

the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences

 

Baruch College will present a reading and conversation with acclaimed poet, author, and journalist Rowan Ricardo Phillips, on Tuesday, March 20, beginning with a reception at 5pm.  This event is free and open to the public.

Phillips, who is the spring 2018 Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, will be reading new poetry, and work from his latest collection Heaven.

He is the author of two books of poetry, The Ground and Heaven, as well as a collection of essays. A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Whiting Award, PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry, Anisfield-Wolf Book Prize for Poetry, and the GLCA New Writers Award for Poetry, Phillips is widely acclaimed and recognized for his writing.

As the sports columnist for The Paris Review Daily, a selection of his writings will be collected next year in the Library of America’s anthology “Basketball: Great Writing About America’s Game.”

WHAT:  “A Reading and Conversation with Rowan Ricardo Phillips” – free event

WHEN:    Tuesday, March 20, 2018 / 5pm Reception / Reading at 5:45 pm

WHERE:  Baruch College – Library and Technology Building – 151 East 25th Street, #750

 

About the Harman Writer-in-Residence Program at Baruch College

Founded in the fall of 1998 by Professor Roslyn Bernstein, the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program brings distinguished writers to the Baruch College campus every semester. Whether they are poets, playwrights, novelists, journalists, essayists or critics, the Harman Writers-in-Residence enrich the Baruch environment, creating a lively literary salon for students and faculty. Endowed by alumnus Dr. Sidney Harman (’39), the Harman Program relies on an intense workshop design, where visiting writers teach small classes and hold individual conferences. In addition, the Harman Program sponsors student creative writing competitions, literary internships, individual guest readings, and a week-long residency.

 

Media Contact:  Suzanne Bronski / 646-660-6095 / Suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

 

About Baruch College:

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak more than 129 languages. Ranked among the top 15% of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. As a public institution with a tradition of academic excellence, Baruch College offers accessibility and opportunity for students from every corner of New York City and from around the world.  For more about Baruch College, go to http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/.

 


PROFESSORS JEGLIC AND CALKINS ARE ON A MISSION TO CREATE A WORLD FREE OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Professors Jeglic and Calkins Are on a Mission to Create a World Free of Sexual Violence

 

When Dr. Elizabeth Jeglic and Dr. Cynthia Calkins first met as psychology professors at John Jay, they were pleasantly surprised to find that their research interests were remarkably similar. They both were interested in exploring sexual crime and reducing recidivism among sexual offenders. They also soon discovered that they worked well together—so well that they started to collaborate on academic papers, and in 2016, they co-edited a volume titled Sexual Violence: Evidence Based Policy and Prevention.

Jeglic and Calkins are also mothers, and in recent years, the professors started to wonder how they could help create a world free from sexual violence for their children. That led them to begin writing a book specifically tailored to parents and guardians on how to protect children from sexual abuse. This February, Jeglic and Calkins published Protecting Your Child from Abuse: What You Need to Know to Keep Your Kids Safe (Skyhorse).

Right now, as the country engages in a national conversation about sexual assault fueled by the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements, Jeglic and Calkins’s research is an important contribution to the conversation on eradicating sexual violence. Jeglic and Calkins say that the best way to stop sexual abuse is to prevent it from happening in the first place, but current policies and laws are ineffective at doing so. This is partly because policies are often not informed by data, but popular misconceptions. For example, despite the fact that 7% of children are abused by a stranger, the myth of “stranger-danger” remains rampant. “Cases involving strangers snatching children from parks are often the ones that get reported in the media,” say Jeglic and Calkins.

The prevalence of those stories in the media has in part led to the implementation of ineffective policy like sex offender registries and residence restriction laws. Sex offender registries are particularly ineffective because a whopping 95% of sex crimes are committed by someone who’s never committed a sexual offense before. “We’re spending the lion’s share of our resources on the 5% who reoffend,” say Jeglic and Calkins. “But we need to focus on what we can do to prevent people from offending in the first place.”

Their research has implications not only for sexual prevention laws, but also for educational and economic policies: sexual violence might be prevented if children from low-income families have access to the same educational resources that their wealthier peers often have. “Most of the individuals who were abused as children reported that it happened when they were in the community without parental supervision,” they say. “One avenue for prevention may be to provide afterschool and summer programming for families that can’t afford it.”

When Jeglic and Calkins were still in graduate school 20 years ago, there was not much research being done on how to prevent sexual violence. While there still remains a great need for data to make better-informed sexual violence prevention programs, the professors are proud to see that interest in the field is flourishing, especially among their own students. “Many of the students in our lab are passionate about the work and bring their own research questions and perspectives to the table,” they say. “Much of our work is done in conjunction with our students. We could not have accomplished what we have so far without the amazing John Jay students who will be the future leaders in the field.”


ABBY STEIN’S LEGACY IS HONORED AT MEMORIAL LECTURE

Abby Stein’s Legacy is Honored at Memorial Lecture

 

The legacy of beloved Professor Abby Stein was honored at the fourth annual Abby Stein Memorial Lecture this February. Stein, who is remembered as a champion for student success, was also involved in launching the innovative John Jay-Vera Fellows Program. Every year, Vera alumni participate in the Abby Stein Memorial Lecture to discuss how their experience in the intensive program has influenced their careers.

Professor Caroline Reitz, who teaches in the Interdisciplinary Studies Program (ISP) and helps manage the Vera Fellows program, says that the idea to bring Vera graduates back to campus was championed by Abby Stein. Stein embodied John Jay’s mission for justice. “She was fierce,” Reitz says. “She was completely passionate both as a researcher and a classroom teacher.”

This year, alumna Lenecia Lewis-Kirkwood delivered the annual Abby Stein Memorial Lecture. After graduating from John Jay, she received her M.A. from Johns Hopkins and now works at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt. In a fascinating Q&A session with students, faculty, and alumni, Lewis-Kirkwood talked about her unique experience as a young diplomat and African-American woman serving in the Muslim world.

Current senior Tialena Elliott also spoke at the event. After a year-long internship placement made possible by the Vera Fellows program, Elliott now works part-time at Common Justice, an alternative to incarceration program. As the inaugural recipient of a new award to help Vera students and alumni study and do research abroad, Elliottrecently traveled to Morocco. The trip helped solidify her interest in justice that developed after becoming a Vera Fellow. “Two years ago, ‘social justice’ was just a hashtag,” she said. “But now, because of my internship placement and the work I’ve done with the professors in the program, I know that I want to work in social justice and do prisoner re-entry work.”

Like Elliott, all Vera Fellows are placed in intensive year-long internships at justice organizations. In addition to gaining hands-on experience at their internship sites, students attend weekly seminars by ISP faculty members. Reitz, who teaches the fellowship seminars with Professor Nina Rose Fischer and Professor Alisse Waterston, said that this model benefits all students, whether they choose to continue their education or launch straight into careers after graduating. “Around 50 to 60 percent of our students go on to graduate school or work full time with justice agencies afterwards,” said Reitz.

Stein, who was highly involved at the College, set a powerful example for the students who knew her. After dropping out of high school, Stein eventually returned to school and became the dedicated professor and passionate mentor that she is still remembered as. According to Reitz, Stein often saw herself in John Jay’s students, and was quick to recognize their assets and skills so she could help mold them into leaders.

That mission of helping students become leaders continues with the Vera Fellows Program, and would undoubtedly make Stein proud. “The Vera Fellowship program has taught me to believe in my potential,” said Elliott. “It’s helped me find myself.”


ANNUAL “LAW DAY” HELPS STUDENTS PREP FOR LEGAL CAREERS

Annual “Law Day” Helps Students Prep for Legal Careers

 

The John Jay Pre-Law Institute has long been preparing John Jay students from all fields of study for careers in law. At the institute’s annual “Law Day,” John Jay students and alumni have the unique opportunity to learn directly from law school admissions officers, current law students, and legal professionals about the study and practice of law.

Each year, students look forward to attending the various events scheduled for “Law Day” and this year was no exception, drawing large crowds to its the morning and afternoon sessions. Through a variety of discussions and small workshops, students learned how to build a successful law school application; attended a mock law school class; listened to current law students talk about their transition to law school; and heard about the realities of a legal career from practicing attorneys. This year, the 13th Samuel and Anna Jacobs Lecture on The Law and the Legal Profession, a keynote speech from an accomplished and inspiring legal professional, was delivered by Shirlethia Franklin.

Watch Shirlethia Franklin speak at Law Day on John Jay’s Youtube

Franklin is a Howard University School of Law graduate and has served as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable Alexander Williams, Jr., federal judge in the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland. In 2013, under President Obama’s administration, she was appointed to the Class of White House Fellows, one of the most prestigious fellowships for leadership and public service.

After a warm introduction by President Karol Mason, who once worked closely with Franklin, Franklin spoke about her journey from growing up in Shaw, Missouri, to becoming a public servant. She encouraged students to never stop believing in their own potential, and cited her own struggle with overcoming self-doubt. “I once had a fear of my own talents. I didn’t think I was good enough,” Franklin said. “But I was destined to become a lawyer because I needed to help people like me.”

 

Annual Law Day John Jay College

 

Becoming a lawyer can often seem like a challenging task, but Professor Charles Robert Davidson, Director of the Pre-Law Institute and Center for Post-Graduate Opportunities, emphasized his commitment to preparing John Jay students for successful legal careers. “We believe that the potential for excellence is in each and every one of you,” he said to students in attendance. “We care about you.”

President Mason showed great admiration for Davidson and the accomplishments of his team. The Pre-Law Institute has a track record for success: its students have been admitted to over 85 national and local law schools, and have secured over $20 million in merit-based scholarships. Mason promised to make sure that the Pre-Law Institute continues to grow. “I wish I had these kinds of supports when I was  going to law school,” she said. “We’re going to create more partnerships and raise the money needed to make these supports even better.”

Katherynne Santos was one of the students who attended Law Day, where she had the opportunity to network with law school admissions officers and learn more about which schools she might want to apply to upon graduation. Santos, who has a two-year-old daughter, said that she initially came to John Jay thinking she would go into law enforcement, but she’s recently changed her mind. “It’s through law that I think I can have the biggest impact,” she said.


“CHAMPIONS OF JUSTICE” SCHOLARSHIP RECEPTION CELEBRATES STUDENTS AND THANKS DONORS

“Champions of Justice” Scholarship Reception Celebrates Students and Thanks Donors

 

This February, John Jay College celebrated student scholarship winners and thanked the generous donors that made these scholarships possible at the 4th annual Champions of Justice reception. This year, three new scholarships were announced at the event and current scholarship recipients shared their moving stories about their journey to reach their dreams at John Jay and beyond. The reception was attended by over 125 people, including donors, student scholarship recipients, faculty, and staff.

Watch the moving student success stories from the evening and the new scholarships that changed their lives.

The College is proud to celebrate the hard work of its scholars, fellows, and interns, and to thank the John Jay donors who year after year help John Jay students succeed. There are currently over 85 scholarships, internships, and fellowships at John Jay, including 13 new scholarships that were launched just this year. In 2018, the College is awarding nearly $3.5 million dollars in scholarship, fellowship, and internship funds to over 1,100 students.

At the Champions of Justice reception, three new scholarships were highlighted: the NECO-First in Family Scholarship, the Judith Bronfman Memorial Scholarship and the Rossana Rosado Fellowship. These scholarships support high-potential students, many of whom are the first in their families to attend college. The awards help these exceptional students overcome unique financial, personal, and academic challenges so that they can successfully graduate with their degrees.

Magdalena Oropeza is one of the scholarship recipients highlighted at the event. When she first started at John Jay, she knew she wanted to study law because of an encounter she’d had with an immigration lawyer when she was only seven years old. Her parents relied on Magdalena to interpret what the lawyer said into Spanish. The experience made a deep impression on Magdalena. “Having to tell my parents that there was nothing the lawyer could do solidified my sense of wanting to help people in the future,” she said.

Now, with the support she’s received through her scholarship, Oropeza has just been accepted into Columbia Law School. “When I received the news, I was on the bus and I screamed,” she said. “I was in tears.”

The voices of the generous donors who make success stories like Oropeza’s possible were also featured at the event. “You’re not just investing in an academic experience, you’re investing in someone’s personal growth,” said Rossana Rosado, Secretary of State of New York and founder of the Rossana Rosado Fellowship.

President Karol V. Mason delivered remarks about the courage and resilience of the scholarship recipients. Mason also thanked donors for their support, and emphasized the continued need to fund scholarship opportunities for John Jay students so they can achieve their dreams. “One of the challenges we face is ensuring that students with the greatest needs have the resources to complete their degrees,” she said. “These students, in this room, are great examples of your impact. Thank you for investing in our students.”

View photos of the evening here.


STUDENTS AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS LAUNCH SEMESTER-LONG SERIES EXPLORING SEXUAL VIOLENCE

Students and Community Members Launch Semester-Long Series Exploring Sexual Violence

 

Bettina Muenster, who has organized semester-long initiatives since 2010 on topics as varied as gun control to the ethics of torture, is dedicated to creating student leadership opportunities outside of the classroom. This spring, Muenster recruited passionate students to help plan the Sexual Justice Now! series, an initiative designed to explore sexual crimes and how to best address them.

Watch the Sexual Justice Now! Title IX panel on John Jay’s Youtube

Paula-Camila Caceres, a sophomore double majoring in Law & Society and Spanish, is one of those students. Caceres has long promoted gender equity as a Gender Justice Advocate at the Women’s Center, making her a natural fit for a panel discussion on Title IX, the federal policy that protects students from gender discrimination. Caceres, who Muenster refers to as an expert on Title IX, was the only student representative among a panel of accomplished professionals. “It was nerve-wracking at first, but I knew I was chosen to be there for a reason,” says Caceres. “As students, we can help figure out how to respond.”

Paula-Camila Caceres

Caceres heard of Sexual Justice Now! from her peer Yuliya Brodska, a student intern in the President’s office who works closely with Muenster. Under the guidance of Muenster and Professor Barbara Cassidy, they helped organize the numerous events in the series. Cassidy, who teaches a course called “Seeing Rape,” in which students expose the realities of sexual violence by creating and performing dramatic plays, says that one of the goals of the series is to get people to think critically about how sexual violence is normalized in American culture.

“Obviously, we don’t accept rape or sexual harassment as a society, but there are other cultural nuances that need to be changed,” she says. “For example, we need to look at what we teach boys and girls in terms of acceptable behavior.”

The need to address sexual crimes and the cultural norms that promote them has always been urgent. But according to Muenster and Cassidy, the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements have focused national attention on sexual justice in an unprecedented way. “There’s a shift in the culture that shows that sexual crimes won’t be tolerated,” Cassidy says. “It’s up to us to keep talking about those crimes and keep the conversations going.”

Muenster and Cassidy think that John Jay, given its mission of educating for justice, is the perfect place to host those important conversations. Events range from the academic to the artistic, from panel discussions with representatives from the Mayor’s Office and community organizations, to documentary screenings and an art exhibit in the Shiva Gallery. The series, which is open to the general public, will come to a close with student-produced plays from Professor Cassidy’s course “Seeing Rape.”

“There are different ways and lenses to look at this issue, and they’re reflected in the events in the series,” Muenster says. “But in the end, it’s all about equity and fairness.”

Caceres says that regardless of the approach taken to the topic, the effect of these events is empowering. “Shedding light on these issues can be positive and liberating,” she says. “That’s the impact we’re all trying to have.”


PROFESSORS MARAS AND WANDT DELIVER CYBERSECURITY TRAININGS TO FBI AGENTS AND STAFF

Professors Maras and Wandt Deliver Cybersecurity Trainings to FBI Agents and Staff

 

John Jay faculty members Marie-Helen Maras of the Department of Security, Fire and Emergency Management and Adam Scott Wandt of the Department of Public Management recently delivered a series of trainings to FBI agents and staff on important topics in cybersecurity. The trainings took place this semester at the New York Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

The first of these lectures was delivered at the FBI-New York office on January 17, 2018, and focused on the latest trends in data aggregation, looking specifically at Internet of Things (IOT) forensics and investigations. Professors Maras and Wandt, who are also faculty of the Digital Forensics and Cybersecurity graduate program, trained agents and professorial staff on methods they should use to protect themselves and their families.

The second of these lectures, titled “Hacking…You ~ Phishing, Spearphishing, and Whaling: Email Forensics and Countermeasures,” was delivered at the FBI-New York office on February 28, 2018. This lecture covered deception and social engineering tactics, ways to identify the methods used by criminal organizations and foreign governments to illicit information and gain unauthorized access to protected systems, and the measures that can be used to counter cyberattacks and intelligence collection efforts. A live demonstration was conducted using two sophisticated spearphishing attacks designed to steal login credentials and infect the target’s system with malware.

“This is an incredible opportunity to introduce our latest research to the Bureau,” Professor Wandt explained. “The digital landscape changes so quickly, it’s important for everyone in law enforcement to understand how these changes impact their ability to investigate crimes and keep the public safe.”

Marie-Helen Maras has authored several books including Cybercriminology and Computer Forensics: Cybercriminals, Laws and Evidence and is the creator and co-editor for a monograph and edited volume series titled, “Palgrave Studies in Cybercrime and Cybersecurity.” Prior to her academic post, she served in the U.S. Navy for approximately seven years gaining significant experience in security and law enforcement from her posts as a Navy Law Enforcement Specialist and Command Investigator.

Adam Scott Wandt is the Chair of, and a Senior Researcher with, The City University of New York’s “Skunkworks: Academic Technology Research and Development Group.” He is a member of the Association of Inspectors General, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the American Society for Criminology, and the American Society for Public Administration and  consults on issues relating to academic technology, applied technology, social engineering, and information security. He is also the host of CUNY’s academic technology podcast  and authors two blogs: “Adam’s Antics” and “Academic Technology in Higher Education.”

Learn more about the Master of Science in Digital Forensics and Cybersecurity degree program at John Jay College.


AFTER THREE YEARS ON CAMPUS, STUDENT DEANDRA SIMON (’19) IS READY FOR LAW SCHOOL

After Three Years on Campus, Student Deandra Simon (’19) is Ready for Law School

 

There’s no denying that Deandra Simon, a junior who plans to pursue a career in law, is a total go-getter. When she’s not working on issues that affect incarcerated youth as a Pinkerton Fellow, she’s organizing campus-wide events through her role as Secretary of the Haitian American Student Association (HASA) at John Jay. This April, Simon and the leadership of HASA are hosting the second annual “Black Girl Magic” event, which celebrates the accomplishments and innovations of Black and Latinx women leaders from a variety of fields, including hair, fitness, lifestyle, and fashion. Last year, the event drew a crowd of 150 John Jay students. For Simon, putting on events like “Black Girl Magic” helps create a more inclusive John Jay community.

“This event is a chance for us to celebrate ourselves and share sisterhood, no matter what color you are. You can be Dominican and Haitian, like I am, or anything else. We need this on our campus. It’s a chance to create new friends,” says Simon.

John Jay is a designated Minority-Serving Institution (MSI) and Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), and students like Simon embody the College’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. Simon was first accepted to John Jay as part of the SEEK program, which prepares students for college-level work with extensive opportunities for counseling and social support. Since then, she’s become highly involved not only on campus, but also in her community as a Pinkerton Fellow. As part of the 15-month fellowship, Simon is working part-time at a mentoring program in Far Rockaway, NY with youth who are on probation. For Simon, who grew up not far in Jamaica, Queens, the experience has not only given her hands-on experience in youth justice, but it’s shown her a potential career path.

“I help youth with GED prep, finding jobs, anything they may need,” she says. “It’s such a rewarding experience. It’s made me want to be a public interest lawyer.”

In addition to the Pinkerton Fellowship, Simon has had countless opportunities to become an expert in justice so she can prepare for her future career in law. She recently spent time abroad in South Africa with the Prisoner Reentry Institute, where she visited three prisons in Cape Town, and was able to compare international systems of criminal justice with what she sees through her work in the states. At the end of this semester, she’ll present on what she learned while she was abroad. “That trip was a catalyst for me to get even more involved in criminal justice,” she says.

Simon has clearly taken advantage of all John Jay has to offer. She’s already chosen what law schools she wants to apply to next year and is now working on her applications. But as a high school senior, she wasn’t always sure John Jay was the place for her. “It’s funny,” she says. “Initially, John Jay wasn’t my first choice. But John Jay has such a good network, and the professors are so diverse. I don’t regret my decision at all.”


Hostos Women’s Basketball Team Takes Home First National Title

March 19, 2018 (Bronx, NY) – What a game. What a tournament. What a season!

The Hostos Community College women’s basketball team capped off its historic run with its first National Championship, after beating top-seeded Rock Valley, 58-52, on Saturday night in the final of the 2017-18 NJCAA Division III Women’s Basketball Championship in Rockford, Ill.

“It is a great feeling to win a national title and I am so proud of my players for trusting the process,” Head Coach DeVernie Winston said. “They responded to every challenge with class, courage and a constant will to win. This historic accomplishment is not only great for Hostos, but for CUNY and the community at large.”

MVP of the tournament and CUNY Athletic Conference (CUNYAC) and Region XV Player of the Year, Kayla Wilson led the charge for the Caimans over the defending champions on their home court after scoring 22 points and grabbing 13 rebounds. She ended the 2017-18 season with 20 straight double-doubles. In the three-day tournament, the freshman averaged 27.3 points and 17.0 rebounds.

“Going to the national tournament was a tremendous experience,” Wilson said. “It was tough, but we banded together as a team, like we did all season long. I am thankful for the individual accolades, but none of it would be possible without my teammates and coaches.”

The victory ended a tremendous season for the Caimans, who finished 28-2 after winning 23 straight—their two losses came against D-I and D-II schools. They did not lose a game after November 18.

The championship game was a thriller, as Rock Valley jumped out to an early advantage at the end of the first quarter with a 21-13 lead. In the second frame, Hostos bounced back and outscored the Golden Eagles 18-8 to go into intermission with a 31-29 edge. Both squads continued to trade blows with Rock Valley out-dueling the Caimans in the third quarter to carry a 44-43 lead into the final period. At the end, the Caimans regained their composure, played great defense and outscored Rock Valley 15-8 for their first NJCAA title.

The Caimans also repeated as Region XV champs and won the CUNYAC title earlier this season.​ The fact this happened during the College’s 50th Anniversary, made the victory extra-special.

For the postgame interview with Kayla Wilson, click here.

For the postgame interview with Coach Winston, click here.

Hostos Award Winners:

Kayla Wilson: Player of the Year and MVP for  CUNYAC and NJCAA Tournament
Coach DeVernie Winston: CUNY Coach of the Year
Skydajah Patterson: All-Region Team

About Hostos Community College

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.

 

 

 


After Decades in Prison, Women Pose for Portraits in their Own Rooms and Reflect

“When you see this photo I took of you, what does it make you think?”

This post features the work of Pete Brook, writer, curator, and educator focused on photography, prisons, and power. You can find more of his work at   www.prisonphotography.org

Evenlyn, 42, in an apartment she shares with a roommate, five years after her release

Photography by Sara Bennett, Life After Life

 

Working as a public defender, Sara Bennett has met a great many women who have faced struggle and hardship. Many serve, or have served, long sentences. Since 1980, the number of incarcerated women has increased by 800% in the U.S. There are nearly 100,000 women in state prisons and federal penitentiaries. A further 110,000 are in county jails, 80% of whom report having been the victim of sexual assault during their life time. Women who have been convicted of serious crimes have, more often than not, been the victims of serious abuse themselves. Irrespective of crime, I have consistently argued that mass incarceration does little to improve or heal. It does the opposite. It damages.

When facing conservative opposition, prison reformers often resort to arguments against the incarceration of non-violent people, women included. Reformers attempt to find sympathetic groups within the prison system for whom the public may be persuaded to support. This is all well and good, but it comes at a price; people convicted of violent crimes are left to rot, so to speak. For advocates such as Bennett, it is clear that long sentences achieve little and that the abuses of the prison industrial complex are wrought on all who it swallows. The Bedroom Project humanizes women who have recently re-entered society after serving long, multi-decade Life With Parole sentences.

Bennett has created a space for each of these women to reflect upon their post-release situation. They regale personal tales and they are photographed in their most personal spaces–their bedrooms. In some cases, a bedroom might be the only place some of these women can claim as their own.

Bennett is a former criminal defense attorney who most frequently represented battered women and the wrongly convicted. She uses photography to amplify her observations of the criminal justice system. Her first project, Life After Life in Prison documented the lives of four women as they returned to society after spending decades in prison. Bennett decries the “pointlessness of extremely long sentences and arbitrary parole denials”. The Bedroom Project is currently on show at the CUNY School of Law in Long Island City, New York until March 28th.

Keen to know more about Bennett’s process and motivations, I approached her with a few questions about The Bedroom Project. Scroll down for our Q&A in which we discuss the meaning of the work for both subjects and audiences.

 

Q & A

Prison Photography (PP): Many of the women you photographed are living in a room in a community house, or an apartment building for returning citizens, or in a one bedroom apartment. So, they have a single room that is their own. While imprisoned, they may or may not have had a cellmate, and the degree to which they could personalise their cell would differ. No matter, they lived within walls for long periods. You’re photographing them also within walls. Tell us about why you focused on their bedrooms.

Sara Bennett (SB): It’s not the similarity to the prison cell that I’m trying to highlight, but the contrast. It’s true that most of the women now live in shared spaces, but still there’s a sense of intimacy, self, and pride. They all have items on display that would have been contraband in prison, including stuffed animals, wooden picture frames, patterned sheets, cellphones and computers. For decades, their cells were randomly inspected, they were locked in every evening, and they were forced to move at a moment’s notice. Now these bedrooms are their own.

PP: What was the dynamic between you and the women.

SB: For many years, I was the pro bono clemency attorney for Judith Clark, who was serving a 75-year-to-life sentence for her role as a getaway driver in a famous New York Case — the Brinks robbery of 1981. All my subjects know her and my first photography project, Spirit on the Inside, is about the women who were incarcerated with her and her influence on their lives. (Spirit on the Inside book.)

The reaction to Spirit on the Inside — viewers were surprised that the formerly incarcerated women were just regular women — sparked my second project, Life After Life in Prison. I followed four women in various stages of re-entry, and I spent so much time with each of them that we really got to know each other. At the same time, I began work on The Bedroom Project, and the four women put me in touch with other potential subjects. So before I even walked in the door, my new portrait subjects were open to me. They’d seen my previous work; they knew some of my former subjects or clients; and they’d been told that I could be trusted.

I’ve ended up being a mentor or friend to almost all the women I’ve photographed.

 

PP: Why did you choose to include the women’s handwriting?

SB: My goal in all of my photography work is to show the humanity in people who are, or were, incarcerated. I believe that if judges, prosecutors and legislators could see lifers as real individuals, they would rethink the policies that lock them away forever. I want viewers to know what these women are thinking. Including their handwriting emphasizes that these are their words, these are their thoughts.

I asked all of them the same question: “When you see this photo I took of you, what does it make you think?” Their answers are varied and lead the viewer to all kinds of issues — from what it feels like to live in a cell, to educational and employment opportunities inside and outside prison, the difficulties in getting parole and being on parole, finding housing, and issues of remorse, regret, and forgiveness.

 

PP: What were the main victories for these women post release? What were their main challenges?

SB: Each woman’s circumstance is unique and so their challenges and victories are different. I’d say the biggest and most immediate challenge is finding housing. There are some re-entry programs that provide housing that is either temporary (up to six months) or semi-permanent, and many of the women were lucky enough to get into one of those programs. Some of the women ended up in homeless shelters and some have bounced around from place to place. I know two women who went home to live with family but both ended up moving to housing programs, in part because those programs offer a community that feels familiar and supportive.

Some of the women have completed educational degrees since coming home, some have found rewarding jobs and relationships, and unsurprisingly, the longer a woman has been home, the more stable she becomes.

But most have difficulty finding a job, let alone a decent job, and almost all of them have financial struggles. Many get benefits but that amount is paltry.

It’s mind boggling how quickly the women seem to adapt, how resilient they are, and how they take challenges in stride. Remember, my subjects spent anywhere from 15 to 35 years in prison. The outside world changed radically in that time. As Aisha, one of my subjects says, “It’s like putting a kindergartner in college”.

 

PP: Release from prison is not easy thing. Many of the women were given “numbers-to-life” sentences. Some got out on their parole date, others years after their first parole eligibility. What has been the situation in NY state for releasing persons who’ve served long sentences? Has parole and release become more common recently?

SB: When I first became an attorney in 1986, there was a presumption of parole. If, for example, a person had a sentence of 15 years to life, then she’d likely be released after serving her 15 years, provided that she hadn’t been in serious trouble in the few years prior. But when Governor Pataki took office in 1995, that presumption changed. And no matter how people spent their time in prison — working in trades, earning college degrees, setting up programs, having excellent disciplinary records, living in honor housing — they were repeatedly denied parole based on the one factor that will never change: the nature of the crime they committed.

I like to think that the parole system in New York State is starting to change. In the last six months, the number of parole grants has steadily increased, in part because Governor Andrew Cuomo has had the opportunity to appoint new parole commissioners and in part because of a culture shift that recognizes that, we, as a society, lock people up for far too long. Still, we have a long way to go.

 

PP: What have been the audiences’ responses to the work?

SB: The photos are currently facing out onto a busy street in Queens, NY and I’ve eavesdropped as passersby have studied the portraits and talked to each other. I’ve never heard anyone say, “you do the crime, you do the time.” Rather, passersby seem sympathetic, drawn in, and incredulous at the amount of time that the women have spent in prison. I’ve also moderated more than a dozen panel conversations with my subjects, and the audiences have been very responsive to the women. No matter what the women’s pasts might have been, today they are hard-working, loving, resilient, optimistic people, and the audience seems to understand that they have earned second chances.

 

PP: Do prisons work?

SB: That’s such a loaded question that I’m not sure how to answer it. Suffice it to say that in this country we incarcerate way too many people for way too long under conditions that are dehumanizing and obscene. In other countries, imprisonment itself is the punishment, but the conditions themselves are not punitive and abysmal.

 

PP: In extension of your photos and the women’s own testimonies, what would you like to impress upon members of the public about improvements in the criminal justice system?

SB: For a long time, most of the conversation around changing the criminal justice system has focused on non-violent felony offenders. President Obama talked a lot about non-violent felony offenders and low-level drug offenders. I’m concerned about people with really lengthy, or life sentences, those who are either repeatedly denied parole or don’t even have that possibility. That’s why my only criteria for The Bedroom Project was that the subjects had a life sentence. (A life sentence doesn’t really mean life in prison unless it’s life without parole. A sentence of say, 25 years to life, means that after 25 years a person becomes eligible for parole.) I wanted to really drive home the point: people with life sentences are ordinary (in the best sense of the word) human beings. They deserve second chances.

 

PP: What effects (positive and/or negative) do prisons and reentry have on women? What are their needs that often get overlooked?

SB: One of the saddest things to me about prison is that it can be the first time a woman has found safety in her life. Most women in prison have been victims of gender-based violence. I’ll never forget a client telling me that she got her first good night’s sleep when she went to prison, no longer subject to abuse by her boyfriend. So, in that sense, prison initially brought some peace as well as a sense of community and self awareness to some of the women I know. Of course, that came at the extremely high cost of the loss of freedom.

In general, women have fewer outside contacts than men and lose touch with their families much quicker than men do. So they are very isolated from the outside world and come home to a world that has moved on without them. They find a society that puts up a series of hurdles: they are required to attend state-mandated programs, barred from inexpensive public housing and banned from voting. In addition, they face travel limitations and curfews that make visiting family and working more difficult. When they eventually become eligible to be released from parole, they are often denied without explanation.

I hope the stories of these women remind us of the countless people still in prison who, like them, deserve that same chance to build a life on the outside.

 

PP: Thanks, Sara.

SB: Thank you.


Originally published on Prison Photography.

What Public Interest Law Looks Like: Areas of Practice

For most of us, the type of work we do and the way we do it is one of the most critical components of happiness. If you’re heading to law school to make justice accessible and attainable for more people in more places, you already know that public interest work could be your calling.

But what does that really look like?

Dreaming up job prospects or envisioning your career a decade from now isn’t so easy if you don’t know the many ways this work gets done. Below is a list of the most common public interest practice settings. Read on for an introduction to what the work looks like.

 

Nonprofit and Legal Services Organizations

Typically organized around specific sets of issues, this work advocates for or against changes in the law, whether representing individual clients or working to advance law reform. The work often involves partnering with community groups and organizers.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: Legal Aid Society

 

Public Defenders

Court-appointed counselors quickly become responsible for all phases of motion practice and legal research and writing. They handle large caseloads, managing strategy, interviews, pretrial hearings and trials, plea bargains, and the investigations themselves.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: The Bronx Defenders

 

Government

The Department of Justice, Attorney General’s Office, state agencies, and public authorities all offer unique public interest opportunities. Litigating public issues, negotiating contracts, drafting regulations, and advising officials are all in a day’s work.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: NYC Commission on Human Rights

 

Elected Office

Law is still the most common background for elected officials. Whether aiming for local office, as a city council or school board member, or aspiring to be on the national stage, this work often provides experience introducing legislation and being a community advocate.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: New York City Council

 

Political Campaigns

Every campaign needs legal experts – and staffing them means gaining an array of skills in a fast-paced environment. This work explores issues and needs through the lens of an elected official’s cares and concerns.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: Recently, The Bernie Sanders Campaign

 

Courts

Judicial clerkships and staff attorney positions mean inside exposure to the judicial process, along with the opportunity to help research questions, shape case opinions, and sometimes formulate new laws.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: U.S. Immigration Court

 

International Public Interest Work

This work is as varied as it is nuanced. Entities across the world are working on environmental law, human rights, transitional justice, and more. State agencies, including the Department of State and the Environmental Protection Agency, and entities such as the International Criminal Court and United Nations all approach law on a global scale.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: Reprieve

 

Foundations

Learning about, selecting, and supporting creative projects to benefit institutions (such as hospitals) or to ameliorate social problems is one way to put a public interest education to work.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: The Educational Foundation of America

 

Unions

Whether representing public or private sectors, union attorneys provide legal direction and advice for leadership and constituents alike. Labor reform, worker cooperatives, and bankruptcy law are all areas of work in this field.

Where you can find CUNY Law grads: United Federation of Teachers

 

Private Law Firms

Whether it’s pro bono work at a traditional firm or issue-oriented work at a private public interest firm, issue-based advocacy can be found along more traditional lines of practice.


SORENSEN CENTER TO HOST JUSTICE SACHS AND DARREN WALKER

Critical Voices from Local to Global: In conversation with Justice Albie Sachs and Darren Walker

 

Join the chief architect of South Africa’s post-apartheid constitution of 1996 and the president of the Ford Foundation as they consider what it means to live in a constitutional democracy.

 

TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 2018

6:00 pm     Welcome Reception

6:30 pm     Conversation

7:30 pm     Reception

 

The Sorensen Center for International Peace and Justice is thrilled to invite you to an evening with two renowned voices in democracy on the world’s stage.  Please join us for a conversation and reception; this event is free and open to the public.

 

CLICK HERE TO RSVP

 

Justice Albie Sachs is a retired Justice of the South African Constitutional Court. His career in human rights activism began in 1955 at the age of seventeen when, as a second year law student at the University of Cape Town, he took part in the Defiance of Unjust Laws Campaign. During the next 11 years, Justice Sachs worked as an activist and lawyer defending individuals targeted by apartheid laws. After several stints of detention and solitary confinement, Justice Sachs went into exile in 1966.  Following the first democratic elections in 1994, President Nelson Mandela appointed Justice Sachs to the newly established Constitutional Court, where he served for 15 years. He participated in landmark rulings, including declaring capital punishment a violation of the right to life as well as making it unconstitutional to prevent gay and lesbian people from marrying. The court also backed AIDS campaigners in 2002 by insisting that the government had a duty to provide HIV-positive pregnant women with drugs to reduce the risk of transmission to their newborn babies. Since his retirement from the Court, Justice Sachs has been a frequent visiting professor and has served as an advisor on matters of constitutional law. A prolific author, Justice Sachs has won two Alan Paton Awards, for Soft Vengeance of a Freedom Fighter and The Strange Alchemy of Life and Law. His latest book is We, the People: Insights of an Activist Judge.

 

Darren Walker is president of the Ford Foundation where is pioneering a model of disruptive philanthropy targeting the causes of inequality. In this role, he led the philanthropy committee that helped bring resolution to Detroit’s historic bankruptcy declaration and he also chairs the U.S. Impact Investing Alliance. Previously, he was vice president at the Rockefeller Foundation, managing the Rebuild New Orleans initiative after Hurricane Katrina, and Chief Operating Officer of the Abyssinian Development Corporation, overseeing a revitalization program of central Harlem. Walker also had a decade-long career in international law and finance. He is a member of the Commission on the Future of Riker’s Island, the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and numerous boards.  Walker was raised by a single mother in Ames and later Goose Creek, Texas, and was one of the first children to benefit from the Head Start Program. Educated exclusively in public schools, Walker received the “Distinguished Alumnus Award,” the highest honor given by his alma mater, the University of Texas at Austin. Walker was recently named one of Rolling Stones 25 People Shaping the Future.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of March 19, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Congratulations to NEST+m’s Grades 6-8 MathCounts Team. During this weekend’s statewide competition at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY NEST+m’s team finished #2 in New York State!  Congratulations to 8th graders Jerry Liang, Josephine Lee, and Ivan Mijackia,  7th grader Paul Gutkovich and 6th grader Davis Zong. Paul Gutkovich placed in the top 12 students in the state. Davis Zong placed 5th.

Learning Environment Survey: The DOE’s Annual survey closes this Friday March 23rd!
NEST+m’s Parent/Family Completion rate is presently reporting as 9% participation. If you have not yet done so, please complete the DOE’s Annual School Survey. Last year we had 65% family completion rate. Let’s Soar past 80%!

Though confidential in nature, your voice and feedback become part of the public’s understanding of how every member of our K-12 school community contributes to our students’ success. Questions are aligned to the DOE’s Framework for Great Schools. If you have any technical questions, please see Julie Longmuir or our new parent coordinator Lisa Seale Cruz.  For more on the survey, please see: http://schools.nyc.gov/Accountability/tools/survey/default.htm

For those of you who did not pick up your survey at Parent Teacher Conferences, you will receive the green envelope via the mail. You can also fill it out online; you will be able to look up your survey code once you start the process. Be sure to list our school as “New Explorations Into Science Technology and Math”. CLICK HERE to fill out the Parent Survey online today!

Building Hours
Please note: NEST+m opens for supervised activities at 7:00am. Our school day ends at 2:40pm. Students who participate in supervised after-school activities are welcome to stay past 2:40pm. Students who do not have a supervised after-school activity (clubs, teams, tutoring, meeting with teachers etc.) are expected to head home at the end of our instructional day. This will enable us to ensure that students are appropriately supervised.

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


The Week Ahead

Monday March 19th :10th Grade PSAT Day.

Tuesday, March 20th: 4:00pm, SLT in the Library

Wednesday March 21th:

  • SAT Day, 11th Grade
  • Grades 3-5 “The BioBus” in-house Field Trip

Thursday March 22nd: 5:30pm-7:30pm Upper Grades Play, “Mr. Burns, A Post Electric Play.”

Friday March 23:

  • Grades 3-5 Family Friday
  • 6:00pm-8:00pm, Upper Grades Play, “Mr. Burns, A Post Electric Play.”

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Pratt Young Scholars
Pratt Young Scholars  is a need-based, three-year scholarship program providing instruction in art and design with college preparation to motivated high school students. Through innovative and challenging studio experiences in the Institute’s youth programs, this scholarship provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to pursue advanced studies in art and design.

Scholars will participate in three years of required studio classes and electives exposing students to higher educational opportunities and careers in the creative fields. This scholarship, valued at $7,000, covers three years of studio instruction, all art materials for courses taken, year-round college access program, Summer Scholars courses in July, and guidance through the college application process.

Students entering 10th grade in the 2018-2019 school year are eligible to apply if they:

  • Attend a New York City public school
  • Demonstrate an interest in art and design
  • Are academically prepared, highly motivated, and have demonstrated persistence
  • Commit to attending classes on Wednesdays after school and Saturdays for three years (no exceptions), as well as July summer programs
  • Meet the income eligibility guidelines

APPLY ONLINE by March 29th, 2018.
For additional information and application instructions, visit www.pratt.edu/scholars.

Institute for Environmental Journalism
We’re proud to announce that InsideClimate News is launching the Institute for Environmental Journalism this summer in New YorkCity. The intensive three-week program is open to high school students and recent graduates and will take place July 9-27. If you are a motivated and curious teen who wants to learn reporting from award-winning journalists, please consider this program. We are currently accepting applications. Deadline is May 1, 2018.

Bronx Loaf 2018
Bronx Loaf 2018 is open and ready for business! This year the conference will be held Monday, July 9th to Saturday, July 14th. This will be our sixth summer (!)  providing students of all backgrounds a golden opportunity to:
-Workshop their creative writing with professional authors
-Collaborate and socialize with students from public, private, and charter schools
-Publish their writing in our anthology Breaking Bread 

This year we have workshops in Poetry, Memoir, Fiction, and Graphic Novel. Each workshop can accommodate up to 12 students. Act fast before all the seats fill up.

Students can apply at our website: www.bronxloaf.org, or by clicking on the following link: Bronx Loaf.  The deadline for applications is April 15th.

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

3T Summer Style Workshop
Naked Angels Theater Company’s (nakedangels.com) 6th annual free 3T Summer Style workshop will take place July 9-19th.  There will be an intro to filmmaking week and a week of writing for the theater.  Professional actors will be acting in the student writers’ work.  It is fast, fun, free, and freeing!  Please email 3T@nakedangels.com for more info and an application.  First come, first accepted!  Click here for more information.

NY Center for Children
The New York Center for Children is a non-for-profit, child-friendly center, providing free, comprehensive evaluation and therapy services to victims of child abuse and their families. We are currently accepting referrals for a 10-12 week support group beginning mid-March for adolescent female’s (ages 14-16) who have experienced sexual abuse. Participants must attend an intake appointment prior to beginning group and commit to attending every session. Please note that our services are completely free and confidential.
Attached is our flyer with more information about the group. For further information, please contact Leah Mansback at (212) 517-3012 ext 34.

Here are a variety of summer job listings:

Summer Jobs:
NYC Gov Jobs & Internships   American Camp Association

Girl Scout Camp Counselor Jobs….
http://www.gsneny.org/en/camp/summer-camp.html

92nd Street Y
https://external-92y.icims.com/jobs/1498/camp-counselors-%28summer-2018%29/job?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic&mobile=false&width=940&height=500&bga=true&needsRedirect=false&jan1offset=-300&jun1offset=-240

Paid Summer Intern: Tech Camp/entrepreneur
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=ldxBYXD8bSH9vAikAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Junior Summer Camp Counselor (NYC Parks)
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=bNfxa5d0noEU-kZNAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

NY Healing Justice-Liberation Summer Camp Internship
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=nbMjvPRVwyF3-v4VAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Downtown Camp-Manhattan Youth http://www.manhattanyouth.org/camps.aspx

Binghamton University Summer College
This summer, Binghamton University will hold two Binghamton Summer College sessions for academically talented students who have completed their sophomore or junior year:
Session 1: Sunday, July 8-Saturday, July 21
Session 2: Sunday, July 22- Saturday, July 28
The deadline to submit an application is May 1, but earlier applications are encouraged since programs have limited enrollment.

Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs 

For schedule, registration, and scholarship information, please visit our website. Deadline is April 1st.

Camp Cardiac and Camp Neuro
Scholarship and standard applications have just opened up for Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro 2018!

Run by medical students in over 30 cities nationwide with locations in Manhattan and Westchester County, Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro are 1-week summer day camps for high school students interested in exploring careers in medicine.

Students may learn more and apply by visiting http://www.campcardiac.org andhttp://www.campneuro.org.

In addition, you may download PDF flyers by clicking on the following links:
Camp Cardiac 2018 Flyer
Camp Neuro 2018 Flyer

Duke University Summer Session
Improve your college application and go to college while still in high school!

At Duke Summer Session, we are committed to providing high school students with the opportunity to be a college student over the summer at one of the world’s premier universities.  By attending our Summer College program, you will not only have the authentic college experience of living in Duke University’s dorms and taking credit-bearing classes alongside undergraduate students, but also the opportunity to accompany your college application with a letter of recommendation from a Duke instructor and transcript from Duke University – two substantive indicators that you have what it takes to thrive in an elite academic setting.

Courses fill up quickly, so apply online today:

Application for US Students

Columbia University Asian American Alliance
Columbia University Asian American Alliance is a nonprofit student-run organization at Columbia University.

We would like to invite NEST+m students to the 2018 Crossroads High School Conference: CONVERGE, our annual, one-day leadership conference for young Asian Americans. At Crossroads, we hope that Asian American youth of all Asian identities including Pacific Islanders will be given the opportunity to question, explain, and discuss aspects of their identity through workshops, a panel, and conversations with their peers. Our mission is to provide youth with the knowledge and skills necessary to organize their communities for social change and create communities to feel supported with it.

Please register at the following link: https://tinyurl.com/y85e9vmu. You can learn more about our conference at our website: aaacrossroads.com.

The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE)
The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE) is an annual event hosted by Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers for girls in grades 9-12. The event provides many exciting opportunities—students will participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak to professional women in various engineering industries.

Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building
Participation Fee: Early Bird (Before February 15th) – $10, Regular – $15
Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Should you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to contact me at swe.EEE@columbia.edu.

YMCA – Teen Summer Paid Internships
The Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs give curious kids an opportunity to dive into an architecture topic of interest and test out their own design ideas. Each program explores a different theme through art and building activities, design challenges, and special site visits. Summer Programs run five days (Monday-Friday), 9:00am-4:00pm at the Center for Architecture. A limited number of need-based scholarships are available.
2 weeks of professional development training (sessions are facilitated by industry professionals from Colgate, Univision, Uber, Memorial Sloan, HBO etc)
6 weeks at internship (participants are placed in their industry of choice*)
Each participant is paired to a mentor for the duration of the program
Participants receive 2 monthly metrocards + $300 clothing stipend + $1500 “working” stipend
www.teencareerconnection.org

NYU Journalisam – Summer 2018
Build your skills! Report, write, shoot, post…food, fashion, culture
Enrollment opens February 12
Visiting students welcome.
Classes for precollege and college students.
Courses scheduled to allow time for internships.
Housing available–come experience New York City!

Paid High School Internships
We are pleased to announce that Wave Hill is now accepting applications for our two paid High School Internship programs, the Forest Project and the Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship.
The Forest Project is open to current sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The seven-week program meets Mondays through Fridays from late June through August 21st, 2018. Interns work in small, supervised crews to help restore woodland areas at Wave Hill. The application deadline for this program is March 18th, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/forest-project/.

The Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship (WERM) is open to current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. This 14-month program provides a unique opportunity to work with local ecologists and participate in ecological research projects. WERM students learn content and develop basic research skills during their first summer through hands-on projects and coursework.  After building on their skills at weekend workshops during the academic year, students embark on a final research project under the guidance of a science mentor for their second summer. The application deadline for this program is April 1st, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/woodland-ecology-research-mentorship/
We have Scholarships for students for our Summer Programs in New York!!
We are glad to offer students a special 40% scholarship and discount (tuition is then $1,490 instead of $2,450) on our Summer 3-Week Summer Program “Discover New York Business and Finance”, which combines top level courses, company and financial institutions visits and guests speakers lectures.

Click here for more information:
https://www.cognitoforms.com/LCapital4/BFMSNYALLPROGRAMS2

Please find hereafter the brochure for our 3-Week Program:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0ikwJKoF7dTWGl3eFdDYU5MUXM/view?usp=sharing

August Writers’ Workshop
The School of The New York Times is excited to announce our new end-of-summer August Writers’ Workshop for rising middle and high school students (grades 7-12) of all writing abilities on August 13–17 in New York City. This week-long program helps students enhance their writing skills under the tutelage of some of the best writers in the world. Students will emerge with strengthened communication skills, confidence in their writing and a profound sense of the power of the written word and visual communication—all right before school starts! The August Writers’ Workshop is the perfect way to kick off the academic year and occurs right after our NYC Summer Academy.

Workshop Quick Facts
Date: August 13–17, 2018
Grade Eligibility: Rising 7-12
Click here for more information.
Click here to register.

Summer 2018 College Credit Courses at Baruch College
Current 10th and 11th graders can apply to enroll in one of the following college credit bearing courses for FREE:
Business Fundamentals – BUS 1011 (3 Credits)
Journalistic Writing – JRN 3050 (4 credits)
Cultural Anthropology – ANT 1001 (3 credits)
Critical Health Issues – HED 1911 (3 credits)
Program Details:
All courses will take place at Baruch College from July 5th – August 16th
Courses will be from Monday through Thursday from 9am – 2pm
Eligibility:
Be a current NYC public high school 10th or 11th grader
Have the following test scores: PSAT/SAT Verbal (Min. 480) OR English Language Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR  ACT English Score (Min. 20),  OR  Overall 80+ English average
Online Application: www.baruch.cuny.edu/collegenow. Deadline for application and ALL supporting documents: April 13th, 2018

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

Interested in medicine or engineering? 
We’re very excited to announce an upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, NY. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments.

We are now seeking applicants for our New York, NY program. Participants should be women in grades 10 and up with an expressed interest in science, medicine and/or engineering.

Applicants should fill out our online application in advance of the March 21, 2018 application deadline. Additional information can be found on our website: www.perryinitiative.org — The application may be accessed directly using the following link:http://perryinitiative.org/programs/student-online-application/ — More information and a printable flyer for this event can be found here.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C. Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life!

Please click here for more information: https://summer.gwu.edu/precollege
Please click here to apply: https://summer.gwu.edu/apply-precollege

Engineering Exploration Experience
This spring, Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers (SWE) will be hosting its annual Engineering Exploration Experience. The event will expose female high school students to the exciting career opportunities available in all branches of engineering. The event provides students with the opportunity to participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak with professional women in various engineering industries.

Registration will open within the next few weeks and will be on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Event Details:
Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building

Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
College Search Seminar (FREE) – 3/17, 10am-12pm – Register Here
May 5 SAT Prep Starts 3/17 – Enroll Here
Practice SAT/ACT Exam (FREE) – 3/24 – Register Here
Study Skills Seminar (FREE) – 4/21, 10am-12pm – Register Here
June 2 SAT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
June ACT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 4/28 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 5/19 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 6/2 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Finding Your Right Path Seminar (FREE) – 6/16, 10am-12pm – Register Here
Common App & Essay Workshop – 8/14 & 8/16, 6-9pm – Enroll Here
– Making College Affordable Seminar (FREE) – 9/8, 10am-12pm – Register Here

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog


CUNY LAW CLINICAL PROGRAM RANKED THIRD IN THE NATION

Faculty, students, and community partners collaborate to create singular clinical experience 

One of the best clinical programs in the nation can be found at the City University of New York School of Law, according to U.S. News & World Report rankings just released. We’re delighted to have the external validation of ranking #3 for the fourth year in a row, as we know the clinical experience at CUNY Law is unique and exceptional.

I commend not only our outstanding faculty for their contributions to building our clinical programs, but also our students, staff, and the community organizations and members we partner with in our clinics. Together, you make our clinics extraordinary. What makes them so singular, you ask?

Here are three reasons our clinics are at the top of the list.

 

Incredible Collaboration

Our faculty and students collaborate with each other and with community stakeholders to improve the quality, value, and accessibility of legal representation in the areas that need it most. The work of our clinics is sustained, focused, and driven by a commitment to bridging the gap where there is unmet legal need.

Embedded in Community

Our faculty and students are in the best position to generate impact; many of them entered the legal field to advocate on behalf of their own families, communities, and needs. CUNY Law is part of the most diverse neighborhood and network in the nation. We are deeply connected to nonprofits, grassroots movements, and community organizers engaged with every social justice issue at the local level and on the world stage. These relationships guide who we represent, what cases we take, what advocacy strategies we employ, and how we engage with community leaders and groups as well as individual clients.

Commitment to Process

We take a creative, full-spectrum approach to addressing client needs with a variety of legal tools – from litigation to working with organizers, from community education to participating in the legislative process. Our clinics help students establish a “Plan, Do, Reflect” approach to their work, encouraging them to spend as much time reflecting on their service as they do preparing, a practice we find vital in our efforts to dismantle and disrupt systems of oppression – and to avoid perpetuating them.

I couldn’t be more proud or excited about the work our clinics and students are doing. We truly believe that our immersive approach to experiential learning is what enables our graduates to excel in whatever area of practice becomes their vocation.

In solidarity,

Mary Lu Bilek


York College/CUNY Launching MSW Program

York College of the City University of New York is proud to announce that in fall 2018 it will launch a Master of Social Work (MSW) program and is currently enrolling students for this exciting program. The York College MSW is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Queens and will prepare students for careers in this in-demand field.

“The introduction of York’s MSW program in Queens, is creating opportunities for students interested in health and human services; and for the regional and greater New York City area, to meet the needs of the communities in improving healthcare and service delivery,” said Dr. Panayiotis Meleties, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at York College. “It was identified as one of the priority graduate programs York had been aiming to launch.”

Professor Selena T. Rodgers concurs.

“The M.S.W. Program at CUNY York College is the result of alumni advocacy and the support of Dr. Marcia V. Keizs, president of York College, Provost Panayiotis Meleties, community leaders, agency partners, past and present elected officials and a cadre of York College community members, ” said Dr. Rodgers, founding director of the program. “Now our undergraduate scholars in Social Work as well as students from elsewhere, have the option to do their Master of Social Work studies at York.”

The MSW is part of President Marcia V. Keizs’ goal of growing the college academically with a number of niche master’s in the health, business and human services area.

 


Fashion Show Celebrates Leaders from African Countries

Charles Pryor, Dean of Student Engagement

Charles Pryor, Dean of Student Engagement, on the walk during the fashion show.

On March 14 the Office of Compliance and Diversity presented Kings, Queens, & Heroes of the African Diaspora Fashion Show. Participating faculty, staff, and students each represented a different African country and modeled African-inspired fashion from designer Kevin Odoi of MAGKOAFRIK. Yolelda Ira did the make-up.

At the end of the cat walk, participants gave a brief presentation about a king, queen, or other noteworthy person from their assigned country who made a significant contribution. The fashion show was an extended celebration of Guttman’s Black History Month and also highlighted the contributions of women in the African diaspora as part of Women’s History Month.

The event encouraged students to recognize and celebrate influential kings, queens, and heroes of the African Diaspora whom they can look to as models. They also met a local fashion designer from Africa and made lasting connections with diverse faculty and staff through a shared co-curricular activity.

Kevin Odoi

Kevin Odoi, fashion designer, with Tiffany Bailey-Gilles, Academic Internship Specialist.

View photos from the Fashion Show.

 

 


Baruch College Hosts First-Ever Alumni-Student Trading Competition

Championship-winning Students and Alumni Team Up for Simulated Market Challenge

The Director of the Subotnick Center, Dr. Trevor Moores (second left), with the first-place team at the Baruch College Alumni-Student Trading Competition: (From left to right) Jonathan Kay (MBA ’89); Bell Chen ’19; and Yinheng Li ’18

The inaugural Baruch Alumni-Student Trading Competition was held on March 10 where Baruch College alumni teamed up with current undergraduate and graduate students in a simulated market challenge. The event was hosted by Baruch College’s Subotnick Financial Services Center in collaboration with the Office for Alumni Relations.

The students who competed at this event were selected by Professor Jarrod Pickens, a mathematics lecturer who recently coached several trading teams to success. Many of the event participants, called “trading whiz kids” by the Wall Street Journal, are Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics or Master of Financial Engineering Program students who battle at national trading competitions such as the Rotman International Trading Competition, Traders@MIT, Datathon, the International Association for Quantitative Finance competition, and the University of Chicago Midwest Trading Competition.

“The competition was an opportunity for alumni to meet with the championship-winning students that have put Baruch’s name up in headlines, and to have some fun competing alongside them,” said Trevor Moores, director of the Subotnick Financial Services Center. “Events that bring alumni and students together can often be inspiring for both sides, and we intend to run the competition again next year.”

The competition took place in The Wasserman Trading Floor, which has 55 workstations that provides access to key trading software including Bloomberg, FactSet, and S&P Capital IQ.

Winning Teams

Each student who finished in first, second and third place at the Baruch Alumni-Student Trading Competition respectively earned a Baruch scholarship for $1,000, $750, and $500. Additionally, each student and alumnus who worked on a winning team was given a trophy. The top-three teams were:

First place: Jonathan Kay (MBA ’89) with students Yinheng Li (’18) and Bell Chen (’19)
Second place: Carl Schmidt (MS ’10) with students Harish Reddy (’18) and Thomas Maltese (’20)
Third place: Leslie Seff (MBA ’80) with students Raymond Wong (’18) and Suguru Kaneda (’19)

Connecting Alums and Students

Janet B. Rossbach, director of alumni relations and volunteer engagement at Baruch College, is excited to make this competition a traditional event. “The Baruch Alumni-Student Trading Competition was a wonderful way to engage a diverse group of alumni with a common passion for trading and being active members of the Baruch community,” Rossbach added. “It was a great example of how we are developing new means for our 140,000 alumni to engage with the College as mentors, speakers, volunteers, and contributors to today’s student experience.”

# # #

 


Professor Sara Reguer’s ‘Opinionated’ Perspective Illuminates the Struggles and Victories of Jewish Women

Her recent book, Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman, examines Judaism and Jewish culture through a feminist lens.

<p><em>Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman</em> collects the best of Professor Sara Reguer's 20 years of articles and essays that originally appeared in The Jewish Press. The cover was designed by her husband, Raffaele Fodde.</p>

Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman collects the best of Professor Sara Reguer’s 20 years of articles and essays that originally appeared in The Jewish Press. The cover was designed by her husband, Raffaele Fodde.

 

Judaic Studies Chair Sara Reguer elicits laughter and nods of agreement from the packed room at the Brooklyn College Student Center, where she read excerpts from her latest book, Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman (Academic Studies Press 2017) on March 8. The book is a collection of her articles and essays originally printed in a biweekly column in The Jewish Press over the past 20 years.

The reading was the first in a series sponsored by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, highlighting the scholarship of accomplished women in a wide range of fields. The event was co-sponsored by the Department of Africana StudiesDepartment of FilmDepartment of History, Department of Judaic Studies, Department of Political ScienceDepartment of Sociology, the Ethyle R. Wolfe Institute for the Humanities, the School of Education, the Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism, and the Women’s Center.

“Over 30 years ago, when I was scholar-in-residence at the Homowack Lodge, I was approached by a smiling older woman who complimented me on the lecture I had just delivered on the Biblical women,” Reguer recalls, discussing the origins of Opinionated. “‘Let me introduce myself,’ she said. ‘My name is Irene Klass. My husband and I own The Jewish Press, and I would like you to write a column for us.'”

Reguer was taken aback by the offer, realizing that The Jewish Press is what she describes as a “right-wing, conservative publication,” and she is a “Modern Orthodox Jewish feminist with an educated Litvak (Eastern European rationalist) approach to Judaism.” However, the Klasses insisted, reserving the right to choose not to publish any articles that they thought might have been too radical for print. Reguer, herself, reserved the right to guarantee that whichever articles they did choose to publish would leave her progressive ideology intact. Both parties agreed to the terms.

“Over the years, there were only five columns—five, okay?—that were totally rejected. Four of which I included in Opinionated,” Reguer says as the audience laughs.

 

<p>Professor and Department of Judaic Studies Chair Sara Reguer reads excerpts from <em>Opinionated</em> at an event held in her honor at the Brooklyn College Student Center.</p>

Professor and Department of Judaic Studies Chair Sara Reguer reads excerpts from Opinionated at an event held in her honor at the Brooklyn College Student Center.

 

Reguer’s strong take on issues relating to Jewish politics are informed by her upbringing. Her father was from Jewish Lithuania, which is modern-day Belarus, and a graduate of one of the leading Yeshiva academies in Eastern Europe. He was almost killed during World War I, a matter that Reguer examines in detail in her book, My Father’s Journey: A Memoir of Lost Lithuanian Jewish Worlds (Academic Studies Press 2015). After receiving permission from Reguer’s rabbi grandfather, her father traveled to Mandate Palestine (which refers to the British mandate that created this territory in 1922) for study, and then eventually immigrated to the United States in 1929—just in time for the Great Depression.

Her mother was born in Poland and grew up in Montreal after her father sent for her and the rest of her family, following his migration. Her parents met and married in 1936 in Brooklyn, where Reguer was born. Her father returned to Europe once to visit his family during this time, and it was the last time her family members saw these relative because in 1939, Adolf Hitler came into power. Reguer’s grandfather, and all of her aunts, uncles, and cousins were murdered by Hitler’s forces during the Shoah, which is the Hebrew word for “catastrophe” meant to describe the horrors of the Holocaust.

Reguer attended the Ramaz School, a “coeducational Jewish Modern Orthodox Day School,” on scholarship, an hour away from her home in Washington Heights, where her family lived at the time. She recalls that it was a school for rich children. “I had a chip on my shoulder right from the start,” she says. “Everyone went to Florida or the Bahamas for the Chanukah holiday. I was lucky if I got a new coat!”

After graduating, attended City College, where she studied pre-med and pre-law, and received her Bachelor of Arts, with honors, in history and political science; Yeshiva University, where she received her Bachelor of Religious Education; and Columbia University, where she received a certificate from the Middle East Institute, a Master of Arts in Middle East history, and a Ph.D. in history. Reguer’s father, a professor of biblical studies, encouraged her to become an educator.

 

<p>In her course, 'The Jewish Woman,' Reguer examines Judaism and Jewish womanhood from a feminist perspective. 'Aguna' is Hebrew for 'anchored,' describing a Jewish woman's status in marriage. 'Get' is a Jewish divorce document.</p>

In her course, ‘The Jewish Woman,’ Reguer examines Judaism and Jewish womanhood from a feminist perspective. ‘Aguna’ is Hebrew for ‘anchored,’ describing a Jewish woman’s status in marriage. ‘Get’ is a Jewish divorce document.

 

Having served as head of Judaic studies for almost 32 years, Reguer is Brooklyn College’s longest standing chair. It is a labor borne of love, but also one borne of a profound sense of commitment and duty. Behind her stands a story of catastrophe and triumph, which she tries to preserve even as there are present-day attempts to erase the testimonies documenting the great violence that was inflicted upon her people from the annals of history.

Reguer, a Tow Foundation Fellow, is a renowned expert in Mandate Palestine/modern Israel, the history of Jewish women, Italian Jewry, and the Jews of the Middle East and North Africa. One of the most crucial aspects of Reguer’s work is illuminating the fact that Jewish people are not a monolith, that there are as many opinions and positions within Jewish societies about politics and religion as there are people within those societies. In her course, “The Jewish Woman,” Reguer examines Judaism from a feminist point of view, noting that while there are still some ways in the religion that are unfair with regard to the rights of a woman’s sovereignty, such as in the case of divorces, where women are not permitted to petition for divorce, but men are, Judaism is one of the few religions that permitted women to run their own businesses, earn and keep their own money and use it in the manner they chose, and inherit, own, and bequeath property.

“When I read the Bible, I look at what the text actually says,” she shares, “and not what later commentators, who were all men, who lived 1,000 years later, have to say about it. I feel very strongly that a lot of things that happened in Jewish societies to hold women down were done sort of subconsciously by the male scholars and leaders trying to work out how to survive as a minority group, surrounded by people who didn’t particularly like us, and perhaps inadvertently came to the conclusion that women should be in the home. What they didn’t realize when they did this was that women would become the leading economic force in every single community—until fairly modern times. So that kind of counterbalanced the social issues that limited women’s autonomy.”

 

<p>Caption: Reguer reads an excerpt about biblical Jewish marriage and divorce from <em>Opinionated</em>, and uses it as a discussion point in class.</p>

Reguer reads an excerpt about biblical Jewish marriage and divorce from Opinionated, and uses it as a discussion point in class.

 

Judaic studies is smaller now than it once was at the college, and Reguer works to raise the profile and resources of the department because she believes it is one of the most vital areas of study, particularly in these fraught sociopolitical times.

“Judaic studies is one of the most interdisciplinary fields that you can find,” she says. “Some of us are trained as historians; others are in religious studies; others teach Hebrew literatures and Jewish languages. We cross over into philosophy, political science, sociology, psychology, economics, anthropology, music, and the arts. We practically invented the film industry! We are all over the world. The Jewish diaspora is in just about every geographic location, taking on the characteristics of the larger culture while maintaining our own identities and traditions—which means that we can serve as an example for how a minority group can recreate itself and survive.”

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Professor Sara Reguer’s ‘Opinionated’ Perspective Illuminates the Struggles and Victories of Jewish Women

Her recent book, Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman, examines Judaism and Jewish culture through a feminist lens.

<p><em>Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman</em> collects the best of Professor Sara Reguer's 20 years of articles and essays that originally appeared in The Jewish Press. The cover was designed by her husband, Raffaele Fodde.</p>

Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman collects the best of Professor Sara Reguer’s 20 years of articles and essays that originally appeared in The Jewish Press. The cover was designed by her husband, Raffaele Fodde.

 

Judaic Studies Chair Sara Reguer elicits laughter and nods of agreement from the packed room at the Brooklyn College Student Center, where she read excerpts from her latest book, Opinionated: The World View of a Jewish Woman (Academic Studies Press 2017) on March 8. The book is a collection of her articles and essays originally printed in a biweekly column in The Jewish Press over the past 20 years.

The reading was the first in a series sponsored by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, highlighting the scholarship of accomplished women in a wide range of fields. The event was co-sponsored by the Department of Africana StudiesDepartment of FilmDepartment of History, Department of Judaic Studies, Department of Political ScienceDepartment of Sociology, the Ethyle R. Wolfe Institute for the Humanities, the School of Education, the Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism, and the Women’s Center.

“Over 30 years ago, when I was scholar-in-residence at the Homowack Lodge, I was approached by a smiling older woman who complimented me on the lecture I had just delivered on the Biblical women,” Reguer recalls, discussing the origins of Opinionated. “‘Let me introduce myself,’ she said. ‘My name is Irene Klass. My husband and I own The Jewish Press, and I would like you to write a column for us.'”

Reguer was taken aback by the offer, realizing that The Jewish Press is what she describes as a “right-wing, conservative publication,” and she is a “Modern Orthodox Jewish feminist with an educated Litvak (Eastern European rationalist) approach to Judaism.” However, the Klasses insisted, reserving the right to choose not to publish any articles that they thought might have been too radical for print. Reguer, herself, reserved the right to guarantee that whichever articles they did choose to publish would leave her progressive ideology intact. Both parties agreed to the terms.

“Over the years, there were only five columns—five, okay?—that were totally rejected. Four of which I included in Opinionated,” Reguer says as the audience laughs.

 

<p>Professor and Department of Judaic Studies Chair Sara Reguer reads excerpts from <em>Opinionated</em> at an event held in her honor at the Brooklyn College Student Center.</p>

Professor and Department of Judaic Studies Chair Sara Reguer reads excerpts from Opinionated at an event held in her honor at the Brooklyn College Student Center.

 

Reguer’s strong take on issues relating to Jewish politics are informed by her upbringing. Her father was from Jewish Lithuania, which is modern-day Belarus, and a graduate of one of the leading Yeshiva academies in Eastern Europe. He was almost killed during World War I, a matter that Reguer examines in detail in her book, My Father’s Journey: A Memoir of Lost Lithuanian Jewish Worlds (Academic Studies Press 2015). After receiving permission from Reguer’s rabbi grandfather, her father traveled to Mandate Palestine (which refers to the British mandate that created this territory in 1922) for study, and then eventually immigrated to the United States in 1929—just in time for the Great Depression.

Her mother was born in Poland and grew up in Montreal after her father sent for her and the rest of her family, following his migration. Her parents met and married in 1936 in Brooklyn, where Reguer was born. Her father returned to Europe once to visit his family during this time, and it was the last time her family members saw these relative because in 1939, Adolf Hitler came into power. Reguer’s grandfather, and all of her aunts, uncles, and cousins were murdered by Hitler’s forces during the Shoah, which is the Hebrew word for “catastrophe” meant to describe the horrors of the Holocaust.

Reguer attended the Ramaz School, a “coeducational Jewish Modern Orthodox Day School,” on scholarship, an hour away from her home in Washington Heights, where her family lived at the time. She recalls that it was a school for rich children. “I had a chip on my shoulder right from the start,” she says. “Everyone went to Florida or the Bahamas for the Chanukah holiday. I was lucky if I got a new coat!”

After graduating, attended City College, where she studied pre-med and pre-law, and received her Bachelor of Arts, with honors, in history and political science; Yeshiva University, where she received her Bachelor of Religious Education; and Columbia University, where she received a certificate from the Middle East Institute, a Master of Arts in Middle East history, and a Ph.D. in history. Reguer’s father, a professor of biblical studies, encouraged her to become an educator.

 

<p>In her course, 'The Jewish Woman,' Reguer examines Judaism and Jewish womanhood from a feminist perspective. 'Aguna' is Hebrew for 'anchored,' describing a Jewish woman's status in marriage. 'Get' is a Jewish divorce document.</p>

In her course, ‘The Jewish Woman,’ Reguer examines Judaism and Jewish womanhood from a feminist perspective. ‘Aguna’ is Hebrew for ‘anchored,’ describing a Jewish woman’s status in marriage. ‘Get’ is a Jewish divorce document.

 

Having served as head of Judaic studies for almost 32 years, Reguer is Brooklyn College’s longest standing chair. It is a labor borne of love, but also one borne of a profound sense of commitment and duty. Behind her stands a story of catastrophe and triumph, which she tries to preserve even as there are present-day attempts to erase the testimonies documenting the great violence that was inflicted upon her people from the annals of history.

Reguer, a Tow Foundation Fellow, is a renowned expert in Mandate Palestine/modern Israel, the history of Jewish women, Italian Jewry, and the Jews of the Middle East and North Africa. One of the most crucial aspects of Reguer’s work is illuminating the fact that Jewish people are not a monolith, that there are as many opinions and positions within Jewish societies about politics and religion as there are people within those societies. In her course, “The Jewish Woman,” Reguer examines Judaism from a feminist point of view, noting that while there are still some ways in the religion that are unfair with regard to the rights of a woman’s sovereignty, such as in the case of divorces, where women are not permitted to petition for divorce, but men are, Judaism is one of the few religions that permitted women to run their own businesses, earn and keep their own money and use it in the manner they chose, and inherit, own, and bequeath property.

“When I read the Bible, I look at what the text actually says,” she shares, “and not what later commentators, who were all men, who lived 1,000 years later, have to say about it. I feel very strongly that a lot of things that happened in Jewish societies to hold women down were done sort of subconsciously by the male scholars and leaders trying to work out how to survive as a minority group, surrounded by people who didn’t particularly like us, and perhaps inadvertently came to the conclusion that women should be in the home. What they didn’t realize when they did this was that women would become the leading economic force in every single community—until fairly modern times. So that kind of counterbalanced the social issues that limited women’s autonomy.”

 

<p>Caption: Reguer reads an excerpt about biblical Jewish marriage and divorce from <em>Opinionated</em>, and uses it as a discussion point in class.</p>

Reguer reads an excerpt about biblical Jewish marriage and divorce from Opinionated, and uses it as a discussion point in class.

 

Judaic studies is smaller now than it once was at the college, and Reguer works to raise the profile and resources of the department because she believes it is one of the most vital areas of study, particularly in these fraught sociopolitical times.

“Judaic studies is one of the most interdisciplinary fields that you can find,” she says. “Some of us are trained as historians; others are in religious studies; others teach Hebrew literatures and Jewish languages. We cross over into philosophy, political science, sociology, psychology, economics, anthropology, music, and the arts. We practically invented the film industry! We are all over the world. The Jewish diaspora is in just about every geographic location, taking on the characteristics of the larger culture while maintaining our own identities and traditions—which means that we can serve as an example for how a minority group can recreate itself and survive.”

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Tatyana Kleyn’s “Still Living Undocumented” premieres at CCNY, March 20

“Still Undocumented,” the latest in CCNY education professor Tatyana Kleyn’s film trilogy on the plight of undocumented youth in New York, premieres on March 20.

Continuing her advocacy for undocumented youths, City College of New York education professor Tatyana Kleyn presents her latest co-production, “Still Living Undocumented: Five Years Later.” It premieres March 20 at a special screening, 6 – 7:30 p.m. at City College’s Aaron Davis Hall, that includes a panel discussion.

Liz Robbins, the New York Times Metro immigration reporter, will moderate the discussion on the documentary produced and directed by Kleyn and shot by independent filmmaker Ben Donnellon.

In addition to Kleyn and Donnellon, panelists include:

  • Farah, a member of The CCNY Dream Team;
  • Irving, CCNY Class of 2012 (BS, bilingual childhood education) and Class of 2018 (MS, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages);
  • Jacki, CCNY Class of 2009 (BS, bilingual childhood education) and Class of 2012 (MS, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages);
  • Jong-Min, an undocumented New Yorker.

Irving, Jacki and Jong-Min appeared in “Living Undocumented: High School, College and Beyond,” one of Kleyn’s widely acclaimed earlier films. Her other documentary was, “US. Una Vida, Dos Países.”

Other speakers at the screening include Rebeca Vargas, CEO of the US-Mexico Foundation and film artist M Erazo, a CCNY graduate and DACA recipient.  The screening is free and open to the public. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Although she has no formal filmmaking training, Kleyn, the director of bilingual education and TESOL Programs in CCNY’s School of Education, uses multimedia for her research and advocacy to great effect.

“Una Vida, Dos Países” and “Living Undocumented” have both received numerous screenings across Mexico and the United States to receptive audiences, including educators, students and mainstream viewers.

“The impact of the films has been amazing,” noted Kleyn, who is also faculty advisor to CCNY’s Dream Team. “Each film is an education tool and has an accompanying curriculum and resource guide for educators to implement and share with their students.”

Through her films Kleyn is making research public. By using the medium of film, she is taking issues beyond academia and presenting them to a wider audience.

About “Still Living Undocumented”
In 2012 “Living Undocumented” captured the realities of undocumented youth in New York City. At the same time the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was announced and drastically changed the lives of some of the people in the film. Five years later DACA is in jeopardy.  “Still Living Undocumented” follows three individuals from the first film to see how DACA has impacted some of their lives and left others outside of its reach.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Welcome Tour for matched students on March 15th at 5:15pm

If your child has been matched to NEST+m for fall 2018, please attend our Welcome Tour on Thursday, March 15th at 5:15pm.

Bring your child’s offer letter.

We look forward to seeing you there! Please RSVP HERE.


Dr. Harriet Fayne is Appointed as Lehman College’s Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Success

Dr. José Luis Cruz, president of Lehman College of The City University of New York, announced that after a national search of qualified candidates, he has selected Dr. Harriet Fayne as the College’s next provost and senior vice president for academic affairs and student success. The appointment is effective July 2, 2018.

“I am pleased to announce that after careful consideration of the search committee’s assessment, the responses received from the various constituencies that participated in the search process, and my own interactions with the finalists, I have recommended the appointment of Dr. Harriet Fayne,” President Cruz said in a statement to the Lehman community.

“In August 2016, I agreed to take on the role of interim provost eager to be part of a new administration committed to expanding Lehman’s reach in the Bronx,” Dr. Fayne said. “I’ve seen firsthand how the College community has been galvanized to bring the promise of opportunity to more young people in the borough. Now, almost two years later, I am both humbled and excited to be named provost, and to continue the work that will transform thousands of lives.”

Dr. Fayne has more than 30 years of experience in higher education, most recently as Lehman’s interim provost and senior vice president of academic affairs. Since being appointed in August 2016, she has been instrumental in helping establish a strong foundation for the College’s third presidency.

Previously, Dr. Fayne served as the dean of Lehman’s School of Education for five years. During her tenure, she provided effective leadership for the College in the areas of teacher preparation, practitioner inquiry, and has fostered both community partnerships and overall institutional growth.

Prior to joining Lehman, Dr. Fayne was dean of the School of Professional Studies at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio. Under her leadership, the School codified policies and identified opportunities across the campus to expand graduate offerings. Before serving as dean, Dr. Fayne chaired Otterbein’s education department for 16 years.

Dr. Fayne is well versed in the fields of educational psychology and higher education administration. Her work has been published in The Professional EducatorNew Directions for Teaching and LearningNetworks: An Online Journal for Teacher Research, and other professional journals. She earned a B.A. from Barnard College; an M.A.T. from Harvard University; an M.A. and M.Ed. from Teachers College, Columbia University; and a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Columbia University.

About Lehman College: The City University of New York’s only four-year college in the Bronx, serving the borough and surrounding region as an intellectual, economic, and cultural center. Lehman provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.

 


Thomas Hull Appointed Assistant Vice President for the Office of Information Technology and Chief Information Officer at Queens College

— With More than 20 Years in Academic, Research, and Corporate Technology, Hull is an Award-Winning Administrator Who Has Led the Design and Implementation of Innovative Computing Services; Will Manage the College’s
Office of Information Technology ​– 

Queens, N.Y., March 12, 2018—Queens College has announced the appointment of Thomas A. Hull as new Assistant Vice President for the Office of Information Technology and Chief Information Officer, following a national search. Hull was most recently the chief information officer and chief technology officer at Florida Polytechnic University and at the Moffitt Cancer Center, affiliates of the University of Southern Florida. He is replacing the outgoing assistant vice president and chief information officer, Claudia Colbert, who managed the college’s large and diverse platform of computing and communication services.

With digital change an ever present challenge to college faculty, students, and staff, Hull brings extensive experience in designing new and complex systems that support laboratories, data centers, digital media labs, learning commons, and other components of modern university needs. He has managed strategic technology plans for academic computing, instituted responsive management and computing service procedures and policies, and introduced emerging technologies. At Florida Polytechnic University, a new institution, he was responsible for building its computing from the ground up, including the largest 3D printing innovation center in the United States—a project for which he received a national award.

“In today’s world, our ability to deliver up-to-date computing and communication facilities is key to fulfilling our promise of providing excellent public education. Thomas Hull will help us face and meet the challenges in this dynamic area,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “We also count ourselves very fortunate to see our Office of Information Technology pass from one set of very capable hands to another. We are deeply grateful to retiring AVP and CIO Claudia Colbert for her nearly five years of service to the college and for the many initiatives that she spearheaded while here,” he added.

Hull has received national recognition for his vision and work in academic computing, which includes his years at Pace University, Siena College, and Virginia Commonwealth University Medical College of Virginia. He is an expert in Blackboard, Campus Portal, DegreeWorks, cloud services, and other arenas essential to higher education.

He is also active in professional organizations and consortia (including as chief technology officer of the University Healthsystem Consortium of 115 academic medical centers), and is an executive consultant to numerous colleges and universities as well as the New York State Board of Cooperative Education Services.

“Thomas Hull brings to Queens College an impressive combination of  technical expertise, business sense, and academic experience,” said William Keller, Vice President for Finance and Administration. “He is the right person to manage this critical office as we work to identify and implement solutions to QC’s information technology needs.”

“I am very impressed with Queens College and am excited to be joining such an excellent community, leadership and OIT group.  I look forward to contributing to the future of the institution with innovation and technology for creating new possibilities for students, faculty and staff,” said AVP/CIO Hull.

Hull holds a BA in computer information science from the State University of New York at Potsdam and an MS in computer engineering from Syracuse University.

About the Queens College Office of Information Technology
The Queens College Office of Information Technology (OIT) manages computing and communication technologies for the entire campus. It maintains computer labs and a help desk for students, faculty, and staff. OIT also provides wireless, network, telephone, web, audio-video, and digital media services, with responsibility for managing CUNYfirst, campus email, CUNY Portal, Blackboard, and authentication services for Lynda.com and Google for Education. It ensures compliance with CUNY’s Information Technology security policy.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Letter to NEST+M Students And Families From Mark Berkowitz, week of March 12, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Thank you for your presence and participation during our March parent-teacher conferences. Your partnership is essential!

DOE’s Annual Survey
If you have not yet done so, please complete the DOE’s Annual School Survey. We are seeking 100% participation! Though confidential in nature, your voice and feedback become part of the public’s understanding of our K-12 school community and contributes to our students’ success. Questions are aligned to the DOE’s Framework for Great Schools.

You can fill out the survey on paper, or you can fill it out online.

  • First, you will need to locate your code which is printed on the survey OR you can look up your code (our school is listed as New Explorations Into Science, Technology and Math). Once you click the link to begin the survey, you will be taken to a screen where you can look up your code.
  • To fill the survey out online, please visit: >>>>>> http://schools.nyc.gov/Accountability/tools/survey/default.htm <<<<<<<
  • You will be taking the “Parent & Guardian Survey”

Responses are due by March 23rd, 2018. If you have technical questions, please contact our Parent Coordinator, Lisa Seale Cruz, at lisasealecruz@nestmk12.net.

March 14th
Please see the following letters which were introduced last week regarding a possible student walkout from grades 6-12 students on Wednesday, March 14th  at 10:00am.

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


The Week Ahead

Tuesday, March 13th

  • Alvin Ailey Family Fun Night, 6-7:30 pm in the Auditorium. Fourth grade families. Must have signed up through PTA.

Wednesday, March 14th is Pi Day

  • The Middle Grade Math Team is hosting a Pi Day bake sale in the Lobby. Please drop off your baked (or bought) treats in the PTA Office on Wednesday morning, and please send your child with some money to purchase!

Thursday, March 15th

  • Game Night for LG students, sponsored by the Key Club. 3-5 pm, in the Cafeteria.
  • Welcome Tour for students matched to NEST+m for 9th grade. 5:15-6:15, in the Auditorium
    • Only matched students are invited; please bring your offer letter!

Friday, March 16th

  • Family Friday for K-2, starting at 8:30 am

Opportunities for NEST+m students

Princeton AI4ALL
Princeton AI4ALL is a high school summer program at Princeton University run in partnership with AI4ALL, a non-profit that runs summer camps in emerging technologies like artificial intelligence for underrepresented high school students. Our 3-week camp, starting July 22, 2018, provides technical exposure, hands-on experience working on exciting AI projects, and connections to role models and mentors from the AI field.

The application is open until March 19. Click here for more information.

Pratt Young Scholars
Pratt Young Scholars  is a need-based, three-year scholarship program providing instruction in art and design with college preparation to motivated high school students. Through innovative and challenging studio experiences in the Institute’s youth programs, this scholarship provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to pursue advanced studies in art and design.

Scholars will participate in three years of required studio classes and electives exposing students to higher educational opportunities and careers in the creative fields. This scholarship, valued at $7,000, covers three years of studio instruction, all art materials for courses taken, year-round college access program, Summer Scholars courses in July, and guidance through the college application process.

Students entering 10th grade in the 2018-2019 school year are eligible to apply if they:

  • Attend a New York City public school
  • Demonstrate an interest in art and design
  • Are academically prepared, highly motivated, and have demonstrated persistence
  • Commit to attending classes on Wednesdays after school and Saturdays for three years (no exceptions), as well as July summer programs
  • Meet the income eligibility guidelines

APPLY ONLINE by March 29th, 2018.
For additional information and application instructions, visit www.pratt.edu/scholars.

Institute for Environmental Journalism
We’re proud to announce that InsideClimate News is launching the Institute for Environmental Journalism this summer in New YorkCity. The intensive three-week program is open to high school students and recent graduates and will take place July 9-27. If you are a motivated and curious teen who wants to learn reporting from award-winning journalists, please consider this program. We are currently accepting applications. Deadline is May 1, 2018.

Bronx Loaf 2018
Bronx Loaf 2018 is open and ready for business! This year the conference will be held Monday, July 9th to Saturday, July 14th. This will be our sixth summer (!)  providing students of all backgrounds a golden opportunity to:
-Workshop their creative writing with professional authors
-Collaborate and socialize with students from public, private, and charter schools
-Publish their writing in our anthology Breaking Bread 

This year we have workshops in Poetry, Memoir, Fiction, and Graphic Novel. Each workshop can accommodate up to 12 students. Act fast before all the seats fill up.

Students can apply at our website: www.bronxloaf.org, or by clicking on the following link: Bronx Loaf.  The deadline for applications is April 15th.

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

3T Summer Style Workshop
Naked Angels Theater Company’s (nakedangels.com) 6th annual free 3T Summer Style workshop will take place July 9-19th.  There will be an intro to filmmaking week and a week of writing for the theater.  Professional actors will be acting in the student writers’ work.  It is fast, fun, free, and freeing!  Please email 3T@nakedangels.com for more info and an application.  First come, first accepted!  Click here for more information.

NY Center for Children
The New York Center for Children is a non-for-profit, child-friendly center, providing free, comprehensive evaluation and therapy services to victims of child abuse and their families. We are currently accepting referrals for a 10-12 week support group beginning mid-March for adolescent female’s (ages 14-16) who have experienced sexual abuse. Participants must attend an intake appointment prior to beginning group and commit to attending every session. Please note that our services are completely free and confidential.
Attached is our flyer with more information about the group. For further information, please contact Leah Mansback at (212) 517-3012 ext 34.

Here are a variety of summer job listings:

Summer Jobs:
NYC Gov Jobs & Internships   American Camp Association

Girl Scout Camp Counselor Jobs….
http://www.gsneny.org/en/camp/summer-camp.html

92nd Street Y
https://external-92y.icims.com/jobs/1498/camp-counselors-%28summer-2018%29/job?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic&mobile=false&width=940&height=500&bga=true&needsRedirect=false&jan1offset=-300&jun1offset=-240

Paid Summer Intern: Tech Camp/entrepreneur
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=ldxBYXD8bSH9vAikAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Junior Summer Camp Counselor (NYC Parks)
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=bNfxa5d0noEU-kZNAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

NY Healing Justice-Liberation Summer Camp Internship
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=nbMjvPRVwyF3-v4VAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Downtown Camp-Manhattan Youth http://www.manhattanyouth.org/camps.aspx

Binghamton University Summer College
This summer, Binghamton University will hold two Binghamton Summer College sessions for academically talented students who have completed their sophomore or junior year:
Session 1: Sunday, July 8-Saturday, July 21
Session 2: Sunday, July 22- Saturday, July 28
The deadline to submit an application is May 1, but earlier applications are encouraged since programs have limited enrollment.

Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs 

For schedule, registration, and scholarship information, please visit our website.Deadline is April 1st.

Camp Cardiac and Camp Neuro
Scholarship and standard applications have just opened up for Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro 2018!

Run by medical students in over 30 cities nationwide with locations in Manhattan and Westchester County, Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro are 1-week summer day camps for high school students interested in exploring careers in medicine.

Students may learn more and apply by visiting http://www.campcardiac.org andhttp://www.campneuro.org.

In addition, you may download PDF flyers by clicking on the following links:
Camp Cardiac 2018 Flyer
Camp Neuro 2018 Flyer

Duke University Summer Session
Improve your college application and go to college while still in high school!

At Duke Summer Session, we are committed to providing high school students with the opportunity to be a college student over the summer at one of the world’s premier universities.  By attending our Summer College program, you will not only have the authentic college experience of living in Duke University’s dorms and taking credit-bearing classes alongside undergraduate students, but also the opportunity to accompany your college application with a letter of recommendation from a Duke instructor and transcript from Duke University – two substantive indicators that you have what it takes to thrive in an elite academic setting.

Courses fill up quickly, so apply online today:

Application for US Students

Columbia University Asian American Alliance
Columbia University Asian American Alliance is a nonprofit student-run organization at Columbia University.

We would like to invite NEST+m students to the 2018 Crossroads High School Conference: CONVERGE, our annual, one-day leadership conference for young Asian Americans. At Crossroads, we hope that Asian American youth of all Asian identities including Pacific Islanders will be given the opportunity to question, explain, and discuss aspects of their identity through workshops, a panel, and conversations with their peers. Our mission is to provide youth with the knowledge and skills necessary to organize their communities for social change and create communities to feel supported with it.

Please register at the following link: https://tinyurl.com/y85e9vmu. You can learn more about our conference at our website: aaacrossroads.com.

The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE)
The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE) is an annual event hosted by Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers for girls in grades 9-12. The event provides many exciting opportunities—students will participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak to professional women in various engineering industries.

Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building
Participation Fee: Early Bird (Before February 15th) – $10, Regular – $15
Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Should you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to contact me at swe.EEE@columbia.edu.

YMCA – Teen Summer Paid Internships
The Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs give curious kids an opportunity to dive into an architecture topic of interest and test out their own design ideas. Each program explores a different theme through art and building activities, design challenges, and special site visits. Summer Programs run five days (Monday-Friday), 9:00am-4:00pm at the Center for Architecture. A limited number of need-based scholarships are available.
2 weeks of professional development training (sessions are facilitated by industry professionals from Colgate, Univision, Uber, Memorial Sloan, HBO etc)
6 weeks at internship (participants are placed in their industry of choice*)
Each participant is paired to a mentor for the duration of the program
Participants receive 2 monthly metrocards + $300 clothing stipend + $1500 “working” stipend
www.teencareerconnection.org

NYU Journalisam – Summer 2018
Build your skills! Report, write, shoot, post…food, fashion, culture
Enrollment opens February 12
Visiting students welcome.
Classes for precollege and college students.
Courses scheduled to allow time for internships.
Housing available–come experience New York City!

Paid High School Internships
We are pleased to announce that Wave Hill is now accepting applications for our two paid High School Internship programs, the Forest Project and the Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship.
The Forest Project is open to current sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The seven-week program meets Mondays through Fridays from late June through August 21st, 2018. Interns work in small, supervised crews to help restore woodland areas at Wave Hill. The application deadline for this program is March 18th, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/forest-project/.

The Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship (WERM) is open to current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. This 14-month program provides a unique opportunity to work with local ecologists and participate in ecological research projects. WERM students learn content and develop basic research skills during their first summer through hands-on projects and coursework.  After building on their skills at weekend workshops during the academic year, students embark on a final research project under the guidance of a science mentor for their second summer. The application deadline for this program is April 1st, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/woodland-ecology-research-mentorship/
We have Scholarships for students for our Summer Programs in New York!!
We are glad to offer students a special 40% scholarship and discount (tuition is then $1,490 instead of $2,450) on our Summer 3-Week Summer Program “Discover New York Business and Finance”, which combines top level courses, company and financial institutions visits and guests speakers lectures.

Click here for more information:
https://www.cognitoforms.com/LCapital4/BFMSNYALLPROGRAMS2

Please find hereafter the brochure for our 3-Week Program:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0ikwJKoF7dTWGl3eFdDYU5MUXM/view?usp=sharing

August Writers’ Workshop
The School of The New York Times is excited to announce our new end-of-summer August Writers’ Workshop for rising middle and high school students (grades 7-12) of all writing abilities on August 13–17 in New York City. This week-long program helps students enhance their writing skills under the tutelage of some of the best writers in the world. Students will emerge with strengthened communication skills, confidence in their writing and a profound sense of the power of the written word and visual communication—all right before school starts! The August Writers’ Workshop is the perfect way to kick off the academic year and occurs right after our NYC Summer Academy.

Workshop Quick Facts
Date: August 13–17, 2018
Grade Eligibility: Rising 7-12
Click here for more information.
Click here to register.

Summer 2018 College Credit Courses at Baruch College
Current 10th and 11th graders can apply to enroll in one of the following college credit bearing courses for FREE:
Business Fundamentals – BUS 1011 (3 Credits)
Journalistic Writing – JRN 3050 (4 credits)
Cultural Anthropology – ANT 1001 (3 credits)
Critical Health Issues – HED 1911 (3 credits)
Program Details:
All courses will take place at Baruch College from July 5th – August 16th
Courses will be from Monday through Thursday from 9am – 2pm
Eligibility:
Be a current NYC public high school 10th or 11th grader
Have the following test scores: PSAT/SAT Verbal (Min. 480) OR English Language Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR  ACT English Score (Min. 20),  OR  Overall 80+ English average
Online Application: www.baruch.cuny.edu/collegenow. Deadline for application and ALL supporting documents: April 13th, 2018

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

Interested in medicine or engineering? 
We’re very excited to announce an upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, NY. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments.

We are now seeking applicants for our New York, NY program. Participants should be women in grades 10 and up with an expressed interest in science, medicine and/or engineering.

Applicants should fill out our online application in advance of the March 21, 2018 application deadline. Additional information can be found on our website: www.perryinitiative.org — The application may be accessed directly using the following link:http://perryinitiative.org/programs/student-online-application/ — More information and a printable flyer for this event can be found here.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C. Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life!

Please click here for more information: https://summer.gwu.edu/precollege
Please click here to apply: https://summer.gwu.edu/apply-precollege

Engineering Exploration Experience
This spring, Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers (SWE) will be hosting its annual Engineering Exploration Experience. The event will expose female high school students to the exciting career opportunities available in all branches of engineering. The event provides students with the opportunity to participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak with professional women in various engineering industries.

Registration will open within the next few weeks and will be on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Event Details:
Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building

Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
College Search Seminar (FREE) – 3/17, 10am-12pm – Register Here
May 5 SAT Prep Starts 3/17 – Enroll Here
Practice SAT/ACT Exam (FREE) – 3/24 – Register Here
Study Skills Seminar (FREE) – 4/21, 10am-12pm – Register Here
June 2 SAT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
June ACT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 4/28 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 5/19 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 6/2 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Finding Your Right Path Seminar (FREE) – 6/16, 10am-12pm – Register Here
Common App & Essay Workshop – 8/14 & 8/16, 6-9pm – Enroll Here
– Making College Affordable Seminar (FREE) – 9/8, 10am-12pm – Register Here

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog


Faculty Member Receives Photography Fellowship

Valdon Battice

Valdon Battice, Lecturer

Valdon Battice, Guttman Lecturer, has been awarded a 2018 En Foco Photography Fellowship for his ongoing visual-ethnographic book project Colombia: A Darker Shade of Black.

The En Foco Photography Fellowship is designed to support photographers of color who demonstrate the highest quality of work as determined by a photography panel of peers and industry professionals. The Photography Fellowship Program awards 10 Fellowships at $1,000 per artist, a Fellowship Group Exhibition, and features the Fellows in A Nueva Luz: Photographic Journal (print and online editions).

En Foco, Inc. is a non-profit that supports contemporary primarily U.S.-based photographers of African, Asian, Latino, Native American and Pacific Islander heritage. Founded in 1974, En Foco is an organization that nurtures and supports contemporary, fine art and documentary photographers of color and of diverse cultures; preserves and promotes its Permanent Collection; and is dedicated to creating and implementing public programs for underserved communities and the general public.


Employers and Organizations Recruit for Talent at the Starr Career Development Center’s Diversity Career Expo

Amazon, American Express, NYC Department of Finance and Ralph Lauren among the nearly 30 participants at the annual event

Baruch College undergraduates got an opportunity to present their skills and academic accomplishments to representatives from nearly 26 companies at the Starr Career Development Center’s Diversity Career Expo on Feb. 15. The annual event was held in collaboration with the Baruch College SEEK Department and Urban Male Leadership Academy (UMLA).

More than 600 students attended the spring 2018 Expo, the highest number since this event started three years ago. The Expo offered students a variety of ways to interact with employers such as a mini career fair, job search workshops and a keynote address. Among the companies who attended the Expo included: Amazon, American Express, Barclays, Brown Brothers Harriman, Google, iCrossing, Morgan Stanley, NYC Department of Education, R/GA, Ralph Lauren, SEO Career, and Teach for America.

Baruch Alum: Featured Keynote Speaker

Baruch SEEK and UMLA alum Jeffrey McClellan ’14, who works as an HCM associate at Goldman Sachs, opened the Diversity Career Expo as the keynote speaker. McClellan’s presentation was called “Leveraging Our Differences & Demystifying the Recruiting Process.” McClellan spoke along with Baruch student leader from SEEK and UMLA, Jeffrey Acosta ’18, who recently interned at Bank of America and will be working full-time at the financial institution after graduation.

Breakout Sessions with Special Programs

In addition to the mini-career fair where students interacted with employees from a variety of industries, the Diversity Career Expo offered special Meet-and-Greet breakout sessions. Students had the opportunity to hear more about the St. John’s University Ron Brown Law School Prep Program and The CUNY School of Law Pipeline to Justice Program.

Two job-search-strategy workshops, co-sponsored by the Students Veterans Association and by Student Disabilities Services, were also conducted. These workshops provided students with the opportunity to gain valuable insight on how to embrace their unique qualities and connect with some of the featured speakers from KPMG, Moody’s, Yelp, and TD Bank.

About Starr Career Development Center

The Starr Career Development Center at Baruch College provides comprehensive career services, skill development programs, internship and job search support for all Baruch undergraduate students. For more information regarding the Center, visit www.baruch.cuny.edu/careers.

# # #

 


Free Film Retrospective Series: Leading Ladies Who Sing

BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (BMCC TPAC), the longest-operating performance venue in lower Manhattan, proudly presents Leading Ladies Who Sing, a free event in the Scenes Through the Cinema Lens series scheduled for Tuesday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Marilyn Monroe from Leading Ladies Who Sing at BMCC TPAC

Leading Ladies Who Sing will showcase choice moments in cinema history when stars who can both act and sing are presented at their most glamorous. The event will focus on distinguished jazz singers like Abbey Lincoln, Peggy Lee and Billie Holiday, all of whom successfully made the transition to cinema, as well as timeless performances by singer/actresses including Judy Garland, Diana Ross and Marilyn Monroe.

Scenes Through the Cinema Lens is curated and hosted by Krin Gabbard, Professor of Comparative Literature and English at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and author of Hotter Than That: The Trumpet, Jazz, and American Culture.

Each Scenes Through the Cinema Lens screening is followed by a Question and Answer session moderated by Professor Gabbard, and all events are free. No reservations are necessary for Leading Ladies Who Sing. For more information, visit BMCC Tribeca PAC.

BMCC Tribeca PAC is Downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families and audiences of all ages. BMCC Tribeca PAC strives to present a broad global perspective through the presentation of high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. BMCC Tribeca PAC is located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue and West Street) and is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R subway lines as well as the New Jersey Path Train. For more information visit  www.tribecapac.org.


CUNY ASAP IS A MODEL FOR A NATIONAL POLICY TO FIGHT POVERTY THROUGH EDUCATION; RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES PUBLISHES ARTICLE

CUNY’s successful Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) initiative, a comprehensive program that has significantly boosted associate degree graduation rates, should be considered as a model for a national higher-education policy to fight poverty through educational attainment, according to an article co-authored by CUNY ASAP leaders and the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity.

“Bringing ASAP to national scale could be a transformative anti-poverty strategy with broad social and economic effects,” the article states. “Millions of students attend America’s community colleges every year with aspirations to create a better life for themselves and their families by earning a college degree. They deserve nothing less than the country’s collective best efforts to help them realize these goals building on proven, evidence-based practice.”

Published in the RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of Social Sciences, the article, “Postsecondary Pathways Out of Poverty: City University of New York Accelerated Study in Associate Programs and the Case for National Policy” is co-authored by Diana Strumbos, Director for Research and Evaluation for ASAP; Donna Linderman, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs;

and Carson C. Hicks, Deputy Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity. The article details a set of policy recommendations based on ASAP that could be implemented at a national scale.

“ASAP is an extraordinary program that has worked so well at CUNY that we are expanding it to 25,000 students by the 2018-19 academic year, are converting Bronx Community College to an ASAP institution for first-time, full-time freshmen, and have piloted a promising senior college version based on ASAP principles, Accelerate Complete Engage (ACE), at John Jay College for Criminal Justice, said Chancellor James B. Milliken.

“This proposal to recognize ASAP as the national model for attacking unacceptably low community-college graduation rates nationwide is an important and sensible contribution to efforts to fight poverty and increase college completion, which directly correlates to economic opportunity.”

The article’s authors note that the U.S. Department of Education has recognized ASAP as “an example of a promising intervention to increase low-income student success,” and say that members of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce announced a bill in September 2017, the Community College Student Success Act, to fund community colleges to “develop and implement programs modeled after ASAP to improve degree completion.” A national-level policy based on the ASAP model could be funded in several ways, including federal grants, that states or institutions could seek to implement or adapt ASAP-like programs, according to the article.

ASAP has sharply increased three-year associate degree attainment. The article notes that an analysis of the most recent five cohorts – Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, and Fall 2012 – found that ASAP students had a three-year graduation rate of 52.4 percent, 25.6 percentage points higher than the comparison group’s rate of 26.8 percent. At CUNY overall, the systemwide, three-year graduation rate at the community colleges has risen to 21.9% (Fall 2013 cohort) from 13.3% in the year before ASAP launched (Fall 2006 cohort), in part due to the growth and success of ASAP.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs Hosts the 2018 NASPAA-Batten Student Simulation Competition on Pandemic Crisis Management and Global Health Security

Baruch College students work to stop the impact of a fictitious deadly infectious disease threatening humanity

On Feb. 24, 36 graduate students from 14 universities deployed their strategic thinking and leadership capabilities in a global simulation competition to stop the next pandemic. The Marxe School at Baruch College hosted the northeast regional part of the 2018 NASPAA-Batten Student Simulation Competition—a partnership between the University of Virginia Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy and the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA). The topic was “Pandemic Crisis Management and Global Health Security.”

“We were delighted to serve as the Northeast U.S. Regional Host Site for this year’s global NASPAA-Batten policy simulation,” said David Birdsell, Dean of the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs at Baruch College. “Simulations provide students with the opportunity to practice the kinds of thinking and action that policymakers tackle in the real world: making sense of new information as it comes in over the transom, making decisions in the absence of certain knowledge, and constantly adjusting policy responses to meet evolving needs.”

Working to Save the World

This fast-paced, time-sensitive competition placed students in top leadership roles where they worked together to minimize the impact of a deadly infectious disease threatening humanity. Students worked in teams representing four different fictitious countries and assumed a variety of high-ranking roles, from Prime Minister to Minister of Public Health, as they navigated difficult policy decisions and their potential outcomes.

Two graduate students Ken Silverman and Sarah Mednick from the Marxe School’s Masters of International Affairs program represented Baruch College in the competition. Five Bachelor of Science in Public Affairs undergraduate students participated in the event.

Dean Birdsell added, “It was particularly rewarding to be one of four sites around the world offering undergraduates the opportunity to participate. Though they were not eligible for the competition, which is restricted to graduate students, they participated in exactly the same simulation, and our five BSPA students performed very well, providing strong support for including undergrads in future competitions.”

The on-site judges evaluated each team on simulation scores, negotiation skills, and written and oral presentations. All judges were from CUNY, with three from the Marxe School: Distinguished Lecturer and Director of the Center for Nonprofit Strategy and Management, James A. Krauskopf; Professor, Jonathan Engel; and Adjunct Professor, James McCarthy. The fourth was Assistant Professor, Minyoung Ku from John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Associate Professor, Anna D’Souza of the Marxe School acted as technical leader and facilitated simulation activities during the day of the competition.

During the week of March 5, a panel of prominent global “super judges” will convene to identify the winner and runner-up of the Global Simulation Competition that consisted of 563 students from 159 universities in 27 countries on five continents.

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The ReelAbilities Film Festival Returns to Lehman College on March 12 and 13

Lehman College will proudly host the 10th Annual ReelAbilities Film Festival: New York on March 12 and 13. All screenings will be held in the East Dining Room in the Music Building on campus. The festival is free and open to the public. All are welcome.

The 2018 festival will be shown at more than 30 other venues across all five boroughs, as well as venues on Long Island and in Westchester and Rockland counties, making it the most geographically accessible festival in the country. Utilizing various technologies, the festival strives to offer the most accessible programs for those with special needs of all kinds. For the first time, the festival will offer audio description for all its feature films.

“We feel very proud that Lehman was the first college in CUNY to participate in the festival,” said Merrill Parra, director of student disability services at Lehman College. “Most people, unless they have firsthand experience, know so little about disability. The festival goes a long way to debunk myths and stereotypes; it showcases the humanity in all of us.”

The ReelAbilities Film Festival seeks to promote awareness of the stories and artistic expressions of people with different abilities by celebrating the diversity of the shared human experience through engaging films and events. The festival also encourages inclusion and authentic portrayals in cinema of people with disabilities, the most underrepresented minority in American media. Following the flagship New York festival, selections from this year’s program travel to ReelAbilities’ growing network of festivals around North America that take place throughout the year.

The feature films being shown as Lehman College this year are:

Ballad from Tibet, a Chinese film, based on a true story, about four young students from a school for the blind who embark on an odyssey from their remote village in Tibet to the giant city Shenzhen in order to sing on a TV talent competition.

Mind/Game: The Unquiet Journey of Chamique Holdsclaw, which tells the story of basketball phenom Holdsclaw from her WNBA stardom to her struggle with mental illness.

Stanley For Stanley, a Polish film about a man and young boy who were both born without arms—several dozen years apart. A remarkable painter—accomplished by using his feet—Stanislaw has become a friend, uncle, and mentor to young Staś. Their story is not only a testimony to the unique understanding that exists between people afflicted with a common condition, but also a lesson about how to react to intolerance towards people with disabilities.

Out of My Head, an American documentary directed by Susanna Styron, that investigates the devastating migraines that have frequently debilitated her daughter and exposes the reality behind what is much more than a bad headache; in fact migraines are a mysterious and stigmatized neurological disease afflicting nearly a billion people worldwide (the film features celebrated writer Joan Didion reading from her legendary essay “In Bed”).

Each day, the festival begins with a series of film shorts at 4 p.m. followed by the features that begin at 5 p.m. on Monday, March 12, and at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 13.

ReelAbilities is the largest festival in the country dedicated to presenting films made by and about people with different disabilities whether physical, developmental, or psychological. Through film and special events, ReelAbilities seeks to unite the community in sharing and exploring stories of people living and thriving with disabilities.

“ReelAbilities is New York’s largest celebration of the disability community,” adds Isaac Zablocki, director and cofounder of the festival. “Making this our most inclusive event to date allows the entire community to celebrate the 10th anniversary of this impactful festival together. We present great films that absolutely anyone can enjoy and be further impacted by the conversations.”

Please visit www.reelabilities.org/newyork to purchase or for more information on venues and screening times.

For a full line up of special events please visit http://www.reelabilities.org/newyork/events.

 

Media Contact:
Joseph Tirella
718/960-8013

 


Jazz and Modern Art Brought Together in Lehman Professor’s New Book

In her newly published book, Two Steps Ahead of the Century: Jazz and Art, Lehman College professor Sharon Jordan examines the relationship between America’s great musical idiom and the visual arts that began roughly a century ago and inexorably shaped the cultural landscape of the world. Jordan, an art historian, appeals to eyes and ears in her richly illustrated coffee table book, which also includes three CDs of jazz recordings that provide a soundtrack to her research and exposition.

Written for a general audience, Jazz and Art was published by the earBOOKS imprint of Hamburg-based publisher Edel Germany GmbH. Jordan’s text is in both English and German, with translation by Margarete and Julian Forsyth. Among the 130 full color reproductions found throughout the book are seminal artworks by Pablo Picasso, Stuart Davis, Romare Bearden, Charles Demuth, and Jean-Michel Basquiat—a comprehensive representation of both American and European artists from Impressionism to Pop Art. Reproductions of significant photographs are found throughout the book as well, from the lenses of masters like Man Ray, August Sander, and Roy DeCarava, which depict the milieu and musicians through the course of the modern era.

The aural expedition through a history of “the improviser’s art” on the three CDs included with Jazz and Artcorrelates with the three major sections of the book—”Ragtime and Popular Entertainment, 1900-1917,” “The Jazz Age in Europe and America, 1920-1930,” and “Post-War Art and Jazz, 1940-1990.” Commencing with “Livery Stable Blues” by the Original Dixieland “Jass” Band from 1917, the recordings range from the traditional jazz, swing, and bebop eras to works by eminent modern jazz progenitors like Miles Davis and John Coltrane. Additionally, there are tracks from European artists and acts like Marlene Dietrich, Quintette du Hot Club de France, and the Weintraub Syncopators.

“I’m thrilled and happy with how the whole book turned out,” said Jordan. “It was a great project, and I really enjoyed the work of bringing the art and music together. My idea was to keep it readable, so that people with any level of knowledge of either art or jazz would be able to learn from the book.”

Professor Jordan states that the inspiration for Jazz and Art arose from her work on the essay “The Rhythm of Our Time is Jazz: Popular Entertainment During the Weimar Republic” that was included in Berlin Metropolis 1918-1933, a companion volume to a 2015 exhibition at the Neue Galerie in Manhattan, edited by Olaf Peters. In her research, Jordan discovered how many artists were attracted to street musicians, dancers, music hall, and nightclub performers, and circus stars in the early 1900s, sensing their “outsider” societal status was akin to the broad frustration with prevailing norms across Western civilization that the artists shared. In short time, Jordan points out, disparate artists centered their attention on jazz musicians—as subjects and also as motivations for their own improvisational modes and techniques—and the artistic movement that came to be called “modernism” began to evolve from an accumulation of cultural insurgencies.

“It seemed a shame not to develop all of the material that I had started to uncover,” says Jordan. “The interrelationships between visual culture and jazz, the popular music of the time, were so prevalent.” Her pitch to earBOOKS was accepted in mid-2015, and she was finished with the writing and artwork selection for the book in October 2016.

A native Chicagoan, Jordan was an art history major at Boston University before receiving a master’s at Hunter College and a doctorate in art history from the CUNY Graduate Center in 2009. She has been on the faculty of Lehman in the art department since 2011. Jordan will focus on the subject of German Expressionism in relation to Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophical ideas about cultural revolution in her next book.

Media Contact:
Thomas Staudter
718/960-8710


OVER 20 YEARS LATER, DENNIS PIEDRA RETURNS TO JOHN JAY TO LAUNCH HIS ‘SECOND CAREER’

Over 20 Years Later, Dennis Piedra Returns to John Jay to Launch His ‘Second Career’

 

When Dennis Piedra graduated from John Jay with a BS in criminal justice in 1992, he didn’t know that he would return more than two decades later to pursue his master’s degree in Emergency Management, a field that he would realize was not just a career, but a calling.

For the past 22 years, Piedra has worked for the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA), where he’s gained firsthand experience responding to citywide emergencies. When tragedy struck on 9/11, it was an eye-opening moment for him. “After 9/11, I distributed SNAP benefits to families affected in the area. That’s when the lightbulb clicked and I knew that responding to emergencies was what I wanted to do,” he said.

In addition to his position at HRA, Piedra is also the Chief of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) in the Bronx, a dedicated and trained team of volunteers that responds to community disasters. Recently, after a fire ravaged a building in the Bronx, Piedra and his team were on the ground days later to hand out provisions and help sort clothing for families who had undergone losses.

In November, Piedra traveled with a group of colleagues to Puerto Rico to provide relief after Hurricane Maria. He was in his second month of his master’s program at John Jay, and he worked with his professors to make sure he wouldn’t fall behind on his coursework while he was gone. In Puerto Rico, Piedra provided essential relief for 12 days, working from early in the morning to 10 at night. “We were helping people with basic necessities,” he said. “They weren’t ready for this kind of catastrophe.”

Piedra has big plans for his career upon finishing his degree, and is considering working for the New York City Office of Emergency Management or FEMA in the future, which he thinks would be a natural fit. In the meantime, he is making the most out of life as a student. Piedra, 50, is also an avid sailor in the summer months, and when he learned about the launch of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary University Program at John Jay, he jumped at the chance to join. He sees his involvement in the auxiliary program as a way for him to learn about safety not only on land, but at sea. “This is another way for me to give back, and help prepare the community for safety,” he said.

Since first graduating from John Jay with his bachelor’s, Piedra has been able to see how the College continues to flourish. “Today, John Jay is gorgeous, and the College is at the forefront. There’s vitality walking up and down the hall. There’s a mosaic of people of different colors and from different walks of life.”

Piedra also remembers the influential staff members who made an impression on him as an undergraduate student, especially the late Francis McHugh, who is remembered at the College as having been a relentless advocate for students as former Dean and Registrar. “Dean McHugh was so instrumental to me. I remember his compassion for people and his amazing ability to hear you out. Without him, I wouldn’t be where I am today.”

The compassion that Piedra so admired in his mentor is one of the attributes embodied not just by faculty and staff, but also the College’s students, foremost among them Piedra himself. “In responding to emergencies, you need to treat people with respect, and help them the most that you can. You need to have compassion,” Piedra said. “I’m bringing my best to everything I do.”


CELEBRATING BLACK FACULTY MEMBERS AND THEIR SCHOLARSHIP AT JOHN JAY

Celebrating Black Faculty Members and Their Scholarship at John Jay

 

John Jay College’s status as a federally-designated Minority Serving Institution (MSI) places us alongside Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in our commitment to providing life-changing educational opportunities for students of color. In honor of Black History Month and throughout the year, we recognize the role of Black and African American faculty in advancing this mission—not least by setting standards of excellence across diverse fields of research and scholarship.

Faculty representing John Jay across the disciplines include National Institutes of Health grantee Jason Rauceo in the natural sciences. Dr. Rauceo’s long-running work on the opportunistic yeast pathogen candida albicans has most recently resulted in a peer-reviewed article in the prestigious open-access journal PLOS ONE. Rauceo’s article, co-authored with 3 students, could have implications for the treatment of C. albicans infections in immunocompromised individuals.

In the social sciences, Maureen Allwood‘s June 2017 peer-reviewed study of differences between child and maternal perceptions of stress felt by children provided insight into the ways that children and their parents experience stressful life events (SLEs). Dr. Allwood’s article made the surprising finding that perceptions of stress have greater associations with the physiological reactions of those experiencing SLEs than the apparent severity of the events being experienced.

Faculty in the humanities continue making rich contributions across disciplines, from philosopher Jacoby Carter‘s deep explorations on the giant of Africana and pragmatist philosophy Alain Locke (African American Contributions to the Americas’ Cultures: A Critical Edition of Lectures by Alain Locke), to historian Stephen C. Russell‘s nuanced studies of land, territory, borders and other social space in the Bible (Space, Land, Territory and the Study of the Bible).

Finally, carrying forward the humanities tradition of productive engagement with popular culture, literary theorist Jonathan Gray reviews the film Black Panther in The New Republic, highlighting the hit film’s engagement with the pan-Africanist theories popularized by revolutionary thinkers like Frantz Fanon, concluding that the film’s balance of “lighthearted fun… with the tragedy of existential loss both personal and intergenerational breathe[s] new life into the superhero movie.” To hear Dr. Gray’s reactions to the film’s runaway success, listen to his recent interview on NPR station WNYC.

To see more research and scholarship from Black faculty members at John Jay, visit John Jay Research Book Talk videos:

  • Lisa Farrington on the history and cultural legacy of African-American artists, from her book African-American Art: A Visual and Cultural History
  • Michelle Holder on the occupational segregation impeding Black men’s recovery after the recession, from her book African American Men and the Labor Market during the Great Recession
  • Jessica Gordon Nembhard on the history of African-American thinking about cooperative economic, from her book Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice
  • Khalil Gibran Mohammad on the creation of the idea of black criminality as central to the making of urban America, from his book The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America

Award-Winning Film Emerald City Debuts in the Borough at Queens College March 14; Chronicles Shift in Irish Immigration

— Emmy Award-Winning Reporter Mary Murphy to Speak; Evening to Feature Filmmaker Q&A, Traditional Irish Music and Dance in Fundraiser
for the College’s Irish Studies Program —

Queens, N.Y., March 2, 2018—The award-winning film Emerald City—said to mark “the end of an era in Irish American identity”—will make its borough debut at Queens College on Wednesday, March 14, in LeFrak Concert Hall. Mary Murphy, Emmy Award-winning WPIX reporter, Queens College graduate, and the daughter of Irish immigrants, will be the guest speaker for an evening that will feature a Q&A session with Emerald City filmmaker Colin Broderick and actors from the film, as well as traditional Irish music and dance performances to raise money for the college’s Irish Studies Program. The evening begins at 6 pm with a reception, performances and remarks; the film will be screened from 7:30 to 9 pm, immediately followed by the Q&A and a closing musical performance. Tickets are $20—$15 for students, veterans and seniors—and are available here.

“The scope of ethnicities represented in the New York City immigrant experience—and each group’s contributions—is unique and immeasurable. Our students are extraordinarily fortunate to be able to benefit from programs like Irish Studies where they can learn about the history and impact of one of the city’s earliest immigrant groups on our cultural and economic landscape,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

Loosely based on Broderick’s life, Emerald City was filmed entirely in New York and chronicles the lives of a crew of Irish construction workers as they witness a shift in traditional patterns of Irish immigration. An estimated 4.7 million Irish have settled in America since 1820, many arriving and working as skilled laborers. Today in Ireland, young adults are more likely to train for technology jobs, and immigrants from Portugal or Spain are often the skilled laborers performing carpentry or plumbing jobs. In the U.S., skilled Irish laborers, for the most part, are being replaced by a predominantly Central American workforce.

The characters in Emerald City struggle with alcohol and gambling addictions, loss, and the burden of upholding a fading legacy as the construction workers who “built New York City.” “The basic message of the movie is that it’s the end of the road for these guys,” says Broderick. “They are like the last of the Mohicans. The ‘Celtic Tiger’ and a new era of affluence in Ireland put an end to the age-old tradition of Ireland exporting skilled manual—specifically construction—labor.”

Emerald City, called “the most talked-about Irish film in decades,” was an Official Selection at the Irish, Manhattan, and Belfast Film Festivals, and received The Screen award at the inaugural IrishCentral Creativity & Arts Awards. View the trailer. The film is recommended for those aged 13 and older.

Performers for the March 14 fundraiser include Ireland native and recording artist Niamh O’Brien, traditional Irish harpist; champion Irish fiddler Jake James; Niall O’Leary, traditional musician, Irish dance performer, choreographer and master instructor; and students from the Niall O’Leary School of Irish Dance.

Author, playwright and screenwriter Colin Broderick was raised Irish Catholic in the heart of Northern Ireland during “The Troubles,” a decades-long period of sectarian violence that he describes as having influenced his body of work. He immigrated to the Bronx at age 20, where he worked as a carpenter while pursuing a literary career. His two-decades-long struggle with alcoholism is a factor in his plays, films, and books, which include Orangutan, That’s That: A Memoir, Father Who, Spudmunchers, Smile, and The Star Farm. Broderick’s work has also been published in the New York Times, Poets & Writers, Writer’s Digest, and Rattapalax.

Queens native Mary Murphy graduated magna cum laude from Queens College and began her broadcasting career through a college internship with WCBS-TV in the 1980s. A member of the PIX11 Investigates unit, she has been honored with 25 Emmy awards, an Edward R. Murrow Award for writing, and recognition from the Associated Press Broadcasters’ Association. Murphy won her most recent Emmy for a six-part series called “Heroin, A to Z.” She is the daughter of Irish immigrants; her mother, Mary, is from County Galway and her late father, James, hailed from County Mayo.

About the Queens College Irish Studies Program
The Queens College Irish Studies Program, established 45 years ago, is among the oldest such program in the nation. Students may take courses in Irish history, folklore, literature, and language. The related Queens Irish Oral History Project is an effort to record and
preserve the memories of Irish immigrants to the borough of Queens.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Chris Hayes to Speak at Macaulay’s Commencement

Host of Emmy Award Winning “All In,” Chris Hayes,
Will Address the Graduating Class of 2018

 

Macaulay Honors College at CUNY proudly announces that Chris Hayes, the host of MSNBC’s popular “All In With Chris Hayes” will serve as the 2018 Commencement speaker. Hayes will address Macaulay’s 500 graduates on Thursday, June 7, 2018 at 3pm at the United Palace Theater in upper Manhattan.

“We are thrilled honor a true son of New York,” said Mary C. Pearl, Ph.D., Dean of Macaulay. “Chris Hayes was born and raised in the Bronx, attended Hunter College High School in Manhattan, and lives with his family in Brooklyn. Like so many of our students, Chris is a product of the New York public schools. His work as a journalist and social commentator serves as a model to our students of the value of bringing carefully considered critical thought into the national conversation. His work underscores the value of the First Amendment to ensure public examination of important issues.”

Each night on “All In,” Hayes covers not only the biggest news stories of the day, but also the issues that are personally important to him such as social justice and the environment.

In addition to his work as a broadcast journalist, Hayes is editor-at-large of The Nation and aNew York Times bestselling author. Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy, is about the crisis of authority in American life and was published in June 2012. A Colony in a Nation, focusing on how a country founded on justice now looks like something close to a police state, was published last year.

Hayes received a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Brown University.

Contact: Geoffrey Glick
VP, External Relations
212 729 2939


City College names Lydia Travis athletic director

Lydia Travis is CCNY’s new director of athletics.

Lydia Travis, a sports management expert with several professional affiliations, is The City College of New York’s new director of athletics. Her appointment is effective March 12.

“Lydia brings expertise and experience for both the academic and athletic facets of our student-athletes’ college lives, and that’s perfect for a place like City College,” said CCNY    President Vince Boudreau. “We are serious about supporting, and enjoying, athletic competition on this campus, but must never lose sight of the bigger picture: that our students must graduate with a successful academic record and a bright future before them.”

He added that Travis was the right person to build these values more deeply into the  program.

“I would like to thank President Boudreau, Interim Vice President for Student Affairs Wendy Thornton and the search committee for entrusting me to lead the City College of New York’s Athletics Program and serve the CCNY community,” said Travis. “I am eager to begin working with the talented coaches and staff who bring a wealth of knowledge to the program as we contribute to the development of our student athletes in and out of the playing arena.  I also look forward to engaging our alumni, campus and local communities to build on the amazing history and traditions of Beaver athletics.”

Travis is a member of the Women Leaders in College Sports, the National Association of Athletic Compliance and serves on the Minority Opportunity Athletics Association Membership Committee.  She joins CCNY from Queens College, CUNY’s only NCAA Division II athletic program, where she was assistant athletics director for student-athlete performance.

Before her tenure at Queens, Travis served as assistant athletic director for internal relations and senior woman administrator at Kentucky State University. There she oversaw several sports programs and strengthened multiple processes to maximize the effectiveness of the athletic academic support services area.

She also created a student-athlete peer mentoring program and KSU’s senior seminar series, designed to prepare senior student-athletes for careers after athletics. Under her direction, KSU earned three Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Academic Team Championships and held its highest department grade point average in over a decade.

Travis is a graduate of Virginia State University where she earned BA and master’s degrees in sports management.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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City of Science Returns to Lehman College on March 11

City of Science, the touring mini-metropolis of mind-expanding demonstrations and hands-on activities for families, returns to Lehman College on Sunday, March 11. Presented by the World Science Festival and Con Edison, City of Science is a series of free day-long events—one in each of New York City’s five boroughs—that engage New Yorkers in the exploration of science, technology, engineering, and math. Visitors can launch objects 20 feet in the air with a seismic accelerator, walk on water, topple seven-foot tall dominoes, create an orbiting solar system at the Warped Space Gravity Simulator, and explore a variety of mind-bending challenges and puzzles.

Lehman College of The City University of New York hosts the Bronx edition of City of Science at the APEX (250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Gate 7), 10 a.m. to 4p.m.

“We are proud to host this wonderfully entertaining and educational event here on our campus for Bronx families,” said Dr. José Luis Cruz, the President of Lehman College. “As always, Lehman College is committed to lifting up the proud and resilient borough that is our home—the Bronx. We look forward to having families explore the incredible City of Science and its inspiring exhibits.”

At City of Science, neighborhood science and community organizations lead hands-on activities. Local experts—teachers, university professors, and professional scientists—are present at each demonstration or activity, to guide visitors through the science behind it.

City of Science is a signature event of the internationally acclaimed World Science Festival. Through 70-plus events over five days (May 29th to June 3rd this year), the annual Festival offers a broad general audience an unparalleled opportunity to engage with scientific discoveries, the thinkers behind them, and their wide-ranging political and cultural implications. City of Science extends the Festival’s presence to include programs throughout the year and across the City.

“We are thrilled to take City of Science to the Bronx, and to give children and families of this vibrant community a day to experience science through hands-on play, interactive learning and engaging explanations,” said Tracy Day, Co-Founder and CEO of the World Science Festival. “We’re deeply grateful to Con Edison for their generous support and partnership, and to Lehman College and its President, Dr. José Luis Cruz, for hosting this exciting installment of City of Science.”

“Through science, we keep our environment clean, design and build infrastructure, create smarter cities, and discover ways to help needy people all over the world,” said Frances A. Resheske, Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Con Edison. “The exhibits and activities City of Science brings to all five boroughs fascinate, entertain, teach, and intrigue kids and adults. The women and men of Con Edison are proud of our sponsorship of this festival of learning and fun.”

About Lehman College
The City University of New York’s only four-year college in the Bronx, serving the borough and surrounding region as an intellectual, economic, and cultural center. Lehman provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.

About the World Science Festival
The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Through discussions, debates, theatrical works, interactive explorations, musical performances, intimate salons, and major outdoor experiences, the Festival takes science out of the laboratory and into the streets, parks, museums, galleries and premier performing arts venues of New York City and beyond. The annual live, week-long Festivals, which launched in 2008, have collectively drawn more than 2.5 million visitors worldwide, with millions more viewing the programs online. The World Science Festival’s original musical and theatrical works tour nationally and internationally. March 2016 marked the launch of World Science Festival Brisbane. World Science U is the Foundation’s online education arm, where students and lifelong learners can dive more deeply through artfully produced digital education content presented by world-renowned scientists.

About Con Edison
Con Edison supports hundreds of nonprofit organizations in New York City and Westchester County to strengthen neighborhoods, sustain communities and improve lives. These philanthropic efforts support the arts, environment, and important educational initiatives in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Many of Con Edison’s 14,000 employees share a personal commitment to the region’s vitality through their own volunteer efforts and also choose to support education by utilizing the company’s matching gifts program.

Media Contact:
David Koeppel
718/960-4992

 


Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of March 5, 2018 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

This week, on Thursday and Friday, we welcome you, NEST+m’s K-12 families,  to our Spring Parent Teacher Conferences. Conferences are an essential opportunity for deepening our school-family partnership in support of your child or children.

  • Conferences will be held from 4:45pm to 7:45pm on Thursday March 8th
  • Conferences will be held from 12:40pm to 2:40pm on Friday March 9th

Please note that Friday March 9th features a half-day of instruction. Classes end at 11:30am.

Following Conferences on Friday March 9, all Middle & Upper Grades families are welcome to join us for the Upper Grades Black Student Union’s family presentation, at 5:15pm in our Auditorium. They will be sharing with you the assembly previously presented to their classmates and our K-12 teachers.

Separately, please be on the lookout for the DOE’s Annual Survey. It can be completed via hard copy in the familiar green envelope or online.  Though confidential in nature, your voice and feedback enable us to strengthen our practices in alignment with the Framework for Great Schools. We aspire to achieve 100% participation by NEST+m’s families! The due date is March 23rd. For more information, please see:
http://schools.nyc.gov/Accountability/tools/survey/default.htm

Please be in touch with NEST+m Parent Coordinator Lisa Seale Cruz should you need additional support with the survey. She can be reached at lisasealecruz@nestmk12.net

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

 


Opportunities for NEST+m students

3T Summer Style Workshop
Naked Angels Theater Company’s (nakedangels.com) 6th annual free 3T Summer Style workshop will take place July 9-19th.  There will be an intro to filmmaking week and a week of writing for the theater.  Professional actors will be acting in the student writers’ work.  It is fast, fun, free, and freeing!  Please email 3T@nakedangels.com for more info and an application.  First come, first accepted!  Click here for more information.

NY Center for Children
The New York Center for Children is a non-for-profit, child-friendly center, providing free, comprehensive evaluation and therapy services to victims of child abuse and their families. We are currently accepting referrals for a 10-12 week support group beginning mid-March for adolescent female’s (ages 14-16) who have experienced sexual abuse. Participants must attend an intake appointment prior to beginning group and commit to attending every session. Please note that our services are completely free and confidential.
Attached is our flyer with more information about the group. For further information, please contact Leah Mansback at (212) 517-3012 ext 34.

Here are a variety of summer job listings:

Summer Jobs:
NYC Gov Jobs & Internships   American Camp Association

Girl Scout Camp Counselor Jobs….
http://www.gsneny.org/en/camp/summer-camp.html

92nd Street Y
https://external-92y.icims.com/jobs/1498/camp-counselors-%28summer-2018%29/job?utm_campaign=google_jobs_apply&utm_source=google_jobs_apply&utm_medium=organic&mobile=false&width=940&height=500&bga=true&needsRedirect=false&jan1offset=-300&jun1offset=-240

Paid Summer Intern: Tech Camp/entrepreneur
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=ldxBYXD8bSH9vAikAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Junior Summer Camp Counselor (NYC Parks)
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=bNfxa5d0noEU-kZNAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

NY Healing Justice-Liberation Summer Camp Internship
https://www.google.com/search?safe=strict&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&ei=_m2VWun3IJm2jwTG7rrADw&q=NYC+Camp+Jobs&oq=NYC+Camp+Jobs&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i22i30k1l6.5772.7462.0.8025.6.6.0.0.0.0.79.417.6.6.0….0…1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.6.417…0j0i67k1j0i10k1j0i22i10i30k1.0.m8rsZ8wrJck&ibp=htl;jobs#fpstate=tldetail&htidocid=nbMjvPRVwyF3-v4VAAAAAA%3D%3D&htivrt=jobs

Downtown Camp-Manhattan Youth http://www.manhattanyouth.org/camps.aspx

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Binghamton University Summer College
This summer, Binghamton University will hold two Binghamton Summer College sessions for academically talented students who have completed their sophomore or junior year:

The deadline to submit an application is May 1, but earlier applications are encouraged since programs have limited enrollment.

Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs 
The Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs give curious kids an opportunity to dive into an architecture topic of interest and test out their own design ideas. Each program explores a different theme through art and building activities, design challenges, and special site visits. Summer Programs run five days (Monday-Friday), 9:00am-4:00pm at the Center for Architecture. A limited number of need-based scholarships are available.

For schedule, registration, and scholarship information, please visit our website.Deadline is April 1st.

Camp Cardiac and Camp Neuro
Scholarship and standard applications have just opened up for Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro 2018!

Run by medical students in over 30 cities nationwide with locations in Manhattan and Westchester County, Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro are 1-week summer day camps for high school students interested in exploring careers in medicine.

Students may learn more and apply by visiting http://www.campcardiac.org andhttp://www.campneuro.org.

In addition, you may download PDF flyers by clicking on the following links:
Camp Cardiac 2018 Flyer
Camp Neuro 2018 Flyer

Duke University Summer Session
Improve your college application and go to college while still in high school!

At Duke Summer Session, we are committed to providing high school students with the opportunity to be a college student over the summer at one of the world’s premier universities.  By attending our Summer College program, you will not only have the authentic college experience of living in Duke University’s dorms and taking credit-bearing classes alongside undergraduate students, but also the opportunity to accompany your college application with a letter of recommendation from a Duke instructor and transcript from Duke University – two substantive indicators that you have what it takes to thrive in an elite academic setting.

Courses fill up quickly, so apply online today:

Application for US Students

Columbia University Asian American Alliance
Columbia University Asian American Alliance is a nonprofit student-run organization at Columbia University.

We would like to invite NEST+m students to the 2018 Crossroads High School Conference: CONVERGE, our annual, one-day leadership conference for young Asian Americans. At Crossroads, we hope that Asian American youth of all Asian identities including Pacific Islanders will be given the opportunity to question, explain, and discuss aspects of their identity through workshops, a panel, and conversations with their peers. Our mission is to provide youth with the knowledge and skills necessary to organize their communities for social change and create communities to feel supported with it.

Please register at the following link: https://tinyurl.com/y85e9vmu. You can learn more about our conference at our website: aaacrossroads.com.

Hunter College Music Department’s College Now Program
The Hunter College Music Department’s College Now program cordially invites music students who are currently juniors and un-decided seniors to attend an Open House at Hunter on Friday, March 23, 2018, from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

You will have the opportunity to participate in classes and workshops -including classical piano, vocal performance, and instrumental jazz-meet with Hunter students and take a tour of the department and college. Instrumentalists should bring their instruments. Pianists should bring something they’d like to play for the piano workshop. Singers are invited to bring a piece they are working on to possibly perform for the vocal workshop.

If interested, please let your music teacher know by March 10, so they can reserve a space for you.

The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE)
The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE) is an annual event hosted by Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers for girls in grades 9-12. The event provides many exciting opportunities—students will participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak to professional women in various engineering industries.

Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building
Participation Fee: Early Bird (Before February 15th) – $10, Regular – $15
Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Should you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to contact me at swe.EEE@columbia.edu.

YMCA – Teen Summer Paid Internships

  • 2 weeks of professional development training (sessions are facilitated by industry professionals from Colgate, Univision, Uber, Memorial Sloan, HBO etc)
  • 6 weeks at internship (participants are placed in their industry of choice*)
  • Each participant is paired to a mentor for the duration of the program
  • Participants receive 2 monthly metrocards + $300 clothing stipend + $1500 “working” stipend

www.teencareerconnection.org

DOE Summer Opportunities and February workshops
Undocumented students can still apply for the Dream scholarship due on March 1st, 2018 Link: http://www.thedream.us/

NYU Journalisam – Summer 2018
Build your skills! Report, write, shoot, post…food, fashion, culture
Enrollment opens February 12

Paid High School Internships
We are pleased to announce that Wave Hill is now accepting applications for our two paid High School Internship programs, the Forest Project and the Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship.
The Forest Project is open to current sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The seven-week program meets Mondays through Fridays from late June through August 21st, 2018. Interns work in small, supervised crews to help restore woodland areas at Wave Hill. The application deadline for this program is March 18th, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/forest-project/.

The Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship (WERM) is open to current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. This 14-month program provides a unique opportunity to work with local ecologists and participate in ecological research projects. WERM students learn content and develop basic research skills during their first summer through hands-on projects and coursework.  After building on their skills at weekend workshops during the academic year, students embark on a final research project under the guidance of a science mentor for their second summer. The application deadline for this program is April 1st, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/woodland-ecology-research-mentorship/

We have Scholarships for students for our Summer Programs in New York!!
We are glad to offer students a special 40% scholarship and discount (tuition is then $1,490 instead of $2,450) on our Summer 3-Week Summer Program “Discover New York Business and Finance”, which combines top level courses, company and financial institutions visits and guests speakers lectures.

Click here for more information:
https://www.cognitoforms.com/LCapital4/BFMSNYALLPROGRAMS2

Please find hereafter the brochure for our 3-Week Program:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0ikwJKoF7dTWGl3eFdDYU5MUXM/view?usp=sharing

August Writers’ Workshop
The School of The New York Times is excited to announce our new end-of-summer August Writers’ Workshop for rising middle and high school students (grades 7-12) of all writing abilities on August 13–17 in New York City. This week-long program helps students enhance their writing skills under the tutelage of some of the best writers in the world. Students will emerge with strengthened communication skills, confidence in their writing and a profound sense of the power of the written word and visual communication—all right before school starts! The August Writers’ Workshop is the perfect way to kick off the academic year and occurs right after our NYC Summer Academy.

Workshop Quick Facts
Date: August 13–17, 2018
Grade Eligibility: Rising 7-12
Click here for more information.
Click here to register.

Summer 2018 College Credit Courses at Baruch College
Current 10th and 11th graders can apply to enroll in one of the following college credit bearing courses for FREE:

  • Business Fundamentals – BUS 1011 (3 Credits)
  • Journalistic Writing – JRN 3050 (4 credits)
  • Cultural Anthropology – ANT 1001 (3 credits)
  • Critical Health Issues – HED 1911 (3 credits)

Program Details:

  • All courses will take place at Baruch College from July 5th – August 16th
  • Courses will be from Monday through Thursday from 9am – 2pm

Eligibility:

  • Be a current NYC public high school 10th or 11th grader
  • Have the following test scores: PSAT/SAT Verbal (Min. 480) OR English Language Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR  ACT English Score (Min. 20),  OR  Overall 80+ English average

Online Application: www.baruch.cuny.edu/collegenow. Deadline for application and ALL supporting documents: April 13th, 2018

Urban Leadership Fellows
ULF exposes exceptional graduating high school seniors to the municipal securities industry through highly supported paid summer internships. Each student is paired with a mentor the duration of the internship.

  • Student Recruitment: High School seniors with at least a 3.0 GPA interested in pursuing finance, law and/or government in college. Big push for NYCHA residents.
  • Duration & Hours: 40 hours/week for 6 weeks in July and August 2018
  • Program Requirements: Interns work 40 hours per week and attend events organized by Futures and Options, including orientations, an opening breakfast, municipal bond school, Excel workshops, public speaking, writing, and presentation trainings, a trip to DC hosted by the MSRB, and a closing luncheon
  • Deadline: Final deadline: March 9th, 2018
  • Scholarship: $500 book grant for all participants, ULF alumni entering their sophomore, junior, and senior year who earn a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher receive $1,250 every year. ULF alumni who maintain a cumulative GPA between 3.25 and 3.49 and received $1,000 college scholarships

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

Interested in medicine or engineering? 
We’re very excited to announce an upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, NY. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments.

We are now seeking applicants for our New York, NY program. Participants should be women in grades 10 and up with an expressed interest in science, medicine and/or engineering.

Applicants should fill out our online application in advance of the March 21, 2018 application deadline. Additional information can be found on our website: www.perryinitiative.org — The application may be accessed directly using the following link:http://perryinitiative.org/programs/student-online-application/ — More information and a printable flyer for this event can be found here.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C. Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life!

Please click here for more information: https://summer.gwu.edu/precollege
Please click here to apply: https://summer.gwu.edu/apply-precollege

Engineering Exploration Experience
This spring, Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers (SWE) will be hosting its annual Engineering Exploration Experience. The event will expose female high school students to the exciting career opportunities available in all branches of engineering. The event provides students with the opportunity to participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak with professional women in various engineering industries.

Registration will open within the next few weeks and will be on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Event Details:
Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building

Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 

  • NYC PSAT Exam & Review Seminar (FREE) – 3/10 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • College Search Seminar (FREE) – 3/17, 10am-12pm – Register Here
  • May 5 SAT Prep Starts 3/17 – Enroll Here
  • Practice SAT/ACT Exam (FREE) – 3/24 – Register Here
  • Study Skills Seminar (FREE) – 4/21, 10am-12pm – Register Here
  • June 2 SAT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
  • June ACT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
  • Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 4/28 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 5/19 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 6/2 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • Finding Your Right Path Seminar (FREE) – 6/16, 10am-12pm – Register Here
  • Common App & Essay Workshop – 8/14 & 8/16, 6-9pm – Enroll Here

– Making College Affordable Seminar (FREE) – 9/8, 10am-12pm – Register Here

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018

Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.


Zahn Innovation Summit at CCNY on March 6

2018 Venture Competition Cohort

Members of some of the Zahn Center’s 2018 Venture Competition Cohort teams.

The inaugural Zahn Innovation Summit will kick off on Tuesday, March 6 as leaders in the NYC startup community and emerging entrepreneurs gather at The City College of New York’s North Academic Center. The summit includes workshops, a fireside chat with the Chief Technology Officer of New York City Miguel Gamiño, and a discussion about the power of investment in non-traditional founders.

The summit is part of NYC Open Data Week, celebrating the city’s investment in open data resources for the tech community, and will feature important discussions on topics like diversity in tech and renewable energy investments in NYC. Participants will also meet the Zahn Innovation Center’s current class of stellar startups.

“We’re extremely excited to bring our CCNY startups into the focus of so many important conversations surrounding entrepreneurship, big data, renewable energy and more,” said Lindsay Siegel, executive director of the Zahn Innovation Center.

The summit will kick off with skill-building workshops for entrepreneurs and pitches from the Zahn Center’s newest cohort of 24 startups that are competing for over $150,000 in prizes. Their first public pitch is in preparation for Demo Day later this semester, which is an annual event to showcase their prototypes and business models.

Workshops include:

  • Using open data in your software app with Jaime Sanchez of Socrata
  • Measuring sustainable impact with Amanda Kizer of B Lab
  • Negotiating in a biased environment with Noha Waibsnaider of Peeled Snacks
  • Sales training for startups with Google

Linda Villarosa, author, journalist and program director of journalism at CCNY, will moderate an investor panel to discuss the importance of investing in marginalized entrepreneurs. Featured speakers include: Rehana Nathoo of Spectrum Impact, Lorine Pendleton of Portfolia Funds, Clayton Banks of Silicon Harlem, and CCNY alumna Elizabeth Vilchis of latinoTech.

For more information, click here. All CCNY students, faculty and staff can attend the summit for free, and tickets are available for the public through Eventbrite. This event is made possible in partnership with the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, Silicon Harlem, NYCEDC’s Futureworks program, and a VentureWell grant at CCNY to support Entrepreneurship and Renewable Energy.

About the Zahn Innovation Center
The Zahn Innovation Center was established by the City College Fund in 2012, with support from the Moxie Foundation and the Manhattan Borough President’s Office, as an incubator at the City College of New York (CCNY). The Zahn Center empowers students to develop entrepreneurial skills while incubating the most promising technology startups and social impact ventures. We provide co-working space, a campus-wide speaker series, and four entrepreneurship competitions with prize money.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Queens College Celebrates Women’s History Month with Presentations by a Tony Award-Winning Playwright, the Governor of Attica Greece, and a STEM Research Pioneer

QUEENS, NY, March 2, 2018—Throughout March Queens College will present a series of events in celebration of Women’s History Month on topics ranging from the arts to politics and to the fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

March 7, Rosenthal Library, President’s Conference Room 2, 12:15 pm: The Department of Sociology and the Hellenic American Project present Irene Dourou, Regional Governor of Attica, Greece, who will will speak on The Challenges of Feminist Policies in a Male-Dominated Arena: The Case of Attica, Greece. Dourou is a Greek political scientist and politician who has served in her current position since September 2014. She will reflect on her experiences with male dominance and sexism while serving in her previous role as foreign policy minister. This event is free and open to the public.

March 13, LeFrak Concert Hall, 7 pm: The Queens College Evening Readings series will feature a panel discussion on Women in American Theatre with playwrights Lisa Kron, Tony Award winner for Fun Home; Kia Corthron, Windham-Campbell Literature Prize winner for Drama; Patricia Ione Lloyd, New Professional Theatre’s Emerging Playwright Award winner; and Monet Hurst-Mendoza, a 2016-2018 Van Lier Fellow at New Dramatists. This panel will highlight the contributions of women to American theatre and address the challenges they must still overcome to have their voices heard and their work recognized. Support for this event is provided by Matthew Watson in memory of his late wife Marjorie Hecht Watson, a 1964 graduate of Queens College, for her lifelong passion for literature and labor justice.

The panel will be moderated by former Newsday theatre critic Linda Winer, who was also chief theatre and dance critic of the Chicago Tribune from 1969 to 1980, and was a critic for the New York Daily News and USA Today. For many years, Winer was virtually the only female first-string theatre critic in New York and the only woman in the New York Drama Critics’ Circle. She will be recognized this month with a 2018 Theater Woman Award for her service to the field.

Subscription to Evening Readings series is $49; tickets for each session range from $15 to $25.

Wednesday, March 21, 12:15 pm, TBD: The Women and Gender Studies Program is sponsoring a talk by Knatokie Ford, a pioneering researcher and advocate for women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, on STEM Diversity and Inclusion. Ford will share insights from her work in the Obama Administration on parental engagement, STEM education (K-12 and postsecondary) and workforce issues, as well as the role of entertainment media as the next frontier of STEM inclusion.

Wednesday, March 21, 12 noon to 5 pm, Rosenthal Library Tanenbaum Room (300i) will be the site of QC’s second Wiki-Women’s Edit-a-Thon, where participants will be editing and creating articles on women, especially women of color, and particularly women in dance. No prior Wikipedia experience is necessary; training, moral support, and lunch will be provided. If you can’t bring your own laptop, loaners will be available. Learn more and RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/glpfhcd.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received over 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Learn how 400,000 cancer cases could be prevented each year at CCNY Mini-Medical School

Lewis Kampel, MD

Each year 12.7 million people find out they have cancer and 7.6 million people die from the disease. However, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), 30-45% of all cancer cases could be prevented, and one-third can be cured through early diagnosis and treatment.

You don’t have to go to a doctor to find out how. On March 14, cancer experts from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will discuss cancer screening, prevention and control at a Mini-Medical School hosted by CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York. This event, which is free and open to the Harlem and City College communities, takes place from 5:30-7pm at the North Academic Center, Room 1/103, of The City College of New York at 160 Convent Ave.

The doctors who will be in to share their knowledge and take your questions include:

Lewis Kampel, MC, Medical Oncologist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Medical Director, Ralph Lauren Center for Cancer Care

Donna D’Alessio, MD, Radiologist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Arnold Markowitz, MD, Gastroenterologist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Please RSVP here to attend this event which will also include healthy refreshments and a special surprise.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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CUNY BA Student, USS Chair, John Aderounmu Featured in AM New York

We are proud to share that CUNY BA senior, John Aderounmu, was recently featured in an AM New York article highlighting CUNY student leaders. John is a Hunter College based CUNY BA student studying Computer Science and Mathematics is also the Chair of CUNY’s University Student Senate and a student member of CUNY’s Board of Trustees. Read more from AM New York and see why John was selected to represent excellence and leadership among CUNY students!

John Aderounmu, 21

Humility is among the rarest of leadership traits, yet there is no shortage of it in John Aderounmu.

Aderounmu, 21, relocated from Nigeria five years ago at 16, moving in with relatives in Far Rockaway, Queens. The way he describes it, after years of visiting New York City on summer break, “it was inevitable” that he’d end up pursuing higher education in the city.

However, just months after he arrived in 2012, superstorm Sandy struck. He and his family were without power for about two weeks and the family home suffered significant flooding damage in the basement. When asked if the disaster made him think twice about his plans to study in NYC, his reply was simple:

“Oh, not at all. I come from a country where the power outages are kind of a norm,” Aderounmu says. “We didn’t get it as bad as some parts of Far Rockaway, so we felt lucky.”

This humility is reflected in every step of his story. He enrolled in the Borough of Manhattan Community College with the intention of pursuing a “safe” career in computer science; however, he encountered mentors and inspirational figures along the way that steered his path toward representative democracy.

Now a Hunter College student, he serves as the chairperson of the CUNY University Student Senate and holds a seat on the CUNY board of trustees.

The idea of student government was initially foreign to him. His schooling experience in Nigeria was academic-intensive, he says, and included only a few extracurricular options.

“It wasn’t until my last semester [at BMCC] that I joined the student government,” Aderounmu says. “I had a friend who was also an immigrant from Africa, Mohammed Omar . . . he told me I should join the student government.”

With his friend’s support, Aderounmu ran for Senate, won, and ultimately assumed the role of president of the Student Government Association, or SGA, at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC).

At Hunter, his top priorities as the CUNY University Student Senate chairperson center on making the body an effective vessel of change, “instead of just event-planning and organizing,” he says.

“One thing we’re talking about right now is the student activity fee,” he says. “It’s a fee controlled by the students, they dictate what the money is used for. We want to make sure it remains that way, and we’re in the middle of that discussion right now.”

Ashtian Holmes, director of the Urban Male Leadership Academy (UMLA), remembers meeting Aderounmu in 2015 when he first started attending BMCC. A formative mentor in his life, Holmes still stays in close contact with Aderounmu today.

“He was kind of a quiet, soft-spoken person,” Holmes recalls. “When he was first involved with UMLA he was going through a lot. He had tremendous potential from the get-go, but it was SGA where he made that known to the world, so to speak.”

Holmes, having watched Aderounmu grow and develop a “high emotional intelligence” over the last several years, recalls a moment when it hit him just how far Aderounmu had come.

“I remember when I sat in on an SGA meeting. The way he commanded the table, I just thought to myself, ‘Oh, he’s here,’” Holmes says. “I remember thinking to myself, ‘Wow, he’s going to be something.’”

CUNY board of trustees chairman William C. Thompson Jr. agrees.

“John, quite simply, is an exemplary young man,” Thompson Jr. says in a statement. “There is no doubt in the minds of those of us who have had the good fortune of getting to know this special individual that he will succeed at whatever endeavor he puts his mind to.”

But if you ask the always-humble Aderounmu, he’s still got a long way to go. While he plans to pursue a law degree one day to help represent immigrants in New York who have no means to defend themselves, he’s taking the most pragmatic approach possible.

“Once I graduate in May, I hope to go into the work industry, then eventually go into law school,” he says. “I need to sort out my finances, and then get ready for law school.”


Women’s History Month 2018 events at City College

Women's History Month 2018 Kickoff

The Department of Student Life and Leadership Development in collaboration with the Office of Diversity and Compliance, Gender Resources and Women and Gender Studies presents: Women’s Herstory Month Kickoff on March 1.

The City College of New York’s 2018 Women’s History Month events include a kickoff with discussion and activities about female empowerment and activism, a leadership summit and a display of artwork.

The schedule of events is as follows:

Thursday, March 1st, the Department of Student Life and Leadership Development, in collaboration with the Office of Diversity and Compliance, Gender Resources and Women and Gender Studies, presents Women’s Herstory Month Kickoff, taking place in the NAC Ballroom from 12-2 p.m.  Is there a 1 sentence ‘what’s the big deal’ that you can add here?

The NYC Alliance Against Sexual Assault will also engage in a dialogue on empowerment and activism as it relates to our present times of the #TimesUP and #MeToo movements.

Thursday, March 1, The Documentary Forum at the CCNY Center for Film and Third World Newsreel present Indie Film Distribution Now at The CUNY Graduate School of Journalism from 6:30-9:30 p.m. Join Impact Producer Denae Peters of Film Sprout and Founder/CEO Deshuna Peters of kweliTV in a conversation on the distribution landscape for documentaries. The tale will be moderated by Distribution & Marketing Director Roselly Torres of Third World Newsreel.

Monday, March 5, City College Libraries will host CCNY Women Make Art 2018 in partnership with the Art Alumni Group showcasing the creative talents of the women of the college community. The artwork will be displayed in the City College Library’s (NAC, Room 301) Cohen Library Archives, 5th Floor.

Saturday, March 10, the Public Safety Department presents the “I Am Woman Conference 2018” where a panel of women will speak to the college community about financial freedom, mental health awareness, domestic violence awareness and more. The event will take place in the NAC Ballroom at 3 p.m. For more information, contact Antoinette Jennings at 845-313-3585.

Tuesday, March 13, the Beyond Identity: A Gendered-Platform for Scholar-Activists a project of The Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative will celebrate the work of 10 remarkable young women, the inaugural class of the Beyond Identity program, in Shepard hall, Room 350 from 6-8 p.m.

The students will present their own work and reflections, alongside acclaimed novelist Dr. Valeria Luiselli, author of “Tell Me How it Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions,” Pulitzer-prize winning critic, and author of “Negroland,” Margo Jefferson, author of “Veil” and political commentator, Rafia Zakaria, and City College President and social movement scholar, Dr. Vincent Boudreau.

Wednesday, March 14, Director Pam Sporn with share clips of film “Detroit 48202: Conversations Along A Postal Route,” a journey through Detroit with Wendell Watkins, an African-American mail carrier and the residents he has faithfully served for thirty years. The event will take place in Shepard Hall, Room 290/291 from 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Pam Sporn will share hare insights into how rekindling longtime ties and forming new community connections in Detroit guided the crafting of the story and deepened its analysis—as well as how she managed to fundraise and produce this film.

Thursday, March 22, a Master Class with Film Director Yoruba Richen will take place in Shepard Hall, Room 290/291 from 6:30-9:30 p.m. Director and Professor Yoruba Richen, director of the “The New Black, Promised Land,” talks about getting into the industry and how she works and gets her stories.

Friday, March 23, the CCNY’s Annual Women’s Leadership Summit will aim to inspire and empower students to foster skills or to continue with leadership roles on and off campus. The theme this year is “Developing Your Potential To Innovate and Inspire.” The event will take place in the NAC Ballroom from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Guttman Celebrates Women’s History Month

Women's History Month logoGuttman Community College is celebrating Women’s History Month with a month-long campaign filled with exciting events, and featuring our own faculty, staff and administration. The theme of the celebration is “Nevertheless, She Persisted.” Along with the timely theme, our HERstory Month Committee is proudly showcasing women in the “SHEro campaign.”

Throughout March, images featuring Guttman’s own female faculty, staff and administrators will be displayed on school monitors and social media and include words of inspiration from participants. All women-identified members of the community were encouraged to write messages honoring their SHEro superpowers and beauty. “My SHEro superpower is being adventurous,” wrote Soulyka Agana-Woodbine, Career Strategist; Professor Claire King said “my brain is beautiful.”

“The campaign is to highlight all of our strengths, superpowers and forms/meanings of beauty,” said Patricia Payano, Senior Career Advisor. She and Bindi Patel, Interim Deputy to the Dean of Student Engagement, Co-Chaired the Women’s HERstory Month Committee. All 36 SHEro photos will rotate on the monitors and social media in March.

Women's History Month: Nevertheless, She Persisted logoThe college will also celebrate with women-centered events taking place throughout the month:

Photos, Buttons, and Swag!
Tuesday, 3.06 at 11:30am
Thursday, 3.08 at 3pm
Atrium

Kick-off Women’s HERstory Month with photo booths, a button making station, and giveaways! Learn about all of the upcoming events.

Self-Defense Workshops
Wednesday, 3.14 at 11am and 3pm
Room 401

Come dressed for an active workshop where you will learn important self-defense skills and ways to prevent becoming a target. Snacks served.

SHEro Campaign: Soulyka Agana, "My SHEro superpower is bing adventurous"

“He Named Me Malala:” Food and Film
Thursday, 3.15 at 6:30pm
Atrium

Join us for a film screening that share the story of Malala Yousafzai. In the face of the Taliban’s attack on her, she persisted in her fight against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education. At the age of 17, she became the youngest person to ever win a Nobel Prize. Dinner served.

Vagina Monologues @ Hunter College
Wednesday, 3.21 at 1pm
Friday, 3.23 at 7pm

Based on interviews with women of all ages and walks of life, this play discusses the power, mystery, and excitement hidden inside a woman’s body. This award-winning show offers a witty and often poignant insight into the humanity of women. Free! Limited tickets, RSVP at www.tinyurl.com/WHMtickets. (For Guttman Students)

#TimesUp: End Gender Bias in the Workplace
Thursday, 3.22 at 3pm
Room 405

Workplace gender equality is achieved when people are able to access and enjoy the same rewards, resources and opportunities regardless of gender. In this interactive workshop, understand the wage gap, learn your value, and practice strategies to get the highest salary possible. Late lunch will be served.

SHEro Campaign: Claire King, "My Brain is Beautiful"

Let’s Talk About Sex…Women’s Health & #MeToo
Tuesday, 3.27 at 11am
Atrium

A ‘real talk’ with sexpert and nurse practitioner, April Autry, where she’ll anonymously answer all your questions about sex, women’s health, and everything in between. Nothing will be off limits! Lunch will be served.

Nevertheless She Persisted: Stories of Success
Thursday, 3.29 at 6:30pm
Atrium, reception following in 401

Everyone faces challenges. What matters is how you persist and learn from those experiences Come hear from women that will share that through it all, nevertheless they persisted. Networking reception immediately following panel.

The Women’s HERstory Month Committee is comprised of students, faculty, and staff and includes:

Katie Wilson
Anastasia Koutsidis
Diana Zechowski
Tracy Daraviras
Soulyka Agana
Carlos Burgos
Kaylen Boglo – student
Kimberly Escolastico – student
Crisnaylin Grullon – student
Melise Douglas – student
Sabrina Hernandez – student
Courtney Stevenson
Tiffany Luckain – student
Andrew Bennett
Bindi Patel – co-chair
Patricia Payano – co-chair


Baruch College Named a Top Producer of Fulbright U.S. Students

This academic year marks the first time Baruch receives the prestigious recognition

New York, NY, February 28, 2018 — Baruch College has been included on a list of colleges and universities as a Fulbright U.S. Student Top Producing Institution recently announced by the Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The Fulbright Fellowship Program is the United States government’s flagship international educational exchange program designed to increase mutual understanding between people from the U.S. and other countries.

The top-producing institutions are highlighted annually in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Baruch is listed under Master’s institutions on the U.S. Student list, where three Fulbright awards were given to Kristina Sarkissyan (’17), Maneesha Bhugwansing (’14) and Hasin Ishraque (’16). Since Baruch opened an office for prestigious grants in 2013, the number of student applicants for the Fulbright has climbed more than 150 percent and the number of recipients has likewise grown from three to nine.

This academic year marks the first time Baruch was recognized for the prestigious U.S. Student program. Previously, the College was honored for the U.S. Scholars Program with four Baruch faculty members honored with Fulbright Awards in 2016.

About the Fulbright Fellowship Program

The Fulbright Fellowship Program offers grants for students, scholars, and professionals to undertake international graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools worldwide. More than 1,900 students and young professionals across the nation are offered Fulbright Program awards each year. The Fulbright U.S. Student Program operates in over 140 countries throughout the world.  Since its inception in 1946, the Fulbright Program has provided more than 380,000 participants—chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential—with the opportunity to exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

Expanding Student Interest in Fulbright Awards

The Fulbright competition is administered at Baruch through Valeria Hymas, Deputy Director of the Office of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising.

According to Hymas, an increasing number of Baruch College students are applying to the Fulbright Awards and other opportunities such as the Truman Scholarship, Marshall Scholarship, Rhodes Scholarship, Schwarzman Scholars Program, NYC Urban Fellows program, Gilman International Scholarships, the Boren Awards, the Critical Language Scholarships, and the Jeannette K. Watson Fellowships since the opening of the Office of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising in 2013. These applicants are coming from a wide range of backgrounds and have diverse interests in their fields of study and career goals. Since 2013, a total of 74 Baruch students and alumni have received national and prestigious fellowships.

 

About Baruch College

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak 129 languages. Ranked among the top 15 percent of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. For more about Baruch College, go here.

 

# # #

Media contact: Suzanne Bronski 646-660-6093 / suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

 


CCNY’s historic Shepard Hall wins Lucy Moses Preservation Award

CCNY’s historic Shepard Hall Photo credit: Elemental Architecture, LLC.

City College of New York’s Shepard Hall, a gothic revival masterpiece designed by the legendary George Browne Post more than a century ago, is the winner of a Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award from the New York Landmarks Conservancy.

This is the second Moses Award for restoration work on the 111-year-old Harlem edifice, a national landmark. In 1997, The Great Hall, located on the second floor of Shepard Hall, received the honor.

The latest accolade is in recognition of the exterior preservation of Shepard. Renowned architect Carl Stein led the almost three decade-long project that was completed last December. It included replacing more than 70,000 terra cotta pieces using modern technology and materials while remaining faithful to Post’s neo-gothic artistic vision.

“The honor of interacting with this historic and architectural landmark has, in itself, been a post-graduate education,” said Stein.

CCNY President Vince Boudreau hailed the award. “Shepard Hall is the spiritual center of City College and the very first building erected on our campus,” he said. “It is also one of the architectural embodiments of the sacred nature of public education. It is deeply gratifying that a building that has had so much meaning to generations of City College students, faculty and staff has received this attention. We are deeply grateful for the honor.”

The coveted Moses Awards are the Conservancy’s highest honors for excellence in preservation. They are named for Lucy G. Moses, a dedicated New Yorker whose generosity benefited the City for more than 50 years. The Awards have recognized individuals, organizations, and building owners for their extraordinary contributions to the City.

“The Conservancy is grateful for the generous support of the Henry and Lucy Moses Fund, which makes the Awards possible,” said Andrea Goldwyn, its director of public policy.

This year marks the 28th anniversary of the awards. They will be presented May 8 at the historic St. Bartholomew’s Church – a 2018 Moses Award recipient as well – in mid-Manhattan.

About the New York Landmarks Conservancy
The New York Landmarks Conservancy has led the effort to preserve and protect New York City’s architectural legacy for 45 years.  Since its founding, the Conservancy has loaned and granted more than $40 million, which has leveraged more than $1 billion in some 2,000 restoration projects throughout New York, revitalizing communities, providing economic stimulus and supporting local jobs. The Conservancy’s work across the City and State protects New York’s distinctive architectural heritage for residents and visitors alike today, and for future generations

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Seven students — a record for BCC — are semi-finalists for the 2018 Jack Kent Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship

Seven BCC students (five pictured)— a record number for the College — are semi-finalists for the 2018 Jack Kent Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship, which provides up to $40,000 a year to graduating community college students planning to pursue a bachelor’s degree at a four-year college in the fall. This makes it the largest private scholarship for two-year and community college transfer students in the country. And come April when the finalists are announced, these Broncos may be among them. Seen above, seated left to right beside President Isekenegbe, are Andre Curtis (Phi Theta Kappa President, Biology major), Karen Alvarez-Julian (Kaplan scholar, Biology), Malcolm Sowah (SGA Senator, Liberal Arts and Sciences), Mary Martinez Nuñez (Student Government Association President, Chemistry) and Manzour Bakere (Mathematics). Not pictured are Krystal Ali (Marketing Management) and Shivanie Harry (Accounting).


Queens College Summer Camp, Now in its 30th Year, offers Kids Sports and Classes From Dance to Computer Coding

— Learn More and Tour at Campus Open Houses: Next One is March 11 —

FLUSHING, NY, February 27, 2018—Now celebrating its 30th year of serving families, the Queens College Summer Camp offers parents and children ages 5 to 16 the chance to tour and receive detailed information at seven upcoming Open Houses beginning Sunday, March 11.

Last year, more than a thousand families from Queens and Nassau took advantage of the camp, known widely for its value, convenience, and the variety of rich, rewarding programs available, from sports to classes in theater, dance, literature, and the sciences. New this summer is a Computer Tech Camp, which will focus on teaching children “Coding for the Future.”

“For three decades, our neighbors in Queens and on Long Island have relied on our camp for a high-quality summer experience for their children,” says Brian DeMasters, summer camp director. “We’re proud of our reputation and our outstanding staff of over 250 adults, including the licensed professional teachers who oversee all camp programs.”

Established in 1988, the summer camp is an extension of QC’s participation in NCAA Division II sports. Activities make use of the campus athletic facilities—soccer, baseball and softball fields, swimming pools, as well as indoor and outdoor tennis courts—and many of the counselors are members of the college’s varsity teams.

Parents can accommodate their schedules and budgets by choosing from 2-, 4-, 6- or 8-week sessions with a wide range of age-appropriate activities to exercise their children’s bodies and stimulate their minds and imaginations. Grab-and-go breakfast and lunch is provided to all campers, whatever their schedule. Transportation to and from campus is available at an extra fee.

Audrey Blackmore, now a freshman at QC, started at the camp when she was ten years old and attended for five years. “When I began, I chose the all-day sports program,” Blackmore recalls, an option that continues today for campers who simply want to swim and play ball—soccer, softball, tennis, volleyball and basketball. “Later, I enjoyed the dance program and crafts such as modeling with clay. I even learned to sew. There were so many options to explore!” she says. “And the teachers really care.”

When Blackmore was about to turn 16, she enrolled in the Counselor-in-Training program, which not only prepared her to be a counselor in the camp for the next two years, but also taught resume building, job interviewing, CPR skills and leadership development. “I’ve seen the camp grow over the years and I made friends years ago who became counselors, too,” Blackmore says. For summer 2018, she will be in the camp office, working to accommodate the needs of all participants, including busy working parents who might unexpectedly need an early-start time for their children.

Families are invited to learn more about the Queens College Summer Camp at Open Houses to be held on campus in the Rosenthal Library, room 230, from 10 am to 12 noon on the following dates:

Sunday, March 11 (last day for Early Bird discount of $200 off)
Saturday, March 24
Sunday, April 8
Saturday, April 21
Sunday, May 6
Saturday, May 19
Sunday, June 3

Presentations will include tours of campus facilities. For more details, including a brochure to download, please visit http://www.queensknights.com/camps . You can also call (718) 997-2777 or email QC.SummerCamp@qc.cuny.edu for information.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its eighty years of service to the City and State through its outstanding liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its 19,000+ students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report’s Best College and a Forbes magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu

 


CCNY tops CUNY schools in Mellon-funded faculty fellow selections

Faculty advisor Vanessa K. Valdés [left] with CCNY’s CUNY Mellon Faculty Fellows Trevar Riley-Reid, Norma Fuentes-Mayorga, Nilda Sanchez-Rodriguez, Andrea Felber Seligman, Laurie Woodard and Tashuna Albritton.

For junior faculty in academia, professional advancement and earning tenure are primary career goals. At The City College of New York, the CUNY Mellon Faculty Diversity Career Enhancement Initiative provides new faculty a greater shot at attaining both.

Six junior faculty members – more than at any other City University of New York institution — make up the second cohort of CFDI fellows at City College. As participants in the program funded by the Mellon Foundation and run by CUNY’s Office of Recruitment and Diversity, they will receive support and opportunities for research, writing seminars and professional workshops.

The 2018 faculty fellows, all assistant professors, and their research topics are:

  • Tashuna Albritton, CUNY School of Medicine at CCNY Department of Community Health and Social Medicine, “Addressing HIV and Sexually Transmitted Disease Disparity among African American Youth;”
  • Andrea Felber Seligman, history, “Gender Diversities in Early Africa;”
  • Norma Fuentes-Mayorga, Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership,  “When Women Come First: Immigration, Gender, Race, and Boundary Crossing;”
  • Trevar Riley-Reid, Raphael Cohen Library, “We Don’t Need the Library: We Have Google: A Possible Future for the Academic Library;”
  • Nilda Sanchez-Rodriguez, Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture Library, “In Pursuit of Diversity in the Library Profession: An Effective Approach to Leadership in Academia;” and
  • Laurie Woodard, history, “A Real Negro Girl: Fredi Washington and the Politics of Performance during the New Negro Renaissance.”

Vanessa K. Valdés, associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese, Division of Humanities and the Arts, is faculty mentor for the 18-month duration of the program.

“They’re all working on incredibly interesting projects pertinent to this historical moment and to City College’s mission,” said Valdés.

Noting that the other CUNY schools in the program, Brooklyn (two), Hunter (four) and Queens (four) had fewer fellows selected than City College, she added: “I am pleased to play a small part in how City supports new faculty on their journey to tenure and promotion.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Annual Human Rights Conference to Focus on Syrian Conflict

The Lehman Center for Human Rights and Peace Studies (LCHRPS) will be hosting its eighth annual conference on Thursday, March 1 entitled “Artist as Witness: Cultural Production, Conflict, and Human Rights in Syria” at Lehman College. The day-long conference, which begins at 10 a.m. and runs until 6:30 p.m., will held in the East Dining Room of the Music Building on campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Through seven years of war, Syrian artists have played a crucial role as witnesses to the devastation of their country, and to the suffering and fortitude of its people. This conference will explore the varied responses by artists to the ongoing conflict, and the manner in which their voices express the experiences of oppression, trauma, exile, and loss. Rarely seen works by Syrian artists will be featured at the conference, along with discussions with several artists, Syrian academics, and activists.

Among the participating artists are film director Maan Mouslli; playwright Liwaa Yazji; photographer Bassam Khabieh; and violinist Samer Ali. An exhibit by visual artist Mohamed Hafez called Unpacked: Refugee Baggage will be on display as well.

Organizers of the conference include Nour Halabi from the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School of Communications, Marianna al-Tabbaa from New York University, and Professor Christa Salamandra from Lehman College and the Graduate Center, CUNY, now interim director of LCHRPS.

The conference is being co-sponsored by the Leonard Lief Library and Lehman College’s Department of Anthropology.

A full schedule of the events with participants in all of the panel discussions can be found here.

 

Media Contact:
Thomas Staudter
718/960-8710


Physician and genome expert Robert Darnell is Levine-de Beer speaker at CCNY, March 21

Neuro-oncologist Dr. Robert Darnell is guest lecturer at Levine-de Beer Lecture March 21.

Robert B. Darnell, MD, PhD, considered one of the world’s leaders in translational medical science, will be the speaker at The City College of New York’s annual Louis Levine-Gabriella de Beer Lecture in Genetics on March 21. Darnell, who is the Heilbrunn Professor and a Senior Attending Physician at The Rockefeller University, is also an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, as well as Founding Director and CEO Emeritus of the New York Genome Center. CCNY President Vince Boudreau and The City College Fund will host the talk, entitled “Emerging Excitement in Clinical Genomics,” at 5 p.m. in the Great Hall of Shepard Hall at City College. A reception will follow.

The lecture, held annually in the spring, is open to and free for the entire college community including students, faculty, staff and alumni and to anyone outside the college community who would like to attend. RSVP by March 12 to (212) 650-6532 or ilene@ccnyfund.org.

About the Levine-deBeer Lecture

The Louis Levine-Gabriella de Beer Lecture in Genetics was established by Gabriella de Beer in memory of her husband, Professor Louis Levine. A graduate of City College, he earned his PhD in population genetics under the late great evolutionary geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky at Columbia University. Professor Levine’s research centered on population studies of Drosophila and behavior genetics of mice. Human genetics and forensic genetics were among other areas to which he was devoted. Professor Levine taught in the Department of Biology and in the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, participated in bi-national research studies in Mexico, was Visiting Professor at the Technicon (the Israel Institute of Technology) in Israel, and in later years served as a consultant and expert witness in criminal cases involving DNA evidence. The aim of these annual lectures is to perpetuate Professor Louis Levine’s lifelong interest in the ever-expanding field of genetics.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of February 26, 2018 (repost)

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

We hope that you have had a wonderful vacation with the space and time to feel rejuvenated and energized for our return to school on Monday. We are excited to see you!

We have some wonderful staffing announcements to make! Please join me in welcoming the following new-to-NEST+m faculty members:

  • Parent Coordinator:  Lisa Seale Cruz
    • As many of you know Lisa has been a steadfast advocate for the NEST+m community through her prior work as communications liaison and data manager for the NEST+m PTA. Now, building upon her communications & design background and her longtime work with the NEST+m community, Lisa will be joining our team as Parent Coordinator. Lisa is parent to 7th grader Maya Cruz and to NEST+m middle school graduate Hana Cruz. Welcome Lisa!
  • Nurse Tiffany Wallace
    • Nurse Tiffany was assigned to us as Nurse Jill’s leave replacement. The Department of Health has officially assigned Nurse Tiffany to our school. Welcome Nurse Tiffany!
  • Welcome back to Madeline Lachman
    • Maddy was formerly a TA to Amanda Sainsott in the 2nd Grade. She is joining the 4th grade team as a long-term sub. Welcome Maddy!

Please save the date for:

  • Thursday, March 1 at 6pm: K-12 Family Town Hall Meeting coordinated by the NEST+m PTA. In addition to the Principal’s Coffees which regularly take place on multiple mornings each month, I will be hosting a Town Hall meeting on Thursday with questions submitted to me prior to the evening via the PTA. Please look for more information from the PTA.
  • Thursday, March 8 and Friday, March 9th: Parent Teacher Conferences. More information forthcoming.
  • The DOE’s Annual School Survey is live now. As you likely know, each year parents, teachers and students in grades 6-12 take the NYC School Survey which is aligned to the DOE’s Framework for Great Schools. Though confidential in nature, your voice and feedback become part of the public’s understanding of how our K-12 school community contributes to every NEST+m students’ success and allows us to understand the ways in which our practices can improve.

For more on the survey, please see: http://schools.nyc.gov/Accountability/tools/survey/default.htm

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

 


Opportunities for NEST+m students

Binghamton University Summer College
This summer, Binghamton University will hold two Binghamton Summer College sessions for academically talented students who have completed their sophomore or junior year:

The deadline to submit an application is May 1, but earlier applications are encouraged since programs have limited enrollment.

Immigrant Support Program from the Teen Resource Center (TRC)
The TRC is recruiting for our new immigrants support program – Home Beyond Home. This program hopes to support new immigrant teens in learning more about New York and exploring their cultural identities. The program will run for two months (March 1 to May 10) every Thursday from 4:30pm to 6:00pm.

We accept applications from young people ages 15 to 21 who have immigrated to the United States in the last three years. Please apply here: http://bit.ly/2rMcfaE. Applications are due on Sunday, February 25 at 11:59pm.

Please click here for the program flyer in English and Chinese.

Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs 
The Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs give curious kids an opportunity to dive into an architecture topic of interest and test out their own design ideas. Each program explores a different theme through art and building activities, design challenges, and special site visits. Summer Programs run five days (Monday-Friday), 9:00am-4:00pm at the Center for Architecture. A limited number of need-based scholarships are available.

For schedule, registration, and scholarship information, please visit our website.

Camp Cardiac and Camp Neuro
Scholarship and standard applications have just opened up for Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro 2018!

Run by medical students in over 30 cities nationwide with locations in Manhattan and Westchester County, Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro are 1-week summer day camps for high school students interested in exploring careers in medicine.

Students may learn more and apply by visiting http://www.campcardiac.org andhttp://www.campneuro.org.

In addition, you may download PDF flyers by clicking on the following links:
Camp Cardiac 2018 Flyer
Camp Neuro 2018 Flyer

Duke University Summer Session
Improve your college application and go to college while still in high school!

At Duke Summer Session, we are committed to providing high school students with the opportunity to be a college student over the summer at one of the world’s premier universities.  By attending our Summer College program, you will not only have the authentic college experience of living in Duke University’s dorms and taking credit-bearing classes alongside undergraduate students, but also the opportunity to accompany your college application with a letter of recommendation from a Duke instructor and transcript from Duke University – two substantive indicators that you have what it takes to thrive in an elite academic setting.

Courses fill up quickly, so apply online today:

Application for US Students

Columbia University Asian American Alliance
Columbia University Asian American Alliance is a nonprofit student-run organization at Columbia University.

We would like to invite NEST+m students to the 2018 Crossroads High School Conference: CONVERGE, our annual, one-day leadership conference for young Asian Americans. At Crossroads, we hope that Asian American youth of all Asian identities including Pacific Islanders will be given the opportunity to question, explain, and discuss aspects of their identity through workshops, a panel, and conversations with their peers. Our mission is to provide youth with the knowledge and skills necessary to organize their communities for social change and create communities to feel supported with it.

Please register at the following link: https://tinyurl.com/y85e9vmu. You can learn more about our conference at our website: aaacrossroads.com.

Hunter College Music Department’s College Now Program
The Hunter College Music Department’s College Now program cordially invites music students who are currently juniors and un-decided seniors to attend an Open House at Hunter on Friday, March 23, 2018, from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

You will have the opportunity to participate in classes and workshops -including classical piano, vocal performance, and instrumental jazz-meet with Hunter students and take a tour of the department and college. Instrumentalists should bring their instruments. Pianists should bring something they’d like to play for the piano workshop. Singers are invited to bring a piece they are working on to possibly perform for the vocal workshop.

If interested, please let your music teacher know by March 10, so they can reserve a space for you.

The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE)
The Engineering Exploration Experience (EEE) is an annual event hosted by Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers for girls in grades 9-12. The event provides many exciting opportunities—students will participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak to professional women in various engineering industries.

Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building
Participation Fee: Early Bird (Before February 15th) – $10, Regular – $15
Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

Should you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to contact me at swe.EEE@columbia.edu.

YMCA – Teen Summer Paid Internships

  • 2 weeks of professional development training (sessions are facilitated by industry professionals from Colgate, Univision, Uber, Memorial Sloan, HBO etc)
  • 6 weeks at internship (participants are placed in their industry of choice*)
  • Each participant is paired to a mentor for the duration of the program
  • Participants receive 2 monthly metrocards + $300 clothing stipend + $1500 “working” stipend

www.teencareerconnection.org

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

DOE Summer Opportunities and February workshops
Undocumented students can still apply for the Dream scholarship due on March 1st, 2018 Link: http://www.thedream.us/

NYU Science Research Program for 10th & 11th Grade Students: 

After a successful launch in summer 2013, the NYU Tandon School of Engineering continues to conduct the Applied Research Innovations in Science and Engineering (ARISE) program.  This program is for academically strong, current 10th and 11th grade New York City students with a demonstrated interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

The program is free, and each student receives a stipend of $500 for the 8-week session.  Participating students are expected to work in their labs every day, and they receive careful guidance from NYU faculty and graduate students.  At the end of the summer, the students present their work at a research symposium.

Here’s a link to the program website: http://engineering.nyu.edu/k12stem/arise/

Applications are due March 1, 2018. There is time to apply!

NYU Journalisam – Summer 2018
Build your skills! Report, write, shoot, post…food, fashion, culture
Enrollment opens February 12

Paid High School Internships
We are pleased to announce that Wave Hill is now accepting applications for our two paid High School Internship programs, the Forest Project and the Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship.
The Forest Project is open to current sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The seven-week program meets Mondays through Fridays from late June through August 21st, 2018. Interns work in small, supervised crews to help restore woodland areas at Wave Hill. The application deadline for this program is March 18th, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/forest-project/.

The Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship (WERM) is open to current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. This 14-month program provides a unique opportunity to work with local ecologists and participate in ecological research projects. WERM students learn content and develop basic research skills during their first summer through hands-on projects and coursework.  After building on their skills at weekend workshops during the academic year, students embark on a final research project under the guidance of a science mentor for their second summer. The application deadline for this program is April 1st, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/woodland-ecology-research-mentorship/

We have Scholarships for students for our Summer Programs in New York!!
We are glad to offer students a special 40% scholarship and discount (tuition is then $1,490 instead of $2,450) on our Summer 3-Week Summer Program “Discover New York Business and Finance”, which combines top level courses, company and financial institutions visits and guests speakers lectures.

Click here for more information:
https://www.cognitoforms.com/LCapital4/BFMSNYALLPROGRAMS2

Please find hereafter the brochure for our 3-Week Program:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0ikwJKoF7dTWGl3eFdDYU5MUXM/view?usp=sharing

August Writers’ Workshop
The School of The New York Times is excited to announce our new end-of-summer August Writers’ Workshop for rising middle and high school students (grades 7-12) of all writing abilities on August 13–17 in New York City. This week-long program helps students enhance their writing skills under the tutelage of some of the best writers in the world. Students will emerge with strengthened communication skills, confidence in their writing and a profound sense of the power of the written word and visual communication—all right before school starts! The August Writers’ Workshop is the perfect way to kick off the academic year and occurs right after our NYC Summer Academy.

Workshop Quick Facts
Date: August 13–17, 2018
Grade Eligibility: Rising 7-12
Click here for more information.
Click here to register.

Summer 2018 College Credit Courses at Baruch College
Current 10th and 11th graders can apply to enroll in one of the following college credit bearing courses for FREE:

  • Business Fundamentals – BUS 1011 (3 Credits)
  • Journalistic Writing – JRN 3050 (4 credits)
  • Cultural Anthropology – ANT 1001 (3 credits)
  • Critical Health Issues – HED 1911 (3 credits)

Program Details:

  • All courses will take place at Baruch College from July 5th – August 16th
  • Courses will be from Monday through Thursday from 9am – 2pm

Eligibility:

  • Be a current NYC public high school 10th or 11th grader
  • Have the following test scores: PSAT/SAT Verbal (Min. 480) OR English Language Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR  ACT English Score (Min. 20),  OR  Overall 80+ English average

Online Application: www.baruch.cuny.edu/collegenow. Deadline for application and ALL supporting documents: April 13th, 2018

Urban Leadership Fellows
ULF exposes exceptional graduating high school seniors to the municipal securities industry through highly supported paid summer internships. Each student is paired with a mentor the duration of the internship.

  • Student Recruitment: High School seniors with at least a 3.0 GPA interested in pursuing finance, law and/or government in college. Big push for NYCHA residents.
  • Duration & Hours: 40 hours/week for 6 weeks in July and August 2018
  • Program Requirements: Interns work 40 hours per week and attend events organized by Futures and Options, including orientations, an opening breakfast, municipal bond school, Excel workshops, public speaking, writing, and presentation trainings, a trip to DC hosted by the MSRB, and a closing luncheon
  • Deadline: Final deadline: March 9th, 2018
  • Scholarship: $500 book grant for all participants, ULF alumni entering their sophomore, junior, and senior year who earn a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher receive $1,250 every year. ULF alumni who maintain a cumulative GPA between 3.25 and 3.49 and received $1,000 college scholarships

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

Interested in medicine or engineering? 
We’re very excited to announce an upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 21, 2018 at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, NY. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments.

We are now seeking applicants for our New York, NY program. Participants should be women in grades 10 and up with an expressed interest in science, medicine and/or engineering.

Applicants should fill out our online application in advance of the March 21, 2018 application deadline. Additional information can be found on our website: www.perryinitiative.org — The application may be accessed directly using the following link:http://perryinitiative.org/programs/student-online-application/ — More information and a printable flyer for this event can be found here.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C. Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life!

Please click here for more information: https://summer.gwu.edu/precollege
Please click here to apply: https://summer.gwu.edu/apply-precollege

Engineering Exploration Experience
This spring, Columbia University’s Society of Women Engineers (SWE) will be hosting its annual Engineering Exploration Experience. The event will expose female high school students to the exciting career opportunities available in all branches of engineering. The event provides students with the opportunity to participate in workshops led by professors and an engineering design challenge mentored by Columbia students. There will also be a panel session where students can meet and speak with professional women in various engineering industries.

Registration will open within the next few weeks and will be on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Event Details:
Date: Saturday, March 24th, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Where: Columbia University (NYC), Mudd Engineering Building

Lunch, t-shirts, and materials for the engineering design challenge will be provided. If the participation fee poses a financial concern, students will be able to request a fee-waiver within the registration form.

CURIE Academy
Curie Academy is a one-week summer residential program for high school girls who excel in math and science, enjoy solving problems, and want to learn more about careers in engineering

  • Website: https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Dates: July 15-21, 2018 (attendance is required for the entire program.)
  • Application: Available online at
    https://sites.coecis.cornell.edu/curieacademy/
  • Deadline: Received by March 1, 2018
  • Rising seniors (class of 2019) who are women and African/Black American, Latino, Native American/Alaska Native, or Pacific Islander and/or first generation college students meeting the requirements below will automatically be considered for a full tuition waiver for the 2018 CATALYST Academy.

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 

  • NYC PSAT Exam & Review Seminar (FREE) – 3/10 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • College Search Seminar (FREE) – 3/17, 10am-12pm – Register Here
  • May 5 SAT Prep Starts 3/17 – Enroll Here
  • Practice SAT/ACT Exam (FREE) – 3/24 – Register Here
  • Study Skills Seminar (FREE) – 4/21, 10am-12pm – Register Here
  • June 2 SAT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
  • June ACT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
  • Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 4/28 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 5/19 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 6/2 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
  • Finding Your Right Path Seminar (FREE) – 6/16, 10am-12pm – Register Here
  • Common App & Essay Workshop – 8/14 & 8/16, 6-9pm – Enroll Here

– Making College Affordable Seminar (FREE) – 9/8, 10am-12pm – Register Here

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018

Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog.


Baruch College Launches the Zicklin School of Business Research Paper Series

Faculty research and findings to be more accessible to broader audiences

New York, NY, February 26, 2018 – Baruch College announced today the launch of the Zicklin School of Business Research Paper Series in collaboration with the Social Science Research Network (SSRN). This Series allows the Zicklin School of Business to share the latest studies, research and findings from its faculty, who are thought leaders and experts in their fields, and to stimulate discussion on a wide range of business-related topics, such as accounting, finance, economics, entrepreneurship, international business, management, marketing, information technology, data science and analytics, business law, and real estate.

To receive the free Series, which will be published bi-monthly, sign up here.

The inaugural issue the Zicklin School of Business Research Paper Series is now available and features the following topics:

Dr. Qing Hu, editor of the series and senior associate dean for academic affairs and innovation at the Zicklin School of Business, noted that high quality academic research is critical to examining and understanding the complexities of today’s business environment, and can contribute to innovation and improvements in the public and private sectors.

“Our faculty are continuously conducting research that have significant and important impacts on business and society,” said Dr. Hu. “Findings of academic research are frequently of great interest to the business community. Along with the media, we hope that this Series provides an open, free, and valuable resource to our constituents.”

About Baruch College

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 18,000 students, who represent 164 countries and speak 129 languages. Ranked among the top 15 percent of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. For more about Baruch College, go here.

About the Zicklin School of Business

Backed by a long tradition of excellence in higher education, the Zicklin School of Business is located within Baruch College—an institution that is consistently ranked among the top performers in areas such as academic excellence, diversity, and value.

Zicklin is proud to be a leader in providing superior undergraduate, graduate, and executive business education for the twenty-first century. Our programs are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), and our classes are taught by faculty who are thought leaders, active researchers, and experts in their fields.

Integrated both physically and philosophically into the fabric of New York City, the world’s financial capital, the Zicklin School of Business is committed to delivering relevant, affordable, academically rigorous business education that is both world-class in quality and reputation and worldwide in its impact.

 

                                                                                    # # #

Media Contact: Suzanne Bronski 646-660-6093 / suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

 

 


York College Professor Publishes New Book “Sexual Harassment Online: Shaming and Silencing Women in the Digital Age”

 

February 2018/216 pages
ISBN: 978-1-62637-695-3E-book available!hc $67 $35 Special price for

a limited time only! Mention e-blast when ordering.

 

 

Announcing . . .

Sexual Harassment Online:

Shaming and Silencing Women in

the Digital Age

Tania G. Levey

Click here to read this book’s introduction.

“A thoughtful and thought-provoking look at the language of online hate and the persistence of misogyny in contemporary Western culture.” —Alecea Standlee, Gettysburg College

Women who use social media are often subjected to blatant sexual harassment, facing everything from name calling to threats of violence. Aside from being disturbing, what does this abuse tell us about gender and sexual norms? And can we use the Internet to resist, even transform, destructive misogynistic norms?

Exploring the language of shaming and silencing women in the cybersphere, Tania Levey addresses these questions and also considers how online attempts to regulate women’s behavior intersect with issues of race, ethnicity, and class.

Tania G. Levey is associate professor of sociology at York College, City University of New York.


BMCC TPAC Presents the Music and Magic of Motown

Motortown All Stars, performers from The Miracles, The Capitals and The Temptations

Motortown All Stars, performers from The Miracles, The Capitals and The Temptations

The BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (BMCC TPAC) proudly presents The Motortown All-Stars on Friday, March 23 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25-$35 and available online, at the door, or by calling (212) 220-1460.

Direct from Detroit, The Motortown All-Stars are an all-star lineup of world-class vocalists and musicians from the legendary ranks of The Miracles, The Capitols and The Temptations. The show is jam-packed with impeccable harmonies, dazzling choreography and those timeless Motown grooves that everyone knows and loves. You can choose to dance, sing along, or just sit back (if you can) and watch the show as they perform all of the greatest hits from the likes of The Miracles, The Four Tops, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder.

Every performance contains that unmistakable Motown stamp, including flashy suits, great singing and dancing, and a polished show that has set the bar for every vocal artist since the late 1950s.

Band members include David Finley (of The Miracles), George Wilson (of The Capitols), and Douglas Gaddy and Charles Franklin (of Ali Woodson’s Temptations).

The backup band is made up of seasoned performers who have been the musicians of choice for hundreds of Motown, Nostalgia, Classic Rock and Doo Wop shows around the country. They have both live performance and recording credits with a veritable who’s who of popular music artists from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s.

This show is an unforgettable celebration for audiences from eight to 80.

BMCC Tribeca PAC is Downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families and audiences of all ages. BMCC Tribeca PAC strives to present a broad global perspective through the presentation of high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. BMCC Tribeca PAC is located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue and West Street) and is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R subway lines as well as the New Jersey Path Train. For more information visit  www.tribecapac.org.


The Art of Stand-Up: John Fugelsang Comes to BMCC TPAC

The BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (BMCC TPAC) will host its annual evening of laughter on Friday, March 16 at 8 p.m. with acclaimed headline comedian John Fugelsang along with fellow comedians Laura Bolivar, John Guild (John G), and Jim Mendrinos.

John Fugelsang, comedian

Preview clips of all four performers and purchase tickets, $20 each, online or by calling (212) 220-1460.

BMCC TPAC is located on the main BMCC campus at 199 Chambers Street, between Greenwich Street and West Street.

Comedians’ bios

Actor, comedian and broadcaster John Fugelsanghosts Tell Me Everything weekdays on SiriusXM Insight #121. He’s also appeared at Montreal’s Just for Laughs Festival and HBO’s U.S Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen. Fugelsang has hosted America’s Funniest Home Videosfor ABC, and Bill Maher called him “one of my favorite comedians.” His film and TV credits include Price Check, opposite Parker Posey; as well as BeckerProvidenceCoyote UglyThe Girl on the Train and Maggie Black. He also plays two roles in the romantic comedy The Whole Truth, starring Elisabeth Rohm and Eric Roberts.

Laura Bolivar is a stand-up comedian and actress based in New York City and says, “I was born and raised in Venezuela, but found out since I came to America… that I’m Mexican.” She’s on Youtube, Twitter and Instagram.

New Jersey Native John Guild (John G), is a blue-collar comedian with an intelligent bent. Starting his comedy career in New York City at clubs such as Gotham Comedy Club and The Greenwich Village Comedy Club, Guild quickly started hitting the road playing rooms up in Connecticut and in his native New Jersey, being featured in the Comedy Cove and other venues. His material is insightful and has an “everyman” quality that many people can relate to.

Comedian Jim Mendrinos is the common man with uncommon comedy observations. From world politics to the politics of personal relationships, Mendrino creates a symphony of comedy covering a wide spectrum of humanity. He is respected in the industry, so much so that he was asked to author The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Comedy Writing (Alpha Press, 2004). His comedy has been featured on stand-up stages around the world and he has brought his special brand of funny to Current TV, SiTV, Comedy Central, The Fox News Network, HBO and the BBC.

BMCC Tribeca PAC is Downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families and audiences of all ages. BMCC Tribeca PAC strives to present a broad global perspective through the presentation of high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. BMCC Tribeca PAC is located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue and West Street) and is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R subway lines as well as the New Jersey Path Train. For more information visit  www.tribecapac.org.


POETRY TO CUNY EARS: CSI PROFESSOR PATRICIA SMITH WINS COVETED $100,000 KINGSLEY TUFTS POETRY AWARD

An English professor at the College of Staten Island, Patricia Smith, has won the prestigious $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, expanding the ranks of exceptionally accomplished CUNY poets whose works have drawn the highest honors, including two Pulitzer Prizes in three years.

The Kingsley Tufts award, considered one of the most prestigious and lucrative poetry prizes, recognizes Smith’s collection “Incendiary Art: Poems,” which explores tragedy and grief in black lives and communities. The award, based at Claremont Graduate University in California, is given to a poet in midcareer and is the most lucrative prize in the world given for a single volume of poetry.

“CUNY is home to a remarkable number of exceptionally talented poets, who enrich our students’ educational experience as well as the culture at large,” Chancellor James B. Milliken said. “We congratulate Patricia Smith on this wonderful recognition.”

“This is one of the best moments in my entire life,” said Smith, who also recently won an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work – Poetry, for the “Incendiary Art” collection, published by Northwestern University Press.

Smith is also the author of six critically recognized poetry collections, as well as having been a 2008 National Book Award finalist. She received the 2014 Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize from the Library of Congress, the 2013 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets and a 2013 Phillis Wheatley Book Award. She has read her work in a variety of venues throughout the United States and the world.

Smith is the second CUNY professor to garner the Kingsley Tufts Award. Tom Sleigh of Hunter College won it in 2008.

Another CSI professor, Tyehimba Jess, won the second CUNY-connected Pulitzer Prize for poetry last year; Gregory Pardlo, a graduate student at the time, took the Pulitzer in 2015. The University’s growing poetry footprint also includes Kimiko Hahn, who teaches in the Queens College M.F.A. program and won the PEN/Voelcker Award for Poetry; Ben Lerner, who teaches at Brooklyn College and is a MacArthur Fellow; Baruch College Distinguished Professor Grace Schulman, winner of the 2016 Poetry Society of America’s Frost Medal for Distinguished Achievement in American Poetry; Hunter College Distinguished Professor Meena Alexander, a winner of the PEN Open-Book Award; and Cate Marvin, an English professor at CSI and 2015 Guggenheim Fellow.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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First Meeting of College Council Under New Governance Plan

Guttman College Council.

College Council meeting February 21, 2018.

 

The inaugural meeting of the College Council under Guttman’s new Governance Plan was held February 21, 2018. Scott E. Evenbeck, College President, welcomed attendees and gave introductions. Stuart Cochran, Dean of Strategic Planning and Accreditation, then reviewed the Council Responsibilities and Council and Standing Committee membership under the new Governance Plan.  He provided an overview of Open Meeting law and procedures and discussed the role of the Council Secretary and Council Alternates, who now will have voting privileges to ensure a simple meeting quorum is met.

At this meeting, the College Council elected:

  • Vice Chair: Rebecca Walker
  • Secretary: Marcus Allen
  • 3 Members of the Council to Serve on the Executive Committee:
    • Nicola Blake
    • Bindi Patel
    • Tashana Samuel
  • 4 Faculty Representatives to Serve on the Legislative Committee:
    • Keino Brown
    • Mary Gatta
    • Jihyun Kim
    • Jinzhong Niu
  • One Full-Time Non-Teaching Representative from the Council to Serve on the Legislative Committee:
    • Diane Zechowski

The Executive Council will appoint a Parliamentarian. The development of By-Laws for the Council and Standing Committees will be created during the Spring I session.

 


“Genius Award” Recipient Cristina Jiménez Moreta Named May 2018 Commencement Speaker

— A Queens College Graduate, She Received a 2017 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur “Genius Award” for Her Role in Shaping the National Debate on Immigration Policy —

February 14, 2018 (Queens, NY) – Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez has announced that alumna Cristina Jiménez Moreta will be the main speaker for the school’s 94th commencement ceremony, which will take place on Thursday, May 31, at 9 am. Jiménez Moreta, who graduated cum laude with a BA in political science in 2007, was named a 2017 MacArthur Fellow for her role in changing public perceptions of immigrant youth and for helping to shape the national debate around immigration policy.

“What could be more appropriate than to welcome back as our commencement speaker an alumna like Cristina who truly embodies our motto, We Learn so That We May Serve,” said President Matos. “She has been a game changer since her days on campus when she cofounded the New York State Youth Leadership Council. Now, as a MacArthur ‘Genius Award’ recipient, she will inspire a new generation of graduates to pursue the limitless futures they built here at Queens College.”

Jiménez Moreta, 33, was recognized for her work at United We Dream (UWD), an immigrant youth-led organization she cofounded; watch her describe her journey to becoming a social justice organizer and “Genius Award” recipient in this MacArthur Foundation video. The youngest of last year’s 24 award recipients, Jiménez Moreta received an award of $625,000, to be distributed over five years. Coincidentally, the award was announced on October 11, which was the 80th anniversary of the first day of classes at Queens College in 1937.

UWD is a nonpartisan network comprised of more than 100,000 immigrant youth and allies who organize and advocate for the dignity and fair treatment of immigrant youth and families. Under Jiménez Moreta’s leadership as Executive Director, UWD has supported and trained tens of thousands of immigrant youth leaders to find and express their voice. The organization provides scholarships to highly qualified Dreamers so that they can continue their education, a cause dear to Jiménez Moreta, who arrived in New York from Ecuador at age 13, and earned her degree at Queens College as an undocumented student.

While receiving the Distinguished Service Award  from the college’s political science department last spring, Jiménez Moreta remarked, “I would have never thought that the knowledge, encouragement, and mentorship I received from the faculty and the experiences that I had here at Queens College were shaping me to have an impact on immigration policy that will go down in history books. It is here that I really found my voice and grew as a student, as a thinker, as an organizer, and as a community leader.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its eighty years of service to the City and State through its outstanding liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its 19,000+ students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report’s Best College and a Forbes magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


THE JOHN JAY/HARRY FRANK GUGGENHEIM SYMPOSIUM ON CRIME IN AMERICA CONVENED FOR THE 13TH YEAR

The John Jay/Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America Convened for the 13th Year

 

On February 15 and 16, John Jay College hosted the 13th annual John Jay/Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America. The annual conference brings together researchers and policymakers with journalists and reporters to deepen public understanding on today’s most relevant crime issues. The first day of the symposium ended with the annual Trailblazer Award Dinner, where Bill Moyers was honored as the fifth recipient of the annual Justice Media Trailblazer Award. The award is given annually by John Jay College and The Cr