School/Class News





Kingsborough Community College Earns New Honor for Excellence in Student Success: Achieving the Dream’s Leader College of Distinction Designation

Only community college in New York State to earn the newest recognition for high achievement

ATD-Leader College Distinction Logo

Brooklyn, NY: It was announced tonight that Kingsborough Community College (KCC) has earned Achieving the Dream’s newest recognition for achieving higher student outcomes and narrowing equity gaps: the designation Leader College of Distinction. KCC was one of 11 community colleges nationwide to earn the accolade, the only one in New York State. The college earned Leader College distinction in 2015.

Achieving the Dream (ATD) leads a national network of more than 220 community colleges championing evidence-based improvements to help community college students achieve their goals, resulting in improved skills, better employability, and economic growth for families, communities, and the nation as a whole.

Participating colleges focus on seven essential areas: leadership and vision; data and technology; equity; teaching and learning; engagement and communication; strategy and planning; and policies and practices.

“The college as a whole has embraced ATD’s principles. Subcommittees of faculty, staff, and students have been gathering and analyzing data to develop new strategies aimed at strengthening and promoting more equitable outcomes,” noted Kingsborough Community College President Claudia Schrader.

Kingsborough has focused on overcoming opportunity gaps by identifying barriers that are nearly always outside the student’s control, including race, English proficiency, and family or community wealth.

“The metrics ATD established for Leader College of Distinction are meant to encourage colleges to sustain aggressive efforts that result in far greater student success and equity,” said Dr. Karen A. Stout, president and CEO of Achieving the Dream. “The honor recognizes Network colleges that have stayed focused on the change process and seen real improvements in student achievement across the institution.” Only colleges that have been Leader Colleges for three or more years were invited to apply.

 

About Kingsborough Community College  

Kingsborough Community College is dedicated to promoting student learning and development as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community. Kingsborough annually serves approximately 15,000 full- and part-time students in liberal arts and career courses. The only one of The City University of New York’s seven community colleges to be located in Brooklyn, Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into professional careers.

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CONTACT:
Lynn Reddy | Achieving the Dream Inc. / lreddy@achievingthedream.org
JoAnne Meyers / JoAnne.Meyers@kbcc.cuny.edu / 718-368-5169


Exploring the relationship between sexual orientation components and health risk behaviors

woman in club accepting pills from manIn recent studies, women who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB), or who report attraction to or sex with women indicated greater levels of substance use and risky sexual behavior. Few studies have measured associations between different components of sexual orientation (i.e., sexual identity, attraction, or behavior) and health risk behaviors, particularly over time.

To address this, CUNY SPH doctoral graduate Margaret Paschen-Wolff led a study for her dissertation with committee members Christian Grov, Elizabeth Kelvin and Nicholas Grosskopf. Using data from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), the researchers compared past-year sexual risk behavior, binge drinking, drug use, and sexually transmitted infection treatment among sexual minority women (SMW) versus sexual majority women (SMJW) by each sexual orientation component separately and by all components combined and tested for effect modification by NSFG survey cycle. The study was published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior.

The researchers found that, in multivariable models, SM identity, behavior, and attraction individually predicted significantly greater odds of risk behaviors. After adjusting for all three orientation components simultaneously, only non-monosexual attraction and behavior (i.e., attraction to and sex with both males and females) continued to predict elevated odds of risk behaviors. Non-monosexual attraction and behavior remained associated with sexual risk behavior and drug use over time. Trends in disparities over time between SMW versus SMJW varied depending on how sexual orientation was measured.

Paschen-Wolff says that, in a shifting political and social context, research should include multidimensional sexual orientation constructs to accurately identify all SMW and prioritize their health needs.

“Our findings indicate that measurement methods matter when assessing associations between sexual orientation and health risk behaviors,” says Paschen-Wolff. “To identify the specific mechanisms that contribute to elevated risks for non-monosexual women observed in multiple NSFG survey cycles, future research should investigate health outcomes separately among women who express non-monosexuality in terms of identity, behavior, and/or attraction rather than considering all sexual minority women as a composite group. Multilevel interventions should be implemented to achieve health equity for all SMW.”

Paschen-Wolff MM, Kelvin E, Wells BE, Campbell ANC, Grosskopf NA, Grov C. Changing Trends in Substance Use and Sexual Risk Disparities among Sexual Minority Women as a Function of Sexual Identity, Behavior, and Attraction, Arch Sex Behav(2019)


BCC Starts the New Year with Three New Grants:

Bronx Community College is swinging into the spring semester with a big assist from three grants.

A $1,190,090 grant from the New York State Education Department under the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. This continued funding makes it possible for BCC to provide essential career and technical education-related programs and services to better prepare our students for employment upon graduation. An annual evaluation of the programs supported through this grant demonstrates that each initiative has a strong impact on students’ workforce preparedness.

A $100,000 grant from the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation in continued support of the Petrie Student Emergency Grant Fund, which provides BCC students with emergency aid for short-term financial crises, including, but not limited to: temporary loss of income, medical/dental emergencies, loss of child care and homelessness or sudden loss of housing. This brings the total BCC has received for this invaluable fund to $600,000 since December 2013.

A $1,500 “Vision” Planning grant from Humanities-NY, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will support BCC faculty in planning an arts and community event on campus this fall. The grant will underwrite a call for and juried selection of artists across a broad range of media to re-envision fame and public commemoration at BCC’s Hall of Fame for Great Americans. The planning team is led by Professor and Archivist Cynthia Tobar.

These grants will allow us to further our goal of building a community of excellence.


KAILEAH GAYNOR ’20 MALCOLM/KING SCHOLARSHIP WINNER SETS HER SIGHTS ON LAW SCHOOL

Kaileah Gaynor ’20 Malcolm/King Scholarship Winner Sets Her Sights On Law School

 

To continue our celebration of Black History month, and in anticipation of our 29th Malcolm/King Awards Breakfast, we spoke with the recipients of the Malcolm/King Scholarship. Their success serves as an inspiration to students of all races, and their deep understanding and appreciation of African-American history is a testament to the many contributions African-Americans have made to this country. Our first “Malcolm/King Scholarship Spotlight” is Kaileah Gaynor, a junior majoring in Law and Society.

February is Black History Month. What does it mean to you to celebrate the many achievements African-Americans have contributed to this country?
It makes me proud and honored to be where I am today, and to have the opportunities that I have today. Years ago, school wasn’t accessible to African-Americans—especially for women. To be able to come to school and achieve a higher education is an honor.

What goals do you have for advancing equality and fairness for all people, especially African-Americans? 
I currently work as an after-school counselor for kindergarten and first grade. What I really want to do is to work in legislation, making sure that all schools have the same resources that upper-class, predominately white neighborhoods already have—the sports programs, the music programs, the language classes. I want to make sure that all kids have these resources.

 

“What I really want to do is to work in legislation, making sure that all schools have the same resources that upper-class, predominately white neighborhoods already have.” —Kaileah Gaynor, ’20

 

When you think of African-American history, what makes you the proudest?
Probably the perseverance and the drive that a lot of our ancestors had in paving the way for the future generations. Both of my grandparents immigrated from Jamaica. My grandmother came to the United States and got her bachelor’s degree. Then she got her master’s degree and became a teacher. My grandfather was a mechanical engineer and worked tirelessly to make sure that my father would be able to go to school and get his education. They pushed us all to do the same thing.

If you could talk to Malcolm X or Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., what would you say to them?
First, I would say thank you. Then I would ask them what kept them going, especially through such a hard time when they were facing adversity and everyone was against them. They still continued to fight and work towards an equal world where there is opportunity for all.

Dr. King once famously said, “Let us realize the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” As a student at a school focused on justice, what does that quote mean to you? 
At the end of the day, justice will prevail. You may feel like you are always fighting and you may not see the end point, but even though the road is long it will always lean towards justice and equality.

 

“At the end of the day, justice will prevail.” —Kaileah Gaynor, ’20

 

What does it mean to you to receive the Malcolm/King Scholarship? 
It’s an honor to receive this scholarship. It’s the first scholarship that I’ve ever gotten. I don’t get financial aid, so I have to take out loans and pay out-of-pocket. I plan on going to law school after John Jay, and this helps ease the weight of those loans.

If everything goes according to plan, where do you see yourself in 10 years? 
In 10 years, I see myself finished with law school and practicing law. Right now, I’m looking at the University of Miami Law School. I’m not 100 percent sure where I will be, but I know that I want to go into legislation and work on making laws for underprivileged schools or for women’s rights.


EVANA ALAM (’20) JOINS PROFESSORS MARIA D’AGOSTINO AND NICOLE ELIAS FOR GENDER EQUITY RESEARCH

Evana Alam (’20) Joins Professors Maria D’Agostino and Nicole Elias For Gender Equity Research

 

Honored about being one of the first recipients of the 2018-19 Inaugural Presidential Student-Faculty Research Collaboration Award, Maria D’Agostino, Associate Professor of Public Management and Nicole Elias, Assistant Professor of Public Management, have started their research project. Co-founders of Women in the Public Sector (WPS), a John Jay organization dedicated to addressing gender issues in public service, the professors have titled their project Gender Equity in Municipalities. The goal? To teach students about how to address gender equity differently“Our student-faculty research collaboration examines how municipalities are addressing gender equality through three learning objectives that contribute to student success, developing knowledge of gender equity; building and applying research skills; and participating in mentorship and professional development for future opportunities,” said D’Agostino. “We hope that this research will get us closer to gender justice by educating, engaging, and fostering a consortium of students, faculty, public service practitioners, and community members interested in women in public service.”

 

“We hope that this research will get us closer to gender justice by educating, engaging, and fostering a consortium of students, faculty, public service practitioners, and community members interested in women in public service.”—Professor Maria D’Agostino

 

Professor Maria D’Agostino

Professor Maria D’Agostino

 

“What is most exciting about working with students is their energy and passion for the projects as they determine which career path to pursue.” — Nicole Elias, Assistant Professor

 

Looking forward to the collaboration, Elias couldn’t help but state her eagerness to work with John Jay students. “WPS has worked with over 13 students since 2013. We view students as collaborators who bring valuable insights and experiences to projects,” said Elias. “What is most exciting about working with students is their energy and passion for the projects as they determine which career path to pursue.”

 

Professor Nicole Elias

Professor Nicole Elias

With one student already selected—Evana Alam (’20), a master’s in Public Administration graduate scholar—D’Agostino and Elias, are still searching for other students to participate. Hoping to encourage her fellow John Jay classmates to take part in the research, we spoke with Alam, to learn more about her goals for the project, what this collaboration means to her, and what advice she has for other John Jay students.

 

Evana Alam

Evana Alam

What do you hope to accomplish with this research?
I’m working with the co-founders of Women in the Public Sector, Maria D’Agostino and Nicole Elias and other students to gather information on how municipalities determine gender equality. To do this, we will be using three objectives, which are developing knowledge of gender equity, building and using research skills, and taking part in mentorship and professional development. By the end of this project, my hope is that we have raised awareness about gender equity issues within public service.

Why are you interested in participating in this specific research collaboration?
I was born and raised in Bangladesh, where women are discriminated in the workforce. There are glass ceilings on almost every sector in the country. Females in the workforce face discrimination when it comes to receiving promotions, salary increases, and job offers compared to males. In addition, women are viewed as incapable of performing in male-dominated fields. By participating in this research collaboration, I hope to raise awareness, so that women in countries like Bangladesh can experience their full range of rights and freedoms.

 

“By participating in this research collaboration, I hope to raise awareness so that women in countries like Bangladesh can experience their full range of rights and freedoms.”—Evana Alam

 

Have you worked with these professors before?
I worked under the supervision of the professors through their organization, Women in the Public Sector. In 2018, I participated in the American Association of Public Administration at Denver, Colorado with the WPS team. We organized a workshop geared towards gender equity in the public sector workforce. That was my first public administration conference and I enjoyed meeting various academics from around the country and learning more about their research. This conference got me thinking about the research that I would do for my graduate program.

Why is it important to have these collaborations between students and faculty?
Student-faculty collaborations help to foster strong relationships while learning. Students and faculty have different viewpoints on issues affecting gender equity. Therefore, this collaboration will allow the team to share their ideas and see things in a different light. The collaboration allows for a deeper bond between students and faculty through the engagement of high-quality research skills. By working with faculty, students would also be able to learn more about themselves. For example, I hope to learn how to advance my research methods outside of the traditional education I received as an undergrad.

How do you hope this research will help move the needle forward in terms of justice?
Gender equality has been a longstanding problem throughout the world. Hopefully, through our research and the collaboration between students and faculty, this issue will gain the attention of students at John Jay College, who will impact society with their work. These crucial topics can ultimately lead to policy change in the United States and elsewhere in the world.

 

“If you are directly impacted by an issue, make it your priority to learn as much as you can about it and use that knowledge to become a catalyst for change.”—Evana Alam

 

What advice do you have for other John Jay students—especially younger students—who may be interested in participating in a research project similar to this one?
I believe that challenging yourself and gaining mentorship from faculty will increase your skills and offer opportunities to develop yourself professionally and academically. Nevertheless, if you are directly impacted by an issue, make it your priority to learn as much as you can about it and use that knowledge to become a catalyst for change.


Baruch College Students Study Abroad with Gilman International Scholarships

Baruch College students from the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences and Zicklin School of Business received prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships to study abroad during the Winter/Spring 2019 semester. The five students will use their scholarships to study in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Peru, and Spain.

“Once again, the talents, drive, and ambition of Baruch students are recognized and rewarded with a prestigious international scholarship,” said Valeria L. Hymas, Deputy Director of the College’s National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising. “The Gilman international Scholarships will provide the students with exceptional student abroad experiences that will significantly contribute to their professional development as global leaders and influencers.”

The Gilman Scholarship, named after former Congressman Benjamin A. Gilman of New York, is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, and grants awards up to $5,000 to apply towards study abroad or internship program costs.

Meet Four Gilman International Scholars

Sumaiya Hassan headshot

Sumaiya Hassan (’20) B.B.A. International Marketing, Zicklin School of Business

Destination: Spain

“I’m ecstatic about the opportunity to study and live in Spain. Being able to experience a different educational system will better prepare me to achieve my goals. I hope to strengthen my skills by becoming more adaptable, self-aware, and culturally ambiguous.”

Hanjie Kuang headshot

Hanjie Kuang (’20) B.B.A. Marketing Management, Zicklin School of Business

Destination: Japan

“The Office of National and Prestigious Scholarships and Fellowships worked with me to make sure my application was competitive. I felt supported throughout the entire process having the help of Valeria Hymas, the director of the department, to provide feedback and keep me on track.”

Wendy Lei headshot

Wendy Lei (‘20) B.A. Graphic Communication, Weissman School of Arts and Sciences

Destination: Hong Kong  

“The Gilman Scholarship gives me the opportunity to explore a new culture through a social and academic lens. Taking business courses abroad is the best complement to the art courses I take at Baruch. My time in Hong Kong will allow me to develop the skills and mindset needed to work in a foreign environment in the future.”

Scarlett Rodriguez headshot

Scarlett Rodriguez (’20), B.B.A. Economics, ZIcklin School of Business

Destination: China

“My long-term goal is to serve as a corporate lawyer and I am hoping that the Gilman scholarship will allow me the opportunity to understand another culture apart from my own. I am excited to learn more about China, from seeing first-hand the very complex and detailed architecture to tasting genuine Chinese cuisine.”

Now Open: Gilman International Scholarship Application

According to Hymas, Gilman International Scholarship applications for Summer 2019 and Fall 2019/YA 2019-2020 are now open.  The deadline for both applications is Tuesday, March 5 at 11:59 pm (CST).

“We encourage all students to pursue the numerous scholarship and fellowship opportunities that are available,” said Hymas. “Our office is here to provide information to students and help guide them every step of the way during the application process.”

Visit Baruch’s Office of National and Prestigious Fellowship Advising to find out more.

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Remarks by Félix V. Matos Rodríguez on his appointment as CUNY’s eighth Chancellor by the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York

Thank you and good afternoon, Chairman Thompson, fellow members of the board, Interim Chancellor Rabinowitz, colleagues of the chancellery, my fellow presidents – and the entire CUNY community.

It is my profound honor to accept the board’s appointment as the eighth Chancellor of The City University of New York. I am deeply grateful, and tremendously excited, to lead the nation’s foremost urban public university, particularly at a time when its mission to maintain and expand academic excellence and to the provision of equal access and opportunity has never been more vital. CUNY is a powerful vehicle for the upward mobility of all New Yorkers and it is therefore an indispensable New York institution. Muchas gracias.

I came to Hunter as a faculty member, as the chairman said, back in 2000, driven, like so many of CUNY’s faculty and staff, by CUNY’s mission of access, academic excellence and social mobility. I was also attracted by the hallmarks that make CUNY a unique educational institution: the intellectual vibrancy and proximity of colleagues and students from 25 campuses; the privilege of working in the world’s most dynamic city; the potential to connect scholarship and public policy to directly impact the public good; and a profound commitment to diversity. I remain as energized and motivated today as I was back in 2000 by the power of CUNY’s mission, impact and institutional uniqueness.

My commitment to CUNY’s mission and promise comes from a profoundly personal place. In every student I have been able to serve at Hunter, Hostos and Queens, I see my mother, Marta, and my father, Félix Sr., the original. I see individuals who come from humble backgrounds, full of talent, potential and aspirations, who get the opportunity to showcase that aptitude and move closer to their aspirations because a quality public educational institution opened doors for them. For my dad and my grandmother that institution was the University of Puerto Rico, the CUNY of Puerto Rico, which made it possible for my parents to become professionals and then provide my brothers and me more educational and life opportunities than they had while growing up. Many of the wonderful things I have experienced and benefited from professionally and personally came because of that door of opportunity being open to my parents. My commitment to CUNY comes because I want to be part of an institution that is at the center of that kind of social mobility here in New York City.

I have to admit that I am still trying to comprehend the full implications, and I am humbled to be CUNY’s Chancellor of color and embrace the opportunities and promise that this unique role holds. One thing is clear in my mind: This historic milestone is largely the result of the investment that CUNY has made in institutions such as Hostos and Centro [Center for Puerto Rican Studies] that made the University a more inclusive and representative space. I am committed to making sure that CUNY continues to invest and innovate in creating such spaces of inclusion and diversity for students, faculty and staff who come from so many different heritages, cultural identities, economic backgrounds and experiences.

Through this commitment we ensure that we remain in the forefront of excellence ad inclusion for generations to come and that, in the words of the African American higher-ed pioneer Dr. Ruth Simmons: “..the thing about being first is that you want to make it possible for people to come after you. A first never wants to disappoint the people who believe in that ideal, in the capacity to endorse difference.”

CUNY is an extraordinary university at every level. Our success is propelled by a unique kinship of students, faculty, staff, alumni and leadership who together carry on CUNY’s legacy as the paradigm of a people’s university. That is both a high aspiration and an incredible obligation.

I want to thank you for placing your confidence in me. I will spend each and every day working to justify that confidence and expectations in the years ahead leading this institution I love, and I look forward to working with the Board of Trustees and the entire University community as we begin to move into CUNY’s new chapter together.

On behalf of Liliana and me I want to thank the Board of Trustees for this early Valentine’s Day gift.


Remarks by CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. on the appointment of Félix Matos Rodríguez as Chancellor of The City University of New York

“On behalf of my colleagues on the CUNY Board of Trustees, it is my honor and distinct pleasure to introduce Dr. Félix “Felo” Matos Rodríguez, whom the Board has just appointed to serve as our eighth Chancellor. His appointment begins a momentous chapter in the history of this great institution, one in which every member of the CUNY community should celebrate.

Before I say a few words about Felo, I’d like to thank Vice Chair Schwartz and the other dedicated individuals who served with me on the Search Committee and acknowledge their stalwart and ardent efforts. Please note that the many hours you put in were invaluably essential in getting us to where we now stand. You helped our University take a very positive and well-considered step with this appointment.

Let me also ask each of you to join me in a heartfelt acknowledgment of gratitude to Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. The workload that Vita has assumed, and handled so well over the course of these past months, is nothing short of breathtaking. Her great efforts and tireless devotion enabled the University to not merely run smoothly, but to continue growing and meeting all the mandates of its mission. Her skilled stewardship gave us the time that was needed to conduct a rigorous, robust and comprehensive search for our next Chancellor. Vita, again, we are so fortunate to have you on the CUNY team, and again, we thank you sincerely for the tireless and invaluable work you continue to do.

Now, let’s talk about Dr. Matos Rodríguez. CUNY’s first Latino, and the first person of color, to lead the University. For a University of CUNY’s rich diversity – one that proudly embraces its mission of accessibility for all, it is with pride and resolve that we arrive at this moment.

Felo is a dedicated champion of accessibility, inclusion and excellence in higher education, and his roots in CUNY are deep. He came to CUNY nearly two decades ago as a historian and scholar, working as a professor of Black and Latino/Puerto Rican Studies, and as director of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, one of the nation’s noted research centers.

Felo’s experiences as president of both Queens and Hostos Community Colleges make him one of very few educators in this country to have led both a community and a baccalaureate college. He is keenly acquainted with the issues that are unique to community and senior colleges, and he knows better than anyone which challenges are common to both types of schools within our vast system. I don’t think we could have ever expected to find an educator with this breadth and depth of expertise.

Felo left us for a few years and returned to Puerto Rico, where he served as a top adviser to the governor and later led the Department of Family Services, an umbrella agency that helped to improve the coordination of services and maximize efficiency. His experiences in managing that agency, with a budget in the billions and thousands of employees dispersed across the island, gave him another real-world perspective that made him stand out.

Dr. Mato Rodríguez has drawn national recognition as a trailblazer in higher education and currently serves as board chair of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. He’s a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and an Aspen Institute Ascend Fellow. He also currently serves on the boards of Phipps Houses, the United Way of New York City, the TIAA Hispanic Advisory Council and the Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

As chair of the Search Committee, I will tell you that this rigorous selection process gave us all a good deal to consider. We met a stellar field of accomplished leaders who stepped forward and expressed interest. There was a significant number of highly qualified candidates individuals who brought much to the table in terms of their experiences, accomplishments and ideas. We interviewed Chancellor-designate Matos Rodriguez early on, and throughout the process we kept returning to him, time and time again, and I can say without hesitation or equivocation that CUNY is getting a leader of unmatched experience, vision and skill.

In word and deed, Dr. Matos Rodríguez has already done so much to advance CUNY’s mission-driven spirit. His sterling credentials, his unparalleled depth of perspective and his demonstrated commitment to CUNY made him the inarguable standout and the obvious choice. It fills me with great pride to have been a part of this pivotal decision, and to be able to announce that the nation’s greatest urban university is making history with one of its own.

Please join me in welcoming Chancellor-designate Félix Matos Rodríguez.


New Media Artspace at Baruch College Presents Lily Benson: Future Mechanism Replacement

Exhibition runs from February 13 through May 3

Video still from Future Mechanism Replacement, Lily Benson, 2015Video still from Future Mechanism Replacement, Lily Benson, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.

NEW YORK, NY- February 14, 2019 – Baruch College presents Lily Benson: Future Mechanism Replacement, an exhibition of video works by Lily Benson, curated by Katherine Behar, Assistant Professor of New Media Arts at Baruch College.

The show opened on February 13 and runs through May 3 at the New Media Artspace gallery in Baruch’s Library and Information Building, 151 E. 25th Street. The New Media Artspace will host a casual discussion with the artist for Baruch students on Tuesday, February 26, from 1:30–3:30 PM in the New Media Artspace and room 415 of the Library and Information Building. Members of the public who wish to attend may RSVP to katherine. behar@baruch.cuny.edu. A public artist lecture will be held on Tuesday, April 2, from 6:00–8:00 PM, at the Baruch Performing Arts Center’s Engelman Recital Hall.

Exhibition: Four Films that Divert from Expected Outcomes to Alternate Horizons

Lily Benson: Future Mechanism Replacement brings together four works by the New York-based filmmaker and artist Lily Benson. Throughout her work, Benson “re-visions” odd episodes lost to history. Rather than simply recuperating or retelling the strange stories she unearths, Benson approaches research with a humorous sensibility and in the spirit of intervention. Her films unsettle characters and events from the past, diverting them from expected outcomes toward alternate horizons, untapped feminist futures, and nascent dream states.

The exhibition title is inspired by techniques Benson learned in her training as a hypnotist. Like art, hypnotism reroutes received wisdom, re-visioning and revising internalized ways of seeing and being. Benson’s films release potential queer futures from inherited legacies of the past. 3D animation liberates imagery, while creative storytelling augurs alternate narratives. In this light, the works collected for Future Mechanism Replacement all refuse the trope of mechanistic causality that anchors belief in historical determinacy as well as habitual uses of technology.

In A Tour of the Self Cleaning House, Benson revisits the eponymous invention of Francis Gabe, an autodidact who aimed to liberate women from housework by inventing, building, patenting, and personally residing in a home that accomplished its own housekeeping. Despite the absurd inadequacies of its actual mechanisms, Benson suggests that the house is a mental refuge that projects future well-being.

Feelings adopts the banal format of broadcast commercials, employing 3D-modeling to advertise apathetic “feel good” personal products. Mechanisms that serve no apparent purpose, the items in these spots seem uncannily futuristic yet quotidian, as if issuing from a parallel universe.

Buttery Coldness emerged from Benson’s discovery of The Cold Woman: On Sexual Coldness in Women, Its Origins, and Its Cure, a 1957 book by the Danish margarine tycoon, Poul Thorsen (1884–1962). The film draws parallels between dominant sexist attitudes of the time, Thorsen’s practice of hypnotism as a technique for controlling women, and the history of margarine, which itself embodies a “mechanism replacement” as an engineered foodstuff designed to replace butter. Invented by Napoleon to affordably feed the masses, margarine was “the subject of hundreds of legal battles over the psychologically deceptive powers of food dye” in at the turn of the century.

Finally, New Stratas derived from Benson’s realization that her grandfather had been “trained by the U.S. military to successfully perform amputations with only hypnosis as anesthesia.”* Experiments with hypnosurgery were contemporaneous with the artist and filmmaker Oskar Fischinger’s invention of a filmic mechanism that sliced through melted colored wax and photographed the morphing frames, producing hypnotic swirling imagery. To create New Stratas, Benson recreated this effect using analog paper marbling on 16mm film leader.

New Stratas exemplifies Benson’s abiding interest in the capacity of filmic imagery and mental imagery to heal, to alleviate pain, and to retrain our thinking. The works in Future Mechanism Replacement all participate in this activist therapeutic logic. In the artist’s words, “In bringing light to sidelined events, I seek to expose precisely why they were concealed, and in doing so, [to] reveal the power structures at play during their time.   My work seeks to replace internalized oppression with [a queer] redistribution of power.”*

* Lily Benson, personal correspondence. January 2019.

About Lily Benson

Lily Benson is a filmmaker, visual artist, and hypnotist. Her work examines feminist history and reconstructs it into new narrative forms. She currently works as a creative adviser at The New York Times and is the co-founder of Cinema COBRA, a curatorial platform for expanded cinema. Her work has appeared at places like CPH:DOX, Rotterdam International Film Festival, The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Anthology Film Archives, The Hand Gallery, The Brooklyn Museum, Freight and Volume, and Nicolai Wallner Gallery. She received a BFA from The Cooper Union in New York City and an MFA from Malmö Art Academy in Sweden. Lily is on a mission to make our world a more experimental place.

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Lily Benson: Future Mechanism Replacement is curated by Katherine Behar, Associate Professor in the Fine and Performing Arts Department in the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences at Baruch College, CUNY. The exhibition is made possible by support from the Baruch Computing and Technology Center (BCTC), the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, the Newman Library, and the Globus and SWUFE Funds All images appear courtesy of the artist.

Gallery Location: New Media Artspace at Baruch College, Library and Information Building, 151 E. 25th Street, New York, NY 10010

Gallery Hours: The New Media Artspace is open to the CUNY community during regular library hours. Members of the public may request access to the New Media Artspace at the security desk at the second floor entrance to the library. For this week’s public hours, please check the gallery website: www.newmediartspace.info or dial a docent at 626-312-1664.

The New Media Artspace is a teaching exhibition space in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts at Baruch College, CUNY. Housed in the Newman Library, the New Media Artspace showcases curated experimental media and interdisciplinary artworks by international artists, students, alumni, and faculty.

About Baruch College:

Baruch College is a senior college in the City University of New York (CUNY) with a total enrollment of more than 17,000 students, who represent 160 countries and speak more than 100 languages. Ranked among the top 15% of U.S. colleges and the No. 4 public regional university, Baruch College is regularly recognized as among the most ethnically diverse colleges in the country. As a public institution with a tradition of academic excellence, Baruch College offers accessibility and opportunity for students from every corner of New York City and from around the world. For more about Baruch College, go to http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/.

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Suzanne Bronski, (646) 660-6093, suzanne.bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

Evan Nemeroff, (646) 660-6146, evan.nemeroff@baruch.cuny.edu


CCNY Dean Gilda Barabino elected to National Academy of Engineering

 

CCNY’s Gilda Barabino has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. She’s now only one of six African-American women members in the prestigious Academy.

Gilda A. Barabino, dean of The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. She is now one of only six African-American women to hold the distinction.

Election to the NAE is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer.  Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to “engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature” and to “the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.”

Barabino, who also holds the title of Daniel and Frances Berg Professor in the Grove School, was cited by the Academy “for leadership in bioengineering research and inclusive models of bioengineering education and faculty mentoring.”

She is a noted investigator in the areas of sickle cell disease, cellular and tissue engineering, as well as race/ethnicity and gender in science and engineering.

Barabino consults nationally and internationally on STEM education and research, diversity in higher education, policy, workforce development and faculty development. She is a member of the National Science Foundation’s Advisory Committee for Engineering, the National Academies Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine and the congressionally mandated Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering. She is the founder and Executive Director of the National Institute for Faculty Equity.

Her election to the NAE is the third major honor for Barabino in less than a year. Last June, she earned the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Science Foundation.

In the fall, Barabino received the Dr. Joseph N. Cannon Award for Excellence in Chemical Engineering from the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers.

The NAE’s announcement brings its membership to 2,297 U.S. members and 272 foreign members. This year’s induction ceremony takes place on Oct. 6,   at the academy’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Barabino has served as dean of the Grove School since 2013 when she became the first African-American woman to serve as dean of engineering at a non-HBCU institution. This fall marks the 100th anniversary of the Grove School.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY SPH Awarded Grant for Environmental and Occupational Health Scholarships

February 14, 2019 – The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) was awarded a two-year, $200,000 grant from the New York Community Trust to provide 10 scholarships annually of $8,750 to aspiring women or minority graduate students who intend to pursue the Master of Science program in Environmental and Occupational Health.

The Master’s Degree in Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences (Industrial Hygiene) at CUNY SPH educates public health professionals to recognize, evaluate, and control occupational hazards to reduce the risk of injuries and illnesses. Upon completion of the degree, students have the requisite skills and experience to anticipate and recognize chemical, biological, safety, and physical hazards as well as methods for quantifying human exposure, utilize controls to reduce or eliminate occupational exposures, apply toxicological principles to anticipate adverse health outcomes, and interpret and apply applicable regulations.

Through these scholarships, CUNY SPH seeks to infuse the rapidly growing industrial hygiene field with a group of diverse and talented CUNY-educated professionals. To promote exposure to the field of industrial hygiene, students will engage in a variety of opportunities including attendance at industry conferences, on-site training and experiential learning and mentorship with Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) professionals, doctoral students, and faculty.

“We are deeply grateful to the New York Community Trust for their generosity and vision in awarding this special scholarship funding,” said CUNY SPH Dean Ayman El-Mohandes. “It is a central aim of our school to train New Yorkers to help improve population health for everyone in this city. Moreover, the goal of bringing a more diverse cohort into the field of industrial hygiene is one that speaks to our dedication to social equity, and to CUNY’s broader commitment to educational excellence for all.”

The first 10 scholarships will be awarded to students entering the program for the fall 2019 semester. Eligible applicants are restricted to women or members of ethnic and racial minority groups including (but not limited to) African American or of African descent, Hispanic, American Indian, Alaskan Native, Native Pacific Islander, Asian or South East Asian. To qualify, applicants must be accepted to the Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences master’s program and demonstrate permanent residency in New York City. Awardees are expected to attend full-time and complete the degree in two years.

For more information on the MS in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, prospective students can visit the program page.

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) is committed to teaching, research and service that creates a healthier New York City and helps promote equitable, efficient and evidence-based solutions to pressing health problems facing cities around the world. For more information, visit sph.cuny.edu.

The New York Community Trust is a grant-making foundation dedicated to improving the lives of residents of New York City and its suburbs. The Trust connects past, present and future generous New Yorkers with vital nonprofits working to make a healthy, equitable, and thriving community for all.


Using innovative sampling methods to understand family demographic trends

mother holds baby in arms while father looks onTrends in family demography in the United States and other industrialized nations such as declining and delayed marriage and childbearing have, until recently, been predominantly studied using large-scale datasets identifying total population and subgroup trends over time, including differences by age, gender, racial/ethnic, and other characteristics. There is limited understanding of how individuals across different levels of social position, for example, make decisions around forming families. This lack of qualitative data has prevented researchers from completely understanding the factors driving these large-scale demographic trends.

To address this, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Diana Romero and DPH alum Dr. Amy Kwan developed a methodologic approach to sampling and field-based data collection for the Social Position and Family Formation (SPAFF) project, a large-scale in-depth interview study of factors influencing different aspects of family formation among heterosexual females and males in the context of individuals’ social position. The study was supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and published in the journal PLOS One.

The quantitatively-informed, purposive sampling approach the researchers employed went beyond common purposive sampling approaches for qualitative data collection that typically do not consider the underlying distribution of key population characteristics, Romero says.

“We hope that qualitative researchers will find the sampling technique we developed to recruit individuals in the NYC metropolitan area an advancement over purposive sampling that generally does not examine the underlying population, geographic or organizational units to attempt to achieve similar distributional patterns on key characteristics.”

Romero D, Kwan A, Suchman L (2019) Methodologic approach to sampling and field-based data collection for a large-scale in-depth interview study: The Social Position and Family Formation (SPAFF) project. PLoS ONE 14(1): e0210776.


Kevin James ‘Hearts’ Radio

The Department of Television and Radio senior, radio DJ, and lifelong listener discusses his work at iHeartRadio, his “second home” at Brooklyn College Radio, and his grand idea for a podcast.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

<p>For World Radio Day (February 13, 2019), Department of Television and Radio senior and Brooklyn College Radio (WBCR) DJ Kevin James talks about his burgeoning career in the industry.</p>

For World Radio Day (February 13, 2019), Department of Television and Radio senior and Brooklyn College Radio (WBCR) DJ Kevin James talks about his burgeoning career in the industry.

Department of Television and Radio senior and Brooklyn College Radio (WBCR) DJ Kevin James says that his position at iHeartRadio (iHeart) is a blessing. He had received two calls for interviews: one from Sirius XM and the other from iHeart.

“Sirius XM offered me a sports-show internship, but it conflicted with my school schedule,” James recalls. “iHeart offered me a job. So not only would I get the experience I needed to succeed in the industry, but I would also be paid for my work.”

iHeartRadio is a syndication company that broadcasts over 850 free local radio stations across the United States. With thousands of podcasts, it is currently the only radio service that allows listeners to save and replay songs from live broadcast radio to their digital playlists. At iHeart, James is a promotional marketing assistant responsible for putting together exclusive company-related events such as award shows and concerts, and overseeing the distribution of giveaways and listener prizes, ensuring that iHeart and its advertising partners are appropriately branded and spotlighted.

His position at iHeart has given James the opportunity to work with some noted celebrity New York-based DJs, including DJ Envy, DJ Clue, and Angela Yee. He tries not to let this sort of exposure go to his head.

“I treat it like it’s just a regular part of the job,” he says.

James is also a staff member at the Brooklyn College radio station WBCR. There he hosted a relationship advice show that took a look at the gender divide from both perspectives, in addition to an athletics-focused show called The Sports Zone. James is also a producer and editor at the station.

He came to WBCR in fall of 2016 at the recommendation of a classmate, Joseph De La Cruz ’17, who is now associate producer at NBC’s Morning Joe. Cruz introduced him to Nadine Rodriguez ’17, who was the president and general manager of WBCR at the time and who is now a video production manager at Def Jam Recordings. James interned at the station and was taken in by the experience.

“I knew this was where I had to ‘live’ and went about learning everything there was to learn about running a radio station.”

“Kevin is the kind of student who makes Brooklyn College Radio possible,” says Miguel Macías ’04 M.F.A., deputy chair for graduate studies and director of radio in the Department of Television and Radio. “WBCR doesn’t have any full-time staff members. So the station relies on the incredible commitment of students like Kevin to operate it semester after semester. He supports other students, produces shows, and helps create an environment where every WBCR member feels at home.”

Born in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, James spent his early years with his grandmother in Jamaica, where both of his parents were born and raised, before returning to the United States. He alluded to some obstacles in his upbringing, conveying that many of the kids from particular kinds of urban environments are forced to grow up faster than kids who have greater access to both academic and recreational activities. Lacking these options, he moved to Montclair, New Jersey, where his grandmother (who had, by this time, immigrated to the United States) purchased a home, and turned to what entertainment was accessible: public media.

“I always listened to the radio,” says James. “Angie Martinez. Miss Jones. Ed Lover. Those New York City radio disc jockeys were some of the most consistent voices of my childhood. They had a profound effect on how I saw and thought about the world around me—and how I heard it.”

<p>After he graduates with the Class of 2019 in May, James would like to begin working on a podcast that pays homage to a classic moment in radio history. </p>

After he graduates with the Class of 2019 in May, James would like to begin working on a podcast that pays homage to a classic moment in radio history.

James was unsure about what he wanted to do after graduating from Montclair High School in New Jersey.

“I didn’t want to go to college just to go or to ‘find myself.’ I wanted to go to college when I knew what it was I wanted to study, when I knew what my purpose was.”

He spent some time in Orlando, Florida, with his father, then returned to New Jersey and decided to find a job. He worked part-time for a moving company with his maternal uncle and part-time as a parking attendant. He says the laborers at the moving company saw his potential and encouraged him to leave that position and pursue his education.

“I said, ‘You know what? I’m either going to become a stand-up comic, or I’m going to be a radio personality.'”

He began teaching himself graphic design because he thought it would be one of the skills that would help him get his foot in the door at comedy clubs or radio stations, designing posters and flyers for their events. He decided then that a college degree would help him realize these aspirations even quicker.

He returned to his mother in Brooklyn and enrolled in multimedia programming at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC). He participated in the work-study program and secured employment at Bloomingdale’s to support himself through college as well as help his mother financially. It took him a bit longer than two years to graduate because the death of his grandmother during his second year caused him to place his education on hold until he could sufficiently recover from the loss.

“I stayed in my grandmother’s house with no one else in it. Just me.”

After getting back on track, James graduated from BMCC and was accepted to Brooklyn College in the spring of 2016. A member of the Black and Latino Male Initiative, he is the first person in his immediate family to attend college, the first to receive an associate’s degree, and will be the first to earn a bachelor’s degree. After graduation, James wants to focus on generational wealth building via his craft and creating what he calls “audio dramas.”

Inspired by the War of the Worlds radio program that caused an American panic in 1938 when listeners believed the Earth was actually being invaded by hostile extraterrestrials, James wants to create what he calls “sonic movies.”

“If you’re traveling on the train or bus, or you’re at home, and you don’t want to watch TV or listen to music, for example, or listen to a regular podcast, or to an audiobook. I want to provide you with an alternate form of aural entertainment. Imagine watching a film, but with your eyes closed.”

Brooklyn College is able to provide students like Kevin James with access to the kinds of experiential learning they need to expand their academic and career prospects thanks to the generosity of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To learn about the various ways to contribute to student success, please visit the foundation website.

 

CONTACT: Jason Carey, 347.486.1017


LaGuardia’s Early Childhood Learning Center Featured on CUNY-TV

LaGuardia’s Early Childhood Learning Center Featured on CUNY-TV
LaGuardia’s on-campus affordable childcare program, the Early Childhood Learning Center (ECLC), was recently featured in the CUNY-TV series, Urban U. The Center was recently awarded  $1.5 million from the U.S. Department of Education to expand support for student-parents.

“We serve children from ages 12 months to 12 years; and our programs have early morning and evening hours, as well as Saturday care options,” said Sonya Evariste (LaGuardia, Class of 1993), director of the ECLC. “We have early childhood, after-school programs, Saturday program, and summer camps. Having this program available allows LaGuardia students to concentrate on their studies, attend classes, pursue internships, and more, while knowing that their children are well-cared for, and nearby.”

“My kids have learned so much at the ECLC; they do swimming, field trips, and much more,” said Ebaneeka “Ramona” Wilkins-Kolkmeyer, age 29, a mechanical engineering major who is married with two young children. “It’s a wonderful, enriching environment. Since it’s on-campus and super affordable, I feel like there’s almost no reason for me to not go to school and better myself.”

Click here to watch.

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Lyndon Haviland: Our health depends on the passage of a Green New Deal

In an op-ed in the Hill, CUNY SPH Distinguished Scholar and Foundation Board Chair Lyndon Haviland urges lawmakers to create and pass a feasible plan to address climate change.

Lyndon Haviland

Lyndon Haviland

Our health depends on the passage of an achievable Green New Deal
By Lyndon Haviland, Opinion Contributor

The Green New Deal is all the rage in Congress, capturing our imaginations about new jobs, new industries and a cleaner energy future for the nation.

But the only way any deal will get done is if lawmakers don’t lose sight of the serious human health consequences of inaction. They must work together, show leadership and pass a realistic plan that may not please everyone, but will put our nation on a constructive path toward addressing the increasing health threat posed by climate change.

The Green New Deal has the potential to boost jobs, drive our economy and promote important environmental programs. Presidential seekers, ranging from Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), former Mayor Michael Bloomberg (D) and Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Corey Booker (D-N.J.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) have signaled interest in pursuing a plan aimed at achieving these lofty goals.

But Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) is in the driver’s seat. Her proposal seeks to derive 100 percent of the country’s electricity from “clean” sources with a federal jobs guarantee. Protesters with the Sunrise Movement stormed Rep Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif) office late last year demanding support for Ocasio-Cortez’s approach. But some, such as Michael Bloomberg, have expressed public concern over “pie in the sky” proposals that will “never” have a chance of passing.

Long before Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal” became the most successful economic stimulus initiative in American history, it received enormous criticism when it was introduced. Opponents from the left felt it didn’t go far enough to nationalize certain industries, such as the banks. Opponents from the right thought it was too heavy handed, where the government was sticking its neck into places it didn’t belong.

It didn’t dissuade him. Putting people back to work was too important, so he found ways to compromise with his critics. He didn’t try to accommodate everyone, because it would end the New Deal’s chances of ever seeing the light of day.

It took leadership from FDR to secure support for his idea. To him, success wasn’t defined by whether it included every program his base audiences wanted. Rather, it was his ability to garner support from opposing sides for its most important elements. The “art of the deal” wasn’t a line in the sand for FDR. And he refused to allow special interests to derail it with unreasonable demands that had no chance of winning bipartisan support.

The architects of today’s Green New Deal might learn something from FDR. Today more than ever, lawmakers must find ways to compromise to ensure core programs that could do enormous good for the country don’t become casualties of constituency-driven political agendas.

Our health will suffer if a workable Green New Deal plan fails to advance soon. We must do something now. Temperatures are rising. Mosquito-borne diseases once limited to tropical regions are reaching the United States. The frequency of summer heat waves is escalating. And extreme weather patterns caused by climate change are increasingly putting lives in danger.

These facts must drive the Green New Deal debate. Lawmakers can use this moment to invest in a public health workforce that can respond to climate change. They can bring about meaningful change by working toward a solution that prioritizes the health of all humanity. This is where the conversation should be focused. What’s more, there’s a good chance lawmakers can agree on these measures.

Standing tall and fighting for what’s right on climate change is a noble mission. But when all-or-nothing proposals risk impeding the advancement of significant policies that could be a monumental step toward driving our economy, protecting the environment and creating a healthier planet for generations to come, everyone loses.

FDR took hits from every direction in order to prevail, in the end, with a plan that became the single, most important economic development program of modern time. His long-view of the political landscape made its implementation possible. And it’s what’s missing from today’s Green New Deal environment.

Congress must lead on this issue and advance a Green New Deal that has a chance of winning broad based support. It will require lawmakers to adopt a more moderate approach, and have the courage to put country over constituency and support a plan that’s realistically achievable.

Because if it doesn’t happen, a Green New Deal to address climate change’s growing impact on human health is already D.O.A.

Lyndon Haviland DrPh, MPH, is a distinguished scholar at the CUNY School of Health Policy & Public Health.


Linda Anderson’s New Self-Help Book on Relationships Published

Hostos Professor Linda Anderson, Ph.D., is one of three authors and clinical psychologists whose upcoming book, Silent Agreements:  How Unspoken Expectations Ruin Our Relationships, has been released internationally by Crown Publishing Group.

The book was years in the making and explores how unexpressed assumptions influence and very often damage our relationships and what we can do about it. Dr. Anderson wrote the book with Sonia Banks and Michelle Owens-Patterson.

Silent Agreements aims to help readers define the silent expectations in their lives by supplying the tools needed to work towards healthier communication. Readers will learn more about their own motivations and how to dismantle beliefs that undermine them. With guidelines and advice on how to have productive conversations about sex, money, commitment, family, the workplace, and health, readers will learn how to break the silence and resolve land-mine issues in their lives.

Dr. Anderson has been a longstanding professor of psychology in the Behavioral and Social Sciences Department at Hostos. During her tenure she has also taught as a Visiting Adjunct Professor at Teachers College, Columbia University as well as Visiting Faculty at Bard College at Simon’s Rock. She is also a Cross-Divisional Consulting Psychologist for the Dalton School.

Dr. Anderson graduated from Boston University with a double major in Spanish Language/Literature and Psychology and earned her doctorate in Clinical Psychology at Columbia University.

You can pre-order Silent Agreements:  How Unspoken Expectations Ruin Our Relationships online HERE.

 


Baruch College Natural Science Assistant Professor Member of Team Awarded $2.5 Million NSF Grant

Dr. Stephen Gosnell’s research focuses on restoring oysters to New York City waters and introducing local high school students to data literacy

Stephen Gosnell, PhD is an assistant professor of environmental science in the Department of Natural Sciences at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences.

Stephen Gosnell, PhD is an assistant professor of environmental science in the Department of Natural Sciences at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences.

Stephen Gosnell, PhD, an assistant professor of environment science at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, is part of a five-person team that received a $2.5 million grant funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of their STEM + Computing Partnerships Program.

This NSF grant supports Dr. Gosnell’s project called “Integrating Computational Science with Environmental Sciences Associated with Habitat Restoration and Education in New York Harbor.” Gosnell’s research focuses on understanding how diversity is maintained in ecological communities and its impact in ecosystem functioning and services. ​At Baruch, Gosnell has concentrated his work on oyster and salt marsh restoration; two once-common local communities that he says have been “decimated over past centuries.”

Real-World Training for Students

Gosnell’s research is coordinated through work with the Billion Oyster Project, a program where students become field scientists and engage in a movement to restore 1 billion oysters to New York City waters. According to Gosnell, this NSF grant will significantly benefit students with numerous hands-on skills.

“With this funding, this important project extends student involvement by moving them from collecting data on oysters to organizing, visualizing, and analyzing it,” Gosnell said. “Introducing students to analysis using data they collect and can contextualize is a great introduction to data literacy and future career options.”

Besides Gosnell, the other members of this multi-institute research group includes Lauren Birney from Pace University, Nancy Woods from the New York City Department of Education, Susan Alter from York University, and Chistelle Scharff from Pace University.

Importance of Billion Oyster Project

Oyster restoration is a major focus in New York because they provide numerous ecosystem services. Gosnell noted that the presence of oysters reduces storm surges, provides habitat for other organisms, cleans the water as they feed, and contributes to nitrogen removal.

Gosnell conducts projects to determine the best methods to raise oysters so they survive in local water.

Furthermore, he works with big data sets to determine what they can tell us about where we should plant the oysters that will help make “informed choices about future restoration sites.”

For Gosnell, getting students involved in the Billion Oyster Project is critical so they see what scientists do outside the classroom and why their work is important. Currently, Gosnell works with the NY Harbor School’s Aquaculture Program where he talks with the junior and senior classes about the research process and why it matters to oyster farmers. He also helps seniors carry out a year-long study to see how species interactions such as predation can impact oyster growth in unexpected ways.

The Next Generation of Scientists

By receiving the NSF grant, Gosnell and the rest of his team will be able to work with more students through the development of curriculum units that will teach them to understand and use data to best restore oyster reefs in local waters.

“These experiences are critical for building a scientifically-literate public and making sure all students realize they can be a part of the next generation of scientists,” Gosnell said. “Additionally, the general public needs to better understand the importance of making wise decisions about how we use our natural resources and how science can help inform those decisions.”

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Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez To Be Named Chancellor Of City University Of New York

Champion of Inclusion and Innovation in Higher Education Will Be CUNY’s First Latino Chancellor


The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York will vote Wednesday to appoint Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, an accomplished scholar, teacher, administrator and public servant who has been president of Queens College since 2014, as the eighth Chancellor of CUNY. He will be both the first Latino and minority educator to head the University. He will assume the post May 1.

An innovative leader, Chancellor-designate Matos Rodríguez, 56, has drawn national recognition as a trailblazer in higher education. He enhanced Queens College’s reputation for excellence and propelled the school to the highest echelon in college social-mobility rankings. As president of CUNY’s Eugenio María de Hostos Community College, the post he held immediately prior to his appointment at Queens College, he gained acclaim for engineering a double-digit increase in the school’s retention rate, leading Hostos to become a finalist for the prestigious Aspen Best Community College prize in 2015. He is one of a select few U.S. educators who has served as president of both a baccalaureate and community college.

“The appointment of Félix Matos Rodríguez as Chancellor marks the onset of a historic chapter in the narrative of this vital institution, one in which every member of the CUNY community should rejoice,” said William C. Thompson Jr., Chair of the CUNY Board of Trustees and leader of the Chancellor Search Committee. “In word and deed, Chancellor-designate Matos Rodríguez embodies CUNY’s mission-driven spirit. Felo’s deep roots in CUNY, combined with his rich experience as a scholar and as leader of both senior and community colleges, make him uniquely suited to lead the University forward, keeping it positioned as the standard-bearer for quality and access in public higher education. Over the course of our thorough search for a Chancellor, we came to consider several serious candidates among a stellar field of accomplished leaders, but we kept coming back to Felo. His sterling credentials, his unparalleled depth of perspective and his demonstrated commitment to CUNY made him the inarguable standout and the obvious choice. It fills me with great pride to have been a part of this pivotal decision and to be able to announce that the nation’s greatest urban university is making history with one of its own.”

“This would be an extraordinary opportunity for anyone who is passionate about the role CUNY plays in the lifeblood of the world’s greatest and most important city,” said Matos Rodríguez. “For me, this appointment is particularly special because CUNY is home. I am immensely proud to have risen through the University’s ranks and am deeply honored to now have the opportunity to lead an institution I love and treasure. I will strive every day that I am Chancellor to fulfill the promise of our noble mission to afford academic excellence and economic opportunity to all. And I will endeavor to elevate to new heights CUNY’s legacy as the paradigm of a people’s University.”

As a college president, Matos Rodríguez has compiled a distinguished record of success, thriving in a field that has been slow to diversify. According to the American Council on Education, the portion of Hispanic college presidents barely changed between 2011 and 2016, inching up to 3.9 percent from 3.8 percent. The overall portion of minority college presidents increased only slightly over the same period, to 16.8 percent from 12.6 percent.

Matos Rodríguez holds a B.A. from Yale University, where he was a cum laude graduate, and a doctorate in history from Columbia University. A scholar and authority on the history of women in the Caribbean, he is a recipient of the Albert J. Beveridge Award of the American Historical Association and the author of Women and Urban Life in Nineteenth-Century San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1820–1862; and editor of several books, including A Nation of Women: An Early Feminist Speaks Out.

Currently the board chair of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), Matos Rodríguez has used his extensive regional and national networks and board memberships to advance Queens College’s visibility and recognition. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and an Aspen Institute Ascend Fellow. He currently serves on the boards of Phipps Houses, the United Way of New York City, the TIAA Hispanic Advisory Council and the Research Alliance for New York City Schools.

Since Matos Rodríguez took office as the 10th president of Queens College, in August 2014, the school has been recognized for its success at propelling students into the middle class. A 2016 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranked Queens College in the top 1 percent of all colleges in moving students from the bottom fifth to the top fifth of the country’s income distribution, and The Chronicle of Higher Education in August 2018 ranked the school 11th of all U.S. colleges for upward social and economic mobility.

Matos Rodríguez has been an aggressive fundraiser; during his tenure, the Queens College Foundation has nearly doubled in value. He spurred the college’s first systematic review of all graduate programs, and the development of an accelerated B.A./M.A. program to encourage more undergraduates to pursue graduate studies.

As he led Queens College, Matos Rodríguez also pushed to increase diversity college-wide. Nearly half of the current members of the college’s Cabinet are people of color, a marked change from its composition when he was appointed. Under his Presidential Hiring Initiative, 48 percent of faculty hires have been from underrepresented groups.

At Hostos, where he served as president from 2009 to 2014, Matos Rodríguez achieved dramatic improvements in student performance, and doubled the college’s fundraising intake. The fall-to-fall retention rate increased to 68 percent from 57 percent during his tenure, the first time in the college’s history that it recorded five consecutive years of increased retention, and the school’s graduation rate increased to 28 percent from 22 percent. His efforts made Hostos a finalist for the prestigious Aspen Best Community College prize in 2015.

Matos Rodríguez left CUNY for several years in 2005, returning to his native Puerto Rico where he worked one year as head adviser on Health and Social Welfare to the governor of Puerto Rico. In 2006, he was named Secretary of the Department of Family Services, a post he held for nearly two years in which he managed an annual budget of $2.3 billion and oversaw nearly 11,000 employees across 104 regional offices.

From 2000 to 2005, Matos Rodríguez was director of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College (El Centro), and he was also a tenured professor of Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Studies. He previously taught at Northeastern University, Boston College and the Universidad Interamericana-Recinto Metropolitano, Puerto Rico.

The appointment follows the recommendation of a 14-member search committee of CUNY trustees, college presidents, faculty, students and civic leaders led by Chairman Thompson. The committee was assisted in its search by Isaacson Miller, a leading executive search firm.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Additional Quote: 

From Ted Mitchell, president, the American Council on Education:‎ “I can’t think of anyone better equipped than Félix V. Matos Rodríguez to head The City University of New York. Félix is one of the few higher-education leaders who has been a president of both a community college and a four-year university. He is a true American success story: a leader whose talents and achievements have taken him from his native Puerto Rico to the Ivy League to becoming the Chancellor of one of America’s greatest universities. CUNY excels at boosting its students into the middle class, and Felix has seen first-hand what a marvelous engine of economic opportunity it is. This appointment is good news for CUNY, its students, the city and state of New York, and the nation.”

 

 


Alumnus Joseph Crowley Donates His Congressional Papers to Queens College in Deed-Signing Event at the College Thursday, February 7

Collection documenting 30 years of Crowley’s public service
will be made available for research purposes

QUEENS, NY, FEBRUARY 8, 2019—Former United States Congressman and Queens College alumnus Joseph Crowley ’85 donated his congressional papers to the Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library at Queens College in a deed signing event at the school on Thursday, February 7.

The collection, comprising items donated or loaned to the college, includes background on legislative issues, official correspondence, strategy and planning documents, speeches, and memorabilia. The papers and material will be arranged and described by Queens College archivists and made available to researchers as one of the school’s growing number of Special Collections. Among the collections currently housed in the library are the papers of Congressmembers Benjamin S. Rosenthal and Gary Ackerman, New York State Assembly Speaker Saul Weprin, and Queens Borough President and Queens College alumna Helen Marshall.

“We are so proud and thankful to our friend Congressman Joseph Crowley for formally donating his congressional papers to his alma mater Queens College,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “No matter where life took him, he found ways to remain connected to the college and to higher education to make sure that the needs of the college were met. What better embodiment of the Queens College motto, We Learn So That We May Serve, than Joe Crowley, who has dedicated his life to service, and what a great gift to our students for whom these materials will hopefully serve as inspiration for careers of great distinction.”

Among the items in the collection are framed copies of the Affordable Care Act with the original signatures of President Barack Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, featuring a handwritten note from Pelosi and a commemorative pen used in the signing; the Senate Good Friday Agreement signed by Hillary Clinton, with a handwritten note from her; the U.S. and India Nuclear Cooperation Bill, with commemorative pen; framed photographs of Crowley with President Bill Clinton, Governors Hugh Carey, Mario Cuomo, and George Pataki, and Secretary Clinton; over 25 photographs, dating to Crowley’s days in the New York Assembly, in which he appears with prominent New York politicians, including several New York City mayors; a framed India Abroad article on Crowley’s activism combatting discrimination against Sikhs; the proclamation of Assemblyman Joseph Crowley Day in Queens signed by then-Borough President Claire Shulman; a championship boxing belt from the Belfast Beltway 2014 Boxing Classic, a cultural and athletic exchange program; and a Queens County St. Patrick’s Day Parade 40th Anniversary sash naming Crowley “Gael of the Year.”

Speakers in addition to President Matos Rodriguez were Chief Librarian Kristin Hart, and Political Science Chairperson Patricia Rachal, who taught Crowley when he was a student at QC.

“Queens College was a bedrock of my education and young life,” said Crowley. “I’m honored that my alma mater will house documents and materials from my three-decade career in politics. It is my hope that students, faculty, and the public will benefit from an inside view of how Washington, D.C. works on behalf of all Americans. I want to sincerely thank Queens College for its assistance in making these documents public for all to interact with.”

About Joseph Crowley
Joseph Crowley served in the U.S. House of Representatives for 20 years, representing his hometown community—the 14th District of New York. Spanning Queens and the Bronx, NY-14 is one of the most ethnically diverse areas in the country.

During his time in Congress, Crowley held elected leadership titles for six years, the last two of them as chairman of the Democratic Caucus, the fourth-highest position among the House’s Democrats. His rise to his party’s top rankings stemmed from his tireless efforts to elect Democrats at every level of government. He mentored colleagues and candidates alike, earning the respect of all those he served alongside. 

As a member of the prestigious Committee on Ways and Means, Crowley worked to protect Social Security and Medicare, make health care more affordable, and reduce taxes for middle-class Americans and small businesses. He helped shepherd through the committee legislation to reform tax laws that unfairly taxed foreign investment in U.S. commercial real estate (FIRPTA), depriving the country of liquidity that could be reinvested into the United States.

Crowley was on the frontlines in the effort to pass the Affordable Care Act, enact marriage equality in New York State, and protect women’s rights and human rights. He was also a three-time co-chair of the Congressional Caucus on India and Indian-Americans, co-chair of the Ad Hoc Committee on Irish Affairs and an active member of the Friends of Ireland Caucus, the chair of the New Democrat Coalition from 2011-14, and co-founder of both the Bangladesh Caucus and Rare Diseases Caucus. 

The congressman grew up in Woodside, Queens, in a hard-working, middle-class family. He graduated from Queens College, the pride of New York City’s public university system. His father, a New York City detective who put himself through law school at night, and his mother, an immigrant from Ireland, instilled in him a strong sense of family and community and a firm belief that America is a place of opportunity. He is married to Kasey Crowley, a registered nurse, and they have three children.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


IMMIGRANT AND UNDOCUMENTED ALLIES LEAVE THEIR MARK OF SUPPORT

Immigrant and Undocumented Allies Leave their Mark of Support

 

“With everything that’s happening in the world, it’s important for allies to show up and show that they’re supporting undocumented students.” – Cynthia Carvajal

 

In a public display of solidarity, members of the John Jay College community came out to show their support for immigrants and undocumented students at our “Calling All Allies” event on February 7. The event was hosted by the new Immigrant Student Success Center. “With everything that’s happening in the world, it’s important for allies to show up and show that they’re supporting undocumented students,” said Cynthia Carvajal, Manager of the Center.

 

Carvajal (far left) making thumb-print butterflies with students

Carvajal (far left) making thumb-print butterflies with students

 

“It’s important for us to be there to support and honor them, and to ensure their rights are protected.” – Professor José Luis Morín

 

Dipping their thumbs in paint, allies created butterflies, a symbol of migration and the symbol of the new Immigrant Student Success Center. Like those who come to this country seeking a better life, the monarch butterfly migrates in order to survive, taking an arduous journey of more than 3,000 miles from the eastern U.S. to Mexico to make it through the winter season. Allies also wrote words of encouragement and support to undocumented, TPS, and DACA students. The banner, filled with thumb-print butterflies, will serve as a constant reminder of the support for immigrant students. “Our immigrant students are not just a large portion of our student body, they are also our future,” said José Luis Morín, Professor and Chairperson of the Latin American and Latina/o Studies (LLS) Department. “Immigrants helped build this country.

Professor José Luis Morín writes his message of solidarity

Professor José Luis Morín writes his message of solidarity

 

At the event, we spoke with attendees and asked why stepping up as an ally was important to them?

 

Erica WiseErica Wise, Staff, Modern Languages Department

“I come from an immigrant family. Undocumented or not, we all belong here, we all get a chance here in America.”

 

 

 

Dahlia CapulinDahlia Capulin, Student  

“I come from a mixed status family. I know how important it is for students here to know that they are supported. With everything happening both on and off campus it’s important to call on allies because we need their support. We need them to stand up and stand with us.”

 

 

 

 

 

Arlienny HernandezArlienny Hernandez, Student

“A lot of people don’t come forward because they’re afraid. We want the undocumented community to feel welcomed and safe in this space. We want them to see that there are more people in this community, and in this world that support them than there are against them.”

 

 

 

 

 

More scenes from the event:

 

Cynthia Carvajal and a group of students

Cynthia Carvajal and a group of students

Students stand together in support of immigrant students

Students stand together in support of immigrant students

A message of support from an ally

A message of support from an ally

Encouraging words written in Spanish. Translated it means “We fight for all.”

Encouraging words written in Spanish. Translated it means “We fight for all.”


City Tech Celebrates Black History Month With A New Exhibition At The Grace Gallery

A new exhibition will be held at City Tech’s Grace Gallery from February 19 through March 29, 2019, with a special reception with the curator on March 1st from 5:30pm to 8:30pm. Curated by Jerome Harris and organized by George Garrastegui of the College’s Communication Design department, As, Not For is an incomplete historical survey of work created by African-American graphic designers spanning the last century.

Credit Andrew Copeland, MICA Communications

The Exhibition, a series of uniformly scaled 24″ x 36″ reproductions of African American graphic designs spanning the past century, increases exposure to Black graphic designers’ works and techniques, which all too often are neglected, due to their frequent absence from syllabi and lectures. As, Not For reflects on ubiquitous social ignorance toward Black art, as outlined in the 1970s exhibition Ritual: Baptismal in Black, and encourages individual expression—rather than conformity to racial generalizations—amongst African Americans. The exhibition challenges the systematic exclusion and historical omission of Black graphic design and their overall impact on graphic design. Ultimately, though, it activates and challenges the design community to promote the deep history, design theory and aesthetics of African Americans.

As, Not For is curated by Jerome Harris and organized at City Tech by George Garrastegui.

At the Grace Gallery, 11th Floor, Namm Building
New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, NY
From February 19 to March 29, 2019
Special reception with the curator on March 1, 2019 from 5:30pm-8:30pm


Letter to Students & Families, Week of February 11, 2019

February 11, 2019

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

This is Respect for All Week, an annual tradition throughout NYC Schools that enables each of us to reinforce our personal commitment—verbally articulated, or expressed in writing—that every student & faculty member is important, known, valued and cared for. We also believe that every student deserves to be “treated with respect, and that bullying, harassment, intimidation, and discrimination have no place in our school community.”

As we enter this five-day instructional week prior to MidWinter Recess, please join us by messaging your commitment to:

  • Respect for All
  • Celebrating the diversity of our students’ lives
  • Creating learning experiences that focus on preventing bias-based harassment, intimidation and/or bullying.

Please see the attached letter regarding the DOE’s Respect for All Week. It has previously been distributed by NEST+m’s Parent Coordinator.

Should you have any questions, please be in touch with your child’s guidance counselor.

Finally, please join us on Wednesday February 13th at 6pm for our mid-year PTA Town Hall & public safety meeting.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up Soon

  • Respect for All Week: Monday, February 11 – Friday, February 15
  • Parent Presentation on Executive Function & Study Skills by Thinking Caps, sponsored by the Whole Child Committee: Monday, February 11 at 8:30am in the Cafeteria
  • 3rd Grade “Family Friday”/Native American Celebration: Wednesday, February 13th, 8:30am-9:15am
  • Town Hall: Wednesday, February 13th at 5:45pm; submit your questions HERE
  • PTA Valentine’s Bake Sale: Thursday, February 14;
    LEARN MORE or Sign up to VOLUNTEER
  • Rapid Dismissal: Friday, February 15 – no afterschool programs in session, Mid-Winter break begins.
  • Mid-Winter Break: Monday, February 18 – Friday, February 22; students return to school on Monday, February 25.

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
The June Regents exam testing schedule (June 18-25, 2019)  is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

FAINESS LIPENGA AND MARTINA VANDENBERG SHINE A SPOTLIGHT ON LABOR TRAFFICKING

Fainess Lipenga and Martina Vandenberg Shine A Spotlight On Labor Trafficking

 

Labor trafficking thrives in the shadows. Its’ victims are often the most vulnerable among us—recently arrived immigrants, undocumented workers, domestic workers, the disabled, and young people. Exploited and cut off from the outside world, they’re often forced to live in inhumane conditions and work endless hours with little to no pay. During National Human Trafficking Awareness Month, to help bring awareness to this often overlooked injustice, John Jay College welcomed Fainess Lipenga, an anti-trafficking survivor and advocate, to share her experiences. Lipenga was joined by Martina Vandenberg, Founder and President of the Human Trafficking Legal Center, who helped explain the problem from a legal standpoint.

On January 31, in John Jay’s Moot Court, each of them held the audience’s attention in their own dynamic way, with Lipenga painting a picture of her experience from her native Malawi to Maryland, and Vandenberg breaking down trafficking myths with pop culture references and gripping labor trafficking examples. Even though the event was held on one of the coldest days this semester, many John Jay students, staff, and faculty members stayed after their presentations for a gripping Q&A session. Their stories perfectly encapsulate why John Jay’s justice-focused mission is vital for an equitable society.

Lipenga’s Story of Survival
Fainess Lipenga is a woman on a mission. Determined to tell her story and help those victimized by labor traffickers, she began by reminding the audience that she is no longer a victim. “I don’t see myself as a victim,” said Lipenga. “I survived modern slavery. I’m a leader that has a story to tell. I have work to do in order to help others.” Lipenga worked as a domestic worker for a diplomat in Malawi for two years. When her employer was offered a diplomatic position in Washington D.C. she convinced Lipenga to go with her, promising Lipenga the chance to receive a formal education and earn more money in order to help her family back home. “You can imagine how excited and grateful I felt when I was made this offer. I dropped out of school because of financial hardships. I needed to help my family. I worked with her for two years and everything was fine. There were no red flags.” With her family’s financial security in mind, Lipenga accepted the opportunity and was asked to sign a contract written in English, a language she didn’t speak or understand at the time. Once in the U.S. however, Lipenga’s life took at unexpected turn.

Fainess Lipenga telling her story

Fainess Lipenga telling her story

 

“I don’t see myself as a victim. I survived modern slavery. I’m a leader that has a story to tell. I have work to do in order to help others.”—Fainess Lipenga

 

“When we arrived in the U.S.,” said Lipenga, “my employer became a completely different person. She turned into a tiger. She became my trafficker.” Lipenga had her passport confiscated, was cut off from contacting her family, had to sleep on the basement floor, fed only scraps, and forced to work up to 17 hours a day making just 40 cents an hour. After three years of torment, Lipenga fled. “I found the courage one day to say, ‘enough is enough.’ I knew when my trafficker was in the house because I could hear the garage door open and close. One day she returned home and didn’t close the garage door completely. That was my way to freedom. I stole my passport and contract and slid under the garage door.”

After fleeing from her trafficker, Lipenga found herself in a shelter and was finally able to call her mother. After three years of not hearing her voice, her mother, elated with joy exclaimed, “Oh my God, my child, you are alive! All this time I thought you had died. What happened?” Lipenga would go on to tell her mother, as well as others, including Vandenberg, the story of her captivity. With guidance from Vandenberg and her organization the Human Trafficking Legal Center, Lipenga was able to secure her U.S. citizenship and seek out justice in her case. In 2014 her pro bono lawyers filed and won a civil complaint against her trafficker where Lipenga was awarded $1.1 million in damages.

Vandenberg’s Hope To Level The Playing Field
Martina Vandenberg, a human-trafficking lawyer who has been at the forefront of the anti-human trafficking movement for more than two decades, started her presentation with a slide and a question. “How many of you have seen the movie Taken?” she said, as many members of the audience raised their hands. “Why do you think a human-trafficking lawyer would hate this movie?” she asked. “Sensationalism,” an audience member suggested. “That’s right. So much sensationalism,” said Vandenberg. “Movies like Taken give the impression that every single victim of human trafficking is a blonde haired, blue-eyed, rich girl who is kidnapped, taken to another country and forced into prostitution. When the reality is very different. In the more than 20 years of working to help victims of human trafficking in multiple countries, I have seen that scenario once.”

Martina Vandenberg gives the audience some gripping examples of labor trafficking in the U.S.

Martina Vandenberg gives the audience some gripping examples of labor trafficking in the U.S.

 

“Movies like Taken give the false impression that every single victim of human trafficking is a blonde hair, blue-eyed rich girl who is kidnapped, taken to another country and forced into prostitution. When the reality is very different.” —Martina Vandenberg

 

Vandenberg explained that human trafficking victims often come to the U.S. of their own volition, with the promise of a better life in their sights, much like Lipenga. “It’s much easier to convince someone to go with you voluntarily, than it is to tie them up, beat them into submission and throw them in the back of a truck,” said Vandenberg. One of the first cases recognized as human trafficking in the U.S. involved 55 deaf Mexican nationals who were brought to the U.S. and forced to work 18 hours in the New York City Subway system selling trinkets. “When they didn’t meet their quotas for the day, they were beaten,” explained Vandenberg. “Some of the women were sexually abused. And to cap it all off, they were forced to make videos saying how wonderful life was in the U.S. in order to recruit others.”

One of the goals of the Human Trafficking Legal Center is for every trafficking survivor, if he or she wants one, to have a pro bono lawyer standing with them. When a worker is held in forced labor they have no power. “The point of the Human Trafficking Legal Center is to upend the balance of power so that survivors of forced labor can actually hold their traffickers accountable,” says Vandenberg.

(left to right) Fainess Lipenga and Martina Vandenberg proudly stand together as advocates for labor trafficking victims

(left to right) Fainess Lipenga and Martina Vandenberg proudly stand together as advocates for labor trafficking victims

 

“Labor trafficking isn’t hard to identify. It’s about making a connection, looking someone in the eye and asking questions.”—Fainess Lipenga

 

Becoming Part of the Solution
One way to effectively shift the balance of power is to report labor trafficking and forced labor abuse when it is suspected. “Labor trafficking isn’t hard to identify,” said Lipenga. “It’s about making a connection, looking someone in the eye and asking questions. The majority of the time, when people see there is an issue, they quickly think, ‘it’s none of my business.’ It’s time to change that thinking. It’s time to change the culture. We have to take action. If you see something, say something. Don’t be a part of the problem, be part of the solution.”

If you’re a victim of human trafficking or suspect someone is in need of help, you should call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888—its confidential and available 24/7.


Baruch College’s Master of Financial Engineering Program Places #3 in Global Ranking

Risk.net evaluated 46 programs from 11 countries, with the Baruch MFE program ranking #3 worldwide and #1 in New York State ahead of Columbia, Cornell, NYU 

The Master of Financial Engineering (MFE) program at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences placed #3 in the “Quant Finance Master’s Guide 2019” worldwide ranking compiled by Risk.net, which evaluated 46 quantitative finance master’s programs from 11 countries.

The first global ranking of its kind, the list included programs from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, France, Italy, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States.

Among all the higher education institutions in New York who made the top 10, Baruch placed #1, ahead of New York University, Columbia University, and Cornell University.

Achievements from Career Placements to Competitions

“Being ranked in the top three that includes programs from four continents is a point of pride,” said Dan Stefanica, PhD, director of Baruch College’s Master of Financial Engineering program. “We are proud of the achievements of our students year after year, on the job market and in multiple competitions, and of our alumni who mentor our students and directly contribute to their success.”

Risk.net is the world’s leading source of in-depth news and analysis on risk management, derivatives and regulation. Risk.net considered metrics including graduate salaries, program selectivity, student-lecturer contact hours, and faculty research scores in its methodology to evaluate more than 40 leading quantitative finance-focused master’s programs worldwide. Particular weight was given to average graduate salaries and a strong employment rate, Risk.net said.

MFE Students Excel at Competitions and Working for Top Organizations     

Students from Baruch’s MFE program have performed admirably at several recent national and international competitions. Xiangtian (Forest) Deng was on the winning team (out of 30 teams) at the 2018 Columbia Data Science Hackathon. For the third year in a row, the Baruch MFE team won the sixth annual International Association for Quantitative Finance competition in June 2017. Additionally, the Baruch MFE team won the 2017 Rotman International Trading Competition that took place at University of Toronto and included 52 academic institutions from four continents.

Graduates of Baruch College’s MFE programs typically receive job offers from such prestigious companies as AQR, Credit Suisse, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Pont72, and Schonfeld. The average first year base salary and sign-on bonus exceeded $120,000 in each of the past five years.

# # #


Inmaculada Lara-Bonilla to Lead Hostos Latin American Writers Institute and its “Hostos Review/Revista Hostosiana”

With the new year, new leadership has arrived at the Hostos Latin American Writers Institute (LAWI) and its journal, the Hostos Review/Revista Hostosiana.

Taking over as Director and new Chief Editor is Inmaculada Lara-Bonilla, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the Latin American & Caribbean Studies Unit. She takes over for Hostos Distinguished Professor and celebrated international author, Isaac Goldemberg.

Based at Hostos Community College, LAWI is The City University of New York’s central advocacy and service organization for the support of the work of Latin American and Latina/Latino writers. The Hostos Review/Revista Hostosiana supports literary creation and provides opportunities for publishing and the discussion of topics that are fundamental to contemporary cultural activity.

“The Latin American Writer’s Institute was created through the vision and dedication of Professor Goldemberg, and I am grateful to him for his work over the years developing the Institute, an initiative that is perfectly aligned with the college mission. I am certain under Professor Lara-Bonilla’s leadership the Institute will continue the important work of supporting Latina/Latino writers from around the world,” said Christine Mangino, Hostos Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs.

LAWI was founded in 1987 and has remained devoted to promoting and disseminating the work of Latin American, Ibero-American, as well as U.S. Latina/Latino writers residing in the United States. It aims to build bridges between these writers and their counterparts in Latin America, Spain, and other parts of the world.

Lara-Bonilla is also an author whose research focuses on contemporary Latin American and Latina Women’s literature and feminist thought. Her research has received awards from Harvard University and the City University of New York and her essays and poetry are frequently published in widely respected journals and anthologies.

Goldemberg founded the Institute as an outgrowth of the New York Latin American Book Fair held in 1985 at New York University and brought it with him to Hostos in 1992, where he also founded the Hostos Review/Revista Hostosiana. Goldemberg is a prolific and award-winning author of poetry, fiction, theatre, and personal essays. His books include the celebrated novel The Fragmented Life of Don Jacobo Lerner (1978), and the more recent Libro de reclamaciones (2018), Philosophy and Other Fables (2016), and Acuérdate del escorpión (2015).

Goldemberg is thankful for the opportunity to support other writers.

“One of my greatest satisfactions as director of LAWI is the assistance that I’ve given to writers, especially emerging ones. I’ve also assisted many cultural institutions and universities in the organization of readings and literary conferences and made LAWI’s information services available to professors, journalists, reviewers, translators, editors, and publishers,” Goldemberg said.

For Goldemberg, Lara-Bonilla is the ideal person to build on this legacy because of her multifaceted experience as a writer, a professor, an essayist, and a scholar.

Lara-Bonilla is excited for the opportunity to help continue LAWI’s important work, while expanding on the languages, genres and authors published through the Hostos Review/Revista Hostosiana.

“My initial focus will be on the Institute’s yearly publication of creative and critical writing, the Hostos Review/Revista Hostosiana, which I see as a ‘literary feast,’” Lara-Bonilla said. “I am delighted to inherit the quality work done by Isaac as former Chief Editor, as well as by the guest editors who have made the journal such a rich platform for readers and writers of so many different backgrounds. This literary exchange is already happening, and everyone—including writers, students, local, national and international scholars—are invited to join!”


CUNY LAW RANKED #1 NATIONALLY FOR DIVERSITY

The National Jurist's Winter 2019 Rankings Report places CUNY Law at the top of the largest ever "honor roll" for law school diversity.

 

"Topping our list is City University of New York School of Law. Nearly half of its students are minorities. More than one-third of its faculty is diverse. Part of CUNY Law’s mission is to help diversify the legal profession, said Ann Cammett, senior associate dean of academic affairs for the Long Island City school, which is known for its commitment to public interest."

 

“Our legal system should represent all of the people, to give them all a voice. If you don’t have this diversity, you create an illegitimate system."

- Ann Cammett, Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs 

 

 

The feature reports that student diversity has increased significantly since 1980, even as law schools experienced application slumps five and six years ago. In an effort to track progress, The National Jurist has assessed and graded law schools for diversity every other year since 2013. 2019 was the largest class of schools that made their top list, which is determined by "evaluating the percentage of minority faculty members and the percentage of students in five racial groups and comparing those to national averages."

 

Read more Most-Diverse-Law-Schools-Article-The-National-Jurist-Winter-2019


Newly Awarded Grants – Advancement, Communications and External Relations

The Grants and Partnerships Office is pleased to announce Bronx Community College has been awarded the following grants:

A $1,190,090 grant from the New York State Education Department under the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. This continued funding makes it possible for BCC to provide essential career and technical education-related programs and services to better prepare our students for employment upon graduation.

A $200,000 grant from the New York City Council in support of the College’s Adult Basic Education and Training Program. The program’s Director, Blanche Kellawon, expects to allocate the grant funds toward upgrading equipment to enhance classroom instruction, providing advanced CPR training for ESL students and updating the program’s facilities to better serve students.

A $100,000 grant from the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation in continued support of the Petrie Student Emergency Grant Fund, which provides BCC students with emergency aid for short-term financial crises, including, but not limited to: temporary loss of income, medical/dental emergencies, loss of childcare and homelessness or sudden loss of housing.

A $100,000 grant from the Pinkerton Foundation in support of Future Now. The funds will assist Future Now students with existing academic probations, allowing them to continue in school and complete their graduation requirements.

A $75,000 grant in support of nursing scholarships from the Louis and Rachel Rudin Foundation. The Rudin Foundation is a longtime funder of the College and their continued support plays an integral in helping BCC nursing students remain in school and on the path to graduation.

A $1,500 “Vision” Planning grant from Humanities-NY, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, in support of planning an art and community event on campus this fall. The grant will underwrite a call for and juried selection of artists across a broad range of media to re-envision fame and public commemoration at BCC’s Hall of Fame for Great Americans.

These grants will allow us to further our goal of building a community of excellence.

Eddy Bayardelle
Vice President
Advancement, Communications and External Relations


JOHN JAY’S PRI ADVOCATES TO EXPAND ALTERNATIVE-TO-INCARCERATION AND REENTRY SERVICES IN NEW YORK STATE

John jay’s PRI Advocates to Expand Alternative-to-Incarceration and Reentry Services in New York State

 

Convened by State Assemblymember and Correction Committee Chair David Weprin, in partnership with the Legal Action Center and the Prisoner Reentry Institute of John Jay College, more than 30 experts and advocates participated in a roundtable at John Jay College of Criminal Justice to share information and to suggest strategies to expand alternative-to-incarceration (ATI) and reentry services within New York State.

Since the 1980s, the State Legislature has provided crucial funding to support many of these programs, which have helped reduce crime, shrink the prison population, provide people with ”second chances,” and save taxpayers millions of dollars.

Roundtable participants shared recommendations on alternatives to detention and incarceration, diversion, and reentry programs, and on services that focus on employment, housing, mental health, drug treatment, and women and special populations.

Ann Jacobs, Director of the Prisoner Reentry Institute (PRI) at John Jay College, noted the importance of access to higher education for people after their justice involvement.  She announced the pending release of a PRI report which maps the higher education programs currently operating inside New York State prisons. The report recommends an expansion of college in prison and increased use of educational release in the last two years of incarceration.

“With the support of our elected officials, New York has made great strides in prison and reentry reform,” said Director Jacobs. “We stand at a crucial moment now where a coalition of public and private officials can make tremendous strides in helping people turn their lives around.”

Learn more about the Prisoner Reentry Institute     

Prison Reentry institute Director Ann Jacobs

Prison Reentry Institute Director Ann Jacobs

PRI Roundtable


Dean Ayman El-Mohandes elected to second term on ASPPH Board

Ayman El-Mohandes

Ayman El-Mohandes

CUNY SPH Dean Ayman El-Mohandes has been re-elected to the board of directors of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH), where he will continue to work with leadership and staff to advance important public health initiatives. This re-election recognizes Dean El-Mohandes’ stature as a leader among his peers in academic public health in the US.

ASPPH is the “voice of accredited academic public health,” representing the 115 schools and programs of public health accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) or in applicant status for accreditation. The mission of ASPPH is to strengthen the capacity of members by advancing leadership, excellence, and collaboration for academic public health.


JOHN JAY FACULTY DEVELOPMENT DAY FOSTERS UNITY AND STIMULATES NEW THINKING

John Jay Faculty Development Day Fosters Unity and Stimulates New Thinking

 

This semester’s Faculty Development Day, held on January 24, provided the opportunity for faculty to come together as a community, and it gave them the chance to learn about new tools, strategies, and approaches that can help support student success and enrich the overall educational experience here at John Jay. “How do we enhance learning?” asked Provost Yi Li during a Q&A session. “Our students today are very different from the students of yesterday, and the students of tomorrow. The way we teach them must change. You are the people who will make those changes happen. I have the deepest appreciation for what you do, day in, and out.”

 

Provost Yi Li speaking during the Q&A session

Provost Yi Li speaking during the Q&A session

 

The day’s sessions highlighted inclusivity, diversity, experiential learning, and online teaching practices. One of the most anticipated sessions was Introducing the John Jay Justice eReader Project. The Justice eReader is a collection of open and library-licensed texts and materials that will be available for free to all students and teachers. The goal, said Raymond Patton, Ph.D., Director of General Partnerships and General Education, is to, “cultivate an intellectual community of teaching and learning around justice, in a forum that teachers can use in the classroom and students can access for free.” The Justice eReader will include a selection of core texts that introduce readers to concepts, experiences, and ideas regarding justice, along with a database of contemporary and historical texts, and valuable teaching materials. Calling the Justice eReader a “living document,” María  Julia Rossi, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures, hopes that the entire John Jay community gets involved in the eReader’s evolution.

 

Faculty members share techniques to enhance the student learning experience

Faculty members share techniques to enhance the student learning experience

 

Faculty Development Day was sponsored and supported by the Teaching and Learning Center. And, it was the tireless efforts of the Center’s Director, Gina Foster, that made the day’s events possible. We spoke with several faculty members to find out what they hoped to learn and gain from this semester’s Faculty Development Day.

 

Dara Byrne

Dara N. Byrne
Associate Provost for Undergraduate Retention & Dean of Undergraduate Studies

“Faculty development day is critical because faculty at this College have a commitment to continuous improvement. The day offers us the opportunity to convene as teacher-scholars around the issues that are core to effectiveness in-and outside the classroom. There is no better way to kick off each semester with colleagues sharing lessons learned and best practices for success.”

 

 

Allison PeaseAllison Pease
Associate to the Provost for Faculty and Professor of English

“I am really excited to see everybody here. They’re all trying to make themselves ready for the semester and to become better teachers. That’s what this day is all about. I’m also excited for the debut of the Justice eReader. Unique to John Jay, the Justice eReader will hopefully be used across our courses, so that all students are introduced to a similar body of knowledge when thinking about justice.”

 

 

Matthew PerryMatthew Perry
Associate Professor of History

“I am part of the editorial board on the new Justice eReader project. It is such a useful project for both instructors and students. I also joined a session on online teaching. Today is all about expanding your skillset. Since I plan to conduct hybrid classes, where part of the teaching takes place in the classroom and the other part is online, it’s important for me to learn new techniques that will help improve my online teaching skills.”

 

 

Elizabeth NisbetElizabeth Nisbet
Assistant Professor of Public Management

“I like to come to Faculty Development Day to get new ideas for the classroom and see how to construct different exercises and structured learning. I enjoy connecting with faculty across departments. It stimulates new thinking about how we can do our work and gives me the chance to connect with a lot of people I don’t normally get to see.”

 

 

Denise ThompsonDenise Thompson
Assistant Professor of Public Management

“I come to every Faculty Development Day because I think there is so much to learn in order to improve your teaching style and syllabi, and just your approach to teaching in general. These are things that help make the learning experience stronger, so I try not to miss it.”

 

 

 

Robin DavisRobin Davis
Emerging Technologies and Online Learning Librarian

“Faculty Development Day is important for a lot of cross disciplinarian and interdisciplinary discussions about how we can best serve our students, getting on board with shared goals of student success. I learn a lot from my colleagues and appreciate the chance to really dig deep on how we can achieve student success.”

 

 

Stephen C. RussellStephen C. Russell
Assistant Professor of Ancient History

“I’m excited about the e-reader project. I teach a course called ‘Justice in Western Traditions’ and I make students buy a textbook. I hope this free alternative will have a depth of resources that are available to students.”

 

 

 

Maria D'AgostinoMaria D’Agostino
Associate Professor of Public Management

“I wanted to see how I could incorporate the e-reader in my class. It would be great to assign my students readings that are available for free on the eReader instead of having them purchase books.”

 

 

 

More scenes from the event:

 

Professor Jan Yager speaking with Professor Allison Pease

Professor Jan Yager speaking with Professor Allison Pease

Professors Raymond Patton, María Julia Rossi, Jamie Longazel, Matthew Perry, Olivera Jokic, and Suzanne Oboler introducing the Justice eReader Project

Professors Raymond Patton, María Julia Rossi, Jamie Longazel, Matthew Perry, Olivera Jokic, and Suzanne Oboler introducing the Justice eReader Project

 

Wynne Ferdinand, Associate Director of First Year Academic Success Programs, asking a question

Wynne Ferdinand, Associate Director of First Year Academic Success Programs, asking a question

 

Professors María Julia Rossi and Jamie Longazel during the eReader Presentation

Professors María Julia Rossi and Jamie Longazel during the eReader Presentation

Professor Maria Volpe engaged in a conversation with Provost Yi Li

Professor Maria Volpe engaged in a conversation with Provost Yi Li


Researchers gauge the availability of substance use disorder services in NY community health centers

Tableau of drugs- pills, coke, marijuana, and alcohol.In 2010 a national survey of behavioral health services offered by Federally Qualified Health Center organizations found relatively high rates of mental health but lower rates for substance use disorder services. Given that New York rates of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use closely mirror national rates, CUNY SPH Assistant Professor Sean Haley and his team were interested in whether the availability of substance use disorder (SUD) services in New York Federally Qualified Health centers (FQHC) would mirror national availability. The results were published in the Journal of Substance Use.

Similar to the national findings, the New York study found that FQHC sites conducted more mental health screenings (55 percent) than SUD screenings (32 percent). However, just six percent of national FQHCs reported that they did not use a standard screening tool compared to over 40 percent of New York sites. In addition, the national survey reported that 55 percent of organizations offered on-site substance abuse treatment compared to 11 percent of New York sites. Although the Affordable Care Act mandates that insurers cover mental health and substance use disorder services at parity with medical and surgical benefits, the Act may not be sufficient to improve SUD service availability without additional federal attention, including performance measures.

“Less than 10 years ago the Health Resources and Services Administration—the federal agency responsible for the FQHCS—introduced quality measures for tobacco screening and cessation counseling, and national FQHC screening and cessation rates increased by 15 percent and 20 percent, respectively,” Haley says. “It is reasonable to think that similar measures could be applied to alcohol. However, introducing new measures without simultaneously attending to the resources needed to accommodate the additional workload would likely further strain safety net providers already treating our most vulnerable patients.”

Haley SJ, Moscou S, Murray S, Rieckmann T, Wells KL. The availability of alcohol, tobacco and other drug services for adults in New York State Community Health Centers, Journal of Substance Use, DOI: 10.1080/14659891.2018.1562577


Letter to Students & Families, Week of February 4, 2019

February 4, 2019

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Congratulations to our Middle Grades students who put on two fantastic performances of Fame, Jr. on Thursday and Friday evening last week!

February provides us with a range of opportunities to celebrate the diversity of NEST+m’s teachers, students and families.

Thank you to the members of NEST+m’s Black History Month Planning Committee who have coordinated a range of programs articulated on this calendar.

To all who will be celebrating the Lunar New Year: Happy New Year! The Lunar New Year is celebrated throughout New York City’s boroughs. As the prior link details, the Lunar Calendar is used to identify holidays within Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Tibetan and other cultural communities. Our in-school Lunar New Year Celebration will happen tomorrow; don’t forget to send in your child with a few dollars to purchase dumplings and almond cookies in the Cafeteria! If you can lend a hand, the planning committee is still looking for a few volunteers.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up Soon

  • Lunar New Year Celebration: Monday, February 4th
  • Lunar New Year Holiday: Tuesday, February 5th – School closed
  • MG Exploration Day: Wednesday, February 6th
  • PTA Skating Party: Saturday, February 9th
  • 3rd Grade “Family Friday”/Native American Celebration: Wednesday, February 13th, 8:30am-9:15am
  • Town Hall: Wednesday, February 13th at 5:45pm; submit your questions HERE
  • Rapid Dismissal: Friday, February 15 – no afterschool programs in session, Mid-Winter break begins.
  • Mid-Winter Break: Friday, February 15 – 24, students return to school on Monday, February 25.

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
The June Regents exam testing schedule (June 18-25, 2019)  is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

Researchers explore ways PrEP users can remember their daily dose

blue SMTWTFS pill boxConsistent daily use of pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, can reduce the risk of HIV infection by 92 percent, but the drug becomes much less effective when taken inconsistently.

Adhering to a daily regimen of any medication can be a challenge, so to assist health care providers in treating patients at risk for contracting HIV, CUNY SPH Professor Christian Grov, DPH student Javier Lopez-Rios, and MPH student Alexa D’Angelo co-led a study into the strategies PrEP users can employ to remember to stay on track with their daily doses. The study was published in the journal Prevention Science.

The researchers conducted one-on-one interviews with 103 gay and bisexual men on PrEP about the factors that contribute to missing a dose and the strategies they use to remember to take it. Participants reported that changes to one’s routine, forgetting, and being away from home were common causes of a lapsed dose. The survey found that nearly all participants in the sample reported using at least one adherence strategy—integrating PrEP into an existing routine such as morning hygiene rituals, using a pillbox, or setting reminders on their phones—to help them remember to take their daily dose.

“Daily PrEP adherence was overall very high in this sample,” says Grov, the study’s lead author. “On average, participants only missed 1.6 doses in the last 30 days. We believe that adherence was high because participants were using these strategies.”

Although PrEP is highly effective even in the event of an occasional missed dose, current FDA guidelines for PrEP recommend it to be taken daily in order to maximize its effectiveness.

“It can be challenging for an otherwise healthy individual to incorporate a new daily pill regimen, and medical providers might consider recommending any number of the strategies we identified for their patients who are either worried about, or struggling with, adherence,” Grov says.

Grov C, Flynn AWP, D’Angelo AB, Lopez-Rios J, Pantalone DW, Holloway, Parsons JT. Gay and Bisexual Men’s Strategies to Maintain Daily Adherence to Their HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Medication: Results from a Qualitative Study Prev Sci(2019).


JOHN JAY CELEBRATES BLACK HISTORY MONTH

John Jay Celebrates Black History Month

 

John Jay College is proud to celebrate Black History Month with a roster of events dedicated to highlighting the many achievements and contributions African-Americans have made to this country. As a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) and Minority Serving Institution (MSI), the College recognizes the month of February as a time to honor our rich, expansive, and ever-growing African-American history, proudly acknowledging the many African-Americans who tirelessly fought for equality. During the month of February, there are several John Jay events planned to celebrate Black History Month that everyone can participate in and enjoy. To get in the spirit of the month, we spoke to several John Jay students and asked them, what does Black History Month mean to you?

Quardear HarrisQuardear Harris
Senior
Hometown: New York City

What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black History Month is a time to celebrate my heritage, connect with my identity and be knowledgeable about where I come from and who I am as an African-American male. As a person of color, and for minorities in general, there is not enough education centered around our history. It’s not taught enough in school, and that’s something that needs to change so that children are more connected with their identity and with who they are. Schools tend to teach what the textbooks say, and the textbook information is not always correct. Then, children go to college and have to pay to learn about their own history. You shouldn’t have to pay to learn about your history. You should be able to learn about it as you grow up and then go to college to further advance that knowledge.

 

“Diversity is a beautiful thing, and the conversation about diversity and inclusion needs to continue.”—Quardear Harris

 

If you could choose one person that we recognize during Black History Month, who would it be, and what would you say to them?
I’m going to say Rosa Parks, and I would thank her for what she did. Because of her bus boycott, every time that I take public transportation, I remember that it’s important for me not to sit in the back. She fought for our right to sit in the front of the bus next to our white counterparts. Sometimes, when I’m on public transportation and a white person speaks to me, I know that the conversations we’re having was made possible because of Rosa Parks. Diversity is a beautiful thing, and the conversation about diversity and inclusion needs to continue.

Heema KisnasamyHeema Kisnasamy 
Freshman
Hometown: Brooklyn, New York 

What does Black History Month mean to you?
It means celebrating the freedoms that we have gained, and acknowledging the ways in which we attained those freedoms. It’s important for the United States to recognize this because though legally we are free, socially we are not. The celebration of Black History Month should stand as a reminder that freedom, and the fight for freedom, is still important today.

If you could choose one person that we recognize during Black History Month, who would it be, and what would you say to them?
I would choose Harriet Tubman. Everything she did with the Underground Railroad was impressive. She broke the rules for us to gain better rules that are inclusive of all races. If she were here, I would thank her for helping to eliminate the ignorance that people had, and for uniting African-Americans. She put her life on the line for this, and if no one would have done that, the country wouldn’t be where it is at today.

Elodie OrientalElodie Oriental
Sophomore
Hometown: Brooklyn, New York

What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black History Month means culture, Africa, heritage, strength, and power to all races. We are all from Africa, so celebrating our black heritage and where we come from is important. We have to give recognition to the African-Americans who have paved the way for us to be free today. 

 

 

We are all from Africa, so celebrating our black heritage and where we come from is important. We have to give recognition to the African-Americans who have paved the way for us to be free today.”—Elodie Oriental 

 

What recent African-American achievement gives you hope and inspiration for the future?
The success of the movie Black Panther*, gives me hope. Usually, movies are primarily made with white actors, and those are the ones that are successful and make a lot of money. But this movie was successful, and still is to this day. The black actors and actresses are getting awards for their roles in it.

 

*In honor of Black History Month, free screenings of Black Panther will be available at 250 participating AMC theaters nationwide February 1-7.

Esteisy SeijasEsteisy Seijas
Junior
Hometown: Queens, New York

What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black History Month is a time to celebrate the inventions and the culture African-Americans have contributed to this country.

If you could choose one person that we recognize during Black History Month, who would it be, and what would you say to them?

I would choose Dorothy Vaughan. I just re-watched Hidden Figures, and it was impressive that Dorothy took the responsibility to teach the women that worked with her, so that they could continue to have a job and be part of history. I want to be a teacher and the focus on education is important to me. Dorothy took it upon herself to bring about education when the opportunity wasn’t given to them. Even though there were many obstacles, she educated herself first, and then continued to educate others for the sake of the history of our country. I can honestly say, that if I could be half the women she is, I would gladly live the rest of my life out happy.

 

“I just re-watched Hidden Figures, and it was impressive that Dorothy [Vaughan] took the responsibility to teach the women that worked with her, so that they could continue to have a job and be part of history.”—Esteisy Seijas

 

Ikbal BakshaIkbal Baksha
Junior
Hometown: Bangladesh 

What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black History Month means appreciating the efforts African-Americans made so that we can have equality.

If you could choose one person that we recognize during Black History Month, who would it be, and what would you say to them?

I would choose Martin Luther King Jr. because he helped remove the barrier between races. He saw everyone as equal and wanted everyone to be treated the same. His efforts have helped me to be treated fairly. People are people and we should treat each other equally.

Magdalene OmaboeMagdalene Omaboe
Freshman
Hometown: Queens, New York

What does Black History Month mean to you?
My parents are from Africa. When I was in elementary school, I was told that I wasn’t black enough because I didn’t understand certain references. I used to be okay with not understanding the references, but that didn’t mean that I was not black. I am black, and we’re all from Africa. Someone can’t tell me that I’m not something, when I know I am. I am black and proud, that’s what Black History Month is all about.

If you could choose one person that we recognize during Black History Month, who would it be, and what would you say to them? 
I would choose Coretta Scott King and I would tell her how much she empowered me. I recently read her book about the way she fought during the civil rights movement, and advocated for all people.

Lizairys SanchezLizairys Sanchez
Freshman 
Hometown: Bronx, New York

What does Black History Month mean to you?
It’s a month to recognize the great achievements that black people have accomplished throughout the years, specifically with how far we have come from discrimination and racism. It’s important because you have to acknowledge what has been done throughout history to move towards a better future.

 

“You have to acknowledge what has been done throughout history to move towards a better future.”—Lizairys Sanchez

 

If you could choose one person that we recognize during Black History Month, who would it be, and what would you say to them? 
I would say Rosa Parks, because she was brave in standing up for herself and saying no. The fact that she was a black woman doing this is very inspiring and powerful. If Rosa Parks were here today, I would ask her what made her reach her breaking point to say, I don’t want to be discriminated against anymore, and I want to be equal.

Alex MorgeseAlex Morgese
Junior
Hometown: Rockland County

What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black History Month is an important time to recognize and bring to light the progress that has been made by African-Americans—especially at a diverse college like John Jay.

If you had to choose one person that we recognize during Black History Month, who would it be, and what would you say to them?
I would choose LeBron James. He came from nothing and now he’s one of the top names in the world. If he were standing in front of me, I would ask him what it means to be a role model to others.

Learn more about our John Jay’s Black History Month Events


PROF. ANTHONY CARPI, HELPING MINORITY STUDENTS BECOME TOMORROW’S STEM LEADERS

Prof. Anthony Carpi, Helping Minority Students Become Tomorrow’s STEM Leaders

 

As Associate Provost and Dean of Research for John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Anthony Carpi, Ph.D. knew the College’s status as a Minority Serving and Hispanic Serving Institution made him well suited to serve on a special committee for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The committee produced the report, “Minority Serving Institutions: America’s Underutilized Resource for Strengthening the STEM Workforce,” which was released last month. It offers best practices and success strategies that could bring more underrepresented students into the STEM workforce. The goal to find ways that Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) can encourage students of color to pursue degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math. The U.S. Department of Education designates a college as an MSI based on measurements like the number of minority students enrolled.

“This report points out the crucial role that Minority-Serving Institutions play in diversifying the STEM workforce,” said Carpi, who teaches and conducts research in the field of Environmental Chemistry. “It also highlights programs like PRISM at John Jay that are helping to produce the next generation of scientists and STEM professionals.”

 

MSI Report Cover

Read the Full Report

 

The report cites PRISM, The Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math, as a model program for other colleges to emulate. Carpi founded PRISM in 2006 and has been instrumental in helping almost 100 students gain admissions to top post-graduate STEM and health programs at institutions such as Princeton University, University of Pennsylvania, and Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences.

Students in the PRISM Undergraduate Research Program work closely with a faculty mentor on a range of research in fields, including: Molecular Biology, Forensic Entomology, Cancer Biology, Organic Chemistry, and Computer Programming. They receive stipends to help them focus on research, saving many from needing to find a job outside the College. PRISM serves about 45 students each year. For the ones that go on to post-graduate work, about half are part of underrepresented populations in science and math fields.

“Our undergraduate researchers are extremely motivated by the opportunity to be mentored by our faculty and by participating in cutting edge research projects in their labs at John Jay,” said Edgardo Sanabria-Valentín, Ph.D., Associate Director of PRISM. “Their successes, and the success of our programs, are prime examples of why the recommendations in this academies’ report work, and why the key to developing a diverse and inclusive scientific workforce lies in investing in Minority-Serving Institutions like John Jay.”

The MSI report recommends that programs like PRISM become a top educational priority and receive greater attention and funding from public and private sources like the Department of Education, Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation.

Help Support PRISM


New Continuing and Professional Studies at CCNY courses introduced for Spring 2019

 

New course offerings from Continuing and Professional Studies at CCNY include Phlebotomy

Continuing and Professional Studies at CCNY is introducing new, career-enhancing classes this Spring 2019 semester.

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), a 130-hour program, is approved by New York State and provides both classroom instruction and a 30-hour clinical internship. Coursework includes anatomy and physiology, basic life support, and fundamentals of patient care. During the final six weeks of class, students are assigned to a clinical externship in a nursing home. Starting March 9.

Phlebotomy is a 96-hour program perfect for CNAs and other patient care professionals who want to become Certified Patient Care Technicians (PCT). Students will learn how to draw blood from patients or donors and assemble equipment (such as needles, blood collection devices, gauze, tourniquet, cotton, and alcohol). Starts Feb. 4.

Students interested in becoming Pharmacy Technicians can enroll in a 75-hour certificate program that prepares students to follow a rewarding career path in the industry. Topics covered include, Pharmacy Law, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Medical Terminology and Pharmacology. (Prior knowledge of arithmetic and pre-algebra required to prepare and dispense drugs.) Students learn about serving patients, maintaining medication inventory control systems, and managing a pharmacy. Classes start Feb. 9.

The Medical Interpreter Certificate program is a 102-hour course is designed to train entry-level medical interpreters in English/Spanish to meet the needs of doctors’ offices, hospitals, emergency rooms, and other medical facilities. Many hospitals now rely on telephone interpreters to assist patients. CCNY’s Certificate in Medical Interpreting is the only one of its kind to incorporate Telephonic Interpreting as part of its curriculum. Students also receive targeted assistance with resume writing, interview skills, and career development. Course begins Feb. 11.

The Certificate in Web Design and Development is a hands-on program designed to teach students the principles and mechanics underlying the design development of websites. Students receive practical training in JavaScript, PHP, and career development including resume writing and interview skills. It is open to beginners with the goal of teaching general skills that can be applied to any web development project. This evening class is starting soon.

Please call 212-650-7312 or email the office for more information on starting dates and times, as well as for details about registration and fees.

Interested students can browse courses here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.


CUNY Colleges Celebrate Black History Month With An Array Of Events, From Readings and Exhibits To Music, Food and Dance

 

February is the 43rd  Black History Month, and CUNY campuses throughout the city will mark the annual salute with more than two dozen events celebrating African-American cultural, artistic, political and scientific heritage. ​ 

These include curated exhibits by the Department of African American Studies at New York City College of Technology and Black Inventors at Queensborough Community College. At the College of Staten Island, Black Lives Matter activist and author Darnell L. Moore will read from his memoir about growing up in New Jersey.

“Black History Month is a powerful opportunity for us to acknowledge and celebrate the vital contributions that African Americans have made to our nation in so many ways,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The events and programs taking place at CUNY colleges during Black History Month will help us all to remember the complexity of the African-American experience in America and appreciate the incredible diversity and richness of the CUNY community.”

Below is a list of some of the events that are planned at CUNY colleges for Black History Month:

BARUCH COLLEGE

Cultural Identity and Work Ethics Panel

Feb. 19, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.

NVC 1-107

55 Lexington Ave.

We have invited Baruch alumni and notable professionals to speak candidly about their cultural upbringing and how it influences their professional identity and work ethic. Refreshments will be provided.

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

All events will be at 199 Chambers St.

Film Screening of “Detroit”

Feb. 1, 3 p.m.

Room N-453

African Heritage Month Opening Ceremony

Feb. 6, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Student Cafeteria

The theme of this year is “Africa United,” in a ceremony that will feature African drumming, spoken word, African art, and dance performances by the Eclectic Butterfly Dance Theater. A sampling of African and Caribbean dishes will be provided as well. All are welcome.

Film Screening of “Paris is Burning”

Feb. 8, 3 p.m.

Room N-453

Movement of the People

Feb. 8, 12 p.m.

Student Cafeteria, 12 p.m.

Please join us for a performance by Movement of the People dance company. The group is dedicated to addressing historical and current sociocultural injustices through dance. The event will include a one-hour workshop on dances from the diaspora.

A Taste of the Black Diaspora

Feb. 13, 12 p.m.

Richard Harris Terrace

Traditional dishes from Africa, the Caribbean, and Southern United States have a reputation of being tasty, but not nutritious. Join the Health Education Department’s Health and Wellness Club to experience a taste of the Black Diaspora: Healthy and Healing Recipes from our culture.

What’s Next? Civil Rights, Black Health and Social Justice

Feb. 14, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Room N-451

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Robert Fullilove, professor of Sociomedical Sciences at the Columbia University Medical Center and associate dean for minority affairs at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. Fullilove, along with BMCC faculty, will discuss resilience, coping, and social justice in the black community.

Film Screening of “Moonlight”

Feb. 15, 3 p.m.

Room N-453

Staged Reading of Our Lady of 121st Street

Feb. 19, 7 p.m.

Room N-451

Following a staged reading of Stephen Adley Guirgis’ Our Lady of 121st Street, there  will be a discussion facilitated by professor Jermaine Rowe (LaGuardia Community College, Broadway and West End Performer). The reading relates to African heritage as it pertains to notions of behavior in community, ideas of forgiveness and honesty, and how the church and the idea of God’s love intersect, as well as clash.

Film Screening of “Hidden Figures”

Feb. 22, 3 p.m.

Room N-453

 

BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Black History Month Art Exhibit

Reception and talk: Feb. 11, 12 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Jan. 31 – Feb. 28, Mon: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Tues. – Thurs., 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Bliss Hall, Hall of Fame Art Gallery

2155 University Ave.

“Light on Color,” an exhibition of paintings by artist Carlton Murrell. Carlton began exploring his artistic talents by drawing and painting the various aspects of everyday life in his native Barbados.

Amadou Diallo 20th Year Youth Commemoration

Feb. 2, 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Brown Center Playhouse

2155 University Ave.

Feb. 4, 2019, is the 20th anniversary of the death of Amadou Diallo. Shot to death in front of his Bronx apartment building in 1999 by four New York City Police Officers, Amadou became the martyr for the modern national movement to address the killings of unarmed black males by the police. Join Bronx Community College and Amadou’s mother, Mrs. Kadiatou Diallo, founder of The Amadou Diallo Foundation, as we present the Amadou Diallo 20th Year Youth Commemoration for middle and high school students.

 

CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK

Student Town Hall: Meet the New Black Studies Director

Feb. 7, 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Shepard Hall, Room 350

160 Convent Ave.

The Black Studies Program presents Student Town Hall: Meet the New Black Studies Director Dr. Valdes. It is open to BSP majors, minors and all interested.

 

COLLEGE OF STATEN ISLAND 

Darnell L. Moore reads from his memoir No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black and Free in America

Feb. 7, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Green Dolphin Lounge – 1C

2800 Victory Blvd.

When Darnell Moore was 14, three boys from his neighborhood in Camden, N.J., tried to set him on fire because they thought he was gay. He escaped, but just barely. Three decades later, Moore is an award-winning writer, a leading Black Lives Matter activist, and an advocate for justice and liberation. In No Ashes in the Fire, he shares the journey taken by that scared, bullied teenager who not only survived, but found his calling.

Artistic Celebration

Feb. 28, 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Green Dolphin Lounge – 1C

2800 Victory Blvd.

An afternoon of celebration to honor our rich African and African-American artistic heritage. This event will feature artistic expressions in forms of live music, song, dance, spoken word and photography. Refreshments will be served.

 

GUTTMAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

All events will be held at 50 W. 40th St

Highlighting African Americans with Disabilities

Feb. 5, 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Atrium

In conjunction with the Office of Accessibility Services, this program will discuss the contributions and achievements of prominent African Americans with disabilities.

The Body is Not an Apology

Feb. 14, 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Room 401

The Office of Accessibility Services presents a workshop and discussion on Sonya Renee Taylor’s work, The Body Is Not an Apology.

Creative Connections

March 6, 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Room 401

A day of Afro diasporic creativity and celebration. Workshops on Afrocentric adornment and dance.

Diasporic Discussion Film Series

Screening of Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust”

March 3, 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Room 401

Discussion of migration, traditions, and conservation of African culture of the Gullah people and contemporary connections. Followed by screening of the film and Q&A session. Light refreshments provided.

 

HOSTOS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Black Activism: The Radical Life of Arturo Alfonso Schomburg

Feb. 14, 2 p.m.

500 Grand Concourse, Bronx

This talk will provide an overview of the life of Harlem’s most famous archivist, Arturo Alfonso Schomburg (1874-1938). Throughout his life, Schomburg worked toward black liberation. As a young man, he was deeply involved in the struggle for Puerto Rican and Cuban independence from Spain, an effort supported by his initiation as a Freemason in an Afro-Cuban lodge in Brooklyn.

Congressman Jose E. Serrano’s Annual Black History Month Celebration

Feb. 25, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Savoy Multipurpose Room

120 E. 149th St., Bronx

D Building

Hostos will host Congressman Jose E. Serrano’s annual BHM celebration. This event honors leaders and community activists.

HUNTER COLLEGE

Black History Month Convocation with Maya Wiley

Feb 7, 5:30 p.m.

Lang Recital Hall

695 Park Ave

Professor and lawyer Maya Wiley is the Henry Cohen Professor of Public and Urban Policy at The New School’s Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment. She has litigated, lobbied the U.S. Congress, and developed programs to transform structural racism in the U.S. and in South Africa. She is a Legal Analyst for NBC News and MSNBC.

LEHMAN COLLEGE

All events will be at 250 Bedford Park Blvd. West, Bronx

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration

Feb. 13, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

East Dining Hall, Music Building

Hosted by The Urban Male Leadership Program, the Lehman chapter of CREAR (College Readiness, Achievement and Retention) Futuros, and the Department of Africana Studies. Professor Gary L. Ford Jr. from Lehman’s Department of Africana Studies will be the keynote speaker. Free admission. No RSVP or registration necessary. 

Black History Month Welcome Reception

Feb. 13, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m.

East Dining Hall, Music Building

Hosted by The Urban Male Leadership Program and the Lehman chapter of CREAR) and Futuros. RSVP by email or telephone to: (718) 960-8801 or Urban.male@lehman.cuny.edu 

Lehman English Department: “The Third World Women’s Alliance and Intersectionality”

Spring 2019 Lecture series with Dr. Arianevani Kannan

Feb. 14, 12:30 p.m. – 2 p.m.

Carman Hall Room 221

The Third World Women’s Alliance was a multiracial coalition of Black, Latinx, Asian, Indigenous, and Arab women that grew out of the civil rights/Black Power movements. The group maintained active chapters in NYC and the Bay Area during the 1970s. Kannan will discuss the Alliance’s foundational work in developing what we know today as intersectionality. 

Annual Black History Month Student-Faculty Reading: “A Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Iconic African-American Poet Ntozake Shange”

March 6, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Leonard Lief Library 2nd Floor Atrium

Poetry reading with Maria Fernandez “Mariposa,” songs, spoken words by students, faculty, staff, community members, and some of Shange’s fans, friends and family members.

MEDGAR EVERS

Golden Legacy: Illustrated History Magazines and Comic Book Series

Feb. 5 – Feb. 28, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Charles Evans Inniss Memorial Library Archives, Lower Level

Bedford Building, 1650 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

The ground-breaking “Golden Legacy” comic books series was initially published from 1966 through 1976 with the intention to implant pride and self-esteem in black youth. The books are dedicated to the lives and deeds of Toussaint L’Ouverture, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Robert Smalls and other prominent black figures in history. The Library Archives will present the 16 original magazines. The collection is a gift from Mr. Jacob Morris, who will be the guest speaker. 

Life and Times of Marcus Garvey: Panel Discussion and Tribute

Feb. 8, 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.

Edison O. Jackson Auditorium

AB1 Health and Science Building, 1638 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

As a prominent black leader, whose ideas about black economic independence and entrepreneurship inspired and encouraged black communities to take ownership and responsibility for their social and economic destinies, Marcus Garvey’s life reflects the significant values of Black History Month and its objective to celebrate and honor the heroes of black culture.

Blacks in Government: Roundtable Discussion, Part One

Feb. 11, 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Edison O. Jackson Auditorium

AB1 Health and Science Building, 1638 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

A panel of black elected officials from the New York City metropolitan area, along with black government officials from federal, state, and local agencies, will discuss the role of blacks in government and future opportunities for students.

Soul Food Festival: Delicious Sampling of Dishes

Feb. 20, 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Main Lobby

AB1 Health and Science Building, 1638 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

The Office of Student Life and Development presents a sampling of dishes that expresses the role of soul food in the lives of past and present generations of African-Americans. The luncheon also features music, dance and poetry.

 

Medgar Evers College’s Big Read: Author’s Event and Dinner

Feb. 20, 5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Edison O. Jackson Auditorium

AB1 Health and Science Building, 1638 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

This collaborative, interdisciplinary endeavor features the book The Fire This Time, edited by Jesmyn Ward. This collection of essays, memoirs and poetry features major authors and thinkers, including Carol Anderson, Jericho Brown, Edwidge Danticat, Kevin Young, Claudia Rankine and Honoree Jeffers. Join us for the event with guest speaker Mitchell S. Jackson, author and a professor at New York University.

Telling Our Story: Photo Exhibit, Second Floor

Feb. 25, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Charles Evans Inniss Memorial Library, Second Floor

Bedford Building, 1650 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

This photo exhibit presents images of people of the African diaspora. It expresses and celebrates the diversity influenced by the mix of African and European traditions. Viewers will be able to relate to the subjects, their personal and familial journeys, their challenges and victories. There will be a presentation by guest speaker Marcia Wilson, followed by refreshments in the Welcome Center.

Jazz Dinner

Feb. 27, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Cafeteria

AB1 Health and Science Building, 1638 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

Join us for a celebration of unsung female jazz artists. In collaboration with the Women’s Her Story Month Committee, we honor Joshua Hutchinson, MSW, and feature music by renowned jazz artist Branice McKenzie.

 

NEW YORK CITY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Join African American Studies at City Tech during Black History Month as it continues to present The Legacy of Storytelling: Celebrating 50 Years of African American Studies.

The Life of Zora Neale Hurston: A Curated Exhibit

Feb. 1 – 28

Ursula C. Schwerin Library at City Tech – 4th Floor

300 Jay St., Brooklyn

This curated exhibit will include archival images and footage of Zora Neale Hurston, whose work as an anthropologist, novelist, essayist, and folklorist highlights the unique stories created and disseminated throughout the Africana world.

The Annual African American National Read-In

Feb. 14, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

City Tech Academic Complex – Room A105

285 Jay St., Brooklyn

City Tech students, faculty and staff will read excerpts from classic and contemporary Africana texts with special recognition of W.E.B. DuBois and Audre Lorde. This national event gives communities like City Tech an opportunity to promote literacy and to celebrate Africana writers. This event is followed by a morning reception.

As, Not For: Dethroning Our Absolutes

Feb. 22, Opening Reception, 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Art Exhibition Feb. 19 – March 29

Namm Building, 11th Floor – Grace Gallery

300 Jay St., Brooklyn

City Tech students, faculty and staff are welcome to attend the art exhibition free of charge. Jerome Harris, curator of the exhibition is an independent graphic designer and teaching fellow at Maryland Institute College of Art. Refreshments will be available at the opening reception.

Black History Month Keynote Event: The Legacy of Storytelling

Feb. 26, 2:30 p.m. – 5 p.m.

City Tech Academic Complex Auditorium

285 Jay St., Brooklyn

For this keynote event, T.R. Simon author of the children’s book series Zora and Me

and musician/composer Kent Rose will participate in a community conversation about the ways in which stories are told in Africana communities. The event will also include student presentations and a musical selection by Rose on the steel pan. A reception and book signing by Simon will follow the program.

  

QUEENSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE


Black Inventors Exhibit

Feb. 19, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Student Union Lounge

222-05 56th Ave., Queens

The event will feature freestanding displays with informational panels that include 3-D artifacts and memorabilia. It’s a “museum experience” that features black inventors.

 

QUEENS COLLEGE

 

All events will be held at 65-30 Kissena Blvd.

Queens My Brother’s Keeper Conference

February 1, 2019 from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm in the Rosenthal Library, room 230.

Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11367

High school students from North and South Queens participate in this day of learning that includes team activities, networking and peer youth dialectic about a range of student-driven topics such as resiliency, conversations with law enforcement, and transitioning from youth to adulthood in college. Guests include keynote speaker Dr. Lester Young from the NYSED, presenters from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and Department of Education and Queens College leadership.

Space is limited to 250 participants, with priority given to the youth in attendance.

There is no fee to attend.

Queens College Celebrates Jazz History and the Publication of the book Art Kane. Harlem 1958

February 7, 2019 from 7:00 – 9:00 pm in the Rosenthal Library, President’s Conference Room 2 on level 5

Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11367

Queens College celebrates the new book Art Kane. Harlem 1958, which tells the full story of one of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century, Art Kane’s A Great Day In Harlem. In August 1958, photographer Art Kane assembled as many of the great jazz musicians of the era for a group photo in Harlem. The image became world famous, inspiring tributes from artists around the world. Joining the discussion of the photograph are Benny Golson, who appeared in the picture; Jonathan Kane, who wrote the book’s introduction; and moderator, musician, bandleader and educator Jerome Jennings.

There is no fee to attend.

In the Footsteps of Dr. King

Feb. 25, 12:15 p.m.

Student Union/Ballroom West

Students share their experiences during a trip to Georgia and Alabama to visit major sites of the civil right movement. Under the direction of educators who worked with Dr. Martin Luther King, students made the five-day journey during the week of Jan. 21,  through the historic landscape of the movement.

Black Business Expo

Feb. 27, 5 p.m. – 9 p.m.

President’s Lounge/Q Side

The Queens College Black Student Union will host the Black Business Expo to commemorate Black History Month and as a way for students and other black business owners to network with one another, promote their businesses, and share how they were able to build their businesses.

“Our Story” Exhibit of Caribbean Creative Arts

Feb. 28, daylong

Student Union Ballroom, 4th Floor

Queens College’s Caribbean Students Association hosts “Our Story,” a celebration of the art and artists from across the Caribbean. The event will feature artists, poets, musicians and historians whose works are linked to the people of the Caribbean.

Stonewall 50: Remembering Transpeople of Color

February 27 from 12:15 to 1:30 pm in the Student Union Ballroom East

Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11367

This panel will highlight trans identities, specifically those of color who are often forgotten due to the common portrayal of white, cisgender gay men as the sole pioneers of the Gay Liberation movement, and discuss TGNC realities as they currently exist post-Stonewall.

There is no fee to attend

 

YORK COLLEGE


Screening of “Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise”

Feb. 21, 12 p.m. – 2 p.m.
AARC, AC – 3B04
94 – 20 Guy R. Brewer Blvd., Queens

Presented by the York College Women’s Center, the screening is the story of iconic writer, poet, actress and activist Maya Angelou whose life intersected some of the most significant moments in the recent history of the United States.

The 30th Annual National African American Read-In

Feb. 4, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
African American Resource Center – Room 3B04
94 – 20 Guy R. Brewer Blvd., Queens

 

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Queens College Named “Best Value College” by Princeton Review

— Queens College Ranks Among Top 200 Schools Nationwide for Return on Investment —

QUEENS, NY, January 31, 2019—For the second consecutive year and fourth time in six years, Queens College has been selected as a Best Value College by The Princeton Review.

The prominent education services company featured Queens College among 200 schools in its 2019 rankings. There was no hierarchal ranking among the 200 schools featured. Queens has been no stranger to the list in recent years, having previously been named a Best Value College in 2014, 2015, and 2018.

“We are not surprised that the Princeton Review has named Queens College to its 2019 edition of The Best Value Colleges and is recognized once again for its academic excellence, affordability, and accessibility to a diverse background of students. Queens College has consistently provided equal opportunity for our students to achieve their dreams,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

In The Best Value Colleges, (which was titled Colleges That Pay You Back from 2015 to 2018) Princeton Review recommends the colleges they consider the nation’s best for academics, affordability, and career prospects. Selections are based on a ROI (Return on Investment) rating score that was developed for this project. The rating consists of more than 40 data points, including institutional data from 658 institutions, surveys of students at those colleges, and PayScale.com data (collected through April 2018) from alumni surveys covering starting and mid-career salaries as well as career social impact.

“We salute Queens College and all of our The Best Value Colleges. They stand out for their outstanding academics and their affordability via generous financial aid to students with need and/or comparatively low sticker prices,” said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s Editor-in-Chief and lead author of the book. “Students at these colleges also have access to extraordinary career services from their freshman year on, plus a lifetime of valuable alumni support.”

In the book’s profile of Queens College, The Princeton Review editors praise the school for “its first-rate education to generations of students from all different backgrounds, maintaining an incredibly affordable price tag while constantly expanding its offerings, programs, centers and institutees, and even its physical campus.” The “Career Information” section in the profile lists an exceptional ROI rating score of 88 for Queens College. It also cites PayScale.com figures reporting QC graduates with at least a bachelor’s degree have a median starting salary of $50, 900 and median mid-career salary of $ 96,600.

About the Princeton Review
The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep, and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. The Princeton Review is headquartered in New York, NY. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


The City University Of New York Comments On Proposed U.S. Department Of Education Regulations To Implement Title IX

CUNY submitted its formal response to the proposed U.S. Department of Education Regulations to Implement Title IX. The comment was crafted by a team of CUNY leaders, chaired by Brooklyn College President Michelle Anderson, a renowned legal scholar on sexual harassment. It concludes that the proposed guidelines would unreasonably narrow the definition of sexual harassment and constrict the circumstances under which colleges may respond to allegations; improperly reduce the responsibilities of colleges to investigate and sanction sexual harassment; mandate costly and burdensome grievance procedures for formal resolution of complaints; and undermine the due process rights of students choosing informal resolution of complaints of harassment.

“By contrast, New York State’s Enough is Enough statute, signed into law by Gov. Cuomo in 2015, encourages students to come forward with complaints, provides support for those who endure sexual harassment and safeguards the rights of both the accusers and the accused,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “It is among the most comprehensive and aggressive pieces of legislation in the U.S. to combat sexual assault on public and private college and university campuses statewide. We fervently oppose measures that make it harder for students to come forward, receive justice and, above all, to partake of the invaluable educational opportunities that CUNY provides.”

The formal response submitted by CUNY to the U.S. Department of Education can be read here.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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JOHN JAY RESEARCH AND EVALUATION CENTER HELPS EVALUATE NEIGHBORHOOD SAFETY IN NYC

John Jay Research and Evaluation Center Helps Evaluate Neighborhood Safety in NYC

 

Researchers at the John Jay Research & Evaluation Center (JohnJayREC) are evaluating the effectiveness of the city’s latest experiment at curbing violence by analyzing data, looking at the statistics, and talking to the people living in New York City’s public housing system.

“This is a major undertaking by the city of New York to improve living conditions for residents of public housing,” says Jeffrey A. Butts, Ph.D., Director of JohnJayREC. Launched in 2014 by the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice (MOCJ), the New York City Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP) is a $210 million initiative aimed at reducing crime by improving quality of life at 17 New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) developments. NYCHA residents are among the city’s poorest with a median household income below $25,000. They’re also among the most victimized. While crime rates have decreased for most of the city, it has remained high across the deteriorating public housing system where residents can go days without gas or heat. The 17 chosen MAP sites led the city in indicators of disadvantage, such as high crime rates and low household income, and represent 20 percent of New York City’s violent crime. Recently, a 62-year-old man was brutally attacked in the lobby of a Tompkins NYCHA building, one of the MAP sites.

Jeffrey Butts

Jeffrey A. Butts, Director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Creating a Safer Community
According to MAP, “evidence shows that disorder, negligence, and decay undercut neighborhood stability” leading to higher crime rates. Enforcement alone won’t solve the problem. Instead, factors such as access to resources, economic advantage, relationships between residents and their government, and ordered space play a key role in reducing violent crimes. The MAP initiative aims to increase safety, and give NYCHA residents a feeling of safety, by investing in their community. Investments include beautification projects that will see vacant lots turn into green spaces, security upgrades, extended community center hours, and employment opportunities for youth ages 14-24 through the city’s Summer Youth Employment program (SYEP). In fiscal year 2017, 4,025 MAP youths applied for SYEP, an increase of 600 people from the previous year. MAP is also bringing together several agencies in an “All In” campaign to help increase outreach in the communities and ensure opportunities, such as SYEP, are visible to NYCHA residents.

 

“This is a major undertaking by the city of New York to improve living conditions for residents of public housing.” – Jeffrey A. Butts, Director of JohnJayREC

 

Measuring the Impact of MAP
In order to measure, or quantify, the impact of MAP, researchers from JohnJayREC worked in partnership with researchers from NORC at the University of Chicago to create an assessment that would help measure MAP’s efficacy. The MAP Evaluation will analyze changes in 34 communities during the MAP time period—from 2014 to 2019. In total, 17 of the city’s 326 public housing developments—there are 400,000 plus residents living in NYCHA buildings—were chosen to participate as a MAP site, while another 17 NYCHA development non-MAP sites were chosen as a control group. By collecting data from both pools researchers will be able to measure what real changes have taken place and what would happen in MAP communities if MAP initiatives were never put in place.

Evaluating MAP’s impact will be a complex process. “We are measuring the possible impact of MAP by using several strategies,” says Butts. The multi-modal approach includes various measurement strategies and data from law enforcement, stats on victimization, an analysis of individual survey responses, as well as multiple observations. “We’re collecting all the possible administrative data we can get our hands on,” says Butts. “We’re getting data from a variety of social services partners that touch these communities in any way.”

Researchers are also using survey research and direct observation to help in their study. This helps them stay up to date on issues plaguing the community. “The JohnJayRec staff goes to meetings involving the MAP communities. They go to the local Neighborhood Stat or ‘NStat’ meetings where neighbors review crime data and public safety data,” says Butts. Each MAP NYCHA site participates in the NStat meetings.

Measuring Attitude Changes
Researchers at JohnJayREC also hope to learn if the MAP initiative is helping to strengthen the relationship between NYCHA residents and local government officials, law enforcement, and other city agencies. “We asked them a series of questions about their lives, their living conditions, their thoughts about their communities, and their thoughts about police and local government,” says Butts. “We use those survey results to see if the people in the MAP properties have more positive attitudes towards the city after all this effort.”

JohnJayREC researchers expect to complete the MAP Evaluation study in 2020. At that time data and analysis from the two sets of NYCHA sites will be compared and researchers will be able to determine MAP’s effect on public safety.


New Endowed Chair of Women’s and Gender Studies Seeks to Explore Overlooked Histories of Local Black Women’s Activism

Professor Robyn C. Spencer is offering free public programming that educates New York City communities about the sociopolitical impact of black women’s leadership and organizing.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

<p>The 2018–2019 Endowed Chair of Women's and Gender Studies Robyn C. Spencer.</p>

The 2018–2019 Endowed Chair of Women’s and Gender Studies Robyn C. Spencer.

 

“There is a direct relationship between the erasure of black radical women from history and the lack of imagination that is currently available in terms of how we think about what leadership looks like, what survival strategies look like, and what resistance looks like,” says Robyn C. Spencer, the 2018–2019 Endowed Chair of Women’s and Gender Studies. “If we don’t know about that history, then we are hamstrung in how we understand the present and think about the future.”

That inquiry is the basis of her curriculum at the college. Challenging Erasures is a series of free and public campus events that seek to “reinscribe black women’s histories in space, place, and time,” particularly in New York. Spencer points to public responses and reactions to contemporary black woman leaders to clarify what she means.

“Even now, there are calls for leadership, and when those leaders show up in black woman form, we employ language to neutralize their effectiveness. Maxine Waters should not be referred to as ‘Auntie Maxine.’ She’s enacting a strategy of resistance. She’s not our aunt. She’s a leader. And we don’t regard male leadership in similarly dismissive ways.”

Spencer, the author of The Revolution Has Come: Black Power, Gender, and the Black Panther Party in Oakland (Duke University Press Books, 2016), was born in Minnesota to Guyanese parents and spent her first three years in Ann’s Grove, Guyana while her parents remained in the United States to work. When she returned to the states, her family had moved to Brooklyn where she was raised. She currently resides in the Bronx.

 

 

The first in her family to attend college, Spencer attended State University of New York (SUNY) at Binghamton where she started out as a pre-med student before following her true interests and switched to her major to history. “In a Caribbean family, the question is always, ‘What kind of doctor or lawyer are you going to be?'” says Spencer. After graduating, she attended Columbia University under a full academic scholarship, and received her Ph.D. in history.

Visiting from Lehman College, where she is an associate professor of history, Spencer came to Brooklyn College to examine the borough of Brooklyn, as well New York City as a whole, which she loves and believes is imperiled by forces that make it unlivable for the very marginalized communities that are the city’s lifeblood. She saw her appointment at Brooklyn College as a tremendous opportunity in the same vein as the endowment’s mission: to demonstrate a commitment to diversity and inclusiveness through research, teaching, and/or service; teach and advise students in four courses during the year; and build the visibility of the program by organizing workshops, lecture series, and public discussions that involve students, faculty, and community members.

Spencer’s first lecture, “From Westchester to the World: Patricia Murphy Robinson and Black Feminist Anti-Imperialism,” uncovered the work of the activist through a panel discussion with the women who created a documentary film about Robinson titled, Pat: A Revolutionary Black Molecule. A packed room of students, faculty, staff, and local community members had the chance to see excerpts of the film and speak directly to director and executive producer Lupe Family, and editor and creative director Emilia A. Ottoo.

 

<p>From left to right: Director of the Shirley Chisholm Project on Women's Activism Zinga A. Fraser, former Shirley Chisholm Project Director Barbara Winslow, artist/activist Emilia A. Ottoo, and activist/filmmaker Lupe Family at the 'From Westchester to the World: Patricia Murphy Robinson and Black Feminist Anti-Imperialism' lecture in October 2018.</p>

From left to right: Director of the Shirley Chisholm Project on Women’s Activism Zinga A. Fraser, former Shirley Chisholm Project Director Barbara Winslow, artist/activist Emilia A. Ottoo, and activist/filmmaker Lupe Family at the ‘From Westchester to the World: Patricia Murphy Robinson and Black Feminist Anti-Imperialism’ lecture in October 2018.

 

“Pat was a unique and transcendent human spirit aside from her timeless and critical work as a writer, therapist, activist, and network builder,” Ottoo says of Robinson. “Her thorough demonstrations in loving people where they are, connecting historical dots, doing your own research and understanding human power are directly applicable to today’s landscape. She had the ‘cheat codes’ to beating the game that tries to beat you. We also have countless amounts of women’s voices, stories and social contributions unseen and unheard, and Pat is a blockbuster of a puzzle piece.”

“How can I put back the histories that have been erased?” Spencer asks. “To make people think twice that on this land, these amazing things happened—’this was a site where people resisted’ or ‘this was the office of a community organization’ or ‘this community mobilized for equitable public education?’ I want to bring back those histories because things are changing so rapidly that the younger generations wouldn’t even know what transpired. This erasure would be their normal. I believe in progress; it’s not that I want to freeze the hand of time, but I see these as acts of displacement, colonization, and ‘push-out’ and I want [students] to have the tools to approach these conditions with historically rooted methods of sociopolitical resistance.”

Spencer is currently working on three books: To Build the World Anew: Black Liberation Politics and the Movement Against the Vietnam WarLeft Traces: Patricia Robinson and the Archive of Black Women’s Radicalism; and Angela Davis: Radical Icon. Her essay, “Black Feminist Meditations on the Women of Wakanda,” can be found on Medium.com.

The Challenging Erasures series resumes on Tuesday, March 5, with “Beyond the Shooting: Eleanor Gray Bumpurs, Identity Politics, and Community Activism,” which examines the police shooting of Bronx, New York resident Eleanor Bumpurs.

A full listing of Spencer’s programming is available on the women’s and gender studies website.

 

 

CONTACT: Jason Carey, 347.486.1017

 

 


Andrew Rich named Dean of CCNY’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership

CPS Dean Andrew Rich

Colin Powell School Dean Andrew Rich.

Andrew Rich, CEO of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation and visiting professor at The City College of New York, is named the Dean of the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership and Professor of Political Science.

“The Colin Powell School has a distinctive mission—to promote and support leadership development and a service ethic among the students working towards degrees in the social sciences,” said City College President Vince Boudreau. “Andy Rich spent his entire career thinking about service promotion among young people; as the deputy director of the Colin Powell Center, he introduced and championed our service-learning program. After he left CCNY, he built service programs into the Roosevelt Institute and then assumed the leadership of America’s premier national service fellowship.  Given this background and these commitments, I’m confident that Andy is the right person to guide the Colin Powell School into its new era.”

Since 2011, Rich has been executive secretary and CEO of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation, an independent federal agency that provides merit-based Truman Scholarships to college students who plan to attend graduate school in preparation for careers as public service leaders. During his tenure at Truman, the foundation has enjoyed record numbers of applicants and institutions participating in the Truman Scholar competition. Rich has expanded the range of substantive programming for Truman Scholars as well as the foundation’s communications and development initiatives.

During his years at the Truman Foundation, Rich has also served in a part-time capacity at CCNY’s Colin Powell School as executive director of the Skadden Arps Honors Program in Legal Studies and academic director of the Semester in Washington, DC Program.

From 2009-2011, Rich was president and CEO of the Roosevelt Institute. At Roosevelt, Rich launched the institute’s think tank and oversaw efforts to expand and strengthen the Institute Campus Network.  Rich was previously an associate professor and chairman of the Political Science Department at City College of New York, as well as deputy director and director of programs at CCNY’s Colin Powell Center for Policy Studies.

Rich is the author of “Think Tanks, Public Policy, and the Politics of Expertise,” and he has written a range of articles about think tanks, interest groups, foundations, individual donors and the role of experts and ideas in the American policy process.

He is a graduate of the University of Richmond (B.A.), where he received a Truman Scholarship. He earned his Ph.D. at Yale University in political science.

About the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership

Located in the vibrant New York City neighborhood of Harlem, CCNY’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership builds upon an exceptionally strong tradition in the social sciences at City College and offers students a living laboratory in which to study and conduct research in their chosen fields. The Powell School’s hallmark values of service and leadership permeate every aspect of our work and animate City College’s unflagging and historic commitment to access and excellence.

The mission of the Colin Powell School is to transform students, faculty, communities, and the traditional university experience by adopting problem-based approaches to education. By promoting the values of service, engagement, and leadership, we enable our students to energetically address the challenges of the 21st century. By fostering creative and public scholarship, we ensure that our faculty produces and disseminates scholarship that is both relevant and in-touch.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Ashley Arocho
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Immigrant Entrepreneur Builds Thriving Business at Queens College Tech Incubator

— German Native Sascha Eder Develops a New York City Client Base While Sharing His Expertise with the Campus and Its Community
Through the IN2NYC Program —

QUEENS, NY, January 25, 2019—NewtonX, an artificial intelligence-powered knowledge search engine that matches clients to the world’s leading investors, consultants and technology experts, wanted to open an office in New York City. Sascha Eder, the co-founder and operations manager of the company, found everything it needed at the Queens College Tech Incubator.

As a member of the incubator, Eder has access to college facilities and to QC’s biggest asset—its people. “Queens College students and faculty are a great resource for us,” he says, “whether it’s talent in software engineering or a business professor’s expertise.” In turn, he has involved himself deeply in campus and community life by sharing his specialized knowledge with aspiring entrepreneurs.

The mutually beneficial relationship between Queens College and Eder, a German native, results from the International Innovators Initiative (IN2NYC). Inaugurated in 2016 by the New York City Economic Development Corporation in collaboration with several CUNY colleges, IN2NYC is designed to attract foreign-born entrepreneurs to our city. Applicants who meet the qualifications receive the coveted cap-exempt H-1B visa to work in the United States while building their businesses in tech incubators at participating CUNY campuses and New York University. Additionally, they serve as mentors to students, create internships and job opportunities, and contribute to academic research and curricula. Applications for foreign entrepreneurs opened on December 17, 2018; the last day to apply is February 1, 2019.

“When we established our Tech Incubator in 2016, we had in mind a rich partnership between tech-focused entrepreneurs, our students, faculty, and staff and the borough,” says Queens College President Félix Matos Rodriguez. “Having Sascha with us thanks to IN2NYC is exactly the kind of knowledge-sharing collaboration we anticipated. And it’s clear that as a business innovator with a global outlook, Sascha is right at home in the stimulating diversity of our borough and our college.”

Eder began his own global career as an undergraduate who studied abroad in Madrid and went on to earn a master’s degree in business at HEC Paris. At the age of 23, he moved to the U.S. on a student visa to attend M.I.T., graduating with a second master’s degree, this time in entrepreneurship and technological innovation.

After arriving at QC, Eder launched a speaker series open to students and the larger community, in which he spoke about artificial intelligence and other technology subjects. These no-cost, one-hour events will begin again in 2019. Eder also held a full-day weekend workshop focusing on the steps needed to succeed as an entrepreneur. To receive notifications of upcoming events, visit https://techincubatorqc.com  Scroll down to “Subscribe to Our Mailing List” and fill out the online form.

Using a unique algorithm, Eder is now discovering pertinent information about QC alumni that is being shared with the college’s Alumni Office and Center for Career Engagement and Internships. “We’ve been looking at the data on recent graduates,” Eder said. “What kinds of jobs are they getting? Where are they working geographically? What’s the correlation with their major?”

For Media Studies Professor Douglas Rushkoff’s Tech Development Lab class, Eder gave a talk, provided feedback on the students’ work, and was a judge for their final presentations.

In December, he played a key role in the Tech Incubator’s first “Pitch Fest,” a competition awarding cash prizes to budding entrepreneurs who proposed the best ideas for tech-enabled products or services. Competitors heard him speak about the essential criteria for launching a new business and received his feedback on their practice pitches. He then joined the jury that chose the three Queens-based winners.

“I’m excited to be here,” says Eder. Sharing his knowledge through coaching brings him a lot of satisfaction. “I enjoy mentoring and teaching students and helping them to become the next generation of entrepreneurs,” he says. “They will come up with the ideas that will at some point change the way we do things.”

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Baruch College Designated a 2019 Military Friendly School

https://www.militaryfriendly.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/MFS19-20_Designation_150x150.png

Baruch College was named a 2019-20 military friendly school by Viqtory Media, the originator of the longest-running survey that evaluates college and university investments in serving military and veteran students.

The “Military Friendly School” designation was given to 766 schools in the United States. This recognition measures Baruch’s commitment, effort and success in creating sustainable and meaningful opportunity for the military community.

Art King, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at Baruch College, said, “Our institution is dedicated to supporting all the men and women and we welcome their skills and life experience into our academic environment. We remain committed to helping military personnel and veterans transition and thrive for academic and career success.”

As of fall 2018, there are 156 veterans and military family members at Baruch College.

Strategic Location to Campus Culture

According to Military Friendly’s profile of the College, “Baruch is strategically located for Reservists, National Guard personnel, and Veterans. It is adjacent to the 69th Armory, a short walk to the VA Hospital, and a mile from The Soldier, Sailor and Airmen Club. Student Veterans choose Baruch for its excellent academic programs, competitive internship and career opportunities, and close-knit campus culture.”

This “military friendly” designation follows a just-released ranking from College Factual where Baruch was among the “Best Colleges for Veterans.

Methodology:

Now in its tenth year, the Military Friendly School methodology evaluated institutions using public data sources and responses from school-completed surveys. Final ratings were determined by combining the institution’s survey scores with the assessment of the institution’s ability to meet thresholds in a number of areas, including rates on student retention, graduation, and job placements. Learn more here.

# # #


Princeton Review names City College “Best Value Colleges: 2019 Edition”

Princeton Review's 2019 The Best Value Colleges

City College is named “The Best Value Colleges: 200 Schools with Exceptional ROI for your Tuition Investment” by The Princeton Review 2019 Edition.

The City College of New York is one of the nation’s best colleges for students seeking a superb education with great career preparation at an affordable price, according to The Princeton Review®.” CCNY features in the 2019 edition of its annual guide, “The Best Value Colleges: 200 Schools with Exceptional ROI for Your Tuition Investment (Penguin Random House / Princeton Review Books, $22.99, January 29, 2019) available today.

“More than 80 percent of the entering class at City College receives some type of financial aid,” notes the Princeton Review. “In addition, in the last three years, City has increased the dollar amount going to student scholarships by 35 percent.”

The Princeton Review chose the schools based on data it collected in 2017–18 from its surveys of administrators at more than 650 colleges. The company also factored in data from its surveys of students attending the schools as well as surveys of school alumni that PayScale.com conducted through April 2018.

More than 40 data points to tally ROI (return on investment) ratings were used to determine selection of the 200 schools for the book. Topics covered everything from academics, cost, and financial aid to graduation rates, student debt, alumni salaries, and job satisfaction.

“We salute City College and all of our “The Best Value Colleges.” They stand out for their outstanding academics and their affordability via generous financial aid to students with need and/or comparatively low sticker prices,” said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s Editor-in-Chief and lead author of the book. “Students at these colleges also have access to extraordinary career services from their freshman year on, plus a lifetime of valuable alumni support.”

The “Career Information” section in the profile lists an exceptional ROI rating score of 87 for CCNY. It also cites PayScale.com figures reporting CCNY’s graduates with at least a bachelor’s degree have a median starting salary of $53,800 and median mid-career salary of $98,500.

According to a CCNY student, “CCNY is definitely a diamond in the rough; it should be considered by any student who wants to experience New York City college life at an affordable rate without sacrificing education quality.”

City College annually receives high rankings from the Princeton Review. In August, the education services company named CCNY, in its 2019 edition,  “The Best 384 Colleges” for the seventh consecutive year.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

About The Princeton Review

The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. The Princeton Review is headquartered in New York, NY. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University. For more information, visit www.PrincetonReview.com. Follow the company on Twitter @ThePrincetonRev.

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
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Black History Month 2019 events at CCNY

Black History Month 2019

The City College of New York’s Student Life and Leadership Development presents Black History Month celebrations on February 5 and 28.

The Black History Month celebrations at The City College of New York commence with a kickoff event and discussion with Vanessa K. ​Valdés, director of the Black Studies Program.   The events are brought to you by the Student Life Activities Program Committee from the Department of Student Life & Leadership Development and the Black Studies Program. All events are open to CCNY faculty, staff and students.

Black History Month Kickoff: Celebrating Our Powerful Voices with ​Valdés​ witnesses the debut of honored individuals chosen by the student committee for the BHM wall on Tuesday, February 5 from 7-9 p.m. in the NAC Ballroom. Soul food will be served at the event, and please RSVP here.

The panel discussion, Talking Equity in Academia, will be from 12:20-2 p.m. on Thursday, February 28 and offer strategies for how to best navigate the world of higher education as students, graduate students and faculty. Share experiences and best practices will be offered on how to overcome obstacles to success that affect communities of color in the U.S., such as prison-pipeline systems, structural inequalities and lack of mentors.

Confirmed speakers for the panel discussion include: Zaire Dinzey-Flores (Rutgers University), Shelly Eversley (Baruch College – CUNY), Megan Wacha (CUNY), Terri N. Watson (CCNY – School of Education) and ​Kim Hall (Barnard College). Please RSVP here.

For more information on Black History Month at City College, contact the Office of Student Life at studentlife@ccny.cuny.edu or the Black Studies Program at blackstudies@ccny.cuny.edu.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


BMCC Pool Opens After Extensive Renovations

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) is inviting members of the lower Manhattan community to visit the newly renovated state of the art swimming pool at 199 Chambers Street.

The 220,000-gallon pool underwent an extensive renovation and is now open to the BMCC community as well as residents of the area.

Admission to the pool is free for BMCC students, faculty and staff and a full schedule for recreational and lap swimming is available at the Athletics Department website. Members of the public 18-years and older, can purchase memberships for the community swim program at the BMCC Center for Continuing Education website. Lifeguards will be on duty during all hours of operation.

The pool features six competition lanes—each of which is six feet wide and 25 yards long, with a depth of four feet.

“The BMCC pool has been available to Tribeca residents since the early 1980s for memberships for lap swimming,” said BMCC Athletics Department Director Steve Kelly. “I think people in this neighborhood like the pool’s location.”

He said over the years, swimming schools had rented the pool for lessons as well.  There are also plans to eventually bring back both a women’s and men’s BMCC swim team.

The health benefits of swimming are undisputed. In addition to burning calories and improving cardiovascular health, swimming is good for stress relief as well as overall mental health.

“As with most physical activity, swimming allows you to focus on your body, your breath, and movement instead of your daily tasks lists, next appointment, or other life worries,” said BMCC Health Education Professor Lesley Rennis. “Being submerged in water makes it easy to block out distractions and stay in tune with your body.”

A More Sustainable Pool

The pool’s renovation included extensive aesthetic as well as infrastructure updates. Contractors also installed a state of the art Neptune-Benson Defender automatic filtration system that ensures cleaner water for swimmers without heavy chemical use and also lessens the facility’s impact on the environment.

A new motorized vinyl sheathing will cover the pool while not in operation.  The sheathing not only reduces humidity and wear and tear on the college’s HVAC systems, it will reduce the college’s demand on the electrical grid.  Overall, BMCC expects to save nearly $40,000 each year on it’s power bill with the pool improvements.

For more information on the community swim program, contact the Center for Continuing Eudcation at (212) 346-8410.


ALUMNA VERONICA PACHECO (’18) DEEPENS HER UNDERSTANDING OF THE WORLD THROUGH TRAVEL

Alumna Veronica Pacheco (’18) Deepens Her Understanding Of the World Through Travel

 

Veronica Pacheco, ’18, was born in Brooklyn, New York and raised in Guayaquil, Ecuador, but when it comes to learning, the world is her classroom. “I’m a big believer in trying new things, meeting new people, traveling the world and immersing yourself in different cultures,” says Pacheco. “Each new experience provides you with a new perspective.”

Starting Off At John Jay
When Pacheco first enrolled at John Jay, she assumed she would follow in her father’s footsteps, majoring in Political Science, and eventually becoming a lawyer. “But I took a couple of International Criminal Justice courses and found that I had a real passion for international relations, which encompass all the avenues of justice I was interested in exploring—political, social, and economic,” says Pacheco. To help her understand the different political and social economic climates on the international landscape, Pacheco immersed herself in several study abroad experiences, giving her a front row seat to the world of international relations.

Learning New Cultures
“The first study abroad program I did was in Melbourne, Australia. It was the first time I traveled that far away from my family and it showed me I could do it. By that I mean, I could not only achieve getting into the program, but I could also successfully complete it,” she says. “The second experience took me to Florence, Italy. While I was there I took an organized crime course that I found really fascinating.”

Pacheco (far left) with friends in South Korea

Pacheco (far left) with friends in South Korea

 

“Studying abroad gives you incredible opportunities. You get to meet different people from different walks of life. You witness first-hand how different political systems, economies, and societies work.” —Veronica Pacheco ’18

 

The most recent study abroad experience Pacheco experienced—and one of the trips she held most dear to her heart—was studying in Busan, South Korea. “For me, South Korea started as an interest, and then just kept growing. My initial thought was that I wanted to explore the dynamics between North Korea and China, and between North and South Korea, and see how those dynamics play a role in society. But I quickly became fascinated by the South Korean culture, their language, their history, and of course, the people. Studying abroad gives you incredible opportunities,” says Pacheco. “You get to meet different people from different walks of life. You witness first-hand how different political systems, economies, and societies work.”

Pacheco celebrating a Tae Kwon Do victory

Pacheco celebrating a Tae Kwon Do victory

 

Pacheco received the  U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship which selects only a small number of students to travel to a country and fully immerse themselves in a language program. “My time in South Korea was made up of language classes five hours a day, five days a week for eight weeks. I also worked with language partners and teachers regularly, did weekly presentations, and fully immersed myself in the culture—which even included taking Tae Kwon Do classes.” While intense, the program was well worth it. In a two-month time frame, she went from knowing just five phrases—yes, no, thank you, hi, and my name is—to being able to understand and comfortably chat with the locals. “By the end of the program I had learned so much, I was able to speak and understand basic conversation. It was so exciting to go to the local supermarket, buy groceries, and communicate with native speakers,” says Pacheco.

Broadening Her Horizons
Beyond expanding her language skills, the opportunity to travel abroad also provided Pacheco with a new perspective on justice issues both in the U.S. and internationally. “Through my study abroad experiences I have been able to observe how different parts of the world work. I’ve seen how political systems and societies operate, and how economies and social classes differ from my own. Things that are the norm for us—freedom of the press or a right to a fair trial—are a privilege somewhere else. You learn to appreciate what you have at home,” she says. “You get to see more of the world, and that of course makes you more open as a person, which leads to growth as a person.”

Pacheco sightseeing with a friend in South Korea

Pacheco sightseeing with a friend in South Korea

 

“There’s is a world out there waiting to meet you. In order to meet it you have to step outside your comfort zone.” —Veronica Pacheco, ’18

 

Veronica encourages John Jay students to explore as many new opportunities and programs as they can. “Apply to everything, even if you don’t think you’ll get it. Try it anyway. The doubt is always going to be there. Don’t limit yourself by boxing yourself in. That’s not the way to approach life, let alone your college career. I’ve learned that there’s is a world out there waiting to meet you. In order to meet it you have to step outside your comfort zone. And when you do, you’ll be amazed at what you can learn from the world around you.”


“Mediums of Exchange” Comes to BMCC Shirley Fiterman Art Center

Moyra Davey, Copperheads 101-200, 2013. Courtesy the artist, Janice Guy, New York and greengrassi, London

Moyra Davey, Copperheads 101-200, 2013. Courtesy the artist, Janice Guy, New York and greengrassi, London

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) and Lehman College (Lehman/CUNY) will present Mediums of Exchange, a two-part art exhibition and the first collaboration between two of the largest gallery spaces in the City University of New York network, opening first on Jan. 31 at BMCC and then on Feb. 9 at Lehman.

An opening reception is scheduled for the Downtown iteration of the show at BMCC on February 6 beginning at 6 p.m.

The project is co-curated by Lisa Panzera, director of the Shirley Fiterman Art Center at BMCC and  Bartholomew F. Bland, director of the Lehman College Art Gallery.

Mediums of Exchange will include more than 30 contemporary artists who appropriate and contextualize money, using currency as a material in their work, or taking a conceptual approach to the global economic system.

Artists across the centuries have depicted the acquisition of money and wealth as a morality tale—a desirable enterprise as well as the source of many evils. In the decade following the financial crisis in 2008, artists have been working to transform an uncertain economy into artworks of visual significance.

Exploring the ever-changing forms and uses of currency, the artists in Mediums of Exchange at the two gallery spaces engage in sociological, psychological, and economic approaches that raise new questions about the role of money around the world. Andy Warhol, who frequently spoke about his fascination with the dollar, is the chief historical precedent for the artists in this exhibition.

Mediums of Exchange – Downtown at BMCC

When: January 31 – March 30, 2019

Where: Shirley Fiterman Art Center, Borough of Manhattan Community College, 81 Barclay Street, New York, NY 10007

Reception: Wednesday, February 6, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Artists featured at BMCC: Nina Beier, Moyra Davey, Stuart Elster, Jane Fine, Meschac Gaba, Ghost of a Dream, Jonathan Herder, Takashi Kunitani, Agnieszka Kurant, Rob Pruitt, Yuken Teruya, Hanna von Goeler, Mark Wagner, Michael Wang, Nari Ward and Andy Warhol.

Mediums of Exchange – Uptown at Lehman College

When: February 9 – May 4, 2019

Where: Lehman College Art Gallery, Herbert H. Lehman College, 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, NY  10468

Reception: Wednesday, February 13, from 5 to 8 p.m.

Artists features at Lehman College: Micah Adams, Melanie Baker, Amel Bennys, Ebony Bolt, David Dew Bruner, Sonya Clark, Jennifer Dalton, Alexis Duque, Stuart Elster, Jane Fine, Erika Harrsch, Louise Laplante, Eugenio Merino, Tom Pfannerstill, Houben R.T., John Salvest, Reed Seifer, Oriane Stender, Hanna von Goeler, Mark Wagner, Andy Warhol, Stacey Lee Webber, C.K. Wilde and Tim Yankosky.


JOHN JAY WELCOMES FRESHMAN AND TRANSFER STUDENTS

John Jay Welcomes Freshman and Transfer Students

 

During this year’s Freshman and Transfer Student Orientations—held on January 15, 16, and 17—spirits were high, friendships were made, and hopes were set for the future. As President Karol V. Mason joined John Jay’s newest members, she made sure that they knew it was okay to be nervous. “When you start a new adventure—and that’s what this is, a new adventure—it’s scary because it’s different. But I will tell you this, I’ve gotten the biggest thrills in my life when I’ve stepped out of my comfort zone.” For Mason the two biggest “out of her comfort zone” moments happened when she joined the Obama administration after 30 years of practicing at the same law firm, and when she came to John Jay College as President on August 1, 2017. “Just like you’re nervous starting out at John Jay, I was nervous that day. But, it was one of the best things I ever did.”

President Karol V. Mason speaking to the new students

President Karol V. Mason speaking to the new students

“Do you see the rich diversity of the class you’re in? That’s what makes this place special, because you represent who this country is.” —President Karol V. Mason

 

With students coming from varying backgrounds, President Mason took a moment to acknowledge the diversity in the room while also urging the students to use their voice to influence change. “Do you see the rich diversity of the class you’re in? That’s what makes this place special, because you represent who this country is. You represent a diversity of voices and perspectives, and you’re going to learn how to use that voice here at John Jay,” said Mason.

Before the students attended a student panel and went on a tour of the College, Alyssa Spano, Coordinator of Student Transition Programs, made sure to tell the new students to take full advantage of our Weeks of Welcomeevents, and to download the John Jay College app that makes it easy to stay in touch with classmates and access all of the College’s services, events, contacts, and maps. Eager and excited to begin their journey as official Bloodhounds, we spoke to several new students to see why they chose John Jay, what some of their concerns are, and what goals they have for the future.

Daniel PatinoDaniel Patino
Freshman
Hometown: Queens, New York
Major: Criminology

“I chose John Jay because I was told that it’s the best College for criminal justice, and I want to become an NYPD police officer. Most of my family is in the Army, but that didn’t appeal to me. By becoming a police officer, I would still be serving my state and I’ll still be able to help my community. While I’m excited to start, one of my concerns is getting here. I’ve been in Queens my whole life and I haven’t taken the train a lot because my school was right next to my house. I’m going to have to start taking the subway. My biggest concern is getting on the subway and making it to classes on time.”

 

Bryan DominguezBryan Dominguez
Transfer Student
Hometown: Palisades Park, New Jersey
Major: Criminal Justice

“I was originally doing computer science at two other colleges in New Jersey, and then realized that it wasn’t my calling and wanted to do something more meaningful. I now want to pursue a career in law enforcement. I’ve heard many good things about John Jay and a lot of the alumni say that if you want to make a change that this is the place to do it. I’m excited about the diversity here. I’m from New Jersey and there’s not much diversity where I live. Being here, there’s a melting pot of different people and while I’m not used to it yet, it’s going to be exciting to experience education in such a diverse setting.”

 

Efthimia TzarasEfthimia Tzaras
Transfer Student
Hometown: East Meadow, New York
Major: Criminal Justice

“I decided to come to John Jay because it’s the top school for criminal justice. I’m excited about learning more about the field and being able to meet and network with different people who are already in the field.”

 

 

Malyka ValentineMalyka Valentine
Transfer Student
Hometown: Brooklyn, New York
Major: Toxicology

“I chose John Jay because they have a toxicology program. I’m excited about doing research and getting my bachelor’s degree. I hope that with my degree I’m able to become a scientist and do research for different organizations.”

 

 

Justin AgramonteJustin Agramonte
Transfer Student
Hometown: Howard Beach, Queens, New York
Major: Computer Science and Information Security

“I chose John Jay because I already had some knowledge of cybersecurity from high school and I wanted to continue it, and I knew that John Jay had an extensive cybersecurity program. I want to specialize in digital forensics and I envision myself working in a federal government agency. While I’m here, hopefully I can engage in all the clubs. I see that there’s a Dominican club and as a Dominican I would love to get involved in it. I would also love to learn more about the internships and what career opportunities they can provide me as a cybersecurity major with a focus on digital forensics.”

 

Kimberly RamirezKimberly Ramirez
Transfer Student
Hometown: New York, New York
Major: Criminal Justice

“I wanted to come to John Jay because it’s the best College for criminal justice. I hope to become a police officer and in the future get my masters degree.”

 


JAY-Z AND MEEK MILL LAUNCH REFORM ALLIANCE AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE

Jay-Z And Meek Mill Launch REFORM Alliance at John Jay College

 

Jay-Z, one of the most celebrated rappers of our time, has never been shy about his social justice opinions. Continuing his justice work on projects like Rest in Power, a Trayvon Martin documentary, and Time, a Kalief Browder documentary, Jay-Z has teamed up with rapper Meek Mill—along with New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, Philadelphia 76ers co-owner Michael Rubin, Brooklyn Nets co-owner Clara Wu Tsai, Third Point CEO and founder Daniel Loeb, Galaxy Digital CEO and founder Michael E. Novogratz, Vista Equity Partners CEO and founder Robert F. Smith, and news commentator Van Jones—to establish REFORM Alliance, a criminal justice reform organization. Fittingly, on January 23, the group chose John Jay College of Criminal Justice as the location to announce the launch of REFORM Alliance.

Jay-Z rousing the crowd at John Jay

Jay-Z rousing the crowd at John Jay

 

“We want to be very clear, if someone commits a crime, they should go to jail. But these things are disproportionate and the whole world knows it.” —Jay-Z

 

Mill stood on stage at the Gerald W. Lynch theater and stated, “The system is basically targeted at people that look like me.” Jay-Z added, “We don’t want people that are in charge of policing the areas to be in danger either. We want to be very clear, if someone commits a crime, they should go to jail,” he said. “But these things are disproportionate and the whole world knows it.”

To create a more equitable society, REFORM Alliance hopes to remove one million people from the criminal justice system within five years, and cut in half the number of people on probation. Jay-Z went on to say that Mill’s experience with the criminal justice system is what motivated him to be more involved in criminal justice reform. “This is a humane issue. When you break the family structure, it affects everyone. Education is the key.”

Michael Rubin and Meek Mill captivating the audience

Michael Rubin and Meek Mill captivating the audience

 

“Meek taught me so much about a world that I didn’t understand at all, about the great injustices that are going on.” —Michael Rubin, Philadelphia 76ers co-owner

 

The wheels for creating REFORM Alliance started turning when close friends Mill and Rubin started talking about inequalities in America. Mill, an African-American man, tried to explain to Rubin, a white man, that there were “two Americas.” Rubin told the audience at John Jay that at first he was skeptical about his friend’s analysis. Then, when Mill was sentenced to two to four years in prison for doing wheelies on a dirt bike, a controversial parole violation, Rubin’s mind was changed. “He called me after the sentencing to say ‘I told you so. Two Americas.’ He was right and I was dead wrong,” said Rubin. “Meek taught me so much about a world that I didn’t understand at all, about the great injustices that are going on.” Hoping to create strong partnerships leading to an organization that would move the needle forward on criminal justice reform, Rubin set up a meeting with Mill and Kraft while Mill was still incarcerated.

When Kraft took to the stage at John Jay, he talked about that initial meeting. There was an instant connection, respect, and friendship, followed by a sleepless night for Kraft. “Here you have someone who’s creative, who’s innovative, who’s inspiring young people. And for riding a motorcycle and doing a wheelie, he’s put in jail where tax payers are paying to keep him going? He’s not employing all the people he could be employing, and not generating all the tax dollars he could be generating,” Kraft explained, clearly perplexed. “It’s just a cuckoo system, forgetting the social impact of that.”

President Karol V. Mason having a moment with Meek Mill

President Karol V. Mason having a moment with Meek Mill

 

“The system is basically targeted at people that look like me.” —Meek Mill

 

Mill went on to tell the audience that his goal was to be a voice for the voiceless, understanding that in some ways—even with his encounter with the criminal justice system—he was “lucky” because he had a voice and a platform to speak out. “I didn’t ask to be the face of reform. I don’t want to be the face of reform. I just want to bridge gaps and bring people together and make the world a better place—especially for people from my culture and the environment that I grew up in,” said Mill.

The group announced that Van Jones, news commentator and social activist, will be the CEO of REFORM Alliance. “In the criminal justice field, we see so much dedication but not enough amplification,” said Jones. “We’re going to fight different.” All of the REFORM Alliance co-founders shared that same passion for the organization’s mission to engender criminal justice reform. “We incarcerate five times more people than the entire rest of the world,” said Novogratz. “There are clearly two Americas in our criminal justice system.” Together all of the founders raised $50 million to form REFORM Alliance. As a community dedicated to exploring justice and creating just societies, Jay-Z’s final words at the event spoke directly to John Jay’s mission as an institution. “We’re all prisoners to this,” he said. “Because until everyone is free, no one is free.”


Hostos’ Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development Receives More Than $400,000 in Grants to Provide Free Career Training

The Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD) at Hostos recently received grants from the Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD), the Regional Economic Development Council’s (REDC) Consolidated Funding Application, and the Capital One Foundation totaling more than $400,000. The newly acquired funds enable the division to continue to provide no-cost career training programs designed to prepare individuals to enter or advance in high-demand fields such as healthcare and information technology.

“Our division is very excited to receive these grants because they allow us to provide free occupational training that results in an industry-recognized credential for people in the community who typically may not have access to these programs. It’s a game-changer for the college and our ability to transition students to the world of work,” said Evelyn Fernández-Ketcham, Executive Director for Workforce Development.

Hostos received two $100,000 grants from the NYS Department of Labor’s Unemployed Worker Training Program through the REDC’s Consolidated Funding Application. The College will use each of the awards to continue offering the Computer Support Technician Apprenticeship program and Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training to unemployed members of the community. The funds will also help ensure participants in the latter program are also CPR trained and certified.

DYCD awarded Hostos close to $114,000 to provide Allied Health occupational training to out-of-school and out-of-work young adults in partnership with community-based agencies. CEWD has developed a unique program model that includes an Introduction to Careers in Healthcare seminar. This intensive program helps young adults maximize their success in a career training program by giving them access to labor market information, as well as to faculty and guest speakers who can provide insight into the advantages of acquiring an industry-recognized credential offered through CEWD at Hostos.

Hostos also received its third consecutive $150,000 grant from the Capital One Foundation in November as part of a multi-year grant initiative—The Community College Workforce Development (CCWD) Cohort. CEWD will continue to work with the Office of Academic Affairs and faculty to develop new credit articulation agreements, which give credit to students who enroll in Hostos after successfully completing a CEWD occupational training program in high-demand fields such as Allied Health and Information Technology. The long-term goals are to better prepare students to enter the College and to improve students’ credit accumulation and employment rates.

Learn more about the career training programs offered through CEWD here.


U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and Kerry Washington Visit Hostos Community College

On Friday, Jan. 25, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and actress Kerry Washington visited Hostos Community College in the South Bronx to inspire local elementary school students to read more and to chase their dreams. Hostos partnered with the Bronx Children’s Museum for what was an inspiring day.
#DreamBigDay

 

 

Click on the headlines below and see more news coverage.

Press Release From Bronx Children’s Museum
Bronx Natives U.S. Associate Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and Actor and Activist Kerry Washington Return to Their Home Borough to Discuss the Power of Reading and Dreaming with 200 South Bronx Children

NBC New York
“Sotomayor Returns to the Bronx, Tells Kids to Dream Big”

News 12 The Bronx
“Sonia Sotomayor, Kerry Washington urge students to ‘Dream Big’”


Winter Convocation Highlights Action Plans to Build Student Success

The third annual Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Designing for Success Winter Convocation was held January 23 at 199 Chambers Street.

The day’s events opened with an address by BMCC Interim President Karrin E. Wilks. “The winter convocation is an important tradition, and an opportunity for our college community to come together,”  Wilks said. “I’m happy that we’re integrating faculty and staff in this event. Part of the purpose of our coming together is to learn from each other, and share what we know about student success.”

Wilks presented data on BMCC student retention, graduation and transfer rates, and discussed how the college’s over-arching Designing for Success efforts address students’ experience through “multiple action plans integrated into a single process.”

Interim President Karrin Wilks

“Incremental improvement isn’t good enough,” she said. “We need to deeply understand the data, to look at the standard indicators and disaggregate that data by gender, race and ethnicity. We’ve doubled the number of students who earn 30 credits in their first year, and we need to scale that up. Numbers might look good, but we need to look closely at who is improving, and who is not improving.”

Wilks also explained that there are bifurcating results in the data on student success at BMCC—data that seem to report opposing facts. “As graduation rates go up, fall-to-fall retention rates are going down,” she said. “Why is this happening? Who is not being retained? Also we recently had the most students ever on the Dean’s List—but we also had the most students ever, on academic probation. We need to disagregate the data by gender, race and ethnicity and figure out what this really means.”

Winter Convocation 2019

Another important factor in improving student retention and graduation, she said, is meeting students’ “essential needs”; addressing issues such as food and housing insecurity, “choices students are having to make between food and textbooks, subway fare or paying a bill.” To gather students’ point of view, she said, the college will hold student focus groups this spring asking the question, “What are the barriers to your success?”

Another focus of Wilks’ talk was the success of cohort models at BMCC, including ASAP, EDGE, the BMCC Learning Academy and others—and the importance of scaling up those programs, to serve more students.

“Thirty-seven percent of our students are now in a cohort program,” she said. “We want that number to be 100 percent. Students in those programs do twice as well as their peers.” Tutoring, she added, is also a factor proven to improve student success: “How do we take tutoring to scale, and make it embedded in the experience of all students at BMCC?”

Wilks’ presentation was followed by questions from audience members who brought up the cost of enhancing tutoring programs, how to better serve students with disabilities, the importance of Single Stop at BMCC as a resource for students experiencing food or housing insecurity, the value of best practices at CUNY and colleges nationwide, and the importance of articulation agreements that link BMCC associate degree programs with baccalaureate programs within CUNY and with other universities in the region.

The opening address was following by breakout sessions on a wide range of topics. These included service learning, promoting student agency through open pedagogy, challenges facing student veterans, digital citizenship and others. A boxed lunch was provided for participants, and the convocation closed with a resource fair and performance by the BMCC Jazz Ensemble led by Professor Quentin Angus in the faculty-staff dining room.

The Winter Convocation’s focus on student success—and the entire college community’s role in contributing to that success—will continue at the Designing for Success Forum scheduled for February 4 at BMCC.


Court Square Law Project Receives ABA Award for Legal Access

Court Square Law Project, a pilot initiative of the NYC Bar Association and CUNY Law, has been named the 2019 recipient of the American Bar Association Louis M. Brown Award for Legal Access. The Brown Award recognizes programs and projects that enable affordable access to legal services in ways that are exemplary and replicable for those of moderate incomes and this is the second time in less than a decade that a CUNY Law initiative has received the award; in 2010 our CLRN alumni program was honored.

 

Cynthia Domingo-Forasté, the executive director of Court Square, accepted the Brown Award on behalf of the project at a ceremony on January 25, 2019 during the ABA Midyear Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada.

“People who make moderate incomes face a justice gap. They don’t qualify for legal aid, yet can’t afford private practice attorneys,” said Domingo-Forasté. “That leaves many people representing themselves and losing in court because they don’t have the knowledge or skills to win their cases. We created this firm to ensure that everyone can have access to the fundamental legal services they need.”

The Court Square Law Project is a pilot program founded in 2016 by the City Bar and CUNY Law with support from 19 leading law firms across New York City. It was developed as an innovative response to several challenges identified by the City Bar’s Task Force on New Lawyers in a Changing Profession. Court Square’s mission is to create a self-sustaining law firm that provides client-centered, affordable, sliding-scale legal services. The project prepares new lawyers with the skills, tools, and resources needed to expand access to sustainable, mission-driven legal practices aimed at closing the justice gap for moderate-income clients.

 

In over just two years of operation, the Court Square Law Project has helped more than 574 clients, employed 23 fellows, and fielded inquiries from law schools and firms nationwide with interest in learning from its model.

 

Read the full press release at the link below.

Court Square ABA Award Press Release


City College partners with NYC to increase number of tech grads

From left: Valerie Rutstein, Grove School Director of Finance & Administration; Associate Dean Ardie Walser; Dean Gilda Barabino; Computer Science Chair Akira Kawaguchi; Martha Hantzandreou, Computer Science Academic Advisor; and Teresa Scala, Special Project Administrator, Provost’s Office, gather to celebrate CUNY 2x Tech.

The City College of New York has partnered with the NYC Department of Small Business Services (SBS) on a new initiative targeted at increasing the number of students graduating with tech-related bachelor’s degrees.

In the fall of 2018, City College was awarded $2.3 million for CUNY 2x Tech, a 5-year, multi-million-dollar program that brings together CUNY senior colleges and NYC tech employers to better align tech education and industry needs. The initiative, launched under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration, is part of the NYC Tech Talent Pipeline (TTP) and aims to double the number of tech-related bachelor’s degrees from CUNY schools by the year 2022 and prepare students to launch careers in the NYC tech ecosystem.

“The idea of expanding opportunities in tech fields aligns perfectly with CCNY’s core mission,” CCNY president Vince Boudreau said. “We are excited to be part of a program which prepares the students of today to take advantage of employment opportunities in New York City’s emerging technology economy.”

CUNY 2x Tech has enrolled over 600 CUNY students in courses taught by industry professionals on emerging skills, including artificial intelligence and software engineering. The initiative provides support for industry-aligned instruction, academic advisors who are knowledgeable of tech industry needs, and access to tech internships/co-op programs.

Unique to CCNY, the Computer Science co-op program is a 2-semester long program that is designed to deliver qualified tech talent to local employers, as well as short-term professional opportunities to competitive NYC undergraduates. Students who take advantage of co-op can earn up to 9 credits while interning, and the program gathers valuable feedback from host businesses to better align tech education with the workforce needs of city employers.

Recent City College Computer Science graduates have been hired full-time at high-profile companies including BNY MellonGrubHub, and Microsoft. CCNY’s participation in CUNY 2x Tech is expected to quickly expand on these successes as the partnership with the city moves forward.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.


Letter to Students & Families, Week of January 28, 2019

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

As we enter the final days of January 2019, thank you families for your partnership and presence throughout this month.

  • Thank you for joining our recent Family Fridays for students in Grades K-2 & 4-5.
  • Thank you for joining our Middle Grades & Upper Grades Winter Concerts.
  • Thank you for joining our K-8 Principal’s Coffees.

We look forward to meeting with Upper Grades Families this Friday, February 1, for our next Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am.

Meanwhile, please note:

  • Tomorrow, Monday January 28th, Middle Grades students will engage in our Mid-year “NEXPO,” a celebration of students’ learning and community.
  • Upper Grades Students return to school for the start of Semester 2 on Tuesday January 29th.
  • Middle Grades students perform Fame Jr. this Thursday, January 31 & Friday February 1.
  • NEST+m’s K-12 Sustainability Committee has produced this month’s important Sustainability Newsletter.

Finally, please see this recent opinion piece by New York Times Columnist David Brooks, who writes, “Students Learn from People they Love.” It is a great message that aligns with our commitment to ensuring that every NEST+m student, teacher and faculty member feels known, cared for and valued.

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


 

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
  • During January Regents exam week January 22-25, 2019, Upper Grades students will not report to school unless they are scheduled to take a January Regents exam. Students should see their Guidance Counselor for questions about January Regents exams.
  • In addition, please note: Upper Grades students do not attend school on Monday, January 28. It is a Chancellor’s Conference Day.
  • The June Regents exam testing schedule (June 18-25, 2019)  is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

Hostos’ Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development Receives More Than $400,000 in Grants to Provide Free Career Training

The Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD) at Hostos recently received grants from the Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD), the Regional Economic Development Council’s (REDC) Consolidated Funding Application, and the Capital One Foundation totaling more than $400,000. The newly acquired funds enable the division to continue to provide no-cost career training programs designed to prepare individuals to enter or advance in high-demand fields such as healthcare and information technology.

“Our division is very excited to receive these grants because they allow us to provide free occupational training that results in an industry-recognized credential for people in the community who typically may not have access to these programs. It’s a game-changer for the college and our ability to transition students to the world of work,” said Evelyn Fernández-Ketcham, Executive Director for Workforce Development.

Hostos received two $100,000 grants from the NYS Department of Labor’s Unemployed Worker Training Program through the REDC’s Consolidated Funding Application. The College will use each of the awards to continue offering the Computer Support Technician Apprenticeship program and Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training to unemployed members of the community. The funds wi

DYCD awarded Hostos close to $114,000 to provide Allied Health occupational training to out-of-school and out-of-work young adults in partnership with community-based agencies. CEWD has developed a unique program model that includes an Introduction to Careers in Healthcare seminar. This intensive program helps young adults maximize their success in a career training program by giving them access to labor market information, as well as to faculty and guest speakers who can provide insight into the advantages of acquiring an industry-recognized credential offered through CEWD at Hostos.

Hostos also received its third consecutive $150,000 grant from the Capital One Foundation in November as part of a multi-year grant initiative—The Community College Workforce Development (CCWD) Cohort. CEWD will continue to work with the Office of Academic Affairs and faculty to develop new credit articulation agreements, which give credit to students who enroll in Hostos after successfully completing a CEWD occupational training program in high-demand fields such as Allied Health and Information Technology. The long-term goals are to better prepare students to enter the College and to improve students’ credit accumulation and employment rates.

Learn more about the career training programs offered through CEWD here.

 


Traveling to Thailand and more: CCNY unveils new courses

Professor David Lohman (second row and third from the left) and students in Thailand.

Students in cave mist-netting for bats, which is used by ornithologists and bat biologists to capture wild birds and bats for banding or other research projects.

Biologist David Lohman of The City College of New York is back from this winter session’s Tropical Ecology and Thailand course—the first of its kind. The 19-day voyage is the only Study Abroad & International Programs’ biology course ever taught by a CCNY faculty member as a CCNY course.

“The course is taught in collaboration with Prince of Songkhla University, and about half of the students will be from that institution,” said Lohman. “I definitely hope to offer this course again—either as a winter or summer term course.”

Students learned about functioning tropical ecosystems including forests, streams, mangrove swamps, coral reefs and a large subterranean cave. They also got to investigate challenges to biodiversity conservation in developing tropical countries with visits to a shrimp farm and tropical tree plantations, including rubber and oil palm.

Following are new and exciting courses for spring 2019:

  • Art, Place, & Engagement: Harlem Convergence, and undergraduate course, will be taught by Professor Shani Peters, from the Division of Humanities and the Arts. 

The art course is conceived as a three part structure: first, a survey of the Harlem neighborhood spanning from the Harlem Renaissance to the present; second, a survey of socially engaged artists producing work in specific and committed orientation to the locality of their work (both Harlem-based and beyond); and finally, the enactment of a neighborhood, group engagement project, designed and implemented by the class;
  • Design and Build: Material, taught by Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture professor Christian Volkman, aims to design-build a material library on the third floor of the architecture building, in form of a three-showcase-assembly, to serve students as a resource for material investigations;
  • Activist Space in NYC, taught by architecture professor Nandini Bagchee, will be focused on the examination of participatory practices in re-purposed buildings that reveal the critical relationship between real estate, architecture and activism. Students will create a “zine” that memorializes the efforts and projects a future for a particular “activist” site;
  • Race, Class and Gender in Media, taught by Elena Romero at the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education, introduces students to the history of U.S. media as it pertains to race, class and gender. Students will focus on four-related areas: media representation of race, class and gender; audience interpretations of media portrayals; critical analysis of media culture and content; and addressing concerns: media message production and consumption, media literacy, activism and advocacy.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Baruch College to Host 2019 CUNY-IBM Watson Social Impact Challenge

Baruch College is hosting the 2019 CUNY-IBM Watson Social Impact Challenge, a city-wide challenge that is open to more than 250,000 CUNY students from all majors and disciplines.

The semester-long competition challenges student teams to propose innovative ideas to help improve services provided through higher education or New York City Government, using IBM Watson technology and IBM Cloud. Grand prizes for the top three teams total $10,000 and will be awarded at a final event on May 3, 2019.

“The CUNY-IBM Watson Social Impact Challenge is an exceptional opportunity for CUNY students to prepare for careers in today’s information-driven economy,” said Stan Altman, Ph.D., professor at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, who is the lead organizer of the program. “Artificial Intelligence technology is tackling and creating solutions for today’s complex challenges facing every sector of our society, and this experience gives students real-world knowledge, experience and the essential skills necessary to be successful in today work world.”

Video: Learn more about the societal problems previous students tackled LINK

How the Competition Works

Teams of three to five CUNY students select a project and then explore creative ways in which artificial intelligence and cloud technology can be applied to improve how public services are provided to members of our society. The competition challenges students to think about the implications that deployment of digital technologies have on the public, such as issues of personal privacy and ethical behavior, cyber security and intellectual property rights, and shifts in the type of skills and knowledge required to be successful in today’s and tomorrow’s workforce. Workshops, boot camps, and mentoring help support student teams throughout the competition.

Registration Open Now and Info Session

An information session will take place on Thursday, Feb. 7, where IBM representatives and competition volunteers will answer questions about the event:

Location: Baruch College, 55 Lexington Ave, 3rd floor, Room 3-160, 12:45 p.m.-2:15 p.m.

Deadline to register: March 1

Team Meet-up and Social Mixer Friday March 8, 2019

Meet other students, exchange ideas and for teams

Location: Baruch College, 135 E 22nd Street, 3rd floor, Room 301, 6:00 pm-8:00 pm

About IBM’s Watson and the Competition

IBM Watson represents a new era in computing called cognitive computing, where systems understand the world in a way more similar to humans: through senses, learning, and experience. Watson continuously learns from previous interactions, gaining in value and knowledge over time. With the help of Watson, organizations are harnessing the power of cognitive computing to transform industries, help professionals do their jobs better, and solve important challenges.

The CUNY-IBM Watson Social Impact Challenge is organized by Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs in collaboration with IBM Corporate Citizenship.

# # #


BNY Mellon Awards $1 Million Grant To CUNY

Grant Funds Scholarships for STEM, Finance Students in CUNY Senior Colleges

The BNY Mellon Foundation has awarded a $1 million grant to The City University of New York to provide financial support to high-achieving, low-income students and help raise graduation rates for recipients.

The three-year grant will provide financial support to 330 juniors and seniors who are on track to earn baccalaureate degrees in either a STEM or finance-related field at a CUNY senior college. Those selected will be designated BNY Mellon Foundation Scholars.

The grant requires recipients to be graduates of CUNY community colleges who have completed the University’sAccelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP). The nationally acclaimed program provides mostly low-income community college students with a range of academic, financial and personal supports to help them earn their associate degrees. The BNY Mellon Foundation Transfer Scholarship also requires recipients to be on course to earn their bachelor’s degrees within two years.

“We are grateful to the BNY Mellon Foundation for this generous and groundbreaking gift, which will help hundreds of CUNY students complete their degrees,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “It is of great significance that the grant was conceived as a link to CUNY’s pioneering ASAP program. The BNY Mellon Foundation Transfer scholarships will be both a reward to deserving students and an incentive for them to keep going. We’re optimistic the scholarships will increase the number of students who complete ASAP and go on to earn baccalaureate degrees.”

BNY Mellon Foundation Scholars will receive scholarships for each academic year to defray the costs of tuition, books and fees. The grant is the largest commitment the foundation has made to support a noncapital campaign. It is also the first grant BNY Mellon has awarded to CUNY; the foundation has previously made smaller direct gifts to individual CUNY colleges.

“This scholarship program is a first for the BNY Mellon Foundation and we’re honored to embark on this partnership with CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university,” saidDaisey Holmes, president of the BNY Mellon Foundation. “What makes this scholarship special is its focus on reducing the barriers to graduation for students who have already faced hurdles in life and demonstrated resiliency and a drive to succeed academically. The grant was enthusiastically approved by the BNY Mellon Foundation Trustees, and we’re proud to team with CUNY to help these students get to their finish line.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

# # #


Appalachian Mountain Club honors Akasha Solis & Ashley Stein

CCNY alumni Ashley Stein (left) and Akasha Solis (right) celebrate their recognition with Nathan Baker, AMC NY/No-J Chapter Chair

At The City College of New York, you can study architecture, engineering, the sciences and many other disciplines from world class faculty. And from the students, you can learn about conservation and preserving the great outdoors.

Revived by Akasha Solis and Ashley Stein three years ago, CCNY’s student-led Outdoors Club is helping train a new generation of young conservationists in tandem with its principle partner the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC).  The students in turn share their knowledge with their peers.

The AMC was a factor in the club’s renaissance when it paired with CCNY’s Colin Powell School for Civic and Global leadership as part of a program to diversify its membership and ultimately “democratize the outdoors.”

This is part of AMC’s mission and one strongly advocated by its president and CEO John Judge.

Under Solis and Stein, CCNY Outdoors, got off to a running start and has burgeoned into a hive of activity. There have been numerous nature outings, including climbing expeditions up Mt. Washington in New Hampshire, hikes, leadership training sessions in Harriman State Park, and backpacking emergency preparedness in the wilderness.

In addition, the two now alumnae have been strong advocates for AMC trail conservation projects and have traveled to Costa Rica on behalf of the College and continue to lobby for more state funding for outdoor activities, including protection of the Land Water Conservation Act.

In recognition of their outstanding leadership, Solis (Class of 2016) and Stein (Class of 2017), are now recipients of Advocacy Ambassador Awards from the 143-year-old AMC, the oldest outdoor group in the United States.

On the enthusiasm for conservation at CCNY and the club’s strong links with AMC, Solis, who graduated from the Colin Powell School with a double major in international studies and political science, said:

“It’s important for students to care about the mission of the AMC, because the environment and nature surround us all, and it provides us every day with unique beautiful experiences. It is a shame the way our government is handling every environmental issue, and it is up to us as a collective to gain momentum and fight for our earth.”

The Outdoors Club is now led by Jasmine Santiago, a Colin Powell School undergraduate and AMC intern. CCNY President Vincent Boudreau serves as the club’s faculty advisor.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Editorial: Communications recommendations for sugar-sweetened beverage-free zones

sugar pouring out of soda canIn the ongoing battle against childhood obesity, institutions are increasingly restricting the sale, and even the consumption, of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on their premises. The American Medical Association now endorses “SSB-free zones” for hospitals, schools, and health centers. In the current issue of the American Journal of Public Health, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Chris Palmedo presents recommendations to organizations seeking to adopt sugar-sweetened beverages from their premises. His recommendations are based on focus group research he conducted with patients and staff at Union Community Health Center in the Bronx, along with established communication guidelines.

Pediatricians at a community health center in the Bronx, NY created its Healthy Beverage Zone in response to the many young children who were coming in for appointments while drinking soda and sweetened juices. The policy, however, applied to everyone — including adult patients and even staff — to establish healthy role modeling for the community and to reduce the stigma that may be associated with focusing interventions on specific individuals.

“Soda as a public health threat is often compared with tobacco,” Dr. Palmedo writes. “Indeed, much of the dialogue in our focus groups was analogous to discourse around tobacco. Many participants reported being regular soda drinkers, and some had recently ‘quit.’ Others reported ‘trying to quit.’ Some expressed difficulty breaking the habit while maintaining social connections.”

But one of the key differences, he writes, is that while the risks of soda consumption are clearly established in the literature, they are still relatively unknown among the general public.

“Our focus group participants asked many questions,” Palmedo says. “Some were surprised to hear soda is linked to heart disease and diabetes. Some asked if brown soda is less healthy than clear soda, and others asked it sports and energy drinks are really as good for you as advertised.”

As Palmedo writes in the editorial, “Can you imagine a group of people today asking those kinds of questions about tobacco?”

Palmedo says the key takeaway is that education should be a key part of policies that restrict soda consumption in places such as schools and health facilities.  While the data show that soda is a significant factor in overweight, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, fatty liver disease and heart disease, most of this is still not widely known today by the general public.

Health education, positive role modeling, and providing healthy substitutes for SSBs, can all be effective ways to increase acceptance for healthy beverage zones, he concludes.

Christopher Palmedo, “Communications Recommendations for Sugar-Sweetened Beverage-Free Zones”, American Journal of Public Health 109, no. 2 (February 1, 2019): pp. 223-224.


Letter To Students & Families, Week Of January 21, 2019

January 21, 2019

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

I am hoping you have had a meaningful King National Holiday. The following resources from the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture have been shared with NEST+m’s teachers and faculty. We are hoping they are of service to you and your families.

From the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

1. Crusader (Without Violence): Martin Luther King Jr. Photography Exhibition presents an intimate travelogue of King’s pilgrimage to India, Nobel Peace Prize acceptance in Oslo, Norway, and his work as a non-violent crusader for civil rights captured by select photographers of the day. These works, taken from the Schomburg Center’s Photographs and Prints Division, reveal a side of King in travel, in rest, and in celebration, lesser-seen in popular photography of the leader at work.

2. Making Black Lives Matter in New York City Schools, Friday February 8, 2019, 6pm

3. 2019 Black Lives Matter Teen Conference, Saturday February 9, 2019 10am

4. In support of our commitment to engaging in cross-cultural dialogue, here is a wonderful model of “Courageous Conversation” between On Being host Krista Tippett and her guest, the poet, playwright and professor Claudia Rankine. How Can I Say This So That We Can Stay In This Car Together?

——–

Thank you to all of the K-2 families who joined this past week’s K-2 Family Friday.

Thank you to all of the Upper Grades families who joined us for last week’s Upper Grades Winter Concert.

Tuesday January 22, 2019, NEST+m is honored to welcome acclaimed children’s book writer and illustrator Bryan Collier who will be reading with our K-2 students.

Bryan Collier is the author and illustrator of Uptown, winner of the Coretta Scott King Award and the Ezra Jack Keats Book Award. He is also the illustrator of Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport and Rosa by Nikki Giovanni, both of which are Caldecott Honor Books. The Chicago Sun-Times has called Collier’s art “breathtakingly beautiful.” Mr. Collier lives with his family in Harlem in New York City.

Upper Grades Regents Week, Tuesday January 22 to Friday January 25th. Upper Grades students will only be in attendance for exams and/or to work, by invitation, with teachers.

Wednesday January 23, 2019:

  • 8:30am, Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am, NEST+m Café
  • Girls Leadership Presentation, 6pm, NEST+m Auditorium

Thursday January 24, 2019:

  • 8:30am, Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee, NEST+m Café
  • Middle Grades Winter Concert, Thursday 1/24, 6pm

Friday January 25, 2019: 

  • 7:30am to 8:15am SOAR (Staff Organized Against Racism) Weekly Courageous Conversation. All are welcome, Room 249.
  • Friday, January 25th at 8:30am; 4-5 Grade Family Friday

Looking Ahead:

  • Chancellor’s Conference Day: Monday, January 28th: No school for Upper Grades students.
  • Upper Grades Spring Term Begins; Upper Grades Students Return: Tuesday January 29th
  • FAME jr. Middle Grades Musical: Thursday January 31st & Friday February 1st
  • 3rd Grade “Family Friday”/Native American Celebration: Wednesday, February 13th, 8:30am-9:15am

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


 

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
  • During January Regents exam week January 22-25, 2019, Upper Grades students will not report to school unless they are scheduled to take a January Regents exam. Students should see their Guidance Counselor for questions about January Regents exams.
  • In addition, please note: Upper Grades students do not attend school on Monday, January 28. It is a Chancellor’s Conference Day.
  • The June Regents exam testing schedule (June 18-25, 2019)  is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

Lucille Kyvallos, Former Queens College Women’s Basketball Coach Nominated for Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame

— Kyvallos, Who Coached the First-Ever Collegiate Women’s Basketball Game at Madison Square Garden, is One of 12 Finalists for the Prestigious Honor —

QUEENS, NY, January 22, 2019 – Lucille Kyvallos, former Queens College women’s basketball coach and a pioneer of the sport, is one of 12 finalists for the 2019 class of the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame.

Kyvallos had unprecedented success as the head coach of the Queens College women’s basketball team for 12 seasons beginning in 1968. In addition to her success on the court, Kyvallos was at the forefront of the Title IX movement and positioned women’s basketball on the national sports media scene.

“We are very proud of Lucille Kyvallos for her well-deserved nomination for the 2019 Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame Class. Kyvallos’ positive influence extended not only to the many student-athletes she coached here at Queens College, but also to all the student-athletes around the country who benefited from her contributions to the advancement of the game of women’s basketball. Her pioneering legacy is an everyday part of our student-athletes’ experience as they compete on the college’s Lucille Kyvallos basketball court, the first such court in New York City to be named for a woman,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

In just a few years at Queens, Kyvallos was able to turn the Knights women’s basketball team into one of the top programs in the country. During her tenure, the team had a record of 239-77 and was ranked among the top ten nationwide from 1972-1978. In 1973, Queens College hosted the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) National Championship Tournament in front of packed FitzGerald Gymnasium. QC lost in the Championship game to Immaculata University, but the popularity of the event got the attention of many in New York City, including Madison Square Garden.

Two years later, on February 22 1975, Madison Square Garden invited Queens College and Immaculata to play the first-ever collegiate women’s basketball game at the world’s most famous arena. Nearly 12,000 fans came out to witness this historic event with Immaculata edging Queens in a thrilling contest.

In 1977, Kyvallos was selected as the head coach of the United States women’s basketball team at the World University Games in Sofia, Bulgaria. There she led USA to a silver medal, losing only to the Soviet Union in the gold medal game. One of Kyvallos’ former players at Queens, Gail Marquis, competed for the 1976 USA Olympic women’s basketball team in Montreal. Kyvallos also served on the United States Olympic Committee from 1969 to 1972 and from 1974 to 1976.

Kyvallos’ 1972-73 squad was the first women’s basketball team to be inducted into the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame. She was also inducted into the NYC Basketball Hall of Fame herself, along with the West Chester College Hall of Fame, and the Queens College Athletics Hall of Fame. In 2015, she was awarded the Joe Lapchick Character Award, which recognizes those who have demonstrated honorable character throughout their basketball careers. Legendary Duke University men’s basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski won the award that same year. In 2017, Queens College renamed their basketball court Lucille Kyvallos Court in her honor.

The Class of 2019 will be selected from the 12 finalists and announced on ESPN2 during the February 4th Baylor at Texas game (7:00 pm ET).

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu

 


Office Hours with Raquel Gabriel

Originally from Jersey City, Raquel Gabriel is a graduate of American University, Howard University School of Law, and Rutgers. In her free time, she can be found at bookstores, scouring the internet for news on the latest Marvel Cinematic Universe movie, and spoiling her cats. Raquel is alternately amused and resigned to the fact she fills the stereotype of a “librarian,” but overall she’s rather proud to be one.

 

Tell us a little bit about how you came to be the new Director of the Law Library.

I arrived at CUNY Law School in January of 2000 as a member of the Law Library faculty and teaches Legal Research. I've served on numerous committees throughout the law school and have also engaged with the larger community of law librarians. From 2010 – 2012 I inaugurated and authored a series of columns for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) journal called “Diversity Dialogues,” which addressed issues of diversity within the profession. In 2018, I was recognized as a “Leader of Today,” with a profile in the second edition of Celebrating Diversity: A Legacy of Minority Leadership in the American Association of Law Libraries. And then in July of 2018, I was appointed the Director of the Law Library.

What’s new and exciting in the library this year?

The Library Staff and I just completed a retreat to help us reassess where we are and what we do and how we as librarians can best evolve our work to support students, faculty, and staff at the law school. It was a fantastic experience; I loved hearing all of the ideas people had and it reaffirmed that we’ve got an awesome library staff of which I’m proud to be a member. We’re going to be hammering out details for some of those ideas this semester, so stay tuned!

 

It’s a new year, new semester… if you could gift everyone a library or reading resolution, what would it be?

Take time to read something – anything – even if’s just for 10 minutes, that has no connection with work or school every day. Choose a topic or subject you enjoy. I’m of the firm belief reading can help you de-stress as well as remind you of who you are and what your interests are outside of work and school.

 

Before teaching, did you have any other jobs or experiences that might surprise us?

My very first paid job was as a summer school teacher/counselor for a mix of second and third graders at a summer program around the corner from my high school. I was 16 and trying to keep about 30 kids entertained and educated for about 4 or 5 hours a day for 6 weeks. Looking back on it, perhaps that’s why I decided to pursue a job in the library when I got to college?

I’ve also worked in libraries pretty steadily my entire life – I worked my way through college at the university library, staffed libraries through an employment office, worked briefly at my law school library, and worked at a public library while getting my library degree. Maybe I was just avoiding the obvious by going to law school, but my love of reading and libraries is partly what channeled my interest in law.

 

What can’t you let go of? Is there anything that holds you enthralled, that you want to keep on people’s radar, or that is keeping you up at night?

I will never let go of the idea that there is something transformative about reading an actual, physical book. The process of reading a physical book demands attention in ways that are not the same as reading something electronically. Every time I read – or reread – a book that I enjoy, I feel more connected to the story that’s being told within it.

 

What is your daily reading routine like? 

I tend to rely on email blasts from papers and blogs to figure out news-related reading for the day.  Some part of my lunchtime is usually spent looking at legal blogs, the news, Facebook, or Instagram. A lot of my friends and colleagues from every corner of my life are on Facebook and Instagram, so it’s fun to connect with them and read the news stories they post and chat about them. Technically I’m on Twitter, but am rarely there.

 

What is your favorite part of your job?

 When a student comes to see me after their first internship and tells me that they were regarded as a research rock star in their workplace due to the skills they learned at CUNY Law!

 

 

 

 

 


Queens College Celebrates Black History Month and Begins a Year of Events Examining African Americans’ Essential Role in the American Experience

— Highlights Include a Black Business Expo and a Celebration of Caribbean Culture —

QUEENS, NY, January 22, 2019 – A Black Business Expo will be among the campus events as Queens College celebrates Black History Month 2019 and begins a year-long exploration of the African American experience.

“This year we are expanding from the limitation of a single month to more broadly explore the essential part African Americans have played in the history of our country. So we’ll offer related events throughout the year for the benefit of our students and community,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

The Black Business Expo will provide an opportunity for students to network with successful African American business owners and learn how they were able to build their enterprises. The business owners will, in turn, be able to promote their businesses to the student body.

Another kind of networking will take place as the college kicks off its Black History Month celebration with the first of a series of monthly Lunch and Discussion sessions. Sponsored by the Queens College Office of the President, these unstructured events—open to all students, faculty, and staff—will encourage participants to interact over lunch with people they may not know too well. Each date will be structured around a particular question, topic, or performance that serves to drive the discussion.

The theme for the college’s month-long celebration is Sankofa: knowing the past to move into the future. This is reflected in many of the planned events. Sankofa is a word from the Akan people of Ghana.

Artists, poets, musicians, and historians whose work is linked to the people of the Caribbean will be featured when the Queens College Caribbean Students Association hosts “Our Story,” a celebration of art and artists from across the Caribbean.

During another program, students will share recollections from their participation in Queens College’s ongoing In the Footsteps of Dr. King program. Each year a group of students makes a journey through the historic landscape of the civil rights movement inGeorgia and Alabama guided by veterans of that struggle who worked with Martin Luther King, Jr.

Queens College has long played a role in the struggle of African Americans for equal rights. In May 1965, King was the first speaker in the collegeʼs John F. Kennedy Memorial Lecture Series, highlighting the power of peaceful resistance in his remarks. “Nonviolence,” Dr. King said, “is the most potent weapon available to oppressed people in their struggle for freedom and human dignity.” A year earlier, during the Freedom Summer voter-registration project in Mississippi, Queens College student Andrew Goodman was murdered along with fellow civil rights workers James Chaney and Michael Schwerner. The collegeʼs Rosenthal Library clock tower is named for the three men. Over the years, the college has honored civil rights pioneers such as Aaron Henry, who received the Queens College Medal in 1990, and John Lewis, who received an honorary degree in 2009.

By extending black history beyond the month of February, Queens College hopes to better reflect the significance of contributions made by African Americans. At the same time, the college—which has students from more than 150 nations—will draw parallels between the experiences of diverse groups on campus and African-Americans, beginning conversations, finding common ground, and educating all participants.

Many prominent African Americans have graduated from Queens College, including Queens Borough President Helen Marshall, New York Assemblywoman Barbara Clark, New York Urban League Chairman Noel Hankin, former Vice Chairman of the CUNY Board of Trustees Philip A. Berry, and Olympic medalist Gail Marquis.

A complete schedule of events can be found at www.qc.cuny.edu/BHM. All events are free and open to the public.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals serving in New York City public schools. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 20,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY engineer Ahmed Mohamed tackles FWE nexus challenge

Ahmed Mohamed, CCNY electrical engineering professor and NSF grant recipient.

Research is underway in several countries to find innovative solutions to the global food, water and energy (FWE) security nexus that inextricably links all three areas. At The City College of New York, Ahmed Mohamed, assistant professor in the Grove School of Engineering is joining the interdisciplinary project, to avert potentially serious consequences on a global population approaching eight billion, thanks to a National Science Foundation grant.

The $374,701 NSF award supports U.S. researchers participating in the   project competitively selected by a 29-country initiative through the joint Belmont Forum-Joint Programming Initiative Urban Europe.

This joint initiative has, in turn, established the Sustainable Urbanisation Global Initiative (SUGI)/Food-Water-Energy Nexus to bring together the fragmented research and expertise across the globe on finding innovative   solutions to the FWE nexus challenge.

SUGI seeks to develop more resilient, applied urban solutions to benefit a much wider range of stakeholders. The rapid urbanization of the world’s population underscores the importance of this focus.

The FWE nexus’ interconnectivity means that actions in any one area – food, water or energy — usually impacts one or both of the other two. International partners, such as Mohamed, an electrical engineer, have therefore been invited to develop solutions for this challenge.

“This project seeks to develop a shared urban data and modeling framework to help cities analyze and characterize FWE systems and nexus interrelationships,” said Mohamed. “The framework will utilize a common urban 3D data model that will be shaped by urban stakeholder requirements and be applicable to regions and cities in Europe and the United States.”

Mohamed will collaborate with Michael Bobker, director of the CUNY building performance laboratory.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


STUDENT COUNCIL PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT MEET NEW YORK ATTORNEY GENERAL LETITIA JAMES

Student Council President and Vice President Meet New York Attorney General Letitia James

 

What’s it like to rub shoulders with one of our state’s highest elected officials? John Jay Student Council President, Jasmine Awad, and Vice President Elza Kochueva were lucky enough to spend time with Letitia James, New York’s new Attorney General, when she came to John Jay on January 6 for her ceremonial swearing-in ceremony. We spoke to the two of them to learn more about what it was like meeting James and the issues they’d like her to tackle while serving as New York Attorney General.

 

“I walked into the room excited to be meeting such an inspirational woman, yet Tish was more focused on my accomplishments.” —Jasmine Awad, Student Council President

 

What was it like meeting New York Attorney General Letitia James?
JA: I was so grateful that I had the opportunity to meet Tish privately. When I met her, and she learned that I was the Student Government President, she curtsied and instantly referred to me as “Madame President.” It was such a sweet thing for her to do, and a humbling experience for me because I walked into the room excited to be meeting such an inspirational woman, yet Tish was more focused on my accomplishments. Tish said, “Now, imagine if the President and Vice President of our country were both women?” She loved that there was so much women representation in our college.

EK: The first time I met Letitia James in person was during the Attorney General debate back in September, when John Jay hosted the event. I was honored to be selected as a John Jay student ambassador and I got the chance to meet all four of the candidates. It was definitely one of the most memorable days of my life. Anyone who meets her can see her passion for the hard-working New Yorkers. There is something about her energy that keeps you thinking, “Wow she really does care about New Yorkers.”

 

New York Attorney General Letitia James speaking to the crowd at John Jay

New York Attorney General Letitia James speaking to the crowd at John Jay

 

“Anyone who meets her can see her passion for the hard-working New Yorkers.” — Elza Kochueva, Student Council Vice President

 

When you heard her address to the crowd, what stood out to you the most?
JA: I really appreciated how Tish started off her address by thanking every single person that has helped her reach her journey. She honestly didn’t make this event about herself. She made it about all of us. Something that was personally important to me was that she reminded everyone that she was just a regular person who grew up in Brooklyn. I grew up in Brooklyn too, so that could easily be me, or any of the people who surround me on a daily basis at John Jay. We need more people like Tish to be an example for young people, because oftentimes we don’t think it’s possible to reach our dreams, but if Tish did it, we can do it too.

EK: One of the many things that stood out to me during her speech was her background. When I think about people in power, I always assume that they were privileged during their lifetime, and that this privilege helped them to achieve what they have now. However, Letitia James is definitely different from many of them. She mentioned how hard her parents—who came from the South—worked and how they raised their kids to work hard as well. Her speech reminded me of my parents, who came to this country and work hard every day. This made me realize that our parents set up a foundation for us to achieve the things that we want to accomplish, and we have to try to make them proud of us.

What topics would you like her to focus on, and how would you like her to tackle those topics?
JA: I’m extremely passionate about tackling criminal justice issues, especially focusing on youth justice. During Tish’s address she mentioned that she would be working with Congressman Hakeem Jeffries on criminal justice reform, and I specifically remember during the New York Attorney General debates, that in order for me to solidify my vote on a candidate, their stance on mass incarceration was important. The advice I would give Tish would be to reach out to youth who have been personally impacted by the justice system and listen to what they think is needed for reform. Quite honestly, this can go for any issue we are trying to tackle. Reach out to the source affected by the issue and gather information directly from them. They know what is needed more than anyone else.

EK: One of the most important topics for me, as an immigrant, is the continuation of work for immigrants. They play a crucial part in New York’s population, and we can’t let them down. I really hope that Ms. James continues her efforts to protect immigrants and immigration laws, and that she will not let others abuse the system. I would encourage Ms. James to expand free English classes for immigrants in order to help them learn the language and simultaneously prepare them for the U.S. Citizenship Naturalization Test.

John Jay students enjoying some time with New York Attorney General Letitia James

John Jay students enjoying some time with New York Attorney General Letitia James

 

“Tish being New York’s first black Attorney General, and the first woman elected to the position creates more room for hope.” — Jasmine Awad, Student Council President

 

Letitia James is the state’s first black Attorney General, and the first woman elected to the position. What does this fact mean to you?
JA: In many ways within government, we are moving in the right direction. This is the first time in history that our House and Senate have the most women representation, and we have broken so many historical records of having women of color in Congress. Having someone close to home like Tish being New York’s first black Attorney General, and the first woman elected to the position creates more room for hope. As an Egyptian woman, I need to know that people representing me understand me. No one will understand me more than another woman of color.

EK: Letitia James definitely gives me confidence to pursue a political career sometime in the future. For many years, I was discouraged when I witnessed the lack of women of color in politics. However, 2019 has so far been one of the most meaningful years for women. Along with Letitia James as New York’s Attorney General, we have plenty of women in the House of Representatives. I have great examples, and now I feel more confident to pursue political opportunities in the future. I am thankful for all the women who ran for offices and made such a significant change on behalf of all of us.

What would you say to your fellow John Jay classmates to inspire them to attend future events?
JA: John Jay students are very fortunate for the amount of opportunities that are presented to us from outside entities. We always have politicians and other impactful organizations host events at the College. I was excited to learn that Tish’s ceremony would be hosted here because it made it so much easier for me to attend. Not only was Letitia there, but so was Loretta Lynch, Hakeem Jeffries, Chuck Schumer, and Kathy Hochul. That was a powerful moment to encounter because they were all in support of Tish and it showed that our representation will be even stronger. We always talk about the importance of voting, and there is a gap in the number of youth who actually vote. If we have events like these hosted at our College, where students can ask direct questions that would allow them to understand how voting impacts them and their families, they should attend. We need to learn that it’s necessary to show up and speak out.

EK: Imagine being in a room full of people who support you and believe in you. You hear “Girl on Fire” by Alicia Keys being played, and you literally have tears in your eyes from the overwhelming atmosphere. Then you spot her in the center of the room, Letitia James, who accomplished being elected to one of the most important jobs in our state. You sit in the third row from the stage with a senator, an assemblyman, and a council member. Although you still have a lot ahead of you, you belong there. It’s very inspiring to be in the same room with such amazing people, because you know that no matter what problems and obstacles you have, they have been there too. They managed to find a solution, and so will you.

The event was packed with governmental luminaries. Did you get a chance to connect with any of them?
JA: Congressman Hakeem Jeffries is actually one of my favorite people and I was very excited to see that he was at this event. This past summer, I interned in Washington D.C. for the Campaign for Youth Justice, and my bosses frequently allowed me to attend events or meetings around the city so that I could expand my knowledge and networking abilities. At one of those events, the American Enterprise Institute, I met Congressman Jeffries where he discussed criminal justice reform, noting that prison reform brings the left and the right together. Every time he speaks, it’s so powerful, and I recognized that he wasn’t reading off of any papers, which shows how genuine his support for Tish really is.

EK: It was inspiring to hear from Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul, because during her speech I believed in the importance of women empowerment. I’m super proud of Kathy Hochul and Letitia James, who have been through a lot, and yet they are currently holding two of the most important offices in the state. I have two perfect examples that inspire me every day and they should inspire you as well.

 

“If someone ever asks me, at what moment did you decide to run for office? I will say, when Letitia James told me to change the world for the better.” — Elza Kochueva, Student Council Vice President

 

If you had to choose one moment from the event that stood out to you, what would you choose and why?

JA: Honestly, I would have to say the most powerful moment was watching the actual swearing in of Tish. The entire room was standing, focused on this one moment. That moment indicated a shift in power, and more importantly, a new beginning. I have a lot of faith in Tish and I’m going to pay close attention to her work and how she reaches her goals and fulfils her promises.

EK: My favorite moment was when Jasmine and I had the privilege to meet Letitia James in a private setting. She told us to go and change the world, and I thought to myself, this is the moment that I will recall for the rest of my life. If someone ever asks me, at what moment did you decide to run for office? I will say, when Letitia James told me to change the world for the better.


ALEXA D’ARIENZO (’22) WINS THE PAULEY PERRETTE FORENSIC SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP

Alexa D’Arienzo (’22) Wins the Pauley Perrette Forensic Science Scholarship

 

It’s not surprising that Alexa D’Arienzo (’22) is our first recipient of the Pauley Perrette Forensic Science Scholarship. Her love of science, empirical data, and problem solving have been a focus in her life for as long as she can remember—the Biology classes she’s thrived in, her science-oriented jobs, and even the scientific television shows she’s inclined to watch.

“I’ve always enjoyed doing labs in school. One of my favorite experiments in high school was when we went to the DNA Learning Center and we got to do a gel electrophoresis test. That’s when you make a Jell-O brick and then insert DNA into different cavities,” D’Arienzo enthusiastically explains. “After 30 minutes the DNA moves, and based off of how far it moves you can compare that sample to other DNA samples. It was exciting to know that they do something similar for paternity tests and DNA comparisons.”

Her interest in science and desire to solve crimes helped D’Arienzo zero in on John Jay as the right College for her. “I only applied to five colleges,” says D’Arienzo. “First, I looked at which school was the best for Forensic Science. Then, with the added chance to learn about Forensic Science in a criminal justice setting, I knew that John Jay was the right fit for me.”  We sat down with this Long Island native to learn more about her goals for the future, her scholarship win, and what it means to be a woman in science.

Now that you’ve completed one semester at John Jay, what work have you done that really interested you?
I took Chemistry 103 in the fall, and this semester I’ll be taking Chemistry 104. In Chemistry 103 we did a lot of labs with Bunsen burners and different chemicals and measurements. It was more of an intro into how to work your way around the lab. I really enjoyed the aluminum-zinc anode lab we did in that class. For this experiment we put an aluminum wire in a mixture and everything started to become attracted to the wire. It was cool to see the different reactions.

What do you hope to do with your major once you graduate?
I really want to work in a crime lab, helping to solve crimes. I enjoy the hands-on work, and it would be nice to get justice for the victims, all while doing something that I like.

 

Alexa D'Arienzo

 

“This scholarship eases the financial stress on my entire family, and because of it, I’m going to get one step closer to my goal.”— Alexa D’Arienzo

 

What would you say is the interaction between forensic science and criminal justice?
Forensic science provides almost 100 percent facts without bias. Whatever the results are of a test—whether good or bad—those are the results. Science helps to inform us about what happened during a crime. When you’re on trial, you can say anything and it doesn’t have to be true. But, if you back it up with facts and proven scientific evidence, it solidifies your case and proves what really happened.

What does it mean to you to be the first winner of the Pauley Perrette Forensic Science Scholarship?
It means that I don’t have to focus on financial issues. I can focus on studying and my academic career. The tuition is not incredibly expensive, but I have to work two jobs—I work in a bakery and a church rectory. This scholarship eases the financial stress on my entire family, and because of it, I’m going to get one step closer to my goal.

Pauley Perrette’s groundbreaking character on NCIS showcased a woman succeeding in a field where women have been traditionally underrepresented. What are your feelings about women pursing careers in math and science?  
I’m not sure why a lot of women don’t pursue math and science, maybe because they’re seen as difficult majors. I also think that the science community wasn’t always welcoming to women. Now, times are changing, and there’s not as much of a gender issue, especially for women working in the science field. Being a woman in this field just proves that you can do what you love, regardless of what others say. Winning this scholarship shows that even more.

 

“Without Pauley Perrette and John Jay, I wouldn’t be able to pursue a forensic science career and go on to work in a crime lab, solving crimes, and helping those in need.”—Alexa D’Arienzo

 

If Pauley Perrette was standing in front of you right now, what would you like to say to her? 
Thank you for giving me the opportunity to do what I love without having to worry about financial needs. Thank you for giving me the ability to pursue science as a woman. Without Pauley Perrette and John Jay, I wouldn’t be able to pursue a forensic science career and go on to work in a crime lab, solving crimes, and helping those in need.


CUNY School Of Medicine Far Outpaces Nationwide Progress In Enrollment Of Racial, Ethnic Minorities

Student Population Reflects Diversity of Communities It Seeks to Serve

At a time when medical schools across the country are struggling to increase their enrollment of racial and ethnic minorities, the two-year-old City University of New York School of Medicine is already among the nation’s most diverse – a distinction closely tied to its unique social mission to increase quality health care for underserved communities.

A study published last month in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that diversity numbers at medical schools are rising, but at a pace so slow that it could take decades for the field to begin mirroring the demographics of the country. By contrast, CUNY’s is the rare medical school whose student population today approaches the demographic diversity of the communities it seeks to serve.

  • A majority of the students in the CUNY School of Medicine – 53 percent – are members of underrepresented minority groups. That’s the antithesis of the nation’s medical schools as a whole, which remain 59 percent white.
  • Black students represent the largest share, accounting for 35 percent of the CUNY medical school’s student body– five times the national percentage, according to data released this month by the Association of American Medical Colleges. The organization last year cited the CUNY School of Medicine as one of the top five medical schools in the country for recruitment of black and African-American students, exceeded only by the four historically black medical schools.
  • Another 18 percent of CUNY’s medical students are Hispanic– twice the percentage nationally.
  • Along with its large representation of black and Hispanic medical students, CUNY has topped the nation in enrolling women the past two years. All told, 63 percent of CUNY’s medical students are women.
  • More than 80 percent of students of CUNY medical students are either immigrants or the children of immigrants.

The CUNY medical school – a seven-year program based at City College that combines undergraduate and medical degrees for about 475 students – was established in 2016 as an outgrowth of CUNY’s Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education. The medical school recruits top New York City high school students, many from underrepresented minority groups, for a program sharply focused on improving health care in underserved communities at a time when the need for primary care physicians nationwide is rising.

“The CUNY School of Medicine’s emergence as a national leader in diversity closely adheres to its mission of public service,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Like the five-year Sophie Davis program from which it grew, our medical school is uniquely committed to training physicians and other health care professionals who want to address health disparities and improve primary, community-based health care in underserved areas.”

And, like the University as a whole, the CUNY medical school is unusually diverse in terms of socioeconomic, cultural and national background.

“I don’t think you’ll find a medical school anywhere that looks like we do,” said third-year medical student Shahid Dodson, a member of the class of 2020, the School of Medicine’s first graduating class. Growing up in Brooklyn, Dodson experienced the health care disparities of poor neighborhoods firsthand. “In the community I’m from, I never had a physician, someone I could ask questions. Now when I see patients in the hospital, they’ll say, ‘You come from where I come from.’ It makes a difference. It gives me purpose.”

Prior to its elevation to a school of medicine, the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, founded in 1973, was a five-year program that integrated a three-year bachelor’s degree with the first two years of traditional medical education. Students then transferred to one of six cooperating medical schools for the final two years of clinical training, and received their medical degrees from those institutions. Now, the students complete their medical education at CUNY, spending their two years of clinical training in rotations at two partnering hospitals, St. Barnabas in the Bronx and Staten Island University Hospital, along with several clinical practices in the New York area.

“The distinctive element of this approach is that even before students start their medical curriculum they are taking courses that get them thinking about vital cultural and social issues in communities of need,” said City College President Vincent Boudreau “This approach allows us to root the school’s medical education in a real sense of mission and purpose. We talk frequently, and with pride, about CUNY as a driver of social mobility. At the CUNY School of Medicine, we’re training doctors to directly combat some of the most devastating obstacles to social mobility: negligible primary health care in underserved areas. This is especially important at a time when the number of primary care physicians is declining nationally. The need has never been greater.” ​

ADDITIONAL STUDENT SNAPSHOTS

Gabrielle Cintron grew up in Far Rockaway, Queens, the daughter of Puerto Rican and Guyanese parents. She began the program when it was the five-year Sophie Davis school. Now, she’s on track to earn her medical degree in 2020 as a member of what will be the first graduating class of the CUNY School of Medicine. Her father’s diabetes sparked her interest in medicine when she was just 8, and she began thinking about medical school as a teenager. “I grew up in a black and Hispanic neighborhood and I never saw a black or Hispanic pediatrician in my life,” she said. “This program is trying to bring in more people from underrepresented backgrounds like me. They want to fix the disparities in medicine. That message really drew me in.”

Maikel Kamel was born in Egypt and came to New York with his family when he was a year old. He attended Brooklyn Technical High School and was attracted to the CUNY medical school because of the uniqueness of its makeup and mission to bring quality health care to underserved communities. “If you take a look around at your classmates you see every race, every ethnicity,” he says. “I also liked that a lot of courses you take in your first two years as an undergrad specifically address health disparities – courses you don’t see in traditional medical schools. It filled my sense of purpose.”

Danissa Williams grew up in Jackson Heights, Queens, and always liked science. But it wasn’t until her high school college counselor arranged for an interview with CUNY’s Sophie Davis program that she knew she wanted to become a doctor. “What I’ve seen and what interests me is the inadequacy of health literacy in the underserved communities where we are training,” she said. “People go by what they hear and there are a lot of misconceptions. So my personal goal is to improve people’s understanding of their conditions, what’s good for them and what’s not, so they’re not blindly following what someone tells them.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Queens College Choral Society Invites New Members to Sing Masterpieces by Mozart and Brahms

FLUSHING, NY, January 16, 2019 – The Queens College Choral Society is seeking new members for its Spring 2019 season, which will feature Mozart’s Mass in C Minor and Brahms’s Schicksalslied (Song of Fate), both masterpieces of personal expression.  Brahms’s poignant work explores themes of fate and human destiny; Mozart’s Mass, left unfinished only a few years before his death, set new standards of brilliance for sacred music at the end of the eighteenth century.

Auditions for new members will take place on the following Wednesdays in Room 246 of the Music Building at Queens College:

January 23, 5:30–7:00 pm
January 30, 6:00–7:15 pm
February 6, 6:00–7:15 pm

Rehearsals are held from 7:30 pm to 9:45 pm on Wednesdays at Queens College, and will begin on January 30, 2019. Auditions consist of basic singing skills—no preparation is necessary.

From its founding in 1941, the Queens College Choral Society has offered Queens College students, faculty, and staff—and other music lovers from Queens, Manhattan, and Nassau/Suffolk Counties—the opportunity to learn and perform choral masterpieces. The society welcomes people of all ages and backgrounds and is open to anyone with prior singing experience.

For further information, visit our website at www.qcchoralsociety.org. To schedule an audition, contact James John, music director, at 718-997-3818 or jmsjhn@aol.com.

Click here for a campus map and here for directions to Queens College.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Dean Ayman El-Mohandes on the appointment of Oxiris Barbot as NYC Health Commissioner

Yesterday, CUNY SPH dean Dr. Ayman El-Mohandes spoke to AM New York about the appointment of Dr. Oxiris Barbot, a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council, to the position of New York City Health Commissioner.

With more than 25 years’ experience in public health and healthcare delivery, Dr. Barbot has dedicated her career to achieving health equity and is well poised to lead the nation’s premier health department.

“Her life story is a testament to someone who has walked the walk,” El-Mohandes told the paper. “There are certain skills and insights that you build through your life story that are just as important if not more important to the understanding of health challenges today.”

NYC’s new Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot knows what it’s like to be denied care

By Lisa L. Colangelo
Dr. Oxiris Barbot knows what it’s like to be denied care when you don’t have the “right” kind of health insurance.

Barbot was just a youngster when her mother took her to see a pediatric orthopedic surgeon to treat an injured, swollen knee.

“I remember distinctly standing in the waiting room, having the doctor come out and saying, ‘I don’t take Medicaid, but you can put ice on that,’” said Barbot, 53, who took over as the New York City Health Commissioner last month. “Those kinds of experiences, especially at a very early age, stick with someone.”

Narrowing the health disparities that exist among communities and ethnic groups is one of Barbot’s passions, as she takes the job she has been preparing for her whole life.

Born at Bellevue Hospital, Barbot is the first Latina to head the city’s Health Department. She lived in the Patterson Houses in the Bronx before moving with her mother to northern New Jersey.

“I like to refer to myself as a Nuyorican,” said Barbot, referring to a term of pride used by New Yorkers with deep Puerto Rican roots. “I have sort of this bicultural experience … I think having a foot in both those worlds really informed my outlook on what it means to have a healthy community.”

The city has spent years tracking and tackling the health disparities among some New Yorkers. Despite some improvements, they remain stark.

For example, recent Health Department statistics show life expectancy for people who live on the Upper East Side is nearly 11 years longer than for people who live in Brownsville, 85.9 years compared to 75.1 years.

The rate of infant mortality is almost double for African-Americans when compared with the rest of the city. While the number of teen pregnancies has gone down over the years, the rate is highest in the South Bronx.

City Councilman Mark Levine, chair of the Health Committee, said another issue facing Barbot and her staff is the persistently high rate of tuberculosis, especially among immigrant groups who are too fearful to seek health care, as well as the rise of e-cigarette use in teens.

“We are also very concerned about the presence of so much added sugar in fast food that is not disclosed,” said Levine, who has authored a bill that would require warning notices. He is hoping Barbot supports the measure.

Barbot graduated from Yale University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. One of her formative jobs was working as a pediatrician at a community health center in Washington, D.C.

“I’ve always dedicated myself to putting my Ivy League education to use in the community that needed it the most,” she said.

Dr. Ayman El-Mohandes, dean of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy, said Barbot brings more than impressive educational credentials to the job

“Her life story is a testament to someone who has walked the walk,” said El-Mohandes. “There are certain skills and insights that you build through your life story that are just as important if not more important to the understanding of health challenges today.”

Her time at the health center put Barbot on the track from clinician to commissioner.

Many of the health conditions she treated were the result of inadequate housing, lack of health insurance, lack of economic opportunities and other factors.

Patients with severe asthma, forced to heat their homes by using the stove, would come in on a regular basis.

“They came looking for a doctor’s note to help get higher on a list for better housing,” she said. “That’s not a way to treat a chronic health condition.”

After seeing children with elevated lead levels, Barbot used a spreadsheet to determine they all came from the same building. That work helped spark a Department of Justice inquiry and action for the tenants.

“I got frustrated of seeing this revolving door I had no real power or influence over,” she said. “I wanted to work, as we say, upstream, which looks at how do we change systems.”

Barbot returned to New York in 2003 to serve as medical director at the Office of School Health at the city’s Health and Education departments, where she developed an electronic health record.

A chance to run Baltimore’s Health Department led to her Charm City in 2010. She launched a “Healthy Baltimore” initiative and oversaw a dramatic drop in the infant mortality rate.

In 2014, she came back to the New York City Health Department for a first deputy commissioner post. Barbot was tapped to take over the top job by Mayor Bill de Blasio after Dr. Mary Bassett stepped down.

“I think the commissioner’s background as a pediatrician and working in the school system is one of the most important qualifications you can have today,” said Fred Hyde, a clinical professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

Barbot said she is “focused on elevating the conversation around what constitutes health, so when we think of health [we’re] not just thinking about physical health, but thinking about mental health.”

She credited First Lady Chirlane McCray’s strong and public commitment to mental health advocacy.

And Barbot’s own personal admission of struggling to deal with her father’s suicide as a child has led to an outpouring of support from New Yorkers.

“If we as adults don’t feel comfortable talking about the hard stuff, how then do we expect our children to learn good coping skills?” she said.

She follows a health regimen that includes exercise and healthy eating but admits to easing a sweet tooth with dark chocolate on occasion. Barbot also meditates every day, something she thinks is beneficial for everyone.

“We have to give ourselves, as adults, a time out,” she said.


Vanessa K. Valdés leads CCNY Black Studies Program

Vanessa K. Valdés, the new director of CCNY’s Black Studies Program.

Literature professor, author and editor Vanessa K. Valdés is the new director of The City College of New York’s Black Studies Program.

Announcing her appointment, City College President Vincent Boudreau said: “Dr. Valdés comes to this position after years of teaching in and working with the program, and I am powerfully confident that her vision and commitment to education in this area will stand the program in good stead for years to come.

I know that our students and the program generally will benefit from her wise leadership.”

An accomplished scholar who joined CCNY in 2007, Valdés holds the title of associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese in CCNY’s Division of Humanities and the Arts. Her research interests include comparative studies of Black cultural productions throughout the Americas, including the Caribbean and Brazil.

She is the author of the critically acclaimed “Diasporic Blackness,” about the life and times of Harlem Renaissance historian, writer and activist Arturo Alfonso Schomburg. Her other books include “Oshun’s Daughters: The Search for Womanhood in the Americas,” a 2015 finalist for the Albert J. Raboteau Prize for the Best Book in Africana Religions;  “Let Spirit Speak!” and “The Future Is Now.”

Valdés also serves as book review editor of the literary platform “sx salon,”   and series editor of “Afro-Latinx Futures” at SUNY Press.  It publishes scholarly monographs and edited collections.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Two Baruch Communication Studies Professors Win 2018 Saxton Applied Research Award

Project explores how undocumented immigrant parents and their children communicate with each other

From left: Baruch College Communications Studies Professor Caryn Medved, PhD, and Assistant Professor Sarah Bishop, PhD

From left: Caryn Medved, PhD, and Sarah Bishop, PhD

Communication Studies Professor Caryn Medved, PhD, and Assistant Professor Sarah Bishop, PhD, both faculty members at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, received the 2018 Stanley L. Saxton Applied Research Award for their co-authored project, “Relational Tensions, Narrative, and Materiality: Intergenerational Communication in Families with Undocumented Immigrant Parents.”

In their research, the faculty members explored how the material conditions of living without legal status kindles unique relational tensions in immigrant families and how undocumented immigrant parents and their children communicate with each other to negotiate those tensions.

Dr. Medved and Dr. Bishop conducted 25 in-depth interviews with parents who are undocumented immigrants from Latin American and their children living in New York City.

“At its heart, this project is about the interaction of material conditions and communication. But its family-scale perspective also provides a view into the ways that broad federal policies affect the lives of everyday Americans as they come of age,” the professors explained in an email interview. “Reading the stories of these families, particularly for someone not familiar with the struggles and successes of undocumented immigrants, is a valuable and eye-opening experience. By engaging with these stories, we can better understand the impacts of undocumented status on family life and relationships.”

The Saxton Award, issued by the Carl Couch Center for Social and Internet Research, is an annual competition open to both students and faculty who submit papers that focus on how theory, research, and/or practice contribute to addressing real, pragmatic, social problems. Papers may be theoretical, methodological, or empirical in nature.

Two Weissman Professors Join Forces

The 2018 Saxton Award winner brought together two Baruch College professors with extensive experience covering distinct subject matter: immigration issues and family conflict.

The inspiration for their research project began when Bishop was conducting interviews for her book, Undocumented Storytellers, published by Oxford University Press this January, which discusses how young immigrants navigate the decision of whether to go public about their undocumented status. Bishop started to “wonder how the day-to-day difficulties of undocumented life affected their families—like not being able to legally work, vote, or plan the future with certainty,” and she was curious if these material conditions would alter parent-child communication.

Since Bishop was new to family-focused research, she was glad to have one of Baruch’s leading scholars of family communication, Dr. Medved, team up with her on this project.

“For decades I have studied how we communicate within and across personal and professional relationship to navigate work and family conflict,” Medved said. “This collaboration allowed me to delve into an entirely different set of family relationships, work conditions, and larger societal pressures at play in these families’ lives. It was an excellent opportunity to learn both from these families as well as to learn from Sarah about issues of immigration and communication.”

Solving the Difficulties Immigrants Face

Both professors were motivated to complete this project because of the communities where they live and work. Baruch College is one of the most diverse colleges in the nation, with its students speaking 104 languages and representing 168 countries.

Bishop is also a volunteer for an immigrant-serving organization in Brooklyn called Mixteca. This organization hosts “Know Your Rights” sessions for undocumented immigrants in the community, offers ESOL classes, and trains young people to be immigrant rights advocates. Seeing the “difficulties that undocumented people have to face every day” led Bishop to try to address the underrepresentation of undocumented immigrants in academic research.

“Mainstream political and popular discourse portrays immigrants more often in groups rather than as individuals, which has a kind of dehumanizing effect,” Bishop said. “But the existing research we studied for this project tells a different story, of undocumented moms and dads—many of whom fled dangerous and even life-threatening situations—doing whatever it takes to see their children achieve their dreams. This is a narrative many of us can relate to. But to understand how undocumented status may inhibit families from achieving their potential, we need more work that foregrounds their voices.”

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RAISING RESILIENT GIRLS: Presentation on 1/23 6:00pm-7:30pm

• RAISING RESILIENT GIRLS 
• Wednesday, January 23, 2019
• 6:00pm-7:30pm
RSVP HERE with code NESTMFAMILY
• All parents are welcome!

Raising Resilient Girls is a 1 hour presentation followed by a 30 minute Q&A session for parents, teachers, and community members. 

Girls Leadership speaks to parents and teachers across the country about the challenges girls face today, the reasons why we see girls struggling, and what we can do to help them. In this acclaimed 1-hour presentation (followed by a 30 minute Q&A), we share how to help girls practice assertive self-expression, emotional intelligence and healthy relationships, preparing them for a life of personal and social leadership. This engaging presentation covers the development of girl dynamics beginning in preschool through high school.

As written up in Parents Magazine, this talk concentrates on practical advice that can be executed in a real-life setting, such as:

  • Talking about your own not-so-happy feelings;
  • Sharing your mistakes;
  • Helping your daughter to solve her own problems;
  • The Good Girl Phenomenon and conflict as an opportunity for positive change

PRESENTATION FEE: The event is FREE for NEST+m families. Please use code NESTMFAMILY when registering for the event. The code can be entered at checkout to discount the complete cost of the presentation.
Click the link to register for the event:
https://girlsleadership.org/programs/nestmrrg/

This presentation is for adults only.

Stay tuned for more information about for the
Girls Leadership grown-up/daughter workshops!


Carnegie classifies CCNY “high research doctoral university”

The City College Center for Discovery and Innovation (CDI) is a state-of-the-art interdisciplinary magnet for research.

In the latest distinction for the institution, The City College of New York is now classified in the “Doctoral Universities: High Research” category by The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education ®. The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades.

The Carnegie Commission on Higher Education developed a classification of colleges and universities to support its program of research and policy analysis. Derived from empirical data on colleges and universities, the Carnegie Classification was originally published in 1973, and is updated regularly to reflect changes among colleges and universities.

This framework has been widely used in the study of higher education, both as a way to represent and control for institutional differences, and also in the design of research studies to ensure adequate representation of sampled institutions, students, or faculty.

Highlights of recent research at CCNY include:

  • Civil engineer Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh’s study of sustainable concrete — key to modern construction—which has earned him the American Concrete Institute’s Walter P. Moore, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award;
  • Biomedical engineering professor Jacek Dmochowski uses ultrasound and lasers to stimulate the brain treating mental disorders as well as physical and mental wellness during deep space exploration missions;
  • Physicist Vinod Menon’s research team uses engineered nanocomposite structures called metamaterials to measure a significant increase in the energy transfer between molecules.

 About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


With Remembrances and Action, CUNY Honors Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The City University of New York will observe Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with a series of commemorative events and volunteer activities on its campuses and throughout the city.

Among the highlights are Medgar Evers College’s 33rd Annual Brooklyn Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, presented in association with BAM and Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams, bringing together world-renowned activists, public figures and performers   for a tribute to King and his legacy; a celebratory performance by the famed Dance Theater of Harlem at Queens College’s Kupferberg Center for the Arts; and a joint City College and Guttman Community College “Day of Service” in which students will contribute to the Harlem community by painting the facilities of East Harlem Scholars Academy II.

“At CUNY, we strive to express Dr. King’s ideals through our mission of serving students from all backgrounds, and we join the nation in honoring his legacy,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “One of the memorable and moving events in CUNY history was Dr. King’s 1963 commencement address at City College, which he delivered just hours after the assassination of Medgar Evers in Mississippi. His words that day ring true more than half a century later. Now more than ever our university endeavors to help ‘transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.’ ”

CUNY’s 2019 MLK Day activities include:

Medgar Evers College

Event Title: The 33rd Annual Brooklyn Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Date and Time: Monday, January 21, 2019, at 10:30 am

Venue: Brooklyn Academy of Music, Peter Jay Sharp Building, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn

Description: New York City’s largest public celebration in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. returns for the 33rd year. Presented by BAM, Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams and Medgar Evers College of The City University of New York, this free event brings world-renowned activists, public figures, and civic leaders together with musicians and other performers to pay tribute to King’s legacy and keep his message alive. The full-day event will feature keynote speaker Tarana Burke, founder of the MeToo movement; musical performances by Oddisee and The Brooklyn Interdenominational Choir; a movie screening and an art exhibition.

Admission: The event is free and open to the public. General admission tickets to this event will be distributed on a first-come, first-seated basis. Lobby doors open at 8 am.

City College of New York and Guttman Community College

Event Title:  MLK Day of Service

Date and Time: Saturday, January 19, 10 am to 5 pm

Venue: East Harlem Scholars Academy II at 1573 Madison Avenue, Manhattan

Description: The MLK Day of Service, a partnership between The City College of New York’s Division of Student Life and Leadership Development and Guttman Community College’s Student Leadership & Campus Life office, will be held at the East Harlem Scholars Academy II, which is part of the East Harlem Tutorial Program. Students will spend the day helping paint classrooms to make a difference in the Harlem community. Breakfast and lunch will be served.

Queens College 

Event Title:  Dance Theatre of Harlem: A Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration.

Date and Time: Sunday, January 20, 4 to 6 pm

Venue: Colden Auditorium, Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, Queens

Description: The acclaimed Dance Theatre of Harlem returns to Queens College to headline the school’s fifth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemoration. Dance Theatre of Harlem founding member and artistic director Virginia Johnson will be the honoree and keynote speaker. Performances will include “Harlem on My Mind,” “Corsaire Pas de Deux,” Balamouk, and Return, a work created by Dance Theatre of Harlem’s resident choreographer Robert Garland set to the music of Aretha Franklin and James Brown.

Admission: Tickets are $35, available on Ticketmaster via the Kupferberg Center or call the box office at 718-793-8080.

Hostos Community College 

Event Title:  Student Volunteer Day with Bronx is Blooming

Date: Monday, January 21, 10 am to 2:30 pm

Venue: Mullaly Park, Jerome Avenue to River Avenue between E. 164th Street and McClellan Street, at Cromwell Avenue, the Bronx

Description:  Hostos students will partner with Bronx is Blooming, a nonprofit dedicated to environmental advocacy, community building, and youth leadership development in the Bronx, to revitalize and maintain Mullaly Park, a multiple-use green space in the Bronx.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies

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CUNY City Counseling Launches New Resource Group

By Alizabeth Newman, Executive Director of Alumni Engagement

 

The CUNY City Counseling Program's Fall Conference on November 16, 2018, brought together more than forty staff members representing seventeen elected official offices and four community-based organizations to consider the most pressing legal needs of New Yorkers. Those gathered heard from three CUNY Law alumni attorneys: Julia Hernandez, ’12, on family law; Elizabeth Cordoba, ’11, on immigration; and Phil Azachi, ’12, on housing issues. Staffers and community organizers shared stories from their constituents and the room considered how best to respond directly to legal needs in our communities. The conference looked ahead to plans for 2019 and discussed the need to collaborate, share resources, and stay in contact.

 

In direct response to New Yorkers' need for quick, reliable, and affordable legal advice and counseling, as shared by staff members representing elected officials and local nonprofits, the CUNY City Counseling Program is launching a new resource space to share experiences, knowledge and best practices.

 

The CUNY Law City Counseling GoogleGroup is where we'll continue the dialogue and help meet the need for legal advice and counseling. Like any other resource bank, it's made more powerful when more members join and add their expertise, so we hope you'll connect with us. We feel that every New Yorker deserves to be counseled on their rights and well-represented in court regardless of means or income and this initiative is just one way we're making it happen.

 

To join the GoogleGroup follow the link above and click "apply to group." If you have questions about the CUNY City Counseling Program, you can email  John-Paul Kocot, Program Coordinator, at john-paul.kocot@law.cuny.edu.


Dee Dee Mozeleski named Executive Director of Combined Foundations at The City College of New York

Dee Dee Mozeleski named Executive Director of Combined Foundations at City College

City College President Vince Boudreau has asked Dee Dee Mozeleski to continue in her role as Executive Director of the Combined Foundations at CCNY on a permanent basis. Mozeleski has spent two years in this role as interim Executive Director, following four years in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at City College, where she was brought on to help build the School and establish some of its most enduring programs, including projects related to human rights awareness, social justice leadership development and a diversity and inclusion pipeline project with the Appalachian Mountain Club.

In a letter to the members of the merging foundations, Boudreau described Mozeleski as “a gifted manager, a masterful supervisor, a motivator, and an exceptional development strategist,” citing the promotion as an “affirmation of the college’s confidence in her accomplishments, leadership and vision.”

Mozeleski is also Senior Advisor to Boudreau and leads the college’s Office of Institutional Advancement and Communications. She has a twenty-five year career in nonprofit fundraising, board management and NGO start-up branding, having worked with some of the largest non-profit organizations in New York City and around the world, including the Weizmann Institute of Science, Tel Aviv University and The Cathedral of Saint John the Divine prior to coming to City College. Throughout her career, she has worked to raise millions of dollars for higher education and cultural engagement.

“City College has a unique place in the history of our nation,” Mozeleski said. “As the first public institution of higher learning in the United States, we see our mission as one of changing destinies. Not just for our students, but for our entire campus community. The world-class research conducted on this campus continues to impact a variety of areas, including science, engineering, political discourse, social justice and educational reform. I am honored to serve City College at this moment in its history – when our mission is needed in ways even our founders may only have imagined.”

At the Colin Powell School, Mozeleski directed philanthropic, financial restructuring and program building teams, as well as establishing the public profile for the school. She worked on primary school building projects in Ethiopia and Tanzania as part of two NGO start-up campaigns and served as a member of the board and development committee chair for the Seeds of Africa Foundation located in Adama, Ethiopia.

A graduate of San Diego State University, Mozeleski also serves as a member of the Board of Advisors and Vice Chair of the Appalachian Mountain Club’s New York-Northern New Jersey Chapter and is past board member of Women in Development, New York.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.


Statement from Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz Regarding the Jose Peralta DREAM Act

Supporting immigrant students has always defined CUNY, an institution built to provide a top-quality education and bridge to the middle class for those who would otherwise be denied.

“There is applause from every quarter of CUNY today for Governor Cuomo’s unwavering commitment to enacting the New York DREAM Act. The extension of tuition assistance to undocumented immigrants will benefit thousands of students who were brought here, through no choice of their own, by parents determined to give them a better life.  Helping young people afford and attend college is an investment that will pay for itself many times over in the future.  Not only does the average college graduate earn more and pay more in taxes, but by overcoming the long odds to put themselves in the position to go to college, DREAMers also have proven that their grit, resilience and determination are second to none.

“We also applaud the Governor for his decision to name this groundbreaking measure for the late Senator Jose Peralta, a Queens College graduate who was one of Albany’s earliest and most eloquent champions of New York’s Dream Act.”

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City Tech Professor Viviana Acquaviva Named One of Italy’s Fifty Most Inspiring Women in Tech

Dr. Viviana Acquaviva, an associate professor of Physics at City Tech, has been named one of Italy’s fifty most inspiring women in tech by InspiringFifty, an initiative to recognize and celebrate women in STEM who serve as role models to girls around the world.

According to its founders, “InspiringFifty aims to increase diversity in tech by making female role models in tech more visible. These trailblazers, innovators and boss women play a major role in challenging the industry’s norms of what makes a leader. The InspiringFifty are important role models for encouraging more girls and women in technology, as well as inspiring future leaders and entrepreneurs to follow in their footsteps. Supporters of InspiringFifty, both men and women, champion women and minorities in tech and value the positive impact that increased diversity has on everything from business growth and innovation to culture and productivity.”

Dr. Acquaviva is dedicated to supporting women and other underrepresented minorities pursuing careers in STEM fields. She has mentored over 20 undergraduate and graduate students, and organizes a program that teaches mathematics to inmates in several correctional facilities in New Jersey.

In addition to being an associate professor in the Physics Department at City Tech and the CUNY Graduate Center, Dr. Acquaviva is also an associate member of the Center for Computational Astrophysics at the Flatiron Institute, a visiting research scientist at the American Museum of Natural History and a Harlow Shapley Visiting Lecturer for the American Astronomical Society.

At City Tech, she developed and taught the first “Machine Learning for Physics and Astronomy” course at CUNY. She is also the co-founder of Enermodel, a NYC-based startup that employs machine learning algorithms to optimize energy usage and storage for commercial buildings.


CUNY School of Professional Studies Climbs in U.S. News Rankings of Best Online Bachelor’s Degrees

Fast-growing school draws plaudits for strong support of adult learners

CUNY’s School of Professional Studies has been ranked 15th in the nation by U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its online bachelor’s degree programs. The list, published today, placed CUNY SPS in the top 5 percent of all ranked institutions for a second straight year and one spot higher than its position last year.

“The CUNY School of Professional Studies deserves this recognition because its online programs are academically rigorous and highly supportive of its learners’ needs,” says Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “SPS is pioneering in its innovative online ways to serve underrepresented students, including many adult learners, who would otherwise find it far more difficult to complete a bachelor’s degree, the key prerequisite to elevated economic status.”

Designed to meet the educational needs of working students and adult learners, CUNY SPS began offering CUNY’s first fully online bachelor’s degree program in 2006. It has since evolved to serve a rapidly growing student population that is unique among CUNY schools: largely working adults who are turning to online courses to complete a degree they started elsewhere years earlier. CUNY SPS is also committed to providing its students with Credit for Prior Learning opportunities, which enable students to earn credit for their previous education, work experience and learning outside the classroom.

“We built our online degree programs to expand access to working adults who want to finish their degree and advance professionally,” says John Mogulescu, dean of CUNY SPS and senior University dean for academic affairs. “Being ranked in the top 5 percent of the country’s online bachelor’s degree programs for a second straight year further validates the dedication of the CUNY SPS faculty and staff to make good on that mission.”

All CUNY SPS undergraduate degree students must have already earned at least 24 credits at a previous accredited institution. More than 70 percent of these students are women, and more than 70 percent are at least 30 years old. Nearly eight in 10 students attend part-time due to family, work and financial constraints, and 97 percent are enrolled in an online program.

One such student is Karline Barthe, who graduated from CUNY SPS in December with a B.S. in nursing and says the experience was “the best thing I ever could have done.” Barthe, a 46-year-old single mother of two teenagers, became a Licensed Practical Nurse and entered the field in 1996; she earned an associate degree to become an RN in 2009.

Barthe was accepted into a traditional bachelor’s degree program in 2016, but worried that she wouldn’t have enough time to fit in-person classes into her busy schedule. That’s when she learned about the online bachelor of science in nursing program at CUNY SPS, and quickly applied; with the exception of a memorable 10-day study-abroad clinical experience in Haiti, and a 90-hour project at the Rogosin Institute Manhattan Dialysis Center, Barthe took all of her courses online.

“The most important thing that CUNY SPS gave me was support; there is always somebody available to speak to you,” says Barthe, who fulfilled her degree requirements in two years, while maintaining the full-time nursing job she’s had since 2011 at Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn. “There is a lot of work, difficult deadlines and pressure. You’re home, you’re cooking and the kids are screaming, and you have to manage your time and finish your work. But there is always a support system at CUNY SPS. They make you feel like you matter, and you see that you can learn. And once you’re able to deliver, everything flows.”

The degree she earned has already paid dividends: In December, just after she wrapped up her courses, Barthe was promoted to head nurse of the stroke and chemotherapy units at Coney Island Hospital. “Getting my BSN helped my professional progress,” says Barthe. “CUNY SPS opened my eyes to leadership and management, which you don’t get as an RN at the associate degree level.”

CUNY SPS currently offers 22 degree programs including 11 bachelor’s degree and 11 master’s degree programs; 19 are offered completely online. CUNY SPS offers an online bachelor’s degree in disability studies, and a combined online and on-campus master’s degree in disability studies that is the first of its kind in the country. Other recently added online programs include a master’s degree in research administration and compliance, and a bachelor’s degree in liberal studies. The school’s total enrollment, currently more than 3,300, has risen by more than 30 percent in the last four years, and it serves thousands more who are enrolled in non-degree and grant-funded workforce development programs.

The 2019 U.S. News rankings assessed more than 360 institutions on factors that include student engagement; faculty credentials and training; student services and technology; and reputation among its peers.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies

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City Tech Professor Illya Azaroff Receives Louise Bethune Fellowship Award From American Institute Of Architects

Last month, Illya Azaroff, an associate professor of Architectural Technology at City Tech, received the prestigious 2018 Louise Bethune Fellowship Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) at its Strategic Council Class Dinner in Washington, DC.

Photo credit: Anja Hitzenberger

The award is one of the top service honors granted to architects by the national body and is given to retiring members of the organization’s Strategic Council, honoring their service and continued commitment to the mission of the AIA. The award also recognizes a high level of dedication to the advancement of the profession of architecture.

For the past three years, as member of AIA’s Strategic Council and its National Board, Professor Azaroff has served the organization through a period of extraordinary transformation. As a councilor, he greatly contributed to research efforts in resilience and technology, directing long-term funding and staffing to both these areas of study. His involvement directly launched the American Institute of Architects’ Certificate Program for Resilience, and helped create and expand a volunteer network of architects trained to respond to post-disaster situations.

Louise Bethune Fellows continue to act as advisors and ambassadors to the AIA beyond their term of service on the Strategic Council. Professor Azaroff notes, “It has been such an honor to serve in the national think tank of the American Institute of Architects these past three years. Receiving the Bethune Fellowship is bittersweet; I will miss the camaraderie and extraordinary work that my fellow strategic council members and I engaged in. However, I am honored and thrilled knowing that the work we have done is making a difference. Given the challenges we face today and projections for the future, it means a great deal to know that we have set the Institute in the right direction to take on these challenges head on and be successful with such forward thinking and planning.”

Professor Azaroff is the founding principal of +LAB Architects in Brooklyn. +LAB actively embraces new and traditional technologies to enhance building practice and inform design trajectories. He is also the recipient of the 2014 Young Architects Award and the 2015 National Component Excellence Award for Knowledge Sharing Initiatives, both from the American Institute of Architects. His recent work on artificial intelligence and XR technologies has made strides for innovation within the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry.


More Than 200 Students Inducted Into BMCC Chapter of National society of Leadership and Success

More than 200 students inducted into BMCC chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has inaugurated the college’s chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success (NSLS), and 226 students were inducted as NSLS members on December 10 in Theatre 1 at 199 Chambers Street.

“BMCC students have once again distinguished themselves by their academic achievements and leadership qualities, this time earning membership in the largest leadership honor society in the nation,” said Vice President for Student Affairs Marva Craig. “I acknowledge our students for taking all the steps necessary to become the trailblazers on whose broad shoulders their student peers will stand. The ceremony gave their friends and families an opportunity to see them on the path to a bright future.”

Students prepared for the induction by completing a semester-long program.

“Through the Office of Student Affairs, we hosted seven NSLS orientation sessions, seven leadership training days, 39 networking team meetings, and three live-speaker broadcast events in less than two months,” said Denise DellaPorta, a student life specialist for peer mentoring and success, and co-advisor of the NSLS chapter with Kayla Maryles, assistant director of student activities and student involvement.

More than 200 students take an oath of leadership

Students who completed the rigorous NSLS sessions at BMCC in Fall 2018 were then elibigle to take part in an induction ceremony in Theatre 1 at 199 Chambers Street. Speakers at the event included Anna D’Alfonso, NSLS chapter support manager at the national office, and Vice President of Student Affairs Marva Craig, who delivered the keynote address.

“It was very moving to see so many students cross the stage to receive their Certificate of Leadership Training, honoring their achievement and lifetime membership in the NSLS,” says DellaPorta. “They also stood in the audience to read the oath together.”

In making the oath, NSLS members make a commitment to strive for academic excellence, participate in community service and grow personally and professionally.

Michael Seifert, NSLS president of the BMCC chapter and a business administration major who works part-time on campus, spoke at the inauguration ceremony.

“As a college assistant in the peer tutoring program at BMCC, I met a lot of students who are struggling but by using the resources available to them, are able to bring up their academic level,” he says. “They are hungry to step up as leaders and share their success with other students who are struggling. Joining the NSLS chapter at BMCC will give them a platform through which to do that.”

Student executive board presents the charter
NSLS Charter Presented to Interim President Wilks

In addition to the large inaugural event, an NSLS executive board of seven students—Michael Seifert, Student President; Tasmin Ullah, Vice President and Success Team Manager; Azeez Alimi, Vice President and Success Team Manager; Shirley Alvarez, Secretary; Osamah Atef, IT Coordinator; Loukmane Tiemtore, Event Chairperson, and Camila Ardila, Marketing and Outreach Chairperson—presented BMCC Interim President Karrin E. Wilks with a copy of the campus charter, recognizing BMCC as a member of NSLS.

According to the NSLS website, membership is for life and provides access to benefits including scholarships and awards, exclusive on-campus events, employer recruitment through an online job bank, and discounts on computers and textbooks.

Expanding opportunities for NSLS members

“Moving forward, we plan to partner with various offices and with other organizations, so we can offer additional programming opportunities for NSLS members at BMCC,” says Maryles.

What will guide the programming, she says, is student interest and goals: “They are most eager to learn about career development, networking and transferable skills as well as finding out more about scholarships and advancing their academic careers.”

DellaPorta explains that while 226 students were inducted into the NSLS, about 530 students altogether accepted the invitation to take part in the program and have the option of completing the activities at a future date.

“They can also choose to complete some of the sessions online, which enables part-time students and those who work and have family responsibilities, to participate, says DellaPorta. “Part-time students are eager to a participate in community service and leadership activities, but because of their schedules, many of the opportunities don’t work for them. So this really met a need.”


BMCC TPAC Presents Lost Jazz Shrines 2019: Celebrating Cobi Narita & The Jazz Center of New York

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Tribeca Performing Art Center (BMCC/TPAC) Lost Jazz Shrines series is dedicated to restoring the memory of legendary New York City jazz venues. On Saturday, February 16 at 8:30 p.m. the series will celebrate the Jazz Center of New York and its legendary founder Cobi Narita.

Performers will include Sumi Tonooka (piano, shown below), Victor Lewis (drums), Erica Lindsay (tenor saxophone), and Rufus Reid (bass). Performers subject to change.

Sumi Tonooka

In 1983, Nobuko “Cobi” Narita created The Jazz Center of New York, a venue where workshops, jam sessions and concerts have taken place with artists such as Abbey Lincoln, Dizzy Gillespie, Randy Weston and more. Cobi Narita is also one of the founders of International Women in Jazz, as well as the founder of Cobi’s Place, a gathering for jazz tap dancers.

The 8:30 p.m. concert celebrating The Jazz Center will be preceded by a FREE conversation at 7 p.m. with Sumi Tonooka and Willard Jenkins, who serves as The Jazz Center’s artistic director of jazz programming.

Tickets for the concert are $30, or $20 for seniors and students. Tickets can be purchased online or by calling Ticketing Services at (212) 220-1460. 

Musician Bios

SUMI TONOOKA (piano) has been called a “fierce and fascinating composer and pianist” (Jazz Times), “provocative and compelling” (The New York Times), and “continually inventive, original, surprising, and a total delight,” (Cuadranos de Jazz, Madrid). She recently received the Music Alive: New Partnerships residency with The South Dakota Symphony Orchestra, which culminated with a premiere of her symphonic work Full Circle. Tonooka is also a recent recipient of the 2015 Artist Trust award and received the Carl & Jini Dellaccio GAP title to compose a new jazz chamber work, Driftwood. Tonooka has also composed over a dozen film scores, and is featured in A Note of Hope, released in 2011, a full-length documentary from Citygate Films on the youngest victims of HIV/AIDS in Africa.

VICTOR LEWIS (drums) is an internationally acclaimed drummer and composer. His first job with a nationally known jazz musician was accompanying Hank Crawford in Omaha. On Lewis’s first gig in Manhattan, he met trumpeter Woody Shaw. Lewis joined the trumpeter’s band and a few months later, he made his recording debut on Shaw’s classic, The Moontrane. The drummer also began making his mark on the burgeoning fusion and pop jazz scenes, providing the beat on records by Joe Farrell, Earl Klugh, Hubert Laws, Carla Bley and David Sanborn. He toured and recorded with Kenny Barron, Art Farmer, J.J. Johnson, Mike Stern, John Stubblefield, Grover Washington Jr., The Manhattan Jazz Quintet, Bobby Hutcherson and Bobby Watson, and has been the main-stay in the Kenny Barron Quintet since its inception. In 2003 Victor joined the faculty of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ where he teaches drummers and coaches jazz combos.

ERICA LINDSAY (tenor saxophone) is an Artist-in-Residence at Bard College where she teaches jazz composition and arranging and is an active performer, arranger and composer. She studied at Berkley College of Music and then headed to Europe where she performed with her own quintet and had guest performances with Frank Zappa and Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. She composed and performed with such ensembles as the Unique Munich Saxophone Choir and the NDR Radio Big Band as well as touring internationally with Melba Liston & Co. During this time she performed with jazz legends such as Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Williams, Al Grey, Britt Woodman and Mary Lou Williams. She composed the musical score for two off-Broadway plays and has also written for television (“Tales from the Darkside”) and modern dance. She is a featured artist in Sally Placksin’s book American Women in Jazz and Burrill Crohn’s PBS documentary Women in JazzHer recent recordings include Initiation, a collaboration with Sumi Tonooka, featuring Rufus Reid and Bob Braye and Further Explorations, from The Alchemy Sound Project.

RUFUS REID (bass) is one of today’s premiere bassists on the international jazz scene. Reid participated in the BMI Jazz Composer’s Workshop for five years, as well as composing pieces for string orchestra, jazz ensembles, double bass ensemble pieces and more. Mass Transit, Reid’s three-movement symphony orchestra composition, premiered in 2011. He also composed Caress The Thoughtas a solo piece for bass virtuoso Diana Gannett, who recorded it on her 2015 CD Artemis in the Oak Grove with pianist Ellen Rowe. Also known as an educator, Rufus Reid created with Martin Krivin the Jazz Studies & Performance Program at William Paterson University. Today, Reid conducts Master Classes, workshops, and residencies around the world. His book, The Evolving Bassist, which has stayed in print since 1974, is recognized as the industry standard on the definitive bass method.


BMCC Pool Opens After Extensive Renovations

The 220,000-gallon swimming pool at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has undergone an extensive renovation and is now open to the BMCC community as well as residents of the area.

The pool features six competition lanes—each of which is six feet wide and 25 yards long, with a depth of four feet.

Admission to the pool is free for BMCC students, faculty and staff and a full schedule for recreational and lap swimming is available at the Athletics Department website. Members of the public 18 years and older can purchase memberships for the community swim program at the BMCC Center for Continuing Education website. Lifeguards will be on duty during all hours of operation.

“The BMCC pool has been available to Tribeca residents since the early 1980s for memberships for lap swimming,” said BMCC Athletics Department Director Steve Kelly. “I think people in this neighborhood like the pool’s location.”

He said over the years, swimming schools had rented the pool for lessons as well.  There are also plans to eventually bring back both a women’s and men’s BMCC swim team.

The health benefits of swimming are undisputed. In addition to burning calories and improving cardiovascular health, swimming is good for stress relief as well as overall mental health.

“As with most physical activity, swimming allows you to focus on your body, your breath, and movement instead of your daily tasks lists, next appointment, or other life worries,” said BMCC Health Education Professor Lesley Rennis. “Being submerged in water makes it easy to block out distractions and stay in tune with your body.”

For more information on the community swim program, contact the Center for Continuing Eudcation at (212) 346-8410.


Yafar Joins BMCC as Assistant Vice President for Planning and Facilities

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) welcomed on January 7, Jorge E. Yafar, Assistant Vice President (AVP) for Campus Planning and Facilities. His primary responsibilities include overseeing the planning, development and implementation of the college’s capital construction program under the management of the City University of New York (CUNY) and the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY). His responsibilities also include developing and implementing protocols for the construction of these capital projects on the BMCC campus.

On the facilities operation side, Yafar will work with the Chief Superintendent in overseeing the functions of the physical plant and the Offices of Facilities Management (Buildings and Grounds.

Jorge E. Yafar

“My role,” he explains, “also requires developing protocols and policies for energy conservation, management of the College Capital budget and strategies to ensure a safe and healthful environment on campus, including promoting and overseeing sustainability initiatives on behalf of the College, and assisting in developing and implementing goals, policies and procedures to ensure alignment with the college’s strategic plan.”

An architect by profession with over 20 years of experience, much of it in the private sector, Yafar has been involved in the design of educational, cultural, recreational, commercial and other private and corporate building projects.

Yafar also spent five years in facility management for Queens College, CUNY, and the past two years he worked for the New York City Department of Design and Construction as a program executive in the capital planning of construction projects ranging from the Fort Washington Armory, the Museum of the City of New York, the Bellevue Men’s Shelter and the Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden.

“Having the opportunity to be part of the CUNY mission is what motivated me to apply for this position at BMCC,” Yafar says. “My academic journey started with CUNY over 25 years back at Queensborough Community College.”

From there, he earned a Bachelor’s in Architecture degree in the Bernard & Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at The City College of New York, CUNY. “Today as a Registered Architect, I will be able to help others create their own journey of academic success by lending my professional experience in the field of architecture and engineering and supporting Vice President of Administration and Campus Planning G. Scott Anderson, in making BMCC the best student experience a community college can offer.”

 


Dance Theatre of Harlem Returns to Queens College for Martin Luther King Jr. Day Commemoration January 20

Dance Theatre Founding Member and Artistic Director
Virginia Johnson
to be Honored

Queens, NY, January 14, 2019—The acclaimed Dance Theatre of Harlem returns to Queens College to headline the school’s fifth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemoration on Sunday, January 20, at 4 pm, in Colden Auditorium of the Kupferberg Center for the Arts. Dance Theatre of Harlem founding member and artistic director Virginia Johnson will be the honoree and keynote speaker. A performance highlight will be Return, created by Dance Theatre of Harlem’s resident choreographer Robert Garland, set to the music of Aretha Franklin and James Brown. Tickets are $35 and are available online and in person from the Kuperberg box office.

“Virginia Johnson’s dedication to continuing DTH Co-founder Arthur Mitchell’s vision to provide opportunities to artists of color that did not exist prior to the creation of Dance Theatre of Harlem exemplifies the spirit of Dr. King’s mission. By selecting her as our honoree, we offer our students and the community the chance to reflect on the scope of this country’s historical inequities, extending into the arts, progress made thus far and the work that remains to be done,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez

Virginia Johnson is being recognized for her commitment to artistry, inclusion, and mentorship throughout her distinguished career as a prima ballerina and for providing dancers of color with groundbreaking performance opportunities in collaboration with the late Arthur Mitchell, founder of Dance Theatre of Harlem. Her career with the company began in 1969 following her graduation from the Academy of the Washington School of Ballet. During Johnson’s 28 years with Dance Theatre of Harlem, she performed most of the repertoire in the principal role. After retiring from the stage she founded Pointe magazine, for which she also served as editor-in-chief, before returning to the company as artistic director in 2010. Under Johnson’s leadership, the organization developed a new cast and repertoire, embarked on national and international tours, and secured committed financial supporters.

“Dance Theatre of Harlem is honored to return to the Kuperberg Center for the annual celebration of the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This year, in recognition of the impact Dr. King had on Dance Theatre of Harlem’s co-founder Arthur Mitchell, the program reveals the richness that becomes possible when access is provided where none had existed before. The ballets to be presented range from Darrell Grand Moultries’ jazz-influenced Harlem on My Mind, the very classical Corsaire Pas de Deux, Chaconne, a masterful solo by the revered Mexican choreographer, José Limón and ends with fan favorite, Robert Garland’s Return, set to the music of the late, great Aretha Franklin and James Brown,” says Johnson.

Now in its 50th season, Dance Theatre of Harlem was founded by Arthur Mitchell. Inspired by the assassination of Dr. King, Mitchell sought to offer children, particularly in the Harlem community in which he was born, the opportunity to learn about dance and the allied arts. Today, Dance Theatre of Harlem provides opportunities for creative expression for artists of diverse backgrounds and maintains its legacy of artistic excellence. Its mission is to present a ballet company of African American and racially diverse artists of the highest caliber who perform a demanding repertory, maintain a world-class school that trains young people in classical ballet and the allied arts, and provide arts education, community outreach programs, and positive role models for all.

Kupferberg Center for the Arts has made complementary tickets available to several youth and community service organizations, including the Queens Community House afterschool program and the Pomonok Center, to enable members of the community to participate in this year’s presentation.

Queens College has a longstanding history of involvement in the struggle for equality and social justice. In 1964, Queens College student Andrew Goodman was slain, along with fellow civil rights workers James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, during a voter registration project in Mississippi. The following spring, as the inaugural speaker in the college’s John F. Kennedy Memorial Lecture Series, Dr. King emphasized the power of peaceful resistance. In 2015, at its 91st commencement ceremony—and fifty years after Dr. King’s address—the college awarded a posthumous honorary doctoral degree to Goodman.

About Virginia Johnson
A native of Washington, D.C., Ms. Johnson began her training with Therrell Smith. As a student at the Academy of the Washington School of Ballet, she studied with Mary Day and following graduation, went on to be a University Scholar in the School of the Arts at New York University. Johnson’s honors include a Young Achiever Award from the National Council of Women, Outstanding Young Woman of America and the Dance Magazine Award, a Pen and Brush Achievement Award, the Washington Performing Arts Society’s 2008-2009 Pola Nirenska Lifetime Achievement Award, and the 2009 Martha Hill Fund Mid-Career Award. She is universally recognized as one of the great ballerinas of her generation and is perhaps best known for her performances in Giselle, A Streetcar Named Desire, and Fall River Legend.

About Dance Theatre of Harlem
For 50 years, Dance Theatre of Harlem (DTH) has demonstrated the power of art to transform lives by providing access to ballet for all. Founded in 1969 by the legendary Arthur Mitchell and his former teacher, the late Karel Shook, DTH has grown into a globally-acclaimed dance institution that occupies a distinguished place in New York City’s cultural landscape and the forefront of American artistic achievement. Located on a block officially named “Dance Theatre of Harlem Way” in testament to its enduring legacy, DTH is comprised of a professional touring company, a school, and a broad range of arts education and community programs.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals serving in New York City public schools. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 20,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs.
Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


BMCC TRIBECA PAC Presents Writers in Performance Showcase: “Longing”

The Borough of Manhattan Community College Tribeca Performing Arts Center (BMCC TPAC) is proud to present on Friday, December 7 and Saturday, December 8 at 7 p.m. in Theatre 2, “Longing,” a performance culminating the annual 12-week writing and performance workshop hosted by BMCC TPAC.

Two BMCC students, Daniel Pena and Akeem “Keemz,” are among the cast of 11, directed by Mario Giacalone, BMCC TPAC Program Director.

Tickets are free, with a suggested donation of $10, and can be bought at the door or by stopping by the BMCC TPAC ticketing services in the lobby of 199 Chambers Street. Advance reservations are not needed.

Throughout the course of the Fall 2018 writing and performance workshop, talented actors, playwrights, poets and storytellers explored writing exercises, theater games, improvisation, movement techniques and ensemble work. “Longing” is a collection of the monolgues and short scenes the participants crafted during those sessions. The result is a dynamic exchange of writing and performance, unique in the creativity, diversity and wide range of its stories.

Participant Bios

Yvette N. Beshier is the co-proprietor of Cobra Plumbing and Heating and a part-time writer and illustrator. Yvette also served as a Newark, New Jersey police officer and held professional positions as a scientist, computer technician and freelance journalist/photographer for the International Boxing Organization. Yvette has authored four books of poetry and is currently working on a fifth. She hopes to eventually become a full-time writer and illustrator. 

Michele Carlo is a writer and performer who has told stories across the United States at venues including Joe’s Pub, the Clearwater Arts & Music Festival and the MOTH’s Mainstage in NYC, on NPR and the PBS TV series “Stories from the Stage.” She is the author of the NYC-set memoir Fish Out Of Agua: My life on neither side of the (subway) tracks (Citadel 2010) and hosts a radio show/podcast called “Fish Out of Agua” on Radio Free Brooklyn, showcasing under-the-radar NYC artists. 

Emily Johnson-Erday (@erdayngerous) is a Brooklyn-based songwriter and theatermaker. Hailing from both the mountains and the Piedmont of North Carolina, her music is proudly rooted in the Appalachian sound. She contributed original music to productions with Columbia University and the North Carolina School of the Arts. She co-created ‘Welcome to the Doll Den’ with the Electric Eye Ensemble and most recently showed a reading of ‘Harpies for the Dead’, which she co-wrote with Thin Space Productions. Upcoming: Check out the web series ‘Acting Out’ to hear Emily’s original theme song. 

Akeema ‘Keemz’ (BMCC student) is a writer, artist and performance poet who has been featured at numerous events, venues and colleges throughout New York City. Most recently, she performed for the New York City Poetry Festival alongside The Blaqlist (Bronx League of Artist and Queers). This is her first year of Writers in Performance and she is excited to witness the fruition of work created over the last few weeks.

Ethan Ness (@thinspaceproductions) is a writer, actor, and producer living in Manhattan. His recent works include Harpies for the Dead, a musical co-written with Emily Johnson-Erday and produced at Dramatist’s Guild Foundation, and Die For Me, produced with NYC Fringe Festival. As an actor, he has appeared with Paper Kraine Theater as well as Rhapsody Theater Ensemble. He is co-founder of Thin Space Productions, a theater group dedicated to new works, and a company member with Electric Eye Ensemble, a Brooklyn-based theater group that tells ‘untold american stories.’ Upcoming projects include Welcome to the Doll Den, a new musical based on the first all-female radio station in the USA. 

Daniel Peña (BMCC student), a Dominican actor, singer and dancer, was born and raised in New York City and is excited to appear in Writers in Performance.

Stéphanie Rupe is a Brooklyn-based actress, designer and writer. Stéphanie’s latest acting work includes two seasons of “Same Coin”; the festival-winning thriller “Taste” and her YouTube channel “Stéph’s Stories and Crafts.” Stéphanie has costumed various shows including “It Can’t Happen Here” and “Dirt is Where Flowers Grow.” Her design work can be seen on her Etsy shops DaisyDoodleStudio and Boutique Frockets.

Melissa Shaw is a writer, educator, performer and humorist from Brooklyn. Most recently she was an ensemble member with A SKETCH OF NEW YORK, the long-running comedy show at the Producer’s Club in midtown Manhattan. Melissa has told stories at the Moth, Bowery Poetry Club, Friday Night Stories and Tell-It Brooklyn, among other venues. She has written and performed two full-length, one-woman shows at venues throughout the city. She holds an MFA in Theater from Sarah Lawrence College. 

Rashmi Singh is thrilled to be a part of Writing in Performance for the third time. An Audelco-nominated actress, award-winning singer-songwriter and accoladed screenwriter, her highlights include The Public Theatre’s Shakespeare in the Park at the Delacorte Theatre, the New York Fringe Festival, Target Margin Theatre and the Classical Theatre Lab of Los Angeles. She has worked with iconic directors including Ron Howard, Ed Zwick and Jamie Payne. Her album of original songs, PUZZLE, is a winner of the Akademia Music Awards Best Folk/Singer-Songwriter EP and she plays regularly at venues such as Rockwood Musical Hall, The Way Station, L.I.C. Bar and The Shrine. Rashmi’s feature film, THE DIVIDE, is an Athena IRIS Screenwriting Lab Official Selection, a semi-finalist for the prestigious Atlanta Film Festival, a finalist for the Sundance Producer’s Lab and Honorable Mention winner at the HBO Urbanworld Film Festival. 

Bria Youngblood is a New Orleans-born performing artist, beauty influencer and founder of the beauty business Lashes To Eye 4™. She attributes most of her love for the arts to her soulful and jazzy upbringing. She is currently leveraging her diverse performing arts background to emerge into a well-rounded influencer and future thought leader.

Gina Stevensen is a playwright and writing instructor who has been involved with Writers in Performance since 2012. Congrats to this year’s cast for their wonderful, courageous work! Gina’s plays include THE COLONY (winner of the American Stage’s 21st Century Voices New Play Festival, and a semifinalist in the Austin Film Festival Playwriting Competition), CRUEL SISTER (semi-finalist in the O’Neill National Playwrights Conference), KIDS (Williamstown Theatre Festival), and BOOK OF ESTHER (Top Ten Finalist: Jewish Playwriting Contest; Semi-Finalist: Princess Grace Award). She teaches playwriting through The Writer’s Rock and earned an MFA Playwriting at Columbia University. 

Mario Giacalone (Director) is Consulting Programing Director for the BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center, where he directs the Writers in Performance series. In the 1970s, he wrote, produced and directed staged works for the Root Theater Collective, which he created. In the 1980s, as Artistic Director of Mass Transit Street Theater, he worked within communities to create new theatrical works which later toured under an Actors’ Equity contract. He also wrote and directed children’s theater for the SYDA Foundation, wrote for a PBS-produced children’s show and was an owner of the Creative Acting Company, a school for professional actors. In recent years Mario has directed shows for The United Solo Theater Festival, The New York Fringe Festival, La Mamma ETC, The Strawberry Play Festival and The National Black Theater Festival. He also is a singer songwriter who appears frequently in Westchester and New York City and is currently recording with his Trio, in the hope of a Spring 2019 release.  

BMCC Tribeca PAC (BMCC TPAC) is Downtown Manhattan’s premier presenter of the arts, reaching audiences from the college community, downtown residential and business communities, local schools, families, and audiences of all ages. BMCC Tribeca PAC presents a broad global perspective through high-quality artistic work in music, theatre, dance, film and visual arts. BMCC Tribeca PAC is located on the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) campus, 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich Avenue and West Street) and is convenient to the 2/3, A/C/E and R  subway lines and the New Jersey Path Train.  


BMCC Earns High Rankings Nationwide on Awarding Associate Degrees to Underrepresented Students

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has attained high rankings in the recently released, 2018 “Top 100 Degree Producers” outcomes compiled by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education and based on analysis of U.S. Department of Education reports submitted by institutions.

Recently, BMCC placed high in other prestigious analyses, including a ranking of #3 among community colleges nationwide in the 2017 Stanford University study “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility.” BMCC also ranked #5 for minority students, #3 for African American students and #11 for both Hispanic and Asian American students, in the 2016 Community College Week Top 100 associate degree producers report.

In looking at the Diverse: Issues in Higher Education analysis of associate degree producers nationwide through the lens of race, BMCC placed as follows:

BMCC ranks #1 in producing associate degrees for:

  • All minority students majoring in Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services.
  • Asian American students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; Public Administration and Social Service Professions; and Public Health.
BMCC ranks #2 in producing associate degrees for:
  • All minority students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; Public Administration and Social Service Professions, and Public Health.
  • African American Students majoring in Communications, Journalism and Related Programs; and Public Health.
  • Asian American students majoring in Education.
  • Hispanic students majoring in Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services; and Public Administration and Social Service Professions.

BMCC ranks #3 in producing associate degrees for:

  • All minority students majoring in Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services; and Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services.
  • African American students majoring in English Language and Literature/Letters; and Mathematics and Statistics.
  • Asian American students majoring in Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services.
  • Hispanic students majoring in Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services; and Public Health.

BMCC ranks #4 in producing associate degrees for:

  • All minority students majoring in Physical Sciences.
  • African American students majoring in Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services.
  • Asian American students majoring in Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services; and Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services.
  • Hispanic students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; and Physical Sciences.

BMCC ranks #5 in producing associate degrees for:

  • All minority students majoring in Education; and English Language and Literature/Letters.
  • African American students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services; Physical Sciences; and Public Administration and Social Service Professions.
  • Native American students majoring in Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services.

 

For more details on BMCC’s rankings, visit the Diverse: Issues in Higher Education Top 100 Producers of Associate Degrees, 2018.”

 

Related articles:

BMCC Receives High Ranking for Student Mobility

BMCC Ranks Among Nation’s Top Community Colleges

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has attained high rankings in the recently released, 2018 “Top 100 Degree Producers” outcomes compiled by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education and based on analysis of U.S. Department of Education reports submitted by institutions.

Recently, BMCC placed high in other prestigious analyses, including a ranking of #3 among community colleges nationwide in the 2017 Stanford University study “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility.” BMCC also ranked #5 for minority students, #3 for African American students and #11 for both Hispanic and Asian American students, in the 2016 Community College Week Top 100 associate degree producers report.

In looking at the Diverse: Issues in Higher Education analysis of associate degree producers nationwide through the lens of race, BMCC placed as follows:

BMCC ranks #1 in producing associate degrees for:
  • All minority students majoring in Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services.
  • Asian American students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; Public Administration and Social Service Professions; and Public Health.
BMCC ranks #2 in producing associate degrees for:
  • All minority students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; Public Administration and Social Service Professions, and Public Health.
  • African American Students majoring in Communications, Journalism and Related Programs; and Public Health.
  • Asian American students majoring in Education.
  • Hispanic students majoring in Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services; and Public Administration and Social Service Professions.
BMCC ranks #3 in producing associate degrees for:
  • All minority students majoring in Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services; and Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services.
  • African American students majoring in English Language and Literature/Letters; and Mathematics and Statistics.
  • Asian American students majoring in Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services.
  • Hispanic students majoring in Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services; and Public Health.
BMCC ranks #4 in producing associate degrees for:
  • All minority students majoring in Physical Sciences.
  • African American students majoring in Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services.
  • Asian American students majoring in Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services; and Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services.
  • Hispanic students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; and Physical Sciences.
BMCC ranks #5 in producing associate degrees for:
  • All minority students majoring in Education; and English Language and Literature/Letters.
  • African American students majoring in Accounting and Related Services; Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services; Physical Sciences; and Public Administration and Social Service Professions.
  • Native American students majoring in Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services.

 

For more details on BMCC’s rankings, visit the Diverse: Issues in Higher Education Top 100 Producers of Associate Degrees, 2018.”

 

Related articles:

BMCC Receives High Ranking for Student Mobility

BMCC Ranks Among Nation’s Top Community Colleges


BMCC Announces 2019 Cohort of Faculty Leadership Fellows

BMCC is proud to announce the 2019 cohort of the Faculty Leadership Fellows Program, which includes 15 faculty members from all levels and from 13 departments.

More than 50 faculty members were nominated by department chairs, past faculty fellows or Cabinet members – 25 faculty members applied and 17 were accepted.

Karrin E. Wilks, Interim President of BMCC, says the Faculty Leadership Fellows Program is essential to enhancing student success.

“We cannot significantly improve student success without strong, visible, and pervasive faculty leadership- particularly pedagogical leadership,” she says. “The Faculty Leadership Fellows program is part of our collective work to strengthen the theory and practice of faculty leadership at BMCC, engaging faculty in leadership development from where they are.”

The professors selected for the 2019 Cohort of the Faculty Leadership Program are: Sidney AskewAccountingMohammad AzharComputer Information SystemsLynda CarlsonAllied Health SciencesCheryl Comeau-KirschnerAcademic Literacy and LinguisticsMarcelle EdinboroNursingJennifer GilkenTeacher EducationLuis Gonzales-UrbinaScienceBenjamin HaasSpeech, Communications and Theatre ArtsMaureen KeenanMusic and ArtSophie MarinezModern LanguagesSyreeta McFaddenEnglishGloria McNamaraHealth EducationChristine PrianoScienceJill RichardsonEnglish; and Michele RondaSocial Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice.

Shirley LeyroSocial Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice and Tracy BealerEnglish, were also accepted into the BMCC cohort; however, they will be participating in the CUNY-wide Faculty Leadership Program.

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The goal of the Faculty Leadership Fellows Program is to recognize and develop faculty leadership through formal and informal roles across departments. The program is also designed to advance departmental and college priorities and promote the role of community colleges more broadly in society.

“In their applications, faculty identified issues that they felt compelled to address,” said Jim Berg, Dean of Faculty. “These issues ranged from helping students with their career goals, to the effects of developmental education reforms, to their own departmental cultures. The program will expose participants to new ways of thinking about issues that face the college and build on their strengths for helping to lead their colleagues for positive change.”

This year’s Leadership Fellows Program will include a five-day seminar from January 8 through January 11. Participants will engage with nationally recognized experts on major challenges facing community colleges. These exemplary leaders and guest speakers included current and former college presidents, as well as prominent experts in the field of higher education teaching and learning, organizational development and equity.

A series of workshops will follow throughout Spring 2019. These will focus on topics identified during the January seminars and could include areas such as mentoring and coaching, planning for student success, dealing with conflict, program planning and budget development, as well as effective communications.

January Seminar Schedule

January 7: Transformational Leadership: Creating a Culture for Positive Change

Invited guest speaker: Monica Worline, co-author of Awakening Compassion at Work: The Quiet Power that Elevates People and Organizations (2017)

January 8: The Community College Mission: Designing for Success

Invited guest speaker: Leigh B. Goodson, President, Tulsa Community College

January 9: Leadership and Students: Leading a Culture of Care

Invited guest speaker: Russell Lowery-Hart, President, Amarillo Community College

January 10: Leading to Support Teaching and Learning: Developing Pedagogical Leadership

Invited guest speaker: Gail Mellow, President, LaGuardia Community College, co-author of Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters (2015)

January 11: Faculty Leader as Institutional Leader: Equity by Design

Invited guest speaker: David E. Kirkland, Associate Professor of English and Urban Education and Executive Director, NYU Center for Research on Equity and the Transformation of Schools


CCNY early childhood education degree ranks high nationally

Early childhood education students from Professor Vicki Garavuso’s science methods class at CWE on the Bronx River. Photo credit: Toniann German.

The City College of New York’s early childhood education bachelor’s program is ranked in the top three percent nationally in the Bachelor’s Degree Center’s latest rankings.  The degree is offered at City College’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education campus in downtown Manhattan.

The CCNY program is #13 among the top 25 colleges and universities nationwide that made the cut from an initial pool of more than 500 schools.

This is the culmination of a thorough search by Bachelor’s Degree Center editors of all Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation and NCATE accredited education schools in the nation. The schools were narrowed to those offering early childhood education specializations. Programs were then ranked according to five factors:

  • Cost (IPEDs data);
  • Employment Rate (IPEDs data);
  • Graduation Rate (IPEDs data);
  • Reputation (Niche student reviews); and
  • Salary Expectation (College Scorecard).

“With this comprehensive set of standards, BDC is confident that these 25 colleges and universities represent the very best early childhood education colleges in the US,” the editors write. “These programs are most likely to provide graduates not only with quality education, but a real opportunity to make a difference – and a living.”

CCNY’s early childhood education degree program is a state-sanctioned teacher’s education degree. Graduates receive a BS-ECE degree and recommendation by the CCNY School of Education to the New York State Teacher Certification board.

The ECE program’s objective is to foster insightful professional growth of all degree candidates. They participate in a semester-long internship that focuses on two different early childhood classroom opportunities.

About The Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at CWE
The Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education (CWE) was founded in 1981. It is one of the leading working adult educational institutions in New York City.  It provides working adults with small classes, flexible schedules, individualized attention, an innovative curriculum, and all the resources of a world-class academic institution. Life experience credit is available. CWE offers a bachelor of arts degree in interdisciplinary arts and sciences and a bachelor of science degree in early childhood education, with special concentrations in childhood studies; disabilities studies; global labor studies; history, politics, and society; literary, media, and visual arts; social welfare; urban studies and public administration; and the Americas. CWE also offers a master’s degree in the Study of the Americas, with a BA/MA option, which enables students to complete both degrees in a shorter time period.​

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Letter to Students & Families, Week of January 14, 2019

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

This past Friday, during the Department of Education’s College Awareness Day, NEST+m teachers and faculty from across our K-12 school community took deliberate steps to celebrate and promote students’ college awareness.

Though this is a regular focus within NEST+m, many teachers and faculty wore “school spirit wear” from a favorite college or their alma mater. For Upper Grades Students, the college office featured visiting alumni who were on site to talk about their transition from NEST+m and academic experiences during the most-recent semester.

Families: as you plan ahead for the February vacation and Spring Break, please consider visiting one or more of the many colleges and universities located within NYC and the New York Metropolitan area.

Upper Grades Families: Please note, NEST+m’s Annual College Fair will be taking place on site in early April. Additional details forthcoming.

Special Announcements:

  • Upper Grades Winter Concert: Thursday, January 17th at 6:00pm
  • K-2 Family Friday: Friday, January 18th at 8:30am
  • End of Semester 1 (for students in Grades 6-12): Friday, January 18th
  • Martin Luther King Day: School is closed on Monday, January 21st.
  • Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee: Wednesday, January 23rd at 8:30am in the Cafeteria
  • Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee: Thursday, January 24th at 8:30am
  • Middle Grades Winter Concert: Thursday, January 24th at 6:00pm in the Auditorium
  • Upper Grades Principal’s Coffee: Friday, January 25th at 8:30am in the Cafeteria
  • Regents Exam Week for Upper Grades: January 22-25, Upper Grades students only report to school if they are scheduled to take a Regents exam.
  • 4-5 Grade Family Friday: Friday, January 25th at 8:30am
  • Chancellor’s Conference Day: Monday, January 28th: No school for Upper Grades students.
  • 3rd Grade “Family Friday”/Native American Celebration: Wednesday, February 13th, 8:30am-9:15am

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


 

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
  • During January Regents exam week January 22-25, 2019, Upper Grades students will not report to school unless they are scheduled to take a January Regents exam. Students should see their Guidance Counselor for questions about January Regents exams.
  • In addition, please note: Upper Grades students do not attend school on Monday, January 28. It is a Chancellor’s Conference Day.
  • The June Regents exam testing schedule (June 18-25, 2019)  is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

PROFESSOR JODIE ROURE’S EXPERIENCE IN PUERTO RICO INSPIRES A FREE SURGICAL PROGRAM FOR THE ISLAND

Professor Jodie Roure’s Experience in Puerto Rico Inspires A Free Surgical Program For The Island

Para leer en español

Ever since Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, Jodie Roure, Associate Professor of Latin American and Latina/o Studies at John Jay, has been instrumental in the island’s recovery. Initially, she led the Doctors for Maria Relief efforts and brought 25 doctors and nurses to the island. Now, more than a year after Hurricane Maria, with the people of Puerto Rico still feeling the effects of one of the deadliest Atlantic hurricanes in history, Roure has collaborated with the medical community in hopes of providing the island’s people with the continued medical care they need.

 

Roure con médicos profesionales en Puerto Rico

Roure (front row on the right) with Doctors for Maria Relief

 

With extensive experience in Puerto Rico’s relief efforts, Roure attended the American College of Surgeons’ (ACS) Boston Conference on October 22, to present on the efforts. Also in attendance were Dr. Girma Tefera, Director of Operation Giving Back (OGB); Dr. Michael Lekawa, Chief of Trauma/Critical Care at the University of California, Irvine; Dr. Matthew Dolich, Clinical Professor of Surgery at the University of California, Irvine; and Dr. Rafael Rodríguez Mercado, Secretary of Health of Puerto Rico. During the presentation, Roure and the doctors announced the creation of a free surgical program. “I have been working to build this program with the American College of Surgeons and Secretary of Health of Puerto Rico since October 2017,” said Roure. “This is the first time ever that a program like this has been rolled out in the United States by the ACS.”

Inspired by the devastation of Hurricane Maria, Roure, the doctors, along with their Operation Giving Back (OBG) program, has made it their mission to provide aid to countries after natural disasters, and lend a voice to the humanitarian culture.

“Hurricane Maria caused over 3,000 fatalities by current tallies, over 100 billion dollars in damages and was the cause of the longest blackout in U.S. history.” —Dr. Matthew Dolich

 

The Hurricane’s Influence
On September 20, 2017, Puerto Rico was struck by a catastrophic category four hurricane that left the island struggling to survive. “Hurricane Maria caused over 3,000 fatalities by current tallies, over 100 billion dollars in damages, and was the cause of the longest blackout in US history,” said Dr. Dolich. “There was disruption of the electrical grid, water supply, cellular communications, and the island’s infrastructure created issues with medical care. Hospitals were running on backup generators, there were access problems for patients and there was a ‘Puerto Rican diaspora.’” Explaining this diaspora, Puerto Rico’s Secretary of Health spoke about the island’s lack of healthcare professionals. “Congress had previously passed a law called Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA)which granted medical professionals the ability to leave the island to work in 12 U.S. states with their medical license from Puerto Rico,” said Dr. Rodríguez Mercado. “Since people started to migrate to the [continental] United States, we had a medical challenge on the island, especially in the areas where the people are underserved.” Understanding the island’s need for medical assistance, three weeks after the hurricane, ACS along with over 350 medical volunteers, traveled to Puerto Rico to provide much needed relief.

(left to right) Dr. Rafael Rodríguez Mercado, Dr. Matthew Dolich, Dr. Michael Lekawa and Professor Jodie Roure

The ACS’s Mission
Once in Puerto Rico, ACS conducted an initial site visit assessing the need for assistance with the surgical caseload, identifying potential partners, and identifying HURRA Hospital in Bayamón as a site able to accommodate a volunteer surgical workforce. With an emphasis on offering inspiration and strengthening the humanitarian culture, ACS’s mission is to create the framework for social change. “What we are trying to do in terms of transforming Puerto Rico with doctors, is working with different organizations to not rebuild Puerto Rico the way it was, but talk about transforming it with solar energy, solar panels, and underground electric grids that are hurricane resistant,” said Roure. Along with ensuring that Puerto Rico is rebuilt to withstand future devastation, Roure is advocating for the future of humanitarian crises. “Since returning from Puerto Rico, we’ve received several requests from Washington, D.C. to provide testimony before Congress, subcommittees of Congress, green Latinos and the Sierra Club in D.C.,” said Roure. “We’ve discussed ways in which we can partner with them, CUNY Service Corps and the community outreach program at John Jay College.”

 

“Humanitarian crises and natural disasters occur all around the world, and as global citizens, we should be concerned about that. We need to promote global consciousness and that’s what I’m trying to do.” —Professor Jodie Roure

 

The Humanitarian’s Future
Eager to continue their humanitarian efforts, OGB and ACS are working together to offer a free surgical program. This program will give students the chance to volunteer in the medical community with a future goal of creating a medical diversity pipeline program for the students. “After a decade of experience, we’re demonstrating how medical organizations can work together to create a pipeline of the next generation of health care providers,” said Dr. Barry D. Mann, program director, general surgery residency training program, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA. Appreciative of the relief efforts in Puerto Rico, Dr. Rodríguez Mercado hopes that the creation of this program is long lasting. “The feel is that once we establish this program, there will be continuity. We need to make sure that the people who come after me continue to work in collaboration with the American College of Surgeons,” he said. With a goal of strengthening humanitarian efforts, Roure has formed a not-for-profit corporation called Hurricane Maria Assistance & Relief Institutional Alliance Inc. (Hurricane MARIA, Inc.). Formerly called Doctors for Maria Relief, this organization, filed under section 402 of the Not-for-Profit Corporation Law, donates medicine, food, doctors and nurses to support the efforts already occurring in Puerto Rico. “Humanitarian crises and natural disasters occur all around the world, and as global citizens, we should be concerned about that,” stated Roure. “We need to promote global consciousness and that’s what I’m trying to do.”

To learn more about Roure’s work in Puerto Rico, and how she began her career in human rights, watch the videos below.

https://youtu.be/Hf-VT-vt4gk

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TLX0kh5He0t_o6mKF3e1SeDIVUfmrp9x/view

 


LA EXPERIENCIA DE JODIE ROURE EN PUERTO RICO INSPIRA EL PROGRAMA QUIRÚRGICO GRATUITO PARA LA ISLA

La experiencia de Jodie Roure en Puerto Rico inspira el programa quirúrgico gratuito para la isla

 Read in English

Desde que el huracán María golpeó Puerto Rico, Jodie Roure, profesor asociado de América Latina y estudios latinas/os en John Jay, ha sido instrumental en la recuperación de la isla. Inicialmente, ella condujo el socorro del Doctores para el Alivio de María y trajo 25 médicos y enfermeras a la isla. Ahora, más de un año después del huracán María, con el pueblo de Puerto Rico todavía sintiendo los efectos de uno de los huracanes Atlántico más mortíferos de la historia, Roure se ha asociado con la comunidad médica con la esperanza de proporcionar a la población de la isla con la atención médica que necesitan.

 

Roure con médicos profesionales en Puerto Rico

Roure (primera fila a la derecha) con Doctores para el Alivio de María

 

Con una amplia experiencia en los esfuerzos de socorro de Puerto Rico, Roure asistió a la Conferencia de Boston del Colegio Americano de Cirujanos (ACS) el 22 de octubre, para presentar los esfuerzos. También asistieron el Dr. Girma Tefera, Director de Operación Devolución (OBG); el Dr. Michael Lekawa, Jefe de Trauma / Cuidados Críticos de la Universidad de California, Irvine; el Dr. Matthew Dolich, profesor clínico de cirugía en la Universidad de California, Irvine; y el Dr. Rafael Rodríguez Mercado, Secretario de Salud de Puerto Rico. Durante la presentación, Roure y los médicos anunciaron la creación de un programa quirúrgico gratuito. “He estado trabajando para construir este programa con el Colegio Americano de Cirujanos y el Secretario de Salud de Puerto Rico desde octubre del 2017”, dijo Roure. “Esta es la primera vez que un programa como este se implementa en los EE. UU. por la ACS”.

Inspirados por la devastación del huracán María, los médicos, junto con su programa Operación Devolución (OBG), han logrado su misión de proporcionar ayuda a los países después de desastres naturales y prestar una voz a la cultura humanitaria.

 

“El huracán María causó más de 3,000 muertes en los recuentos actuales, más de 100 mil millones de dólares en daños, y fue la causa del apagón más largo en la historia de los Estados Unidos”, —Dr. Matthew Dolich

 

La influencia del huracán
En el 20 de septiembre del 2017, Puerto Rico fue golpeado por un catastrófico huracán de categoría cuatro que dejó a la isla luchando para sobrevivir. “El huracán María causó más de 3,000 muertes en los recuentos actuales, más de 100 mil millones de dólares en daños, y fue la causa del apagón más largo en la historia de los Estados Unidos”, dijo el Dr. Dolich. “Hubo una interrupción de la red eléctrica, el suministro de agua, las comunicaciones celulares y la infraestructura de la isla creó problemas con la atención médica. Los hospitales funcionaban con generadores de respaldo, había problemas de acceso para los pacientes y había una ‘diáspora puertorriqueña’”. Al explicar esta diáspora, el Secretario de Salud de Puerto Rico habló sobre la falta de profesionales médicos en la isla. “El Congreso había aprobado previamente una ley llamada Ley de Supervisión, Administración y Estabilidad Económica de Puerto Rico (PROMESA), que otorgaba a los profesionales médicos la posibilidad de salir de la isla para trabajar en 12 estados de los EE. UU. con su licencia médica de Puerto Rico”, dijo el Dr. Rodríguez Mercado. “Desde que la gente comenzó a migrar a los Estados Unidos [continental], tuvimos un desafío médico en la isla, especialmente en las áreas donde la gente no recibe suficientes servicios”. Comprendiendo la necesidad de asistencia médica en la isla, tres semanas después del huracán, ACS y más de 350 voluntarios médicos, viajaron a Puerto Rico para brindar un alivio muy necesario.

(de izquierda a derecha) Dr. Rafael Rodríguez Mercado, Dr. Matthew Dolich, Dr. Michael Lekawa and Profesora Jodie Roure

La misión del ACS
Una vez en Puerto Rico, ACS realizó una visita inicial al sitio, evaluando la necesidad de asistencia con el número de casos quirúrgicos, identificando socios potenciales e identificando al Hospital HURRA en Bayamón como un sitio capaz de acomodar a una fuerza de trabajo quirúrgica voluntaria. Con el énfasis en ofrecer inspiración y fortalecer la cultura humanitaria, la misión de ACS es crear el marco para el cambio social. “Lo que estamos tratando de hacer en términos de transformar a Puerto Rico con médicos, es trabajar con diferentes organizaciones para no reconstruir a Puerto Rico de la manera en que lo fue, pero hablar de transformarlo con energía solar, paneles solares y redes eléctricas subterráneas que sean huracanes resistente “, dijo Roure. Además de garantizar que Puerto Rico se reconstruya para resistir la devastación futura, Roure aboga por el futuro de las crisis humanitarias. “Desde que regresamos de Puerto Rico, hemos recibido varias solicitudes de Washington, D.C. para brindar testimonio ante el Congreso, los subcomités del Congreso, los latinos verdes y el Sierra Club en D.C.”, dijo Roure. “Hemos discutido las formas en que podemos asociarnos con ellos, con CUNY Service Corps y con el programa de alcance comunitario en John Jay College”.

 

 “Las crisis humanitarias y los desastres naturales ocurren en todo el mundo y, como ciudadanos global, deberíamos preocuparnos por eso. Necesitamos promover la conciencia global y eso es lo que estoy tratando de hacer”. —Profesora Jodie Roure

 

El futuro del humanitario
Con ganas de continuar sus esfuerzos humanitarios, OGB y ACS están trabajando juntos para ofrecer un programa quirúrgico gratuito. Este programa les dará a los estudiantes la oportunidad de ser voluntarios en la comunidad médica con un futuro objetivo de crear un programa de canalización de la diversidad médica para los estudiantes. “Después de una década de experiencia, estamos demostrando cómo las organizaciones médicas pueden trabajar juntas para crear un canal de la próxima generación de proveedores de atención médica”, dijo el Dr. Barry D. Mann, director del programa, programa de capacitación de residencia en cirugía general, Lankenau Centro Médico, Wynnewood, PA. Agradecido por los esfuerzos en Puerto Rico, el Dr. Rodríguez Mercado espera que la creación de este programa sea duradera. “La sensación es que una vez que establecemos este programa, habrá continuidad. Necesitamos asegurarnos de que las personas que vienen después de mí continúen trabajando en colaboración con el Colegio Americano de Cirujanos”, él dijo. Con el objetivo de fortalecer los esfuerzos humanitarios, Roure ha formado una corporación sin fines de lucro llamada  Huracán María Asistencia y Alianza Institucional de Socorro Inc. (Hurricane MARIA, Inc.). Anteriormente llamada Doctores para el Alivio de María, esta organización, presentada en virtud del artículo 402 de la ley de las corporaciones sin fines de lucro, dona medicamentos, alimentos, médicos y enfermeras para apoyar los esfuerzos que ya se están realizando en Puerto Rico. “Las crisis humanitarias y los desastres naturales ocurren en todo el mundo, y como ciudadanos global, deberíamos preocuparnos por eso”, afirmó Roure. “Necesitamos promover la conciencia global y eso es lo que estoy tratando de hacer”.

Para conocer más sobre el trabajo de Roure en Puerto Rico y cómo comenzó su carrera en derechos humanos, vea los videos a continuación.

https://youtu.be/Hf-VT-vt4gk

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TLX0kh5He0t_o6mKF3e1SeDIVUfmrp9x/view


PROFESSOR ELAINE YI LU WINS SWPA AWARD FOR WORK IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Professor Elaine Yi Lu Wins SWPA Award For Work in Public Administration

 

Professor Elaine Yi Lu, in the Department of Public Management, was just named the Dr. Julia Juanita Henderson International Award recipient from the American Society for Public Administration, and her new book Public Performance Budgeting was published this past December. To learn more about the research that Lu has been conducting, we sat down with her and dove into the background, the cases, the pros, and the cons of performance budgeting.

Q. What is performance budgeting?
A. In general, performance budgeting is about bringing program performance to the same table where resource allocation decisions are being made. When you are doing performance budgeting, you are not only looking at the numbers, but also goal setting and how the goals and performances are assessed and managed. Historically, budgeting and performance have been two parallel lines that don’t intersect. Performance budgeting is basically saying, let’s add a performance element to the budgeting conversation. They can then talk in such a way that they have twisted DNA lines, and performance information can inform budgeting decisions.

Q. Can you give us an example?
A. Imagine if a government agency asked a community if they needed a park. Undoubably, 99 percent of the people would say “yes” to a park. Then you inform the community how much the park is going to cost—the investment—and it’s going to make people pause. Then you bring a different set of questions—the performance—by saying how many people visited the surrounding parks the previous year. That’s when people are going to ask if they need another one. With each layer of information coming in, the dynamics of the conversation changes. The beauty of performance-informed budgeting lies in the questions it asks.

Elaine Yi Lu

 

“The beauty of performance-informed budgeting lies in the questions it asks.” —Elaine Yi Lu

 

Q. What are the advantages of performance budgeting?
A. The biggest advantage when compared to traditional budgeting is that it emphasizes the purpose of the government. The purpose of the government is not to use the public’s financial resources. Their purpose is to advance public interest using those resources. We get so caught up with how much money one department might have compared to another that we forget the purpose. It’s not just to spend funds, it’s to achieve the public’s interest. We need to focus on achievements, desired outcomes, and how those outcomes come about.

Q. What are the disadvantages of performance budgeting?
A. When you have tight performance management, it can trigger people to under or over report performance data just to make it look better. Another downside is goal displacement. Because you have “Goal A” highlighted, and people become driven to meet this goal, they can lose sight of “Goal B” or “Goal C.” Also, performance budgeting has never been about the direct relationship between the performance and the budgeting. People assume that if they perform well, that they’ll get more money, but this is not performance budgeting. In the public setting, if you perform well with 30 percent of your budget, then it actually shows that you don’t need 40 percent. And, if you perform poorly, what really needs to happen is a conversation about why this is happening, which might be because of a lack of funding.

Q. How would you say performance budgeting affects the criminal justice system?
A. I think the remarkable shift of youth correction from confinement to community-based alternatives provides a good example of how performance might be linked with budgets overtime. If we look at the past 25 years and the evolution of juvenile justice—which is the agency that we studied primarily in our book—back in the 1980s and early 1990s, these were the decades in which juvenile justice faced tremendous challenges, and a lot of people attributed those challenges to several factors. One of which is that the number of credible scientific studies documenting the effectiveness of juvenile justice intervention was sparse, at best. They didn’t have data to look at performance. A more recent report showed that actually changed with the passing of Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. This was a huge act in the performance field. This act said that you had to show the results.

“Performance management and budgeting helped move the discussion forward on alternatives for court-involved young people.” —Elaine Yi Lu

One of the examples that we noticed was that right after this act passed, the juvenile justice field established what they called a Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 2002. This focused on the outcomes on the state of juvenile justice programs funded by the federal government. With the focus on the performance, people began to think about how they were doing with juvenile justice. The outcomes were horrifying. A large number of studies showed that confining youth in secure facilities too often has a severe and lasting impact on their development. Then people started looking at the budgets. One of the reports done from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism found that in 2010, New York State spent $266,000 per adult use. California spends about $271,000. They’re realizing that they are spending huge amounts of money, and the outcome is nowhere near what we are trying to achieve. Because of the information coming in, people began looking into the movement of youth corrections and what the next step was. This explains what we are seeing right now with the community-based alternatives. Performance management and budgeting helped move the discussion forward on alternatives for court-involved young people.

 

“One thing that has helped me throughout my career is thinking about Theodore Roosevelt. He said, ‘Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.’ That’s how I try to live my life.” —Elaine Yi Lu

 

Q: You just won the Dr. Julia Juanita Henderson International Award from the Section on Women in Public Administration (SWPA) of the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA). Can you tell us what that award means to you?
A. I think the intent of this award is to recognize a person who has done work for public administration—particularly internationally—that can inspire then next generation of women scholars. For me to be presented with this means a lot. I’ve tried to do as much as I could over my 18-year career, but I never thought I would get an award. I try to help junior faculty when I can, organize international conferences, do international panels with organizations, and do international work for John Jay. One thing that has helped me throughout my career is thinking about Theodore Roosevelt. He said “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” That’s how I try to live my life. Even when I was a junior faculty—and I would question how I could contribute—I thought about this and realized that I could participate in the classroom, with community projects, funding the projects, and with research. I found that these little things build up and mean a lot.

 


SARAH KOENIG, BRITTANY PACKNETT NAMED 2019 JUSTICE MEDIA TRAILBLAZERS BY JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Sarah Koenig, Brittany Packnett named 2019 Justice Media Trailblazers by John Jay College of Criminal Justice

 

New York, NY, January 10, 2019 — Sarah Koenig, co-creator of Serial, and Brittany Packnett, contributor to the Webby-award winning Pod Save the People podcast, will be honored February 21, 2019 as the 2019 Justice Media Trailblazers.

The awards are given annually by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and The Crime Report to honor individuals in the media or media-related fields who have advanced national understanding of the 21st-century challenges of criminal justice.

Koenig’s Serial program, which launched in 2014, is credited with bringing mainstream attention to podcasting. Episodes have been downloaded more than 420 million times and have attracted new audiences to the issues of justice reform. The third season, covering the criminal justice system in Cleveland, premiered in late 2018.

Packnett, named one of TIME Magazine’s “12 New Faces of Black Leadership,” has emerged as one of the most exciting new voices for justice reform through her impactful use of activist podcasting and other media channels. Her achievements include co-founding Campaign Zero, which lobbies for police reform, and serving as vice president of National Community Alliances for Teach for America. Pod Save the People debuted on the iTunes podcast chart at number four, and reached a peak of number two.

“The changes in the media landscape have generated innovative approaches to reaching audiences around the country, and the debate over criminal justice has deepened as a result,” said Stephen Handelman, Executive Editor of The Crime Report. “Sarah and Brittany are extraordinary examples of creative media entrepreneurship, and they’ve blazed a path that others are now following.”

The two women will be presented with the sixth annual Justice Media Trailblazer award at John Jay College, during a dinner on the evening of February 21, which will also recognize the winners of the annual 2018-2019 John Jay/Harry Frank Guggenheim Prizes for Excellence in Criminal Justice Journalism. The dinner is the highlight of the 14th annual John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Symposium on Justice in America held February 21 and 22.

Previous Trailblazers were: Bill Moyers executive producer of “Rikers: An American Jail”; Van Jones of CNN; David Simon of The WirePiper Kerman, author of Orange is the New Black; NPR’s Maria Hinojosa, producer of Latino USA; and New Yorker writer Jelani Cobb.

Serial co-creator Julie Snyder will introduce Koenig at the dinner; and Brooklyn, NY activist Blair Imani will introduce Packnett. The event will be emceed by NY 1 News anchor Errol Louis. 

Seating is available by reservation only. Please find details here.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York offers a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nationsIn teaching, scholarship and research, the College approaches justice as an applied art and science in service to society and as an ongoing conversation about fundamental human desires for fairness, equality, and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu and follow @JohnJayCollege on Twitter.

The Crime Report,  published daily by  John Jay’s Center on Media, Crime and Justice,  is a national online site located at www.thecrimereport.org, that provides analysis, research news  and commentary prepared for practitioners, criminologists, journalists and others across the criminal justice community. The Center on Media, Crime and Justice was established at John Jay College in 2006 as the nation’s only practice- and research-oriented think tank devoted to encouraging and developing high-quality reporting on criminal justice, and to promoting better-informed public debate on the complex 21st Century challenges of law enforcement, public security and justice in a globalized urban society. For more information, visit the Center on Media, Crime and Justice website.


Promoting HIV self-testing via text message to truck drivers in Kenya

freight truck in KenyaTruck drivers in sub-Saharan Africa are especially vulnerable to infection with HIV due to contact with multiple sexual partners—often including sex workers—along their trucking routes. Accessing HIV testing can be a challenge for truckers due to their mobility and long working hours, as well as concerns about confidentiality and stigma. CUNY SPH researchers Dr. Elizabeth Kelvin, Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and DPH candidate Matthew Romo are exploring HIV self-testing as a way to increase testing rates in this high-risk population.

The researchers led a randomized controlled trial that assessed whether alerting truckers via text message about the availability of HIV self-testing at clinics located at major transit hubs in Kenya would increase HIV testing rates. The results were published in the journal BMC Public Health.

The study found that, among truckers who were not accessing HIV testing regularly, receiving text messages about the availability of HIV self-testing in these clinics significantly increased HIV testing rates compared to receipt of text messages about the availability of HIV testing In general (not self-testing). However, HIV testing rates remained low even among those in the intervention. Making HIV self-testing kits available at clinics is only a partial solution to increasing testing rates in this hard-to-reach population, Kelvin says.

“To reach more truck drivers we may need to bring HIV self-testing kits to them at the truck stops,” she continues. “Text messaging could also be used to alert people about that kind of an outreach program to increase uptake.”

Kelvin and Romo recently published a similar study among female sex workers in Kenya and found that those who were notified about the availability of HIV self-testing via text message were also significantly more likely to come to a clinic for HIV testing compared to those who received text messages about HIV testing in general.

Kelvin EA, George G, Kinyanjui S, Mwai E, Romo ML, Oruko F, Odhiambo JO, Nyaga EN, Mantell JE, and Govender K. Announcing the availability of oral HIV self-test kits via text message to increase HIV testing among hard-to-reach truckers in Kenya: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Public Health, Jan 2019.


CUNY SPH faculty comment on new federal report on student hunger

CUNY students protesting student hunger

CUNY students at a recent food security conference

On Wednesday, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report on food insecurity among college students, revealing that millions may be going hungry despite qualifying for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps).

On Thursday, researchers from the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute at CUNY SPH held an online press briefing commenting on the report’s findings. The New Food Economy covered the event:

How an outdated law is leaving millions of low-income college students hungry

by Jessica Fu

Nearly 2 million college students who are likely eligible for food stamps aren’t receiving them, according to a new report issued by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) on food insecurity in higher education.

But behind that headline, there is a more nuanced, and in some ways more critical, story about who typical college students seem to be in the popular imagination—versus who they actually are.

The report, released on Wednesday, was the result of an in-depth analysis of 31 different studies on campus hunger and numerous interviews with governmental officials, administrators, and students at 14 selected colleges across the country.

As part of its research, GAO also examined what is known about the extent of food insecurity among college students, how the 14 schools are addressing it, and the extent to which federal programs are of any help to students who are struggling to feed themselves.

What it found is alarming: Millions of college students may be going hungry despite qualifying for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps).

That finding is particularly surprising given the rash of recent evidence showing that college students are experiencing disproportionately high rates of hunger. A 2017 survey of the California public university system, for instance, found that 40 percent of its undergraduate and graduate students faced food insecurity—defined by the Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a range of experiences including reduced quality of diet and reduced food intake.

The GAO report offers up several reasons for this. For one, college is way more expensive than it used to be. Over the last 30 years, the cost of attending a four-year public college in state has nearly doubled. The net price of two-year public colleges has also risen, from $6,800 to $8,000.

As the gap between what school costs and what the average student can afford widens, distressing sacrifices sometimes have to be made.

“I did not have much money when I started school, and immediately had to choose whether to buy food or a $200 book for class. I chose to buy the book,” one student told GAO.

For many, that kind of decision is a terrible jolt. From kindergarten through high school, students from low-income families can often qualify for free or reduced-price meals. The GAO report defines “low-income” as earning a household income at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty line, which is also the income eligibility limit to qualify for SNAP (that’s currently $1,316 for a single-person). But there’s no equivalent college-level program, the GAO report points out. Kids who may have counted for years on free breakfast and lunch every day are left in the lurch when they advance to college.

While the federal government is doing little to curb hunger on campuses, students and colleges are.

Another reason campus food insecurity is making so much news has to do with the changing demographics of college students.

“In the past, most college students were white and middle-class,” said Nicholas Freudenberg, a distinguished professor at the City University of New York (CUNY) during a discussion following the release of the GAO report. Now, “more low-income people, more Black, Latino, and Asian students” attend college than ever.

The data check out: Since 1975, college attendance among low-income high school graduates has more than doubled from 31.2 to 65.4 percent, according to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). That’s about the rate at which high-income high school graduates were already attending college back in 1975.

So a typical student body in the 1980s is no longer emblematic of college campus demographics today. The trouble is, our perception of college students as middle- and upper-class kids with parental support persists. That’s why some school officials perpetuate the misconception that college students are ineligible for SNAP, and why many believe it.

To make matters worse, food stamps laws are also stuck in the past.

In 1977, Congress passed a food stamp act that barred “any such person enrolled in an institution of higher education” from participating in SNAP, with limited exceptions for single parents, students with disabilities, and those attending federal or state work-study programs.

But these are very particular circumstances that don’t accommodate the nuances of the college experience.

Ronnette Cox, a CUNY graduate student, said she applied for SNAP three times while earning less than $12,000 a year. Yet, Cox was rejected every time, despite working for the city of New York under its college aid program. According the job’s guidelines, Cox was allowed to work only up to 17 hours a week. But in order to qualify for SNAP, college students must work at least 20 hours weekly. Cox had been missing out on food assistance because of conflicting and arbitrary work requirements beyond her control.

To bridge this SNAP gap, GAO offered recommendations mostly having to do with clarifying what exactly college students need to do in order to qualify for benefits. This included making USDA’s website more easily accessible, putting rules in plain English rather than the current legalese, and encouraging state SNAP agencies to share best practices on helping students enroll.

But Jan Poppendieck, a professor emeritus at CUNY said that’s not enough.

“This goes beyond what GAO was willing to say, but the SNAP rules are obsolete,” said Poppendieck during the discussion. “Frankly, as a college professor, I don’t want my students working 20 hours a week,” she said, noting the burden that work requirement places on the quality of student work.

While the federal government is doing little to curb hunger on campuses, students and colleges are. At my alma mater, McGill University, for example, a volunteer-run student group prepared and served vegan meals daily by donation. Food pantries are becoming a familiar sight on college campuses. And most students quickly learn how to make use of a school’s informal free food network—from club meetings over pizza to $2 samosa sales to lectures followed by wine and cheese receptions.

“There are resources out there, but students have no idea,” said Cox, who is now a CUNY food security advocate. Even when students are connected with resources, still “there is stigma, there is shame.”

 


Elena Felder’s Google Search Yields Terrific Results

The computer and information science alumna says her education exceptionally prepared her for her current position at the tech giant.

<p>Elena Felder '04 works with the Brooklyn College Magner Career Center to offer current student advice on how to break into the tech industry. Photo by Craig Stokle. </p>

Elena Felder ’04 works with the Brooklyn College Magner Career Center to offer current student advice on how to break into the tech industry. Photo by Craig Stokle.

 

Elena Felder ’04 had a problem: She was good at math, but barely spoke English, and the City University of New York (CUNY) admissions test was looming.

So she resolved to write the essay portion of the exam in the simplest sentences possible to mask her lack of fluency. She also memorized SAT words starting with letters A to J (all she had time for on her work lunch breaks). Little did she know that this first step would set her on a path that would eventually score her a position at one of the largest and most well-known companies in the world: Google.

After completing engineering work for two tech start-up companies (one of which was founded by Brooklyn College Professors Gerald Weiss ’78 and David M. Arnow) and the Federal Reserve (which offered her a position two weeks before she graduated from the college), she was recruited by Google. Her interview required her to demonstrate her knowledge by solving coding problems on a whiteboard. She performed well and was hired by the company as a software engineer.

“The level of openness and transparency, and lack of bureaucracy at Google is astounding,” Felder says, which is emblematic of the company’s mission statement “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful” as well as its unofficial slogan: “Don’t be evil.”

Felder emigrated from Novosibirsk, Russia, and came to Brooklyn with her mother, grandmother, and “six suitcases” when she was 17 years old. “I get the maximum ‘wow effect’ when I tell people that I’m from Siberia,” she says. “However, I lived in what was a fairly reasonable climate. I am from southwestern Siberia, where winters are everything you imagine—40 below zero (before global warming took effect). But the summers are a much more even, predictable, less humid version of New York summers.”

She did not speak any English, but learned some after securing a seasonal, then permanent, position in retail. Because of the fast-paced environment there and consistent exposure, she picked up the basics fairly quickly. Eventually, she took the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), passed, and enrolled at Brooklyn College, where a cousin of hers was an alumnus. She knew immediately that she wanted to study computer science.

 

<p>A photo of Felder on the Brooklyn College campus in 2003 recreated in 2018. Original photo provided by Felder. Recent photo and diptych by Craig Stokle.</p>

A photo of Felder on the Brooklyn College campus in 2003 recreated in 2018. Original photo provided by Felder. Recent photo and diptych by Craig Stokle.

An uncanny knack for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) runs in Felder’s family; her parents are computer programmers and her grandparents are engineers. She says her mother, in particular, “is spectacular at math.” Her family tried to steer her toward economics because in her homeland, becoming an economist was the more prestigious choice of occupation. While she recognized it as an “elegant field of study,” she insisted upon computer and information science as her major and she excelled.

She also worked part-time at the college as an assistant to the Associate Director of Institutional Research and Data Analysis Annie Lee, who Felder says is “nurturing generations of students to go out and change the world.” Felder earned a bachelor of science and graduated summa cum laude.

Her success is remarkable, but she says she had tremendous support from family and faculty along the way.

“It mattered a ton to me that Professor Paula Whitlock was an accomplished woman who was studying things beyond my comprehension. I just looked at the Monte Carlo methods research [a kind of computer algorithm that uses numerical randomness to solve particular problems] on her website and I thought, ‘That sounds amazingly impressive!’ So I took every class she taught and I only realized years later how much she influenced me. Yes, the classes were full of men, but look who was teaching.”

Felder returned to campus recently to participate in the Magner Career Center‘s information panel, where she offered current students a rare peek into her life and work.

“Alumni coming back to share their advice gives students valuable insight that they likely can’t get on their own,” says Magner Career Center Director Natalia Guarin-Klein. “It also boosts their confidence when they see someone from their college achieve success. I always say that the center’s work is impossible without alumni. In the past six months, over 100 were engaged in our events and over 90 people, mostly alumni, donated to our cause. Alumni help us make students career aspirations a reality.”

For Felder, coming back is a function of giving back.

“I’ve worked alongside people who have hundreds of thousands of dollars in student loans. We have been doing the same work at the same organizations. The only difference is that I did not end up with debt like they did,” she says. “There are great students and faculty at Brooklyn College. The education I received is as good, if not better than the education people received elsewhere. I learned so much. I was exposed to so much. How could I not pass those privileges on?”

 

CONTACT: Jason Carey, 347.486.1017


ACI bestows national award on CCNY engineer Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh

Award-winning CCNY civil engineer Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh

A focus of civil engineer Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh’s research at The City College of New York is the development of sustainable concrete — key to modern construction. His research on concrete sustainability and his expertise in sharing his knowledge with middle school and college students in Harlem has earned him the American Concrete Institute’sWalter P. Moore, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award.

Assistant professor in CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering, Yazdanbakhsh, will receive the honor on March 24 at ACI’s spring 2019 convention in Quebec City, Canada.

The award recognizes junior faculty members for excellence and innovation in the teaching of concrete design, materials, or construction. It’s given out in memory of Walter P. Moore, Jr., ACI Fellow, former ACI Board member, and a structural engineer and educator in Texas.

The honor from the ACI Board of Direction is specifically for Yazdanbakhsh’s “innovative and broad-reaching ways of educating students from middle school through college about environmentally-conscious concrete design,” said Ronald G. Burg, ACI executive vice president.

In June 2017, Yazdanbakhsh led a workshop at the Grove School for students from nearby Hamilton Grange Middle School. The young engineers got hands-on, in-depth exposure to the many qualities of concrete. They also learned why it is among the world’s leading choice material for building construction.

“Part of concrete’s attractiveness is the availability of the raw materials and the low-cost of production,” said Yazdanbakhsh, adding “environmental considerations must be taken into account when using concrete as it is one of the largest emitters of COduring the production of its components.”

The program was in partnership with the New York City Department of Design and Construction, the NYC Department of Education and the After-School All- Stars Program.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
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Baruch College Ranks Among the Top Schools for “Best Colleges for Veterans” by College Factual

Baruch College places among the top 15 percent of all four-year colleges and universities in the U.S. for veteran friendliness.

Baruch College has been ranked among the nation’s and New York State’s top schools in College Factual’s 2019 “Best Colleges for Veterans” list, which surveyed 1,820 schools for veteran friendliness.

At-a-Glance, Baruch is ranked:

  • #208 nationally, placing the College among the top 15 percent of all four-year colleges and universities
  • #14 out of 134 colleges in New York State, representing the top 10 percent
  • #6 among all public schools in New York State

“Baruch College is proud to be recognized as one of the best schools for military veterans,” said Art King, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at Baruch College. “Our institution is dedicated to providing the men and women who served our country with a quality education and all the necessary resources they need for academic and career success.”

According to King, Baruch College is focused on accessibility for veterans and providing a supportive community to pursue their educational and career objectives. Currently, the College serves 156 veterans and military family members as of fall 2018. Baruch offers an active Student Veterans of America chapter, exclusive networking and career-readiness events for veterans and military family members, and dedicated staff who work to ensure the success of student veterans at Baruch.

Baruch also ranked highly in several categories for veterans, including:

  • #1 of 833 for business, management and marketing
  • #2 of 625 for accounting
  • #2 of 113 for business/managerial economics
  • #2 of 392 for finance and financial management
  • #3 of 57 for entrepreneurial studies
  • #4 of 46 public administration
  • #6 of 29 for real estate
  • #9 of 84 for information science

College Factual said, “Colleges and universities must demonstrate quality outcomes and support dedicated to veterans in order to achieve recognition” on this ranking. The quality factors included in that help veterans “identify colleges that are likely to be supportive of them and their unique needs” include veteran affordability, veteran resources available at an institution, veteran population, veteran policy, veteran satisfaction, and overall college quality.

More information about the rankings methodology is available here.

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Volunteering for MLK Day of Service on January 19

MLK Day of Service 2019

The MLK Day of Service is on January 19 from 10-5 p.m. at 1573 Madison Avenue.

This year, students from The City College of New York are volunteering on Saturday, January 19 for the annual MLK Day of Service in partnership with the Division of Student Life and Leadership Development and Student Leadership & Campus Life at Guttman Community College. Students dedicate the day to doing acts of service.

This year, students will help paint classrooms at the East Harlem Scholars Academy II, which is a part of the East Harlem Tutorial Program. The goal of the annual day of service is to make a difference within the Harlem community.

The event takes place from 10-5 p.m. on January 19 at 1573 Madison Avenue, and breakfast and lunch will be served. The deadline to RSVP is Wednesday, January 16.

If interested in volunteering, please RSVP here and choose the correct option listed. Additional information with details will be sent to all those who RSVP.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
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Zicklin School of Business Ranked Among the “Top 50 Best Value Undergraduate Business Schools”

#2 in New York State and #24 out of all business schools in the U.S., according to Value College

https://cdn.valuecolleges.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Top-50-Best-Value-Undergraduate-Business-Schools-300x213.png

Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business is among the “Top 50 Best Value Undergraduate Business Schools” for 2019, according to a ranking by Value College.

The Zicklin School of Business placed:

  • #24 in the U.S.
  • #2 among all New York State colleges

Value College said the ranking brings attention to the undergraduate business schools with the “academic quality, exceptional mentorship, and job market connections to turn students into industry leaders.”

Praise for NYC location to “exceptional ROI”

Value College called attention to several positive factors of Baruch that distinguished the College.

“As part of the City University of New York (CUNY), Baruch College is located in New York City, the center of finance and business in the U.S.,” Value College stated in its profile of the College. “Step out the door and students are in the heart of Manhattan, with access to internships, networking, and a job market that is essentially theirs to choose from.”

Value College added, “With an exceptional ROI, and entry into the world of commerce easily at hand, Zicklin is not just one of the top business schools in U.S. higher education, but one of the best value undergraduate business schools as well.”

Zicklin School of Business earns top rankings

This recent ranking from Value College adds to Zicklin’s existing list of national recognitions. During 2018 alone, Zicklin earned the following top spots:

Watch video: Take the new virtual tour of the Zicklin School of Business with finance student David Alvarez. Click here.

Methodology:

Value College used three data points to determine its ranking: publisher and student reviews, annual total costs (IPEDs data), and early career salaries (payscale.com data). According to Value College, “this formula hits the sweet spot between the most relevant, innovative education and the most reasonable investment for the highest return.”  More here.

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WHY ARE MORE YOUTHS THINKING ABOUT AND ATTEMPTING SUICIDE?

Why Are More Youths Thinking About and Attempting Suicide?

 

More than double the amount of children are hospitalized for suicidal thoughts and attempts to kill themselves than just ten years earlier, but explanations for the increase are lacking.

To meet this challenge, an interdisciplinary group of researchers from the United States is launching a consortium aimed at increasing diversity in suicide research among children, adolescents, and young adults. The Youth Suicide Research Consortium (YSRC) includes researchers from 22 institutions (colleges, universities, and medical centers), including John Jay College Professor of Psychology Dr. Elizabeth Jeglic.

“While traditionally, individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups were less likely to die by suicide, rising rates of death by suicide are also being observed in these groups,” said Professor Jeglic. “LGTBQIA youth are also particularly high risk to attempt or die by suicide.”

Researchers from the consortium are dedicated to the study of youth suicidal behavior among diverse populations, including racially, ethnically, and socioeconomically diverse, sexual minority, and gender-diverse youth, with an emphasis on understanding and decreasing disparities to reduce youth suicide.

“My research has been focused on understanding social and cultural factors that may account for increased rates of attempts to die by suicide among Latinx youth and emerging adults in order to better inform prevention and intervention programs,” added Jeglic.

YSRC says that more people think about and attempt suicide in their teens and early twenties than they do at any other time in development, across race and ethnicity.

However, while the suicide rate among White (non-Hispanic) Americans is highest in middle age, the suicide rate among racial and ethnic minorities is highest in the early twenties. Additionally, national surveys of high school students suggest racial disparities in suicidal thoughts and attempts. Sexual minority youth are particularly vulnerable to attempting and dying by suicide.

YSRC researchers believe that with the increasing diversity of the US population – particularly among youth – it is critical for theories and research on youth suicide and for suicide prevention to keep pace with shifting demographics by increasing representation of these groups in research. The YSRC seeks to accomplish this goal by fostering multilevel and cross-disciplinary conceptualizations of and research on youth suicide and self-harm in the United States and other parts of the world, and by encouraging suicide research that considers development and diversity.

The YSRC hopes to disseminate research findings among families, teachers, clinicians, youth, policy makers, media, and other consumers who are not researchers or academics but for whom suicidal behaviors are of concern; and to empower researchers from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines to advance in their careers by mentoring aspiring and junior researchers interested in the study of youth suicidal behavior.

The YSRC also hopes to serve as a model for similar efforts in other countries. For more information, or if interested in joining or partnering with the YSRC, please visit www.youthsuicideresearch.orgwww.blog.youthsuicideresearch.org, or contact info@youthsuicideresearch.org. You can also follow the YSRC on Twitter @youthsuicideres.


Noted physicist Tony Liss is City College of New York Provost

CCNY Provost Tony Liss

Dr. Tony Liss, an internationally known physicist with research experience at the world’s highest energy accelerators, is The City College of New York’s new provost, CCNY President Vincent Boudreau announced. Liss had served as interim provost and senior vice president for academic affairs since March 2018.

In his permanent capacity, Liss continues to help lead the 172-year-old CCNY that is now classified in the “Doctoral Universities: High Research” category by The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education ®. The Carnegie Classification has been the leading framework for recognizing and describing institutional diversity in U.S. higher education for the past four and a half decades.

Liss joined CCNY in fall 2013 as the first Martin and Michele Cohen Dean of Science. During his tenure as Dean, he reinforced the Division of Science’s five departments with dynamic research-active faculty; oversaw the opening of a   new complex of science buildings on CCNY’s South Campus, and tirelessly championed faculty, student and staff success.

Before coming to CCNY, Liss was a professor of physics at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, whose faculty he joined in 1988.

Globally, Liss is renowned for his research in high-energy physics at the world’s highest energy accelerators, including the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). He led groundbreaking research that resulted in the discovery of a new fundamental particle, the top quark, and he is a member of the ATLAS Collaboration that co-discovered the Higgs Boson in 2012.

A fellow of the American Physical Society, Liss earned his PhD in physics from the University of California – Berkeley in 1984 and holds a BA in physics from The Johns Hopkins University.

He is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and serves on the boards of the New York Structural Biology Center and Science and Arts Engagement New York.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
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Social Studies for Secondary Education Major Meets Growing Demand

Starting Fall 2019, students at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) will have the option of earning an Associate in Arts degree in Social Studies for Secondary Education through the Teacher Education department.

The Social Studies for Secondary Education program meets a need within BMCC and New York City itself.

“Urban schools often have difficulty recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers, especially those whose racial and ethnic backgrounds reflect that of the students served,” says Cara Kronen, a professor and coordinator of the secondary education program in the BMCC teacher education department.

She cites an April 2015 New York Times article showing that 85 percent of students in New York City schools are children of color, yet more than 60 percent of teachers is white.

“Teachers of color are essential in urban classrooms because they can provide real-life examples to students of future career paths they might consider, and the benefits of academic achievement,” she says.

In addition, Kronen says, 65 percent of 434 BMCC students surveyed in 2015 by the teacher education department said they would consider a program in Secondary Education for Social Studies, or would have considered the major if it had been available when they enrolled at BMCC.

Careers that meet a growing demand

The Social Studies for Secondary Education associate degree program at BMCC will articulate with the Bachelor’s of Arts degree program, Adolescent Social Studies, at Hunter College, CUNY.

“Students who earn their bachelor’s degree will be eligible to apply for Social Studies teaching certification in grades seven through 12,” says Kronen. “They will have a variety of employment options. They can teach, with a starting salary of more than $56,000. They can also pursue careers in school administration, textbook publishing, professional development and educator training, working with non-profit organizations and others.”

More than 1.1 million students attend 1,800 schools in New York City, she points out, “and as the population of New York City continues to grow,there will be an increasing demand for highly qualified teachers.”

The integral role of social studies in secondary education

Graduates who earn their associate degree in Social Studies for Secondary Education, followed by a bachelor’s degree at Hunter College, can go on to earn additional degrees that would position them to work in colleges and universities.

“I started my career as a high school social studies teacher,” Kronen says. “Social studies education is crucial now more than ever. We need our young people to learn about civic engagement, to become critical thinkers and fierce defenders of our democracy.  Social studies teachers help students understand the importance of their role in making a community more equitable for everyone. I’m excited to see BMCC students working toward careers as secondary education teachers who will follow their passion and make a difference in our city.”


BMCC Film Festival Showcases Student Talent

Excitement is building for the Fall 2018 Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Student Film Festival December 13, beginning at 3 p.m. in Theater One at 199 Chambers Street.

The competitive semi-annual event, produced by the BMCC Video Production Club, showcases student films from both BMCC and other CUNY colleges. Only films where BMCC students serve as producer, director, screenwriter or main talent—acting, music or dance—are eligible for the competition. Films featured at the festival are shorts, ranging in length from 15 seconds to 20 minutes.

The festival was founded in 2013 by students in the Video Production Club who wanted to have a more official and prominent event to showcase their work.

BMCC Media Arts and Technology Professor Anastassios Rigopoulos said he expects more than 30 films from BMCC students will be submitted by the December 6 deadline for the competition.

“We are excited to have our student’s films presented in a venue as prestigious and beautiful as TPAC’s Theater One. Watching their work with an audience and sensing the crowd’s reaction should be a profound learning experience and hopefully, encouragement for our participating students,” said Rigopoulos.

Three guest judges—independent filmmaker William Tyler Smith (Kiss Me Again, The Third Mind), actor Claire Hsu (You Were Never Really Here, The Hard Problem) and independent filmmaker Mehmet Guney (Love 1.0 Even Without You, Enduring- A Mother’s Story) will decide who wins the competition.

Guney, founder of the production company Synergy Motion, is also a BMCC graduate.

Films will be judged in ten different categories including best: narrative, documentary, director, cinematography, sound, editing, screenplay, PSA/experimental music video, animation and best acting performance.

Also, one member of the Video Production Club will be awarded the The Michael Vincent Rosen-Pipitone Award—named after Pipitone, a BMCC student who died unexpectedly in 2013. Pitpitone’s parents have attended each BMCC film festival since the event’s inception in 2014.

Many of the BMCC students who screen their work at the festival hope to eventually find jobs in New York City’s thriving film, media or animation sector. The film industry employs more than 170,000 in New York City, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The Media Arts and Technology department at BMCC helps students get a foothold in the industry by providing them with necessary tools not only to further their college education, but also to land work in a media-related field.


Panther Partners Program Helps First Generation Students Navigate Academic Life

When first-generation college student Garey Santano first arrived on the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) campus in Fall 2018, he was overwhelmed by the vast of amount information and how college was about to change his life.

“I didn’t know where to start,” said Santano, a Science for Health Professions major.

Because of this, Santano applied to Panther Partners, a program designed specifically for students at BMCC who are the first in their families to attend college. Developed by the BMCC Office of New Student Programs and the Office of Student Affairs, the program provides students with a mentor—“panther coach”— who offers personal support and encouragement, throughout their time at BMCC. Piloted in 2017, Panther Partners currently has 66 BMCC faculty and staff coaches serving 165 students.

Student participants are selected through an application process, then paired with BMCC faculty and staff whom are also first-generation college students. Panther Partners also has a number of mandatory workshops that cover a myriad of topics including: Academic Achievement through Academic Advisement, Knowing your Finances and Goal Setting and Asking for Help.

Santano says the program has helped him better understand how to seek out and take advantage of all the services available to students and how to interact with his professors.  He says his coach has also helped him learn how to better manage his schedule, and even the stress.

As many as 36 percent of community college students are the first in their families to go to college according to a 2018 survey of 11,000 campuses by the American Association of Community Colleges. And, there is a growing body of research suggesting that a combination of simple nudges and check-ins with a mentor helps first-generation students feel more confident about navigating the intimidating maze of college life.

For example, a 2011 study from Stanford University found that students who took part in mentoring and coaching services were 10 to 15 percent more likely to advance to another year of college.

“The most helpful aspect of the Panther Partners program is the mentorship students receive during their first semester from coaches —faculty and professional staff—who were the first in their family to attend college,” said Rahana Belle-Jerome, New and First Year Student Programs Coordinator, BMCC.

Santano’s mentor, Dr. Precious Sellers-Mulhern, a counselor at the BMCC Counseling Center, says students who are the first in their families to go to college, often feel self-conscious or insecure around other students who they perceive to know more or have a better sense of belonging because of their backgrounds.

“Spending time with my Panther Partners mentee gives him an opportunity to discuss certain ideas or concerns that he may not be able to discuss with his family members. Sharing my college experiences with him lets him know that he is not the first to have issues or concerns about belonging or having the ability to succeed, and more importantly, he is not alone in this journey,” said Sellers-Mulhern.

She said the program helps build bridges between new students and BMCC college life. It provides students with a connection that helps them feel more welcome in the college environment.

“As mentors share their experiences with students, it gives students different points of reference and offers many possibilities for exploration and success,” said Sellers-Mulhern.


Protected: Honoring Seymour “Sy” Boyers

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Call-In Press Briefing – Hungry in College: Food Insecurity Among CUNY Students in New York City

When:    Thursday, January 10, 9:00 – 10:00 am

Where:  CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy (CUNY SPH)

 Call in Number:   +1 646 876 9923 US (New York) Meeting ID: 536 194 142

 Zoom meeting link:  https://zoom.us/j/536194142

On Wednesday, January 9, leading researchers, policy advocates and others will offer an in-depth discussion of a new Government Accountability Office (GAO) report on food insecurity among college students in the United States to be released that day.

To provide additional information on food insecurity among students in New York City, the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute will hold a follow-up telephone press briefing on Thursday, January 10 from 9:00 am to 10:00 am to present data on food insecurity at the City University of New York, where 274,000 students are currently enrolled in degree programs.

At the press briefing, CUNY researchers will release findings on food insecurity among CUNY students from their 2018 survey. The briefing will put a New York City face on the GAO report, which adds to the growing evidence that many college students are experiencing food insecurity, and for some, this experience undermines academic progress. Researchers will present findings from a recent survey of food insecurity among a sample of CUNY students and summarize changes in levels of food insecurity among CUNY students since 2010. Presenters will also describe findings on the impact of food insecurity on academic success at CUNY. Researchers will discuss the findings and recommendations of the GAO report and assess their relevance for New York City and CUNY.

Since 2010, researchers at City University of New York have conducted three surveys of representative samples of CUNY students to assess levels of food insecurity. These surveys are part of the Healthy CUNY initiative, which seeks to identify and reduce health and social problems that interfere with academic success of CUNY students.

In 2010, 23 percent of CUNY’s students reported that they had often or sometimes been hungry in the past 12 months due to lack of resources to buy food and 39 percent reported two or more of four indicators of food insecurity identified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. By 2015, the percentage of students who reported hunger in the last 12 months fell to 15 percent and those reporting two or more indicators of food insecurity fell to 25 percent. At the briefing, researchers will discuss the role of that universities can play in reducing food insecurity among college students. 

Participants are Nicholas Freudenberg, Distinguished Professor of Public Health at CUNY SPH and Faculty Director of Healthy CUNY and the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute; Jan Poppendieck, Senior Faculty Fellow at the Urban Food Policy Institute, Professor Emerita of Sociology at Hunter College and author of several award-winning books on food insecurity and poverty; and a student food security advocate from a CUNY campus.

This briefing is sponsored by the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute, and Healthy CUNY.

RSVP HERE

Contact:

Craig Willingham

Deputy Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

646-364-9614

craig.willingham@sph.cuny.edu 

                           CUNY Urban Food Policy Logo      healthy-cuny-two-lines two line logo. The logo reads: Healthy CUNY promoting health for academic success  CUNY SPH logo avatar

 

 


THEDREAM.US Announces New Round Of Scholarships For Dreamers 

TheDream.US, the nation’s largest college access and success program for immigrant youth, recently opened its new round of scholarship applications for the 2019-2020 academic year.

The program’s scholarships, worth up to $14,500 for an associate’s degree and $29,000 for a bachelor’s degree, are available to DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and TPS (Temporary Protected Status) students who meet eligibility criteria. The application deadline is Feb. 28. To date, the organization has committed more than $140 million in scholarship money.

Currently, there are 714 CUNY students attending the University on full-tuition scholarships from TheDream.US. CUNY’s scholars arrived in the United States at an average age of 5 years old. Hailing from over 70 countries, they earn an average cumulative GPA of 3.2. Sixty-eight percent are working while in school. Eighty-seven percent are enrolled full time.

“TheDream.US scholarship has enabled hundreds of CUNY’s DREAMers to pursue their goals and achieve academic success,” said Interim Chancellor Vita Rabinowitz. “We could not be prouder of our DREAMers. The CUNY community values their contributions to our campuses and to our city, state and nation. The University will continue to nurture the ambitions of its immigrant students as it has done with great pride for more than 170 years.”

“We remain fully committed to helping DREAMers access a college education,” said Donald E. Graham, former publisher of The Washington Post and co-founder of TheDream.US. “But, let’s be clear, the most powerful commitment continues to be from DREAMers themselves. As described ‘In Their Own Words,’ and as demonstrated by the record number of scholarship applications TheDream.US received last year, DREAMers hold steadfast to the belief that no one can take a college education away from them.”

The new scholarship opportunity announcement was preceded by the TheDream.US’s release of “In Their Own Words,” a report summarizing the responses and implications from a national survey of 1,400 TheDream.US Scholars. The survey results underscore how important educational gains are to Scholars’ dreams and futures, while painting a portrait of the uncertainty and anxiety that Scholars face in a difficult immigration climate.

Learn more about the new round of TheDream.US Scholarships at: https://www.thedream.us/scholarships/

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Letter to Students & Families: Week of January 7, 2019

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

We are hoping you had a wonderful return to school last week.

This week, on Friday January 11th, public schools throughout NYC will be celebrating College Awareness Day. Please see the attached flier.

If you have school-spirit wear connected to a favorite College or University, please show your school pride by wearing it on Friday January 11th.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


 

  • College Awareness Day: Friday, January 11th – wear your favorite college spirit-wear.
  • Photo re-take day for K-11th grade students: Friday, January 11th in the Auditorium. Details will be emailed by the PTA this week.
  • Martin Luther King Day: School is closed on Monday, January 21st.
  • Regents Exam Week: January 22-25, Upper Grades students only report to school if they are scheduled to take a Regents exam.
  • Chancellor’s Conference Day: Monday, January 28th: No school for Upper Grades students.

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
  • During January Regents exam week January 22-25, 2019, Upper Grades students will not report to school unless they are scheduled to take a January Regents exam. Students should see their Guidance Counselor for questions about January Regents exams.
  • In addition, please note: Upper Grades students do not attend school on Monday, January 28. It is a Chancellor’s Conference Day.
  • The June Regents exam testing schedule (June 18-25, 2019)  is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

Exploring the social epidemiology of the microbiome

Human microbiota samples under a microscopeThe microbiome is emerging as a factor for many diseases for which there are known health disparities, pointing to the opportunity for investigation of this new area of biology in social and population health research. While recent research establishes the importance of the microbiome for human health, data on how the social environment shapes the microbiome is limited.

Jennifer Dowd, Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at CUNY SPH, and recent MPH graduate Audrey Renson published a paper describing potential mechanisms of the social epidemiology of the microbiome. The review appeared in the journal Current Epidemiology Reports.

In the paper, the researchers laid out the many factors that shape the microbiome in humans, such as social relationships, socioeconomic status, and health behaviors.

“While research in this area is still very new, we found evidence of the importance of early life exposures, psychosocial stress, and the built environment in influencing the microbiome,” says Dowd. “We argue that broader consideration of how the social environment shapes the microbiome over the life course is needed to understand variation in the microbiome and ultimately how to intervene on it.”

Dowd JB, Renson A. “Under the Skin” and into the Gut: Social Epidemiology of the Microbiome. Curr Epidemiol Rep. 2018;5(4):432-441.


THE INSTITUTE FOR INNOVATION IN PROSECUTION AWARDS CERTIFICATES TO INSIDE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PARTICIPANTS

The Institute for Innovation in Prosecution Awards Certificates to Inside Criminal Justice Participants

 

When it comes to criminal justice reform, one of the smartest and most effective partnerships is that of prosecutors and formerly incarcerated individuals. That’s why The Institute for Innovation in Prosecution at John Jay (IIP), the Manhattan DA’s Office, The Department of Corrections, and The Columbia Center for Justice created “Inside Criminal Justice”—a course that includes Manhattan Assistant District Attorneys and residents of Queensboro Correctional Facility. The participants all work collaboratively, participating in discussions on incarceration, analysis of the criminal justice system, research on the history of race and punishment in America, and ultimately the participants create group projects defining specific areas of policy that could be improved. Once they finish the course, the students receive a completion certificate and the opportunity to receive college credits from The Columbia University Center for Justice. On December 20, 2018, the most recent “Inside Criminal Justice” participants gathered to present their projects and receive a well-deserved certificate of completion.

 

Mason inspiring the audience

Mason inspiring the audience

“We can learn so much from the people impacted by the system that we’re hoping to improve.” —Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice

 

Learning From Those Impacted
President Karol V. Mason opened the event by stating how important it is for community leaders, prosecutors, and policy makers to hear directly from people affected by the criminal justice system. “One of the things that I learned from my prior job—and I learn every day here at this job—is that we can learn so much from the people impacted by the system that we’re hoping to improve,” said Mason. “When we hear their voices, and listen to what they believe we need to be doing, it has to be taken to heart. Hopefully, we’ll be able to implement their ideas.” Mason went on to applaud the members of IIP for their dedication to helping prosecutors and the communities they serve prioritize public safety and equity, noting that the IIP served more than 100 jurisdictions across the country. “Everyone knows that I’m an eternal optimist, I see hope and opportunity in everything,” said Mason. “I especially see hope in the work the IIP is doing, and what the “Inside Criminal Justice” participants are going to be telling us about tonight.”

 

Lucy Lang speaking to the “Inside Criminal Justice” students

Lang speaking to the “Inside Criminal Justice” students

 

“On the first day of class we explored the quote often attributed to Dostoyevsky, that the degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons. If that’s true, the classes that you all created together is truly a model for an ideal society.” —Lucy Lang, Executive Director, IIP

 

Creating A Better Society
The power of the program was evident not only in the presentations made by the current participants, but also by the attendance of last year’s participants. “I’m really gratified to look out and see so many students from last year’s class here to support this new group of students,” said Lucy Lang, Executive Director, IIP. She went on to address this year’s students, thanking them for sharing their personal stories and listening to each other’s ideas. “On the first day of class we explored the quote often attributed to Dostoyevsky, that the degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons. If that’s true, the classes that you all created together is truly a model for an ideal society.”

Vance explaining the power of education in the criminal justice system

Vance explaining the power of education in the criminal justice system

 

“The most important, single thing we can do to reduce recidivism is to give someone the opportunity to get a college education in prison.” — Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., Manhattan District Attorney

 

Reflecting On The Responsibility 
Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., Manhattan District Attorney, underscored the importance of reentry to prosecutors, and highlighted the value of education in prison programs. He started by asking a very direct question: Why should a District Attorney’s Office be focused on or care about reentry? “One of the reasons why we care about reentry is that it’s one of the first principals of our penal code. When you go to the United States penal code, and you look at section 1.05, it will tell you that succeeding in transitioning folks from prisons back into the communities is a principle goal of our system,” said Vance. He emphasized that because prosecutors ask judges to send someone to prison, they have a heightened responsibility to ensure that those individuals successfully transition back home. “If we don’t provide that help, unfortunately the data is very clear. People will be reoffending and be back in prison at very high percentages.” Vance went on to state that his office is investing half a million dollars in providing college and prison programing throughout New York State. “The most important, single thing we can do to reduce recidivism is to give someone the opportunity to get a college education in prison. It’s really that simple.”

Hearing Their Voices
The participants in the “Inside Criminal Justice” program went on to present policy presentations on: A Reentry Navigators Pilot Program; Creating a Prison to School/Work Pipeline; Earned Time; and Increasing Engagement to Build Trust in the Criminal Justice System. We spoke with some of the participants to learn more about their personal experience with the “Inside Criminal Justice” seminar, and to find out more about their hopes for criminal justice reform.

Emmanuel Alvarez

Emmanuel Alvarez

Emmanuel Alvarez
I was always passionate about criminal justice, that’s why I went to school for it, but during that time I actually got incarcerated. Once I found out about this program, and how the District Attorney’s Office was involved, I figured I had to participate. In the class I brought the practical side of the problems we discussed. I was incarcerated, so I know the behind-the-scenes aspects. I know about the educational services offered. Truthfully, I’d like to see more rehabilitation come out of this program. I don’t think corrections focuses on the rehabilitation part of incarceration nearly enough—which is a shame because most of these people are coming back into society. We have to prepare them to be productive.

left to right, Vincent Stevenson and Jemar Williams

(left to right) Vincent Stevenson and Jemar Williams

Vincent Stevenson
I’m the Reentry Program Supervisor for the District Attorney’s office of Manhattan. The program gives a space for two groups to come together that normally do not come together, in a safe environment.

Jemar Williams
I liked what the program was aiming for, it was all about reform. I’ve learned a lot about the community in general, how everything plays an effect on a person’s life and lifestyle. I’ve learned a lot by enrolling in the class. It was very informative. I hope to see change, transition, and everybody coming together. There are stigmas with everything—like with the prosecutors and African-Americans—and I would like for everybody to see that everybody is equal. People are people.

More scenes from the event:

(left to right) Jay Holder, Columbia Center for Justice, with Anthony J. Annucci, Acting Commissioner, New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision

(left to right) Jay Holder, Columbia Center for Justice, with Anthony J. Annucci, Acting Commissioner, New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision

(left to right) Lucy Lang, Executive Director of The IIP, with Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., Manhattan District Attorney

(left to right) Lucy Lang, Executive Director of The IIP, with Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., Manhattan District Attorney

(left to right) Maggie Wolk, Director of Planning and Management at New York County District Attorney’s Office, and Ann Jacobs, Director Prisoner Reentry Institute

(left to right) Maggie Wolk, Director of Planning and Management at New York County District Attorney’s Office, and Ann Jacobs, Director Prisoner Reentry Institute

(left to right) Michelle Yon, Queensboro Deputy Superintendent; Kathleen Gerbing, Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Superintendent; and Delta Barometre, Lincoln Superintendent

(left to right) Michelle Yon, Queensboro Deputy Superintendent; Kathleen Gerbing, Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Superintendent; and Delta Barometre, Lincoln Superintendent

Inside Criminal Justice participants learning from each other

“Inside Criminal Justice” participants learning from each other

Xavier Martinez, and his team, presenting their group project on “The Reentry Navigators Pilot Program”

Xavier Martinez, and his team, presenting their group project on “The Reentry Navigators Pilot Program”


JOHN JAY SCHOLARS WEIGH IN ON VACCINES AND THE FLU

John Jay Scholars Weigh In On Vaccines and the Flu

 

It’s winter, which we sometimes call “flu season.” In fact, “you can catch influenza at any time during the year if exposed to the virus, and its severity is the same regardless of when you get sick,” says Edgardo Sanabria-Valentín. We don’t fully know the answer to why influenza is more common during the colder months. According to Nathan Lents, “The virus is viable for a longer time in cold air, and spreads more readily in dry air. Another reason that may contribute is that winter air dries our mucus membranes, which makes them less effective at preventing viral entry. We also tend to spend more time indoors with closed windows and recirculated air.”

A somber anniversary

Mike Wallace headshot

Mike Wallace

The 2018 flu season was also the 100th anniversary of the infamous global influenza pandemic, a year when more than 500 million people around the world are estimated to have died from flu. Of that number, 675,000 fatalities came from the United States, with roughly 20,000 from New York City alone. According to Mike Wallace, in his 2018 book Greater Gotham, more Gothamites died of disease in the city than died during World War I; the ongoing war effort actually impaired New York’s efforts to fight the flu, by concentrating soldiers in training camps where disease could spread and by taking much-needed medical personnel away from home to establish medical camps near the battlefields in Europe.

Despite the high numbers of fatalities at home, New York of 1918 had a lower death rate than other major cities (4.7 deaths per 1,000 residents, as compared to Boston’s rate of 6.5 and Philadelphia’s of 7.3). This was attributed by Health Commissioner Royal Copeland to New York’s long history of public health work, and particularly the alleviation of unhealthy conditions around the city at the turn of the 20th century.

Vaccines and you

Nathan Lents headshot

Nathan Lents

Today, scientific and public health efforts have brought some protection from a repeat of 1918 in the form of vaccines. In the case of the flu, explains Lents, “Each year’s vaccine is targeted toward the three to four strains that appear to be spreading the most rapidly. The injected vaccine contains killed viruses [from those strains], while the nasal spray contains live but weakened viruses. In both cases, the large dose of viral particles elicits a strong immune reaction from our bodies, including the production of antibodies that can stick around for years or even decades. The second time we are exposed to the same virus, it only takes a day or two to mount the same level of immune response. This ‘priming’ gives the immune system enough of a head start that it usually prevents the infection from ever taking hold.”

Because the influenza virus is so good at mutating from year to year, “no vaccine is 100 percent perfect, and getting the flu shot will never protect you against 100 percent of all flu strains,” says Sanabria-Valentín. But the vaccine will “significantly decrease the risk of getting sick, and will decrease the severity and length of infection, and decrease the chance that you get other people sick” if you do contract the virus.

Vaccinating also helps to protect those around you in other ways, namely by contributing to “herd immunity.” “Some people cannot be vaccinated because they are too young, too old, immune-compromised, or battling other kinds of infections,” says Lents. When the percentage of people in a population are effectively immunized, it helps to prevent the spread of disease to those who were unable to receive the vaccine. But when the percentage of vaccinated people falls because individuals who otherwise could be immunized choose not to be, it puts vulnerable populations at risk.

Conquering vaccine hesitancy

Edgardo Sanabria-Valentín headshot

Edgardo Sanabria-Valentín

“Controversies about vaccinations have been out there since we adopted this preventative measure almost 100 years ago,” says Sanabria-Valentín. “There are a lot of myths about vaccinations which are peddled by conspiracy theorists trying to sell you something or by people who might have good intentions but got swindled by ill-intentioned people trying to make a fast buck. One of the most popular ones is that vaccines can cause autism in children. This claim was first made in a study that was demonstrated (by many groups) to be fraudulent; no direct relationship between receiving vaccinations and autism has been found. There is overwhelming consensus among scientists and physicians that vaccines are safe and effective even though, like most medical treatments, in very rare cases they can cause side effects and in even rarer instances can cause serious unintended health problems. There is overwhelming evidence that vaccination has helped not just individuals, but humankind.” Although diseases like smallpox, polio and the measles were all but eliminated by vaccine technology, skepticism about immunization–which many attribute to the rise of social media–has caused some long-gone diseases to stage a comeback.

Lents stated that, “in 2017, 80,000 people died of influenza, the highest number in 40 years. If more healthy people had been vaccinated, that number could have been much less. Each person that decides not to vaccinate adds a little bit of risk to the entire population.” This dynamic played out in October 2018, when measles—which was declared eliminated in the US in 2000—broke out in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The New York City Department of Health confirmed 42 cases in Williamsburg and Bensonhurst as of mid-December, and is currently barring un-immunized students from attending local schools. And according to The Guardian, Europe is also experiencing a surge in vaccine hesitancy and a corresponding growth in the numbers of new measles cases; Europe will see more than 60,000 new cases this year and 72 deaths, the highest number this century.

Evelyn Aranda headshot

Evelyn Aranda

It is generally agreed that fears about vaccine side-effects are overblown, and contradicted by scientific consensus. “Vaccines are constantly monitored and modified as circumstances dictate. The FDA does not approve a vaccine unless initial trials indicate the benefits clearly outweigh the risks. In response to vaccine safety concerns today, healthcare providers have to give vaccine information sheets to recipients clearly describing the risks and benefits of the vaccine. And finally, vaccines are subject to particularly high safety standards because, unlike other health treatments, they are given as preventive measures to protect healthy people,” explains Evelyn Aranda Jaque. “Although vaccination is not 100 percent effective, studies on flu vaccination programs have shown that people who get vaccinated are less likely to be seriously ill or die in comparison with those who do not vaccinate. We must consider that the widespread use of vaccines for life-threatening diseases in the United States has led to a dramatic decrease in their incidence.”


Alfano book breaks down non-invasive optical spectroscopic methods

When it comes to the application of light and photonics technologies to the study of biological, biomedical and condensed matter systems, few have charted the path better than Robert R. Alfano, Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering at The City College of New York. The pioneering researcher and inventor is co-editor of the text “Neurophotonics and Biomedical Spectroscopy,” published by Elsevier of Oxford, England.

Alfano’s 610-page tome, in collaboration with Lingyan Shi, a City College PhD graduate and former research associate in his lab, is one of the latest publications by CCNY faculty.

The book addresses the novel state-of-the-art work in non-invasive optical spectroscopic methods that detect the onset and progression of diseases and other conditions. These include pre-malignancy cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, tissue and cell response to therapeutic intervention, unintended injury and laser energy deposition.

It also highlights research in neurophotonics that investigate single and multi-photon excitation optical signatures of normal/diseased nerve tissues and in the brain. This provides a better understanding of the underlying biochemical and structural changes of tissues and cells that are responsible for the observed spectroscopic signatures.

Alfano’s decades-long contribution to the field of ultrafast laser science and photonics is legendary with more than 120 patents and 700 publications.

Other new titles from CCNY faculty include:

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD) at Hostos receives $150,000 Grant from Capital One Foundation

On November 30, Hostos Community College’s Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD) received its third consecutive $150,000 grant award from the Capital One Foundation for its multi-year grant initiative – the Community College Workforce Development (CCWD) Cohort. Capital One’s CCWD Cohort is a consortium of community colleges from Virginia, Maryland, Louisiana, Texas, and New York that are working together to improve student outcomes through career pathways, labor market research, and community partnerships.

Hostos will use the grant to more effectively align CEWD’s non-credit occupational training programs with credit-bearing academic degree programs. The long-term goals of this project are to better prepare students to enter the college and to improve students’ credit accumulation and employment rates.

The grant will be used to develop new credit articulation agreements which give credit to students that enroll in Hostos after successfully completing a CEWD occupational training program in high-demand fields such as Allied Health and Information Technology. CEWD will work with the Office of Academic Affairs and faculty in the Allied Health and Mathematics Departments to develop new credit articulation agreements.

“We are excited to obtain our third grant award from the Capital One Foundation,” said Evelyn Fernández-Ketcham, Executive Director for Workforce Development. “Our goal is to help students identify and meet their career and academic goals. This grant allows us to partner with faculty to help students earn credit and create a clear pathway from in-demand occupational trainings to degree programs that will result in employment.”

Hostos will also strengthen its existing non-credit to credit pathways and help current Hostos degree students obtain valuable occupational training. As part of the grant, CEWD will implement a data-tracking system to better identify students’ long-term trajectories.

About Capital One Foundation

Capital One Foundation’s philanthropy program provides grants to national and local organizations that support education, financial literacy, and community development initiatives. In addition, they build partnerships with nonprofit organizations with missions that complement these focus areas. By combining philanthropic dollars with strong, enduring partnerships, they are able to maximize the number of residents reached and the overall impact within a community.

About Hostos Community College

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for a half-century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


CUNY Secures Mellon Foundation Funding to Augment Study of ‘leaky Pipeline’ Between Community College and B.A. Degrees

Guttman studentsCUNY researchers have secured a $550,000 award from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to analyze the factors that may promote or hinder community-college-to-senior-college transfer among students with interests in the humanities. The award marks the next step in CUNY’s ongoing push to diagnose and repair leaks in the pipeline between community college and bachelor’s degrees.

Investigators Alexandra Logue, Chet Jordan and Colin Chellman will focus on students at Guttman Community College during the first year of the three-year grant period; they will widen their lens in the second and third years to examine all seven of CUNY’s community colleges, said principal investigator Logue, a research professor at the Center for Advanced Study in Education at CUNY’s Graduate Center.

“It is imperative that we better understand the factors that impede the progress of associate degree students as they work on the road to earning a bachelor’s degree in order to help them meet their educational and career goals,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Professor Logue and her colleagues have been immersed in these challenging matters, and this new grant from the Mellon Foundation will enable them to delve deeper, synthesizing insights that can be useful to educators at universities across the country.”

It has been understood for decades that the pathway from an associate’s degree program to one in which students work toward a bachelor’s degree is fraught with obstacles. More than 30 percent of U.S. students begin their post-secondary studies at a community college. And while more than eight in 10 of those students say their goal is to earn a bachelor’s degree, only 17 percent will have attained one after six years. At CUNY, that number stands at 11 percent.

The Mellon Foundation award will complement a four-year, $1.4 million grant for transfer research from the Institute of Education Sciences of the federal Department of Education, which Logue and Chellman secured in August in partnership with MDRC, a highly regarded social research organization. That study, titled “A Leaky Pipeline: Community College Students and Pathways to the Bachelor’s Degree,” seeks to pinpoint specific stages in the transfer pipeline at which students hit snags, along with an analysis of the supports that could enable them to avert the drop-off and make a successful transition.

“Together, the two grants will allow us to collect significant amounts of new information that will benefit countless transfer students and aspiring transfer students,” said Logue.

“We already know that many of the reasons for the leaks in this pipeline are due to environmental obstacles that community college students working toward a bachelor’s degree must face,” Logue added. “For reasons of opportunity and equity, we must find out how and why the significant leaks in this pipeline are occurring, so that we can then begin to design effective interventions.”

Where researchers have examined the relationships between students’ majors and ability to successfully transfer, the focus has generally been on students in the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, math). Although community college students most frequently study general liberal arts and sciences, this study will be the first to focus on transfer by those who are majoring in the humanities.

“We don’t know when they’re being lost … and until you know who’s dropping out of the program, and when they’re being lost, you don’t know where to begin your intervention,” Logue said.

Some of the challenges that can affect community college students who are navigating the transition to a bachelor’s degree program are: inadequate advising; course unavailability; and the loss of some credits as a result of their transfer, or the reclassification of those credits to electives that don’t count toward their major.

“These all serve to make an education more complicated for those students,” said Logue. “They already come from complicated environments; the longer it takes for them to progress on the pathway to a bachelor’s degree, the greater the chance that something happens to interrupt that process.”

Logue is the author of Pathways to Reform: Credits and Conflict at The City University of New York, a book about the college transfer issue published in 2017. She has donated all of the net proceeds from book sales — $15,000 to date — to fund transfer scholarships for CUNY ASAP students who have earned an associate’s degree and want to now work toward a bachelor’s.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

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JOHN JAY STUDENTS LEARN FROM AWARD-WINNING CHILEAN FILMMAKERS

John Jay Students Learn from Award-Winning Chilean Filmmakers

 

The Historical Memory Project (HMP) at John Jay College hosted the producers and director of the Chilean production Una Historia Necesaria (The Suspended Mourning),  winners of the 2018 Best Short Series category of the International Emmys Awards that took place in New York City on November 19, 2018. Made up of 26 “chapters,” the short series documentary tells the story of human rights cases during the years of General Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973-1990). It includes stellar performances by renowned Chilean actors, such as Alfredo Castro, Alejandro Goic, and Catalina Saavedra. Una Historia Necesaria shows how essential it is not to forget these tragic events in history so that they are not repeated. The series was jointly produced by Tridi Films, Escuela de Cine de Chile, with financing from the country’s National Television Council. It  is available on the online platform of the Chilean TV station, @cntvdechile, and on YouTube.

During a class taught by Professor Suzanne Oboler (LLS), Director Hernán Caffiero, together with Ignacio Villalabeitía from Chilean National Television and Cristobal Tabilo from ProChile, discussed the importance of keeping the memory of the past alive today. Their conversation with the students focused on understanding the ongoing violence and dehumanizing ideologies both in Chile and throughout the Americas. The students were visibly moved and reacted with great empathy and curiosity, raising poignant questions about impunity, justice,  and reconciliation. They also learned from comparing the Chilean case to the struggles for justice in Peru, Guatemala and other countries in Latin America. The presentation and the discussion that followed were clearly impactful for everyone in the class.

As one of the students Rumi Das said, “I want to congratulate the team for their achievements. It is great to see that the shorts series was nominated and won the award. It seems that arresting and disappearing are very common in Chile. The movie expresses how people suffer by losing their relatives. Since it is based on real-life stories, people will become more curious like our fellow classmates did. I hope their work spreads all over the world.”

The Historical Memory Project at John Jay College is engaged in cultivating historical memory to memorialize victims of state-sponsored terror, raise awareness of historical injustices in Latin America and beyond, and foster collective human rights memory.


Third cohort of CCNY students qualify for Stanford global fellowship program

The third cohort of University Innovation Fellows

The third cohort of University Innovation Fellows: (from left) Skavi Ballinas, Ahsanul Abeer and Gabriela Gonjon.

The third cohort of City College of New York undergraduate students are named University Innovation Fellows by the Stanford d.school program. They are among 358 students from 96 higher education institutions in 16 countries that become agents of change by ensuring that their peers gain the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to compete in the economy of the future and make a positive impact on the world.

The program is run by Stanford University’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school), and with the addition of the new fellows, it has trained more than 1,800 students since its creation. Following acceptance into the program, the students went through six weeks of online training and travel to one of two in-person meetups in the spring to continue their projects and skill building.

The students, their majors, graduation year and home towns, are:

  • Ahsanul Abeer: Political Science, 2020, Queens
  • Skavi Ballinas: Mechanical engineering, 2019, Bronx
  • Gabriela Gonjon: Architecture, 2021, Manhattan

“Our mission is to get freshman and sophomores more aware as to what programs are going on at CCNY,” said Gonjon. who is overseen by faculty advisor Joseph Barba, professor of electrical engineering at the Grove School of Engineering. “It’s a way to redo everything and make it better for other students coming in.”

The fellows advocate for lasting institutional change and create opportunities for students to engage with innovation, entrepreneurship, design thinking and creativity at their schools. Fellows design innovation spaces, start entrepreneurship organizations, host experiential learning events, and work with faculty to develop new courses.

To accomplish this, the CCNY fellows have created and marketed events on campus to notify students about campus activities, programs and workshops as well as encouraged students to use the CCNY Student Life app, which was created by the Department of Student Life and Leadership Development and hosted by Campus Group, to stay on top of deadlines, announcements, club information and more.

“We’re trying to bridge the communication gap between students and the resources provided at CCNY, and resources doesn’t end with faculty and administration, our mission also extends to clubs,” said Abeer. “One of our main goals is to understand the culture and student body at CCNY, and what kind of marketing initiatives will reach our students to maximize outreach so more students attend on-campus events.”

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Letter to Students & Families: Week of December 31, 2018

December 31, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Happy New Year!

I am hoping you have had a joyful Winter Recess.

Over this holiday week I’ve had the opportunity to visit Washington D.C. with my family.

As we enter the final hours of 2018 and center ourselves for the start of 2019, I have been heartened by the many individuals, groups and families that have gathered in our nation’s capital.

Pitched upon the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, late one afternoon, the sight and sounds of all who were present made it feel as if every nation of the world had sent a few lucky ambassadors to gather at that very spot at that very moment.

And the voice of August 28, 1963 continued to echo for all who were listening as person upon person stood where Dr. King once stood, peering beyond the reflection pool and the Washington Monument toward the Capitol.

It was as if each of us was called in our own voice to say:  I, too, have a dream deeply rooted in the American Dream. . . .

It was a moment of pause; a reminder that our nation’s highest ideals are alive because they have been passed down from one generation to the next.

It was also a reminder that we are preparing every NEST+m student to thrive in an increasingly complex world community.

—-

NEST+m’s mission is deeply connected to the core principles upon which the finest ideals of our country stands.

Intellectualism: Within the National Archives, our Nation’s founding documents, including the Declaration of Independence, The U.S. Constitution & The Bill of Rights are secured and displayed for posterity. We create meaning through deep, enduring understandings and the experiences of past and present

Inclusivity:  The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial features a range of his most famous quotes, including: “If we are to have peace on earth, our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, and our nation; and this means we must develop a world perspective.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Christmas sermon, Atlanta, Georgia, 1967.

From the Capitol Building to George Washington’s Mt. Vernon to the National Archives, our country’s legacy of slavery, segregation and injustice are being discussed openly and explored along with the democratic ideals upon which our nation was founded. King once said of our nation: “Just be true to what you’ve said on paper.” It seems that our national memorials and museums are starting to hold up the mirror in deliberate self-examination.

CollaborationThe National Air & Space Museum might seem best positioned as a site for “Exploration”—which, of course, it is. But when thinking of Collaboration, the trials and experimentation that led to the first airplanes and later, space flight, are glowing examples of collaborative innovation.

Exploration: From the newly opened National Museum of African American History & Culture to the National Museum of the American Indian to the Library of Congress to the National Portrait Gallery, Explorations of the self & of communities across our nation are on display for all to see and grapple with. In this painting, Shimomura Crossing the Delaware, artist Roger Shimomura reinterprets Washington’s Crossing the Delaware. Shimomura’s work is on display at the National Portrait Gallery while Emanuel Leutze’s Washington is on display in NYC’s own Metropolitan Museum of Art.

What are the ways in which you have been inspired or re-energized by the concepts of Intellectualism, Inclusivity, Collaboration and Exploration during the Winter Recess?

As we start the New Year and return to NEST+m, thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Happy New Year to you and yours.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


 

  • Winter Recess: December 24 – January 1, return to school on January 2nd, 2019

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
  • During January Regents exam week January 22-25, 2019, Upper Grades students will not report to school unless they are scheduled to take a January Regents exam. Students should see their Guidance Counselor for questions about January Regents exams.
  • The June Regents exam testing schedule (June 18-25, 2019)  is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

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INRC Wins Asylum for Woman Fleeing Domestic Violence

By Katherine Dennis, Andrea Natalie, and Andrea Velasquez

The Immigrant and Non-Citizens Rights Clinic (INRC) is delighted to share the asylum victory of Ms. J, a longtime client and survivor of domestic violence. She won her case before the New York City Immigration Court and is now able to safely remain in the United States with her two young sons; she also has a path to citizenship.

 

This case was especially challenging due to the current administration’s attempts to weaken asylum claims from domestic violence survivors. Just last summer, former Attorney General Jeff Sessions upended the United State’s commitment to ending gender-based violence.

INRC students on their way to submit a brief

Sessions certified Matter of A-B- where he reversed a grant of asylum to a Salvadoran woman who fled horrific sexual, emotional, and physical violence at the hands of her then-husband. In the course of this reversal, Sessions made sweeping and inherently flawed statements asserting persecution by private actors would not be covered under asylum law. He deliberately used harmful language that is non-binding, but nonetheless confusing, to make winning asylum more difficult for those fleeing gang violence and domestic violence – people like our client Ms. J. In December of 2018, a federal judge recognized the flawed nature of Sessions’ attempt to broadly disqualify entire categories of immigrants from asylum protections and permanently blocked the policy as applied to immigrants requesting asylum at the border for being contrary to the Immigration and Nationality Act, the Refugee Act, and the Administrative Procedures Act.

We made the case and successfully argued that Ms. J had been persecuted by her former partner because of her political beliefs in gender equality and her resistance to his machista attitudes—evinced by her desire to pursue education, desire for equal roles in their household, and her eventual decision to flee the marriage and country of her birth. While reading her oral decision granting asylum, the Immigration Judge acknowledged the political nature of our client’s beliefs and the many acts of resistance she undertook in her abusive relationship.

 

PREPARING THE CASE

Upon meeting our client, our initial goal was to gain her trust.  We were under significant time constraints to prepare our filing, but managed, in less than three weeks, to more than double the size of our initial filing. We worked with Ms. J to add more details and facts to her affidavit and submitted more documents evincing the country conditions that enabled this abuse to continue with impunity. Cultural competency was also fundamental in this process. We really connected with our client because we were a team of women who were close to her in age. She felt comfortable speaking to us and opening up to us in her native language, Spanish, and that is how we also gained the trust of her family members in Honduras. Our success was possible because we were able to gain our client’s trust, which led her to open up.

At times, we struggled with maintaining the client-centered approach to representation that we strive to achieve when lawyering. Because of the administration’s attempts to change fundamental asylum law a few months before Ms. J’s hearing, we needed to strengthen our legal arguments and add an additional ground for persecution: political opinion. By shifting the focus of the legal argument, together with our client, we worked to reshape her narrative. We had many open conversations about our legal arguments, strategies, etc., and we believe that this created trust, despite our time limitations and the shadow of potential bad legal precedent.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

While we are so happy for our client, we also want to add a critical perspective on our asylum win and what it adds to the complex narrative and history of immigration law.  Ms. J has a sympathetic story that, we fear, perpetuates the narrative of who is a ‘good’ immigrant versus a ‘bad’ immigrant. Our client suffered horrible abuse and had no choice other than to flee Honduras for her and her son’s life. This generally fits a ‘good’ immigrant story – a young mother with no criminal history protecting her and her children’s lives, and now they are safe here in Queens. She fled a country in which the U.S. has continually exerted its power. The U.S. has a role in creating the conditions from which many people seek asylum—yet in the courtroom we had to present a narrative which singularly painted this small Central American nation as a horrible, deadly place without the complex geo-political landscape and history that is essential to any discussion on this region. Part of making our legal argument necessarily involved furthering this harmful narrative to some degree.

As law students and as a clinic, we are committed to supporting stability and legal status for all immigrants, and consider daily how to create success stories for all immigrants – including those with criminal convictions, those subject to discriminatory policing policies, and/or those who have been over-broadly labeled as threats by the security state. Our classmates represent many clients in the aforementioned categories and we acknowledge that their hard work may not receive any accolades or acknowledgement in a blog post. We were in the rare situation in this era to experience a win in immigration court, but we underscore our admiration for our INRC clients’ and colleagues’ resilience and creativity in the face of the reality that they may never see success before any government judge or adjudicator due to the U.S. government’s characterizations of their clients as criminals, gang members or security threats.

Another takeaway of this legal journey is to be fully prepared and know your filing from beginning to end. Practice is key to feeling comfortable with your work and arguments on the day of the hearing. Most importantly, having constant communication with your client and addressing her questions are vital to providing a client-centered approach to your case and gaining your client’s trust.

 

ABOUT THE INRC TEAM

Our team consisted of three INRC students: Andrea Natalie, Katherine Dennis, and Andrea Velasquez; our supervising Professor, Nermeen Arastu; and our INRC classmates and Professors Kassem and Peleg who each contributed significantly to this win. Classmates helped strategize the legal arguments and prepare for the hearing, gave us feedback and advice on our direct examination questions and closing argument, and helped prepare our client for cross-examination.

The design of the clinic enables the students to be very involved in the cases. We were the student attorneys on the case and led the entire hearing. While our professors provided us extensive guidance and support, they supported us in taking the lead. This method prepared us to be effective and capable future immigration attorneys and advocates. The experience has truly increased our confidence about our ability to graduate from CUNY School of Law and become great lawyers and advocates.

We want to express our profound gratitude to our amazing supervising attorney, Professor Nermeen Arastu, for her support during the preparation of the filing and during the hearing. She was there with us, advising us, and helping us, including at 11 p.m. two days before the hearing. When we were nervous, she listened to us, laughed with us, and pumped us up when we really needed it. Professor Arastu provided us with support the day of the hearing that helped us excel. None of this would have been possible without her guidance and advice.


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History Professor Ernest Ialongo Publishes Work on Italian Migration

Hostos Associate Professor of History and resident expert on Italy Ernest Ialongo has co-authored a fascinating and timely paper on migration in Italy with Teresa Fiore, Associate Professor of Modern Languages at Montclair State University.

The article penned by the pair serves as an introduction to three other essays they co-edited for the Journal of Modern Italian Studies, which explores migration in a country that had not received as much attention as the rest of Europe. The timeliness of the topic is not lost on Ialongo.

“The work was inspired by the topic of migration into Europe, and Italy specifically, which spiked after 2014, but because of the heated rhetoric on immigration in both Europe and America recently, the article we worked on became more relevant than we initially expected,” Ialongo said.

As for his collaboration with Professor Fiore, also the Inserra Endowed Chair in Italian and Italian American Studies at Montclair State, Fiore is a member of the Columbia University Seminar in Modern Italian Studies, where Ialongo has served as Chair for the past seven years. The seminar gives academics a chance to explore political, social, cultural, and religious aspects of Italian life. They also organized a two-day event titled “Italy and the Euro-Mediterranean Migrant Crisis” held at Columbia University and Montclair State in April 2017 with scholars from Italy, and a screening of an Italian film on the migration crisis, which included the film’s director. From that two-day event, the Journal of Modern Italian Studies requested Ialongo publish the papers.
The introduction to these papers by Ialongo and Fiore is an incredible piece of historic research that brings to light an overlooked phenomenon in the global discussion of immigration and migration.

Below is an excerpt from their contribution:

The public debate on this case [Italy’s refusal to allow a boat with migrants to dock in June 2018] is a reminder of the increasing impasse related to the question of migration, which revolves around the stark clash between pity for the desperate and rejection of the unwanted, leaving out considerations of regular, organized, sustained, and safe channels for mobility across the Mediterranean in exchange for a reliance on pure border security. It is the editors’ hope that this collection of articles helps create a more informed and productive discussion over the migrants’ condition in Italy, Europe, and the Mediterranean, its representation in the media and the arts, and the states’ responses, within an interdisciplinary and transnational framework very much in line with this journal’s approach. The editors, and the authors of the articles in this section, are conscious that the politics of migration in Italy, and Europe, is in a constant state of evolution. However, in an era that is witnessing the emergence of populist, nationalist, anti-migrant sentiments, and governing regimes, on both sides of the Atlantic (at the time of the writing of this introduction, the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump was defending its policy of separating children from their migrant parents at the U.S. border as a means to deter future migrants), we feel it is important to put Italy front and centre in this critical discussion over global migration. Italy is still a focal site for the ‘migrant crisis’, and as it develops, lessons may be learned, for good or ill, on how to address the crisis in a way that does not ignore its human components.”

Access the entire work here.

More about Professor Ernest Ialongo:
Ernest Ialongo is Associate Professor of History at Hostos Community College in The City University of New York, where he has taught since 2008. He is Chair of the Columbia University Seminar in Modern Italian Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in Modern European History from the Graduate Center of The City University of New York, and an MA and BA in History from York University (Toronto, Canada). He is the author of various articles dealing with Futurism, politics, and culture in Liberal and Fascist Italy, and has published the book Filippo Tommaso Marinetti: The Artist and his Politics with Fairleigh Dickinson University Press (2015). His most recent work is a co-edited special issue of the Journal of Modern Italian Studies entitled “On the 80th Anniversary of the Racial Laws. Essays on Italian Fascist Anti-Semitism in Honor of Michele Sarfatti” (December 2018), and the article “Nation-Building through Antisemitism: Fascism and the Jew as the Internal Enemy” for Annali d’Italianistica (December 2018).


$91K Grant Will Advance Cyber Security Education at Hostos

Hostos Community College was recently awarded a $91,600 grant from the U.S. Department of Education to help advance the college’s ability to offer cyber security education to underrepresented groups in the computer science and information security fields.

The grant will be applied toward Hostos’ Cyber Security Education Opportunity Program (CSEOP) and address the College’s need to build the infrastructure necessary to facilitate course offerings—credit and non-credit—on a variety of cyber security skills; the funds will help enable Hostos to provide anytime, anywhere access to a virtual lab environment to be used in conjunction with the campus Cisco Networking Academy, CompTIA Academy and Microsoft IT Academy cyber security courses.

“Thanks to this Department of Education grant, Hostos will be able to take a significant step forward in being able to offer not only theoretical, but also practical lab-based learning opportunities in the ever-growing and critically important field of Cyber Security,” said Varun Sehgal, Chief Information Officer and Assistant Vice President of Information Technology at Hostos.

The initial focus of the CSEOP is improving technology workforce development through the implementation of a Cisco Cybersecurity Operations certificate program, which could potentially count toward academic credits in a proposed Computer Science and Cyber Security Associate degree program. If implemented, the degree program will provide successful students the opportunity to pursue a Bachelor’s degree through Hostos’ partnership with John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

The certification program’s curriculum includes a 4-day “Introduction to Careers in IT” seminar, introductory cybersecurity course, professional development seminars, and140-hours of instructional, simulation and competency-based Cisco CCNA Cybersecurity certification training.

As part of the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technology Education (ATE) Program, Hostos will work closely with Prince George’s Community College National CyberWatch Center to ensure the program offerings are aligned with the needs of the labor market.

With an anticipated growth in available jobs to reach over 20% by 2020 in what is already an underemployed market, especially in New York City, and with very few opportunities and access to education and learning environments for these skills, Hostos’ CSEOP will lay the foundation for creating a pipeline of skilled workers, particularly from the South Bronx and other neighboring underserved communities.

The collaborative effort by Information Technology, Academic Affairs and Continuing Education and Workforce Development helped ensure a successful grant application and will be the cornerstone to ongoing success in these and future technology course offerings.


Baruch College Data Science Students Finish First

The Zicklin School of Business and Weissman School of Arts and Sciences were among the Top 25 Master’s Programs for data science in a test conducted by Correlation One

https://bmb.merlinone.net/mx/thumbs2018/tdir0489/ax114_7988_9.jpg

The Zicklin School of Business as well as the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences finished first among the Top 25 Master’s Programs for data science in a recent test conducted by Correlation One, a firm that recruits data science talent for major companies.

Students from Zicklin’s Master of Science in Statistics and Weissman’s Master of Financial Engineering (MFE) programs took first place in the “Master’s Programs” category with an average score of 69.9%, fifteen points ahead of its nearest competitors Princeton University and Stanford University. The data science professional exam was developed to measure the abilities of thousands of graduate students in the United States through the identification of common challenges to talent assessment in the field.

“With the Data Science concentration in the MS in Statistics program, our department is at the forefront of education in this new and thriving field,” said Marios Koufaris, PhD, professor of information systems and chair of the Paul H. Chook Department of Information Systems and Statistics. “We offer advanced courses in topics like machine learning, big data technologies, and advanced data mining, preparing our students to lead organizations in a data-driven competitive environment. The results of Correlation One’s Data Science Professionals Exam are a testament to the strength of the faculty and the students in this young program that it is already producing world-class data scientists of the highest caliber.”

About the Zicklin School of Business

The Zicklin School of Business located in New York City is a recognized leader in providing undergraduate, graduate, and executive education for the 21st century. It offers part- and full-time business degree programs taught by faculty who are thought leaders and practitioners in their fields. An AACSB-accredited business school, Zicklin has developed cutting-edge dual-degree programs with top universities around the world.

About the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences

The Weissman School of Arts and Sciences offers the atmosphere of a small liberal arts college and the resources of a major public university. With a nationally recognized faculty over 200 full-time members strong, the school provides personalized, supportive attention to its 2,600 undergraduate majors and more than 350 graduate students in five master’s programs, which combine academic excellence with practical experience. The school also delivers essential common core courses required of all of Baruch undergraduates to ensure they enter the workplace and the world with excellent communication, quantitative, and critical-thinking skills, along with civic, ethical, cross-cultural, and aesthetic awareness.

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MISDEMEANOR ARRESTS PLUMMET, INCLUDING AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE & PEOPLE OF COLOR

Misdemeanor Arrests Plummet, Including Among Young People & People of Color

 

New Study on New York City & State Also Shows Racial Differences in Arrest Rates Persist

(New York, NY) – Misdemeanor arrests across New York State, particularly New York City and upstate cities continued to plummet over the past four years, but the differences in arrest rates between Whites and non-Whites held steady and in some cases, widened; this according to the new report, Trends in Misdemeanor Arrests in New York, 1980 to 2017, from the Misdemeanor Justice Project (MJP) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. (View the Executive Summary)

“This report builds on MJP’s efforts for the last six years to highlight changes in lower-level and misdemeanor enforcement that had received little attention previously but can have a significant impact on issues of public safety, police-community relations and the legitimacy of the criminal justice system,” said Associate Professor Preeti Chauhan, Director of MJP. “With this study, MJP provides an unbiased, empirical foundation for the important conversations across the State, and Country, about how best to produce public safety in a manner that is just and equitable.”

“New York has engaged in significant criminal justice reform and this recent report demonstrates that progress is starting to be made, but there is still work to be done. Nonetheless, I’m encouraged by the reduced enforcement of minor crimes, reduction in incarceration, and lower crime rates. John Jay College and the Misdemeanor Justice Project are perfectly positioned to research, document, and analyze these trends while illustrating how lower-level enforcement impacts communities,” said Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

“This latest report from the Misdemeanor Justice Project shows New York has entered a new era of police-community relations. The statewide decline in misdemeanor arrests, combined with New York City’s historic drop in pedestrian stops and summonses, shows that law enforcement can safely de-prioritize arrests without an associated rise in crime rates. The Laura and John Arnold Foundation is proud to support the Misdemeanor Justice Project’s critical work tracking these enforcement trends,” said Jeremy Travis, Executive Vice President of Criminal Justice for the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

The report, which adds the last four years of data to a previous report by MJP, traces misdemeanor arrests in three groups; New York City, Upstate Cities (Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse and Yonkers), and the Rest of the State. It’s a continuation of MJP’s efforts since its creation in 2013 to shine a light on the significant role that lower-level and misdemeanor enforcement play in just and equitable public policy.

Misdemeanor arrest rates peaked in New York City in 2010 (4,351 arrest per 100,000 people), and Upstate Cities in 1996 (4,892 per 100,000), before declining with both areas having a 2017 rate of about 2,650 per 100,000.

Rates of arrests for minorities went up and down during this time period as well, however, the numbers were consistently higher for non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics than Whites. For example, in New York City, the arrest rate for non-Hispanic Blacks rose from 4,539 per 100,000 in 1990 to a peak of 9,517 in 2010, before dropping to 5,571 per 100,000 in 2017.

In 2017, non-Hispanic Blacks were 5.2 times more likely than non-Hispanic Whites to be arrested for a misdemeanor in New York City, 3.1 times more likely to be arrested for a misdemeanor in Upstate Cities and 4.1 times more likely to be arrested for a misdemeanor in the Rest of the State.

Arrest rates for Hispanics in 2017 were lower relative to non-Hispanic Blacks but Hispanics were still 3.0 times more likely than non-Hispanic Whites to be arrested for a misdemeanor in New York City, 1.5 times more likely to be arrested for a misdemeanor in Upstate Cities and 1.6 times more likely to be arrested for a misdemeanor in the Rest of the State.

The types of charges driving misdemeanor arrests have also changed greatly over time with person-related charges like simple assault now accounting for the largest proportion of arrests compared to all other charge categories including property/theft, vehicle/driving, marijuana, drugs other than marijuana, and others.

For New York City, the proportion of person-related charges jumped from 11.4% in 1980 to 28.1% in 2017. Upstate Cities saw a rise from 18.5% to 31.0% and the Rest of the State saw an increase from 13.6% to 21.8%.

“Now, with this data in hand, we are collaborating with seven other jurisdictions across the United States, all part of MJP’s Research Network on Misdemeanor Justice,” said Meredith Patten, the Executive Director of the Research Network. “We hope to further fill the gaps in our understanding of lower-level enforcement trends and assess whether recent reductions in enforcement levels are unique to New York or may be part of a larger nationwide or, even urban, phenomenon.”

View the full report, Trends in Misdemeanor Arrests in New York, 1980 to 2017.

About Misdemeanor Justice Project
The Misdemeanor Justice Project (MJP) is a research initiative at John Jay College of Criminal Justice dedicated to promoting a better understanding of the criminal justice system’s responses to the enforcement of lower level offenses. To date we have published reports on misdemeanor arrests, criminal summonses, pedestrian stops, mobility of arrests for misdemeanors, trends in jail admissions and custody, as well as conducted city-level evaluation work. For more information about the Misdemeanor Justice Project, please go to: www.misdemeanorjustice.org.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: 
An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York is a Hispanic Serving Institution and Minority Serving Institution offering a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu and follow us on Twitter @JohnJayCollege.


Statement From Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz

William C. Thompson Jr.On behalf of the Board of Trustees and the entire City University of New York community, I want to extend deepest sympathies to our board chairman, William C. Thompson Jr., on the passing of his father, William C. Thompson Sr., a pioneering leader in the public life of the city and state.

Thompson was for decades an important force in city and state government and the judiciary. In 1965, he became the first African-American state senator from Brooklyn. He later served on the City Council and in 1973 was elected to the State Supreme Court. He was an associate justice of the Appellate Division for 20 years. In 2002 he had the honor and joy of swearing in his son, now our board chairman, as the city comptroller.

Our thoughts are with William C. Thompson Jr. and his entire family as they mourn the loss of Justice Thompson and celebrate his long and accomplished life.​

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DIRECTOR SPIKE LEE VISITS JOHN JAY AND TALKS SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Director Spike Lee Visits John Jay And Talks Social Responsibility

 

With social responsibility playing a pivotal role in their work, Adjunct Professor Ilyasah Shabazz, daughter of Malcolm X, invited acclaimed film director Spike Lee, to speak to her American Cultural Pluralism and the Law class. On December 11, Lee joined the John Jay students for a Q&A discussion where Shabazz started the event by reminding her students of what they had learned in class. “We have observed some information on the remarkable contributions of Americans regardless of race, class, gender, or religion for racial equality and human rights,” Shabazz said. “I hope that this inspires you to rise to the occasion when it’s your time to do the very same.” A.J. Calloway, an American television personality, and Tony Phillips, Vice President of On-Demand Content at WNYC, also joined Lee on the panel.

Lee began by talking about the beginning of his career in film. “Growing up in the People’s Republic of Brooklyn, New York, I had no idea I wanted to be a filmmaker. I went down south to Atlanta for college, and like I always say, I didn’t discover film, film discovered me,” Lee said with a laugh. “After I graduated, I came back to New York and attended NYU Graduate Film School. I couldn’t get into other film schools because you needed an astronomical GRE score. I was fortunate that you didn’t have to take the GRE for NYU.” Lee then spoke about his initial awareness of social responsibility, which started in his Brooklyn home. “Being aware of it was just being at the dinner table. That was where the events of the day were discussed by my whole family,” he said.

 

Spike Lee Discussion Group Picture

(center, from left to right) Calloway, Shabazz, Lee, and Phillips with John Jay students

“Even though Do the Right Thing came out in 1989, we were talking about global warming, gentrification, and racism. These issues have not changed.”—Spike Lee

 

When asked if he consciously uses film to effect change, Lee said that this was not his main intention. “My objective is not to inspire, it’s to tell a story,” he said. “Some films might have an agenda, and then there are some that are more story-driven than subject matter.” And, while his goal might not be to inspire, Lee acknowledges that social responsibility is a key component of his work. “When everything happened with Eric Garner, I had a flashback. I immediately called my editor and we re-cut the footage of Garner with the fictitious murder of Radio Raheem. It was almost the exact same thing. Even though Do the Right Thing came out in 1989, we were talking about global warming, gentrification, and racism. These issues have not changed.”

 

Spike Lee Discussion with Calloway and Phillips

(left to right) Calloway, Lee, and Phillips

 

As the event ended, Calloway reminded Shabazz’s students to be more humane to everyone around them. “There’s a homeless guy by my job who’s been homeless for 38 years. I’m probably the only person who talks to him,” he said. “No one speaks to him. People give him money, but they don’t treat him like a human.” Calloway continued, advising students to uplift others. “It doesn’t matter what level you are on, you can always help someone. That’s our social responsibility.” After listening to the panel, we spoke with several students to hear their thoughts on the discussion.

 

 

Aidayvette Tebles

Aidayvette Tebles

Aidayvette Tebles

Junior

Major: Law and Society; Spanish: Legal Translation and Interpretation

“John Jay is a very diverse school and it’s very important for people to know that Hispanics and African-Americans are making contributions. We all have the capacity to become professionals. Having speakers like Spike Lee, who is a successful man of color, gives you a direct connection to them and makes you feel like you can do it too.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sara Pennacchia

Sara Pennacchia


Sara Pennacchia

Junior

Major: Criminology; Minor in Law

“Having someone like Spike Lee speak here is important because he can educate us on viewpoints that we might not be educated on. I liked what A.J. Calloway said about blessing others and being humane towards others. That’s an important aspect in our society that we need to grasp and practice with each other. We live in New York City and it’s very fast paced, it’s important for us to learn to slow down and be humane with one another.”

 

 

 

 

 

Shady Baez

Shady Baez

Shady Baez

Sophomore

Major: Culture and deviance studies

“People who work in the media like Spike Lee are important to have here because they are public figures and their voices are heard. If they express their viewpoints and experiences, people will listen and can follow in their footsteps.”


PRESIDENT MASON CELEBRATES MIDTOWN COMMUNITY COURT’S 25TH ANNIVERSARY AT MOMA

President Mason Celebrates Midtown Community Court’s 25th Anniversary at MoMA

 

Reducing arrests. Keeping people at home with their families. Building smaller, safer, and fairer justice systems. These very familiar goals are the reason why, 25 years ago, Midtown Community Court was created. The goal of Midtown Community Court was, and will always be, to make justice more meaningful. Instead of punitive fines or jail sentences, the court tries to consider alternative responses to low-level crimes, offering community service and on-site social services. This community-based approach to justice takes into account problems such as unemployment, poverty, homelessness, addiction, and mental illness. Celebrating the court’s 25th anniversary, on December 7, John Jay President Karol V. Mason joined a panel of criminal justice advocates, artists, and innovators to discuss “Art and Alternatives” at the MoMA.

 

Dean Fuleihan, First Deputy Mayor New York City

Dean Fuleihan, First Deputy Mayor New York City

 

“Today New York City has significantly lower incarceration rates than any other major American city. And, thanks to the community partnerships that you all have helped to forge, crimes are at a record low.” —Dean Fuleihan, First Deputy Mayor of New York City

 

The Court’s Impact
Before the panel started their discussion, Dean Fuleihan, First Deputy Mayor of New York City, spoke to the group acknowledging the work of Midtown Community Court. “It’s good to recognize how much has been accomplished and how much more we actually can achieve. We have seen a 31 percent decline in the women in custody in New York City, even as that number rises across the nation,” said Fuleihan. “Today, New York City has significantly lower incarceration rates than any other major American city. And, thanks to the community partnerships that you all have helped to forge, crimes are at a record low.” He went on to say that the mayor wants to keep working on expanding meaningful alternatives to incarceration, citing the mayor’s quote that mass incarceration didn’t begin in New York City, but with help from organizations like Midtown Community Court, we’re finding a way out of it.

 

The panel, left to right: Rachel Barnard, Young New Yorkers; Calder Zwicky, Museum of Modern Art; Karol V. Mason, President John Jay College; John Feinblatt, Everytown for Gun Safety; Sherene Crawford, Midtown Community Court

The panel, left to right: Rachel Barnard, Young New Yorkers; Calder Zwicky, Museum of Modern Art; Karol V. Mason, President John Jay College; John Feinblatt, Everytown for Gun Safety; Sherene Crawford, Midtown Community Court

 

 

“When you bring art into the criminal justice system, it is very restorative not only for young people, or people being prosecuted, but also for the people working in the system themselves.” — Rachel Barnard, Founder and Executive Director of Young New Yorkers

 

The Artistic Connection
Rachel Barnard, Founder and Executive Director of Young New Yorkers, an organization that provides arts-based diversion programs to court-involved young people, beautifully explained the reason why artistic endeavors are a smart alternative to jail, sanctions, or a criminal record. “When you bring art into the criminal justice system, it is very restorative not only for young people, or people being prosecuted, but also for the people working in the system themselves,” said Barnard. “Art can connect us quite quickly as a community.” Calder Zwicky, Assistant Director, Teen and Community Partnerships, wholeheartedly agreed. He went on to explain that while working with women who had been arrested for prostitution, he ended up learning as much, if not more, from them as they created artistic altars dedicated to someone who had a profound impact on their lives. “It was the idea of altars, sacredness, celebration, human and personal narrative,” said Zwicky. Some of the women honored people who passed away, while others depicted children or parents that they hadn’t talked to in decades. “It brought out these larger conversations, and it complicated the narrative and their identity,” said Zwicky. Their artwork told a fuller story about their lives, giving context to their hardships and journeys.

 

Rachel Barnard

Rachel Barnard

 

Barnard went on to explain that at the end of each program, Young New Yorkers puts on an elaborate exhibition in the courtroom. The space is filled with their artwork, creating an atmosphere that reminds everyone—judges, prosecutors, and the defendants themselves—to see people as people.

 

John Feinblatt

John Feinblatt

 

“It’s okay to try to help the community while trying to help someone that’s been arrested. If you do both, you’ll get better outcomes.” — John Feinblatt, Everytown for Gun Safety

 

The Way Forward
To fully understand the court’s impact, John Feinblatt, who founded the Midtown Community Court, looked back at the court’s initial aspirations. That meant looking at the intersections between law and social problems, and recognizing that the abiding principle that should be running through the veins of the justice system is problem solving. “We had to admit that the adversarial system maybe wasn’t a perfect fit for these kinds of cases. Maybe we could combine punishment and help, understanding they were not principles that had to fight each other. They could be complementary,” said Feinblatt. “It’s okay to try to help the community while trying to help someone that’s been arrested. If you do both, you’ll get better outcomes.”

 

Karol V. Mason

Karol V. Mason

 

“Fundamentally, what we’re trying to do is to get people to stop thinking about incarceration as the default mechanism for holding people accountable when they make mistakes,” — Karol V. Mason, President John Jay College

 

President Karol V. Mason, agreed, especially looking back at her time in the Obama administration. “Fundamentally, what we’re trying to do is to get people to stop thinking about incarceration as the default mechanism for holding people accountable when they make mistakes,” she said. To end the discussion, Sherene Crawford, the panel moderator from Midtown Community Court, asked the group what they hoped to see happen in the court in the next 25 years. Mason made a plea that everyone on the panel also wanted to see become a reality. “I’m going to be bold and hope that you extend this program beyond low-level, non-violent crimes.” She went on to say that she thought the country was ripe for bold actions on criminal justice reform. As the night went on, a host of judges, attorneys, artists, advocates, elected officials, and community leaders went into the museum, looked at impressive works of art, and discussed innovative ways that Midtown Community Court could move forward in the future.

More scenes from the event: 

 

Greg Berman, Center for Court Innovation

Greg Berman, Center for Court Innovation

Hon. Charlotte Davidson, Midtown Community Court

Hon. Charlotte Davidson, Midtown Community Court

Hon. Janet DiFiore, Chief Judge New York State Unified Court System

Hon. Janet DiFiore, Chief Judge New York State Unified Court System

President Mason having a moment with Daniel Aguilar, John Jay alumnus ('17) and first graduate from Young New Yorkers

President Mason having a moment with Daniel Aguilar, John Jay alumnus (’17) and first graduate from Young New Yorkers


Zicklin Students Place as Top Finishers in Deloitte & Touch LLP’s Annual Audit Innovation Campus Challenge

Team will head to national competition in April 2019 

(From l to r) Syed Hussain, Brittany Plotnikov, Eimi Ogura, Ruby Dong, Ellis Hamabuchi, and Derek Lee

(From l to r) Syed Hussain, Brittany Plotnikov, Eimi Ogura, Ruby Dong, Ellis Hamabuchi, and Derek Lee

 

A team of six accountancy students from the Zicklin School of Business were one of two top finishers in the northeast regional competition in Deloitte & Touch LLP’s annual Audit Innovation Campus Challenge held in Boston on November 16.

Baruch placed in the top spot, along with Rutgers University, competing against northeast accountancy programs from Boston College, Fairfield University, Fordham University, Pace University, Providence College, St. John’s University, Villanova University, and the University of Connecticut.

The team will head to Dallas Texas in April, 2019 as one of 12 schools competing at the national competition at Deloitte University.

“The Zicklin students had the creativity, intelligence and drive to come out on top in a very competitive challenge,” said Thomas Ray, distinguished lecturer in the Stan Ross Department of Accountancy. “Our entire college can be proud of their success and I am thrilled to serve as their faculty advisor.”

This year’s team was comprised of Ruby Dong, Ellis Hamabuchi, Syed Hussain, Derek Lee, Eime Ogura, and Brittany Plotnikov.

The Challenge

Deloitte’s Audit Innovation Campus Challenge, which is sponsored by the firm and The Deloitte Foundation, provides students with an opportunity to leverage their skills and experience through practical application by responding to an innovative audit challenge statement.

This year’s challenge was to show how Deloitte could further capitalize on its attributes, including independence and technical competence, to broaden its assurance services in connection with less traditional, non-financial subject matters.

According to Ray, Baruch’s team developed and presented an innovating set of services to assure that a company’s privacy policy is in compliance with relevant laws and regulations and that it actually is in compliance with its policy, on a real-time basis.

“This is not the first time Baruch College has come on top at this competition,” added Ray. “Our teams from two previous competitions also placed at the top of the regional events.”

For details about Deloitte’s Audit Innovation Campus Challenge, go here.

 

# # #


Baruch College Student Named One of the “Most Promising Multicultural Students” in 2019 by the American Advertising Federation

Headshot of David Yao  David Yao among the 50 “high-performing undergraduate seniors” selected nationwide 

David Yao (’19), a marketing major at the Zicklin School of Business, was chosen for the 2019 class of the “most promising multicultural students” by the American Advertising Federation (AAF).

David is among only 50 students from across the country selected as winners for the program.

Eight leading advertising industry professionals, who represent some of the world’s most prominent agencies, picked the class on October 24 in Washington, D.C.

“It’s truly a pleasure to represent Baruch College and the Zicklin School of Business for the American Advertising Federation (AAF).  I owe this opportunity to Baruch itself for all the Zicklin professors who strive to make our marketing curriculum more competitive every day,” said David. “From the quality of the education to the real-world insight given to me, I could not be more thankful for all that the College has provided me.”

According to the AAF, the organization’s Most Promising Multicultural Students program “connects the advertising industry with the nation’s top multicultural seniors.”  A rigorous application process includes high academic performance and submission of portfolios, resumes and letters of recommendations.

“On behalf of the Zicklin School of Business, we very proud of David’s achievement as the one of the AAF’s Most Promising Multicultural Students Class of 2019,” said Barry Soloff, professor in the Allen G. Aaronson Department of Marketing and International Business.  “This recognition will, in all likelihood, lead to a job with one of the most prestigious advertising agencies as many recruiters highly value these candidates.”

In February, David and other members of the 2019 Class will attend a multi-day program in New York City that provides networking and learning opportunities, site visits to major advertising and media companies, and an exclusive AAF career job fair with recruiters.

Expanded Programs and Student Opportunities

According to Soloff, Zicklin has expanded its array of advertising and communication courses over the last few years. This comprehensive curriculum, which includes a wide-range of courses from account management, to advertising campaigns, to media planning and buying, prepares students for careers in the field.

“Our advances in the advertising and marketing department have led to students gaining more recognition in the industry,” said Soloff. “This year, five Zicklin students were recognized by Publicis Media, one of the world largest media agencies, as Multicultural Talent Pipeline candidates, adding to the five candidates recognized in 2017 and 2016.”

For more information about the Advertising and Marketing Department, go here.

# # #


CCNY duo wins Gilman International Scholarships

CCNY’s latest Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholars, from left, Seher Ali and Oneika Pryce.

Winter break for City College of New York undergraduates Seher Ali and Oneika Pryce this time around means three weeks in Jordan and Senegal, respectively, as Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholars.  The two students are recipients of the competitive national award that provides support for overseas travel and research.

A junior majoring in biotechnology in City College’s Division of Science, Ali travels to Amman, Jordan, on Dec. 28 for a stint studying Arabic at the Qasid Institute.

The Brooklyn resident grew up in Pakistan speaking Urdu, a language whose alphabet is similar to Arabic. Ali, who’s minoring in Arabic, has two semesters of the language behind her at CCNY.

She plans to pursue a medical career, specializing in either neurology or oncology.

The Gilman Scholarship adds to Ali’s other academic honors garnered at CCNY. They include the NAACP’s Herbert Lehman Education Fund Scholarship — which is another highly competitive national award – and the
Chancellor’s Global Scholarship for Study Abroad from the City University of New York.

Pryce is a senior in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership’s international studies program, where her concentration is development. She’s minoring in French.

The Queens resident, who was born in New York of Jamaican immigrant parents, will spend her time as a Gilman Scholar working in rural Senegalese   communities learning ecologically sustainable development practices.  She’ll also volunteer at health centers.

Pryce, who has studied French and Arabic at CCNY, plans a career in international development and human rights.

Like Ali, she also counts a Chancellor’s Global Scholarship for Study Abroad among her other academic honors.

About the Benjamin A. Gilman Program
The U.S. Department of State’s Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship is a grant program that enables students of limited financial means to study or intern abroad, thereby gaining skills critical to our national security and economic competitiveness.

The Gilman Scholarship Program is open to U.S. citizen undergraduate students who are receiving Federal Pell Grant funding at a two-year or four-year college or university to participate in study and intern abroad programs worldwide.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Baruch College Expands Global Cultural Exchange Certificate Program

Connecting international and Baruch students to bridge world cultures and experiences

Students in Baruch College's Global Cultural Exchange Certificate Program listen to a Jazz performance to learn about American cultural activities.

Participants in Baruch College’s Global Cultural Exchange Certificate Program listen to a Jazz performance to learn about American cultural activities. 

 

Baruch College’s International Student Service Center (ISSC) has launched a new chapter of its signature Global Cultural Exchange Certificate program as part of its ongoing commitment to bring a global perspective to students’ college experience.

For 2018-19 academic year, the program participants—most of whom are also members of the Percy Ellis Sutton SEEK (Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge) initiative—come from either South Korea (nine students), China (10 students), or the United States (14 students). All students in this program have the first-hand opportunity to expand their cultural knowledge by meeting people from different backgrounds and learning from each other about their country’s rituals and traditions.

Building Relationships through Shared Experiences

The program features a variety of activities throughout the year, including introducing international students to American culture such as jazz music from Lincoln Center. Program participants have already seen a presentation about American football. Students will also tour Wall Street and compete in a capital markets trading simulation.

The program also includes support for career readiness. All students learn about networking strategies and proper dining etiquette to prepare for job interviews.

Along the way, the students will explore their cultural and language differences, and discover their similarities.

Global Experience Right at Home

Last year, international students from China joined Baruch students to participate in the program. For Baruch students, the experience broadened their worldview:

“The program expanded not only my network but my knowledge and understanding of a group of people that I could never relate to in the past,” said Emmanuel Oladejo (’21), majoring in business administration. “Growing up in Nigeria, I was exposed to a lot of European influences and the only information I received about China were in the movies that I watch. Thanks to the Global Cultural Exchange Certificate program’s goal to foster and nurture the bond between students like myself and international students, my admiration for Chinese culture has increased drastically.”

Esteban Santana (’21), majoring in business administration and international business, said participating in this program was beneficial because he was able to experience intercultural communication and its barriers early in his academic career.

“Being able to communicate with people from around the world made me realize that even though globalization keeps us close, as students and future business men/women we have to always take into account our geographical distances and our distinctive traditions,” Santana said. “Being that in the future I see myself living in China and working there for a few years, this program gave me the ability to experience what my future in China may hold.”

Baruch College: An Eye on Global

Baruch College recently strengthened its global footprint as the Zicklin School of Business formed new partnerships with several international universities for students to obtain dual-degrees. The new partners to join the College’s innovative MBA/MS global dual-degree program are Shanghai International Studies University, Renmin University of China, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano and University of Padova.

These new partnerships add to the existing MBA/MS dual degree programs the College already has with College of Management Academic Studies in Israel (COLLMAN)—which graduated its first cohort of students in June—and Peking University HSBC Business School in China.

International Education Week Participation 

The College also recently celebrated International Education Week (IEW) held on November 12-16 with a wide range of activities to inform students of the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. IEW is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education promotes programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences.

# # #


Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program at Baruch College Celebrates 20th Anniversary

Since 1988, 41 distinguished writers—including Pulitzer Prize winners, MacArthur Fellows, National Book Awardees and Poet Laureates—have participated in the celebrated program for students

Baruch College hosted an event on December 4 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program

From left to right: Roslyn Bernstein, founding director of the Harman Program; Grace Harman, Sidney Harman’s granddaughter; Bridgett Davis, program director; poet Rowan Ricardo Phillips (Spring ’18 Harman writer), and author Katherine Vaz (Fall ’12 Harman Writer).

 

Baruch College alumnus Dr. Sidney Harman (’39) once said, “Good writing is revelatory. It is not merely transference of fully formed material from brain to paper. Writing is an act of magic creation: writing is discovery.”

This visionary quote, along with a generous gift from Dr. Harman, helped Baruch College establish the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary during the 2018-19 academic year.

Dr. Harman believed the College needed more “poet managers,” and therefore wanted to establish a literary salon where business and the arts and sciences could flourish side by side.

The Harman Residency Program, endowed in Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, brings a distinguished writer to campus every semester. The Harman program has played hosts to poets, playwrights, journalists, non-fiction authors, and novelists who offer master classes in the workshop-style to select students, give campus-wide readings and serve as judges in student creative writing competitions.

“Sidney Harman’s advice for all of us is that we ‘should stay curious.’ It is advice students in the Harman Writer-in-Residence Program have taken to heart over the past two decades and it is advice I hope students will follow in the next 20 years, too,” said Roslyn Bernstein, Professor of Journalism, Emerita, Baruch College and Founding Director of the Harman Program from 1998-2013.

Professor Bernstein added, “The Harman Program teaches us how to stay curious. The answer: by deep reading and thoughtful writing; by sharing diverse and demanding ideas; and by poking and pushing at hidden meanings and revelations.”

History of the Harman Program

Since 1988, 41 distinguished writers have participated in the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence. Among them, they have received numerous honors including six Pulitzer Prizes, three MacArthur Fellowships, four National Book Awards, and two Poet Laureate designations.

Acclaimed playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins is the current Writer-in-Residence. Other notable program participants included Katherine Vaz, Susan Choi, Rowan Ricardo Phillips, and Russell Shorto, who was the guest speaker at Baruch’s Convocation 2018.

Over its two decades, Harman writers have taught such offerings as Food-Centric Fiction, Exploring Sound, Subject and Imagination in Poetry, Family-in-History Narratives, Stories from Archival Materials, and Poetry of Exile and Emigration.

The Harman Program has also established a Writing Fellow Program through the Harman Foundation’s generosity. As part of this Writing Fellow Program, acclaimed emerging writers conduct writing workshops on campus each semester. Additionally, the Harman Program sponsors student creative writing prizes, with winning entries published in Encounters, Baruch’s literary arts magazine.

“The Harman Program remains as vibrant, vigorous and essential as it was in 1998, when it was created,” said Bridgett Davis, Director of the Harman Program. “There’s no doubt that the Program will continue to be a vital part of Weissman, Baruch College and the literary community for decades to come.”

# # #


Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program at Baruch College Celebrates 20th Anniversary

Since 1988, 41 distinguished writers—including Pulitzer Prize winners, MacArthur Fellows, National Book Awardees and Poet Laureates—have participated in the celebrated program for students

Baruch College hosted an event on December 4 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program

From left to right: Roslyn Bernstein, founding director of the Harman Program; Grace Harman, Sidney Harman’s granddaughter; Bridgett Davis, program director; poet Rowan Ricardo Phillips (Spring ’18 Harman writer), and author Katherine Vaz (Fall ’12 Harman Writer).

Baruch College alumnus Dr. Sidney Harman (’39) once said, “Good writing is revelatory. It is not merely transference of fully formed material from brain to paper. Writing is an act of magic creation: writing is discovery.”

This visionary quote, along with a generous gift from Dr. Harman, helped Baruch College establish the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary during the 2018-19 academic year.

Dr. Harman believed the College needed more “poet managers,” and therefore wanted to establish a literary salon where business and the arts and sciences could flourish side by side.

The Harman Residency Program, endowed in Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, brings a distinguished writer to campus every semester. The Harman program has played hosts to poets, playwrights, journalists, non-fiction authors, and novelists who offer master classes in the workshop-style to select students, give campus-wide readings and serve as judges in student creative writing competitions.

“Sidney Harman’s advice for all of us is that we ‘should stay curious.’ It is advice students in the Harman Writer-in-Residence Program have taken to heart over the past two decades and it is advice I hope students will follow in the next 20 years, too,” said Roslyn Bernstein, Professor of Journalism, Emerita, Baruch College and Founding Director of the Harman Program from 1998-2013.

Professor Bernstein added, “The Harman Program teaches us how to stay curious. The answer: by deep reading and thoughtful writing; by sharing diverse and demanding ideas; and by poking and pushing at hidden meanings and revelations.”

History of the Harman Program

Since 1988, 41 distinguished writers have participated in the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence. Among them, they have received numerous honors including six Pulitzer Prizes, three MacArthur Fellowships, four National Book Awards, and two Poet Laureate designations.

Acclaimed playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins is the current Writer-in-Residence. Other notable program participants included Katherine Vaz, Susan Choi, Rowan Ricardo Phillips, and Russell Shorto, who was the guest speaker at Baruch’s Convocation 2018.

Over its two decades, Harman writers have taught such offerings as Food-Centric Fiction, Exploring Sound, Subject and Imagination in Poetry, Family-in-History Narratives, Stories from Archival Materials, and Poetry of Exile and Emigration.

The Harman Program has also established a Writing Fellow Program through the Harman Foundation’s generosity. As part of this Writing Fellow Program, acclaimed emerging writers conduct writing workshops on campus each semester. Additionally, the Harman Program sponsors student creative writing prizes, with winning entries published in Encounters, Baruch’s literary arts magazine.

“The Harman Program remains as vibrant, vigorous and essential as it was in 1998, when it was created,” said Bridgett Davis, Director of the Harman Program. “There’s no doubt that the Program will continue to be a vital part of Weissman, Baruch College and the literary community for decades to come.”

# # #


CCNY biomedical engineer receives NIH and TRISH grants for brain research

NIH and TRISH grant recipient Jacek Dmochowski

NIH and TRISH grant recipient Jacek Dmochowski, a biomedical engineering professor at CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering.

The City College of New York’s biomedical engineering professor Jacek Dmochowski uses ultrasound and lasers to stimulate the brain treating mental disorders as well as physical and mental wellness during deep space exploration missions. His research just got a boost from the National Institutes of Health’s Brain Research Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative and the Translational Research Institute for Space Health, in partnership with NASA.

“The brain is sensitive to mechanical forces, and we think that we will be able to make the brain more or less active by sending in a wave of ultrasound applied to the head,” said Dmochowski about his NIH grant. “In particular, we are interested in altering the pattern of brain waves that have been shown to be modified during disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.”

By changing the abnormal patterns of brain oscillations through ultrasound, it will treat the symptoms and potentially the root of the disease.  The major advantage of brain stimulation versus medication is that it can be applied just to one area of the brain, as opposed to drugs, which are generally taken orally and then delivered to all parts of the nervous system, causing unwanted side effects.

His mentor Elisa Konofagou, a professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia University, oversees Dmochowski during the two-year NIH grant. As a junior investigator, Dmochowski will benefit from Konofagou, whose expertise is in ultrasound. The grant is for $300,000.

Dmochowski’s two-year TRISH grant will allow him to test the possibility of using lasers to increase energy metabolism in the brain. By stimulating the brain with lasers, it will accelerate energy metabolism and enhance cognitive function in spaceflight for astronauts. The grant is for $800,000.

“All cells, including those in the brain, require energy in the form of ATP to carry out essential functions,” said Dmochowski. “This is an important problem during deep space missions, which last 18-24 months, because a number of negative health consequences, including those affecting cognition, have been reported.”

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
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THE JOHN JAY COMMUNITY COMES TOGETHER FOR HOMECOMING 2018

The John Jay Community Comes Together For Homecoming 2018

 

On December 11, John Jay’s Athletics Department hosted its annual Homecoming celebration which brought together almost 1,000 students, alumni, faculty, and staff, at the doghouse. The moment the doors opened there were plenty of pre-game festivities set up to entertain the crowd, including the official Bloodhound Jameson, who took photos with attendees. The Alumni Skybox was packed with people excited to cheer on their fellow John Jay community members and get a glimpse of the 2018-19 men’s and women’s basketball teams. For the second straight year, the game began with a ceremonial tip-off by President Karol V. Mason. Then the women’s team took to the court. Facing off against Sarah Lawrence College, the women used a strong fourth quarter to propel them to a 62-48 win, their fifth of the season. Freshman Katie Healy was named “Player of the Game” after her amazing performance with a season-high and game-high 21 points, season-high and game-high 18 rebounds, a team-high four steals, and three assists. The men’s team played afterwards. Going up against Bard College, the men came out with the same enthusiasm as the women, playing a tremendous game.

 

Members of the Hall of Fame Class of 2019 at Homecoming

 

Following the women’s phenomenal performance, the Athletics Department honored all of the existing Hall of Famers in attendance as part of a Hall of Fame Rededication Ceremony. Each Hall of Famer was presented with a brand new plaque courtesy of the Athletics Department. After this, the 2019 Hall of Fame Class was unveiled. This class includes two coaches, four players and a championship team, all representing five decades and four different sports programs. These Hall of Famers will be inducted on Saturday, April 6, 2019 in a ceremony at John Jay College. Continuing with the recognitions, student-athletes from rifle, women’s soccer, and women’s cross country were also honored for their successes. Reflecting on Homecoming, Assistant Athletics Director for Media Relations Brandon Fieland, discussed the Athletics Department’s delight about the event’s success. “It was great to see the entire John Jay College community come together for a fantastic night of festivities and basketball,” said Fieland. “Bringing back many alumni and Hall of Famers, as well as announcing the Hall of Fame Class of 2019, capped off the night.”

 

More scenes from Homecoming:

 

Members of the Hall of Fame at Homecoming

Members of the Hall of Fame at Homecoming

John Jay students holding up signs of encouragement

John Jay students holding up signs of encouragement

Students watching with excitement

Students watching with excitement

A men’s basketball player making a jump shot

A men’s basketball player making a jump shot

John Jay students cheering on fellow classmates

John Jay students cheering on fellow classmates

Students supporting the players

Students supporting the players

Members of the 2019 Hall of Fame Class with existing Hall of Famers

Members of the 2019 Hall of Fame Class with existing Hall of Famers

The men’s basketball team playing while everyone watches

The men’s basketball team playing while everyone watches


Exploring Prevention Entrepreneurship

CUNY SPH hosted an international group focused on transdisciplinary approaches to social innovation in public health on December 12. The aim of the meeting was to introduce ideas for a proposed collaborative Global Platform for Prevention Entrepreneurship at CUNY, which would serve as an incubator for self-sustaining innovations that promote population health. Terry Huang, director of the CUNY Center for Systems and Community Design, Clara Gonçalves of Portugal’s UPTEC – Science and Technology Park of University of Porto, Orlando Rocha of MIEW Creative Studio, Concepción Galdon of Spain’s IE Business School Center for Social Innovation, and Whitney Buchmann of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers shared their experiences and insights about bringing the mindset and methods of entrepreneurship to public health.

 

prevention entrepreneurship group

Prevention entrepreneurship group

 

prevention entrepreneurship slide

Prevention entrepreneurship presentation


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, Week of December 17, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

This is our week! Five focused days of teaching and learning for each of our students, each of our classes and each other.

Thank you to all of the K-5 families who have been on site during our recent celebrations.

Lower Grades Celebrations continue this week with 3rd Grade Family Thursday from 8:30-9:15am,  and 4th & 5th Grade Family Friday from 8:30-9:15am.

On Friday, Upper Grades Students engage in our Fall Semester “NEXPO” a student-to-student exposition where students will select one high-quality creation – a work product from their first months of school that they are particularly proud – and share it with classmates and students from other grades. It will be a student-to-student celebration of learning. Our Middle Grades’ Mid-year NEXPO will take place (for students only) in January 2019.

We will have a rapid dismissal on Friday December 21, 2018: all after-school activities are cancelled.

It is NEST+m policy that students should not receive homework over vacation.

We hope that you and yours have a meaningful vacation, a well-deserved rest and a Happy New Year.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


 

  • SLT Meeting: Tuesday, December 18, at 4:10pm in the Library
  • Grade 3 Family Thursday: Thursday, December 20 at 8:30 – 9:15am
  • Grade 4-5 Family Friday: Friday, December 21 at 8:30-9:15am
  • Rapid Dismissal: Friday, December 21 at 2:40pm; no After3, SONYC or BOKS programs in session
  • Winter Recess: December 24 – January 1, return to school on January 2nd, 2019

Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.
  • In January Regents exam week, Upper Grades students will not report to school unless they are scheduled to take a January Regents exam. Students should see their Guidance Counselor for questions about January Regents exams.
  • The June Regents exam testing schedule is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.

JOHN JAY’S PRESIDENTIAL STUDENT-FACULTY RESEARCH COLLABORATION AWARDEES

John Jay’s Presidential Student-Faculty Research Collaboration Awardees

 

“Research sits at the core of our mission to educate for justice. The research that our faculty and students perform has lasting, positive impacts on our society.” —Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College

 

Recently, President Karol V. Mason announced the awardees of the 2018-19 Inaugural Presidential Student-Faculty Research Collaboration Award. Mason directed the Office for the Advancement of Research to develop the award, which was generously funded through the President’s own discretionary research budget, to involve students directly and comprehensively in faculty-supervised research or creative projects. “Research sits at the core of our mission to educate for justice. The research that our faculty and students perform has lasting, positive impacts on our society,” says Mason. “Empirical data reveals inconsistencies, highlights disparities, and has the power to open minds and change policies.” In the coming weeks we’ll be diving deep into each of the awardees’ projects specifically, but we’d like to take this opportunity to recognize their upcoming work, and familiarize the John Jay community with their future projects.

Maria D'AgostinoMaria D’Agostino, Associate Professor, Public Management and Nicole Elias, Assistant Professor, Public Management

Nicole EliasGender Equality in Municipalities
“Our student-faculty research collaboration examines how municipalities are addressing gender equality through three learning objectives that contribute to student success—developing knowledge of gender equity; building and applying research skills; and participating in mentorship and professional development for future opportunities,” says D’Agostino.

 

 

Michael Yarbrough, Jamie Longazel and Jean Carmalt

(left-right) Michael Yarbrough, Jamie Longazel and Jean Carmalt

 

Michael Yarbrough, Assistant Professor, Political Science; Jamie Longazel, Associate Professor, Political Science; and Jean Carmalt, Assistant Professor, Political Science

Diversity, Inequality, and Law in the Global City of New York
“The Presidential Research Collaboration Award will fund the first phase of a multi-stage research project, in which Law & Society majors do research in their own communities to help solve a problem they think is important,” says Yarbrough. “In the interdisciplinary field of Law & Society, social scientists, legal scholars, and others, study how law works in the real world. A lot of this research focuses on working-class communities of color—like the ones our students call home—but the research is almost always conducted by outsiders. In this research project, our students will help design and conduct the project from the ground up.”

 

María Juila RossiMaría Juila Rossi, Assistant Professor, Modern Languages and Literatures

Encouragement and Models for Latina and Latino Students
“I am currently finishing a manuscript on servants in Latin American fiction and beginning a new project on translations of queer texts in Latin America during the twentieth century,” says Rossi. “However, my proposal is an attempt to involve Latina and Latino students in research activities, as well as visualizing Spanish as a language for intellectual and academic exchange. I expect to open new roads for students who had not imagined themselves as researchers for many reasons. In this sense, what I hope to accomplish is that students present their own research in Spanish in undergraduate research conferences.”

 

 

 

Yuliya Zabyelina

Yuliya Zabyelina, Assistant Professor, Political Science

The Vienna Winter School on Transnational Organized Crime and UN Office of Drugs and Crime SHERLOC Database
“Over the past two decades, a new generation of organized crime groups has appropriated advanced technologies, adapted sophisticated network structures, and diversified criminal activities and modus operandi. This resulted in new threats to the security and economic well-being of nations, human rights and environmental sustainability,” says Zabyelina. “The project I proposed for the Presidential Student-Faculty Research Collaboration Award aims to give students a chance to research transnational organized crime, learn about its nature, characteristics and contemporary patterns and explore national policies.”

 

 

 

Marcia EsparzaMarcia Esparza, Associate Professor, Criminal Justice and Daniel Auld, Director of Student Learning, Academic Services & Assessment

Daniel AuldHistorical Memory Project/E-Portfolio Collaboration
“Our project is rooted in the John Jay Historical Memory Project or HMP. HMP cultivates historical memory to memorialize victims of state-sponsored terror, raise awareness of historical injustices in Latin America and beyond, and foster our collective human rights memory. We maintain that the recovery of historical memory is an antidote to ongoing historical injustices,” says Auld. “In pursuit of our mission, HMP preserves the collective memory of the forcibly disappeared, the tortured, the massacred, and all those whose human rights were violated by planned and coordinated state actions. Our goal is to teach and raise awareness of state violence and human rights crimes and empower immigrant and diasporic communities to form a shared sense of identity and to become the next generation of human rights activists seeking truth, justice, and equality.”


Testing the connection between neighborhood cohesion and viral suppression among HIV-positive New Yorkers

young people on stoop

HIV viral suppression is a positive medical outcome which indicates viral control and inability to transmit infection. It is usually achieved through antiretroviral therapy. There is a lack of research into the psychosocial factors affecting HIV viral suppression, such as perceived neighborhood social cohesion, or how connected the subject feels to their neighbors.

To fill this gap, CUNY SPH alumna Ellen Wiewel led an analysis with faculty Luisa Borrell, Heidi Jones and Andrew Maroko and researchers from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene into whether perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with better medical outcomes among New Yorkers newly diagnosed with HIV infection.

The researchers used data from the New York City HIV surveillance registry, which includes all persons reported with HIV in the city since 2000 and their HIV-related laboratory test results, plus interviews of a stratified random sample of persons who were diagnosed with the virus between 2006 and 2012. Perceived neighborhood social cohesion did not appear to influence achievement of suppression among the 92 persons in the analysis.

“We had data from a relatively small and healthy population, and we weren’t able to demonstrate a consistent association between neighborhood social cohesion and viral suppression,” says Wiewel.

Future studies could explore whether cohesion has varying effects on medication adherence among populations of New Yorkers with HIV, and whether cohesion influences maintenance of viral suppression after its initial achievement, Wiewel adds.

Wiewel, E. W., Borrell, L. N., Maroko, A. R., Jones, H. E., Torian, L. V., & Udeagu, C.-C. Neighborhood social cohesion and viral suppression after HIV diagnosis. Journal of Health Psychology, Dec. 2018


BMCC Now Offers Textbook-Free Criminal Justice Degree

Criminal Justice Professor Michelle Ronda who along with other faculty developed the OER associate degree

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students majoring in criminal justice can now potentially complete the degree program without ever having to buy a textbook, saving altogether, an estimated $2,500.

BMCC faculty have redesigned 20 courses to create an Open Educational Resources (OER) criminal justice associate degree. The effort was funded by a 2016, two-year OER grant from the organization Achieving the Dream.

This milestone was reached through the efforts of criminal justice faculty as well as professors in core courses such as mathematics. A number of faculty who worked to bring the OER criminal justice degree to fruition—the first OER associate degree program at BMCC—say the process was filled with challenges yet ultimately was energizing.

BMCC along with Hostos Community College (CUNY) and Bronx Community College (CUNY) participated in the Achieving the Dream initiative. The thin-path to a textbook-free criminal justice degree—where at least one section of each core course is offered with OER materials—is just one component of the college’s multi-pronged efforts to bring Zero Textbook Cost (ZTC) to students. Funded by the New York State Department of Education, efforts are currently underway to develop a ZTC animation and motion graphics degree program, along with redesigning gateway and high enrollment courses.

BMCC growing ZTC options

As 2018 comes to a close, BMCC faculty are teaching more than 500 sections of ZTC courses each semester, resulting in an estimated annual savings of $2.5 million for more than 20,000 students. By Fall 2019, cumulative savings for BMCC students will be at least $6 million, according to figures compiled by the BMCC A. Philip Randolph Memorial Library.

Research from a 2017 study from the Association of American Colleges and Universities suggests that OER is an equity strategy: providing all students with access to course materials on the first day of class serves to level the playing field in course settings.

That holds especially true at BMCC where more than half of the students come from households with annual incomes of less than $20,000. This makes the average $1,200 annual cost for books and other supplies a barrier to academic success for many students.

BMCC Open Knowledge Librarian, Professor Jean Amaral, who has been leading the ZTC effort at BMCC, commended participating faculty for their success in the OER initiative.

“Since 2015, when we launched our Open/Alternative Textbook Program, our faculty have been doing extraordinarywork in redesigning their courses with OER and other no-cost materials,” said Amaral.

She said BMCC faculty commitment to equity and justice for the college’s students fuels the OER/ZTC efforts.

“Building on the efforts and success of our faculty, CUNY’s participation in the Achieving the Dream Grant contributed to New York Department of Education funding of OER/ZTC efforts over the past two years,” Amaral said. “We are grateful to our funders and our faculty for their contribution and commitment to our students’ success.”

BMCC Interim President Karrin E. Wilks  says the OER/ZTC efforts are a critical component of the college’s Designing for Success work, and the college’s commitment to dramatically improve student success.

“We are greatly appreciative and very proud of all  the faculty who have contributed to creating our first ZTC degree program,” said Wilks. “We know that for many students, the cost of textbooks is a barrier to their success. We also know from national studies that students find the pedagogy associated with OER highly engaging and relevant.”

While the main goal of OER effort is to lower costs for students ensuring equitable access to materials, there are other benefits as well, according to faculty who participated in the redesign process.

Faculty weigh in on OER redesign process

Criminal Justice Professor Michelle Ronda called the work an energizing process that freed her teaching from the confines of a textbook and reawakened the creativity in how she taught her course.

“The process of moving to open-and alternatively sourced educational materials also encouraged faculty to expand their thinking as scholars, teachers, and take full advantage of the plethora of information in the ever-changing, digitally-driven world we live in,” said Ronda.

Brenda Vollman, also a BMCC criminal justice professor, said by curating course material, she had the opportunity to choose resources that align with her teaching approach, while at the same time challenging her to consider, and adopt something new.

“Moving to low-cost and no-cost resources allows me, and my colleagues, to introduce and support the reality that knowledge should be, and is, free, open, available and creatable, not bound or owned by a publisher or expert knowledge icon or talking head standing at the front of the classroom,” said Vollman.

Vollman says she had to come out of her academic silo in order to bring OER course materials to fruition.

“Joining in the movement of open education has provided me with multiple opportunities to collaborate within and between disciplines,” Vollman says. “Not only do I use material licensed in the Creative Commons, but I also use alternative sources accessible in the public domain as well as through our information platforms and services at the college such as those available at the BMCC Library.”

BMCC Mathematics Professor Chris McCarthy says in the past, he loathed forcing students to buy expensive textbooks and that many students simply did not purchase them because they were so cost prohibitive.

From a faculty perspective, “OER’s most impressive benefit is that professors can customize their course,” McCarthy said. “Since the materials aren’t costing anything, you can assign the students materials from different sources. If you produce the material yourself you can customize it to be exactly as you want.”

Psychology Professor Monica Foust used OER materials in two courses—Child Psychology and Developmental Psychology— that are also writing intensive.

“I think the combination of OER and writing provides students with better ways of engaging with the text and materials,” Foust said.  “For one, the readings are more engaging. I use readings from academic journals and popular news sources. I sense that the popular news sources are generally, more interesting the textbooks and are less overwhelming than textbooks can be.”


JOHN JAY’S PRISONER REENTRY INSTITUTE HOSTS “A NIGHT AT OTISVILLE” WITH TRIBECA FILM INSTITUTE

John Jay’s Prisoner Reentry Institute Hosts “A Night At Otisville” With Tribeca Film Institute

 

“In many respects, the film screening program has become a pipeline to the pipeline.” —Baz Dreisinger

 

There’s a natural synergy between art and education. “Through arts education, people can discover if they have artistic talent—whether it’s creative writing, comedy, music, or drama—and they discover that art is the window to their own humanity,” said Anthony J. Annucci, Commissioner, Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, during the “A Night at Otisville” celebration hosted by John Jay’s Prisoner Reentry Institute and the Tribeca Film Institute on December 11.

 

Baz Dreisinger talking with a Prison-to-College Pipeline student

Baz Dreisinger talking with a Prison-to-College Pipeline student

 

It’s that connection between art and education that led Baz Dreisinger, Founding Academic Director of the Prison-to-College Pipeline (P2CP) program, to reach out to the Tribeca Film Institute. Dreisinger, who has spent over seven years directing P2CP, bringing John Jay professors to Otisville Correctional Facility to teach accredited College coures, created the Tribeca Community Screening Series at Otisville to bring films to incarcerated individuals. And, the impetus came from the men at Otisville themselves. “Incarcerated learners would approach me as I was coming out of the Prison-to-College Pipeline and say, ‘What do you have for us?’” said Dreisinger. After connecting with the Tribeca Film Institute, film screenings, discussions, and workships organically grew into a new program at Otisville. Men volunteered to become “Tribeca Commnuity Screening Series Facilitators” colaborating on the events. “What’s happening with the film screenings is that it’s starting to attract new learners. People who didn’t have an interest in college are coming to the screenings. Then they keep coming and engagging in the workshops afterwards. It gets them thinking about College,” said Dreisinger. “In many respects, the film screening program has become a pipeline to the pipeline.”

 

Baz Dreisinger with her Prison-to-College Pipeline students

Baz Dreisinger with her Prison-to-College Pipeline students

 

“The battle to lift the ban on Pell grants is something that I’m very invested in. We seem to be obsessed with sending people to prisons for really long periods of time, but what do we want them to do while they’re there?” — Allison Williams

 

Getting Everyone Involved
This intersection between education, art, and incarceration, resonates with a wider audience than many would expect. Actress Allison Williams, from the HBO show Girls and the film Get Out, attended “A Night At Otisville” and easily mingled with everyone around her. Beyond her natural ability to be personable, there was a larger reason why Williams felt at home—many of the men attending the event had been her students. “I’ve been to Otisville before, and I was able to teach a class on Shakespeare,” said Williams. “The most gratifying thing was that Sam [a P2CP student] just quoted act one, scene three of Romeo and Juliet to me at the table. That made my day. I had the most incredible time in that class. I wish the program could be replicated all around the world.”

 

Allison Williams with Tribeca facilitator Richard Seabrook

Allison Williams with Tribeca Facilitator Richard Seabrook

 

Even before her involvement with P2CP and Tribeca, Williams spent a great deal of time working with organizations trying to close the opportunity gap and the inequity of education for children in low-income families. “I grew up very lucky. I had a great education, and it always seemed crazy to me that it wasn’t available to everyone,” said Williams. “Sadly, when you don’t reach those kids, or you lose track of them, the demographics are strikingly similar to our populations inside prisons. That’s why I needed to know more about the criminal justice system.” After spending hours talking about Shakespeare and films with the men at Otisville, she’s become even more passionate about criminal justice reform. “The battle to lift the ban on Pell grants is something that I’m very invested in,” said Williams. “We seem to be obsessed with sending people to prisons for really long periods of time, but what do we want them to do while they’re there?” Williams believes that education is the best possible option for people caught up in the criminal justice system, their families, their communities, and the country as a whole.

 

Williams having a lively discussion with one of her students

Williams having a lively discussion with one of her students

“I work with one of the students in our horse barn. It seems to have had a positive effect on him. Since he’s been in the program he’s been more motivated and happier.” —Steven Drapala, Correction Officer

 

Seeing a Difference
Both the P2CP and Tribeca Community Screening Series projects are yielding noticeable differences in the men involved in them. “I work with one of the students in our horse barn,” said Correction Officer Steven Drapala. “It seems to have had a positive effect on him. Since he’s been in the program he’s been more motivated and happier.” For the men involved in the projects, the positivity moves from generation to generation, and program to program. Richard Seabrook—or “Mr. Seabrook” as many of the younger students call him—is a Tribeca Facilitator who encourages newcomers into the programs and advocates for education inside the facility. “The men that I have encountered have given me a ray of hope,” said Seabrook. “Before you can teach someone, you have to be able to reach them. You have to dig down deep inside and pull them back a layer at a time. They have to understand that regardless of their past choices, they do have the ability to change.”

(left to right) Correction Officers Steven Drapala, Anthony Brown, James Terwilige

(left to right) Correction Officers Steven Drapala, Anthony Brown, James Terwilige

 

“John Jay means having a future. Now I can have a future that won’t land me dead or in prison.” — Haneef Washington

 

Being In The Program
One of the best parts of attending “A Night At Otisville” was having the opportunity to speak to the students themselves, hearing firsthand what the program means to them and what they hope to accomplish with their newfound education. When we asked, “What does the Prison-to-College Pipeline program mean to you?” Haneef Washington had an immediate, one-word answer: Future. Then he followed up by saying, “It means a future that I couldn’t foresee for myself before I did the things that landed me in prison. When you don’t know what hope is, you tend to risk your life because you have no value for it,” said Washington. “Once you find education, it gives you self-worth. Once you have self-worth, it brings hope and you care about your life and the choices you make. For me, John Jay means having a future. Now I can have a future that won’t land me dead or in prison.”

 

(left to right) Jesus Santiago and Haneef Washington

(left to right) Jesus Santiago and Haneef Washington

“You see a lot of wasted talent in prisons. There are so many people that are incarcerated that could go a lot further in life. These educational opportunities are really needed.”  — Kevin Lilly

 

P2CP student Kevin Lilly, who’s in his first year of the program, felt a bit intimidated walking into his English 101 and Sociology 101 classes, but now he’s thriving. “When I first entered the class, I didn’t know what I was going to be facing, but the classes are very informative. It’s challenging, but I’m getting As,” said Lilly. He’s even started contemplating the larger ramifications of the criminal justice system and how it impacts populations. “You see a lot of wasted talent in prisons. There are so many people that are incarcerated that could go a lot further in life,” said Lilly. “These educational opportunities are really needed.”

 

(left to right) Richard Seabrook and Kevin Lilly

(left to right) Richard Seabrook and Kevin Lilly

“There’s a certain clarity and eagerness to consume things like film and entertainment here in Otisville. The way the students deconstruct things is amazing.”  —Allison Williams

 

Leading The Way
The event brought together artists, educators, activists, and public officials. After watching the short documentary film, On The Bit, depicting Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Equine Therapy for veterans, several students participated in a lively Q&A session with the film’s director, Ashley Brandon. Then members of the Tribeca Community Screening Series Panel held a discussion moderated by Dreisinger. Williams opened the talk by saying, “I want to make sure everyone knows they’re safe. The girl from Get Out is not coming to prisons.” After getting a well-deserved laugh, she went on to discuss film analysis, escapism, incarceration, and arts education with her fellow panelist: Amy Hobby, Executive Director, Tribeca Film Institute; Dino Solorzano, Former Community Screening Series Facilitator; and Moses El-Sun White, Former Community Screening Series Facilitator. “There’s a certain clarity and eagerness to consume things like film and entertainment here in Otisville,” said Williams. “The way the students deconstruct things is amazing. I’m going to bring my next movie here so that I can get all those notes from the very smartest film viewers and incorporate them into the final cut.”

 

(left to right) Dino Solorzano, Allison Williams, Moses El-Sun White, Amy Hobby, Baz Dreisinger

(left to right) Dino Solorzano, Allison Williams, Moses El-Sun White, Amy Hobby, Baz Dreisinger

 

“Investing in programming and alternatives to incarceration reduces recidivism, helps create safer communities, and brings us closer to ending the cycle of incarceration plaguing communities across our state.” — David Weprin, New York State Assemblyman

 

Before the evening ended, New York State Assemblyman David Weprin walked up to the lectern and delivered some very powerful words. “Thanks to John Jay and The Prisoner Reentry Institute we are able to provide support to those who seek it. Each time I meet these students, I gain more familiarity with the program, and I see that the students are truly committed to getting their lives back on track,” said Weprin. “Supporting these programs is not only the right thing to do, but also smart policy. Investing in programming and alternatives to incarceration reduces recidivism, helps create safer communities, and brings us closer to ending the cycle of incarceration plaguing communities across our state.” Weprin went on to add that the assembly is working on expanding the program statewide, supporting higher education institutions like John Jay. “This past session we included $500,000 in additional funding to alternative-to-incarceration programs and I’m optimistic that we will be able to do much more.”

 

New York State Assemblyman David Weprin listening to a student

New York State Assemblyman David Weprin listening to a student

More scenes from “A Night At Otisville”:

Kathleen Gerbing, Superintendent, Otisville Correctional Facility, with a student

Kathleen Gerbing, Superintendent, Otisville Correctional Facility, with a student

Anthony J. Annucci, Commissioner, Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, enjoying a conversation with a student

Anthony J. Annucci, Commissioner, Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, enjoying a conversation with a student

Laughter after dinner

Laughter after dinner

Discussing arts education

Discussing arts education

Embracing the holiday spirit

Embracing the holiday spirit

P2CP Students

P2CP Students

Students enjoying dessert

Students enjoying dessert

P2CP Student

P2CP Student

P2CP Student

P2CP Student

The screen set up in the Otisville gym

The screen set up in the Otisville gym

Festive touches for the evening

Festive touches for the evening

A warm welcome for visitors

A warm welcome for visitors


Baruch College Expands Global Cultural Exchange Certificate Program

Connecting international and Baruch students to bridge world cultures and experiences

Students in Baruch College's Global Cultural Exchange Certificate Program listen to a Jazz performance to learn about American cultural activities.

Participants in Baruch College’s Global Cultural Exchange Certificate Program listen to a Jazz performance to learn about American cultural activities. 

Baruch College’s International Student Service Center (ISSC) has launched a new chapter of its signature Global Cultural Exchange Certificate program as part of its ongoing commitment to bring a global perspective to students’ college experience.

For 2018-19 academic year, the program participants—most of whom are also members of the Percy Ellis Sutton SEEK (Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge) initiative—come from either South Korea (nine students), China (10 students), or the United States (14 students). All students in this program have the first-hand opportunity to expand their cultural knowledge by meeting people from different backgrounds and learning from each other about their country’s rituals and traditions.

Building Relationships through Shared Experiences

The program features a variety of activities throughout the year, including introducing international students to American culture such as jazz music from Lincoln Center. Program participants have already seen a presentation about American football. Students will also tour Wall Street and compete in a capital markets trading simulation.

The program also includes support for career readiness. All students learn about networking strategies and proper dining etiquette to prepare for job interviews.

Along the way, the students will explore their cultural and language differences, and discover their similarities.

Global Experience Right at Home

Last year, international students from China joined Baruch students to participate in the program. For Baruch students, the experience broadened their worldview:

“The program expanded not only my network but my knowledge and understanding of a group of people that I could never relate to in the past,” said Emmanuel Oladejo (’21), majoring in business administration. “Growing up in Nigeria, I was exposed to a lot of European influences and the only information I received about China were in the movies that I watch. Thanks to the Global Cultural Exchange Certificate program’s goal to foster and nurture the bond between students like myself and international students, my admiration for Chinese culture has increased drastically.”

Esteban Santana (’21), majoring in business administration and international business, said participating in this program was beneficial because he was able to experience intercultural communication and its barriers early in his academic career.

“Being able to communicate with people from around the world made me realize that even though globalization keeps us close, as students and future business men/women we have to always take into account our geographical distances and our distinctive traditions,” Santana said. “Being that in the future I see myself living in China and working there for a few years, this program gave me the ability to experience what my future in China may hold.”

Baruch College: An Eye on Global

Baruch College recently strengthened its global footprint as the Zicklin School of Business formed new partnerships with several international universities for students to obtain dual-degrees. The new partners to join the College’s innovative MBA/MS global dual-degree program are Shanghai International Studies University, Renmin University of China, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano and University of Padova.

These new partnerships add to the existing MBA/MS dual degree programs the College already has with College of Management Academic Studies in Israel (COLLMAN)—which graduated its first cohort of students in June—and Peking University HSBC Business School in China.

International Education Week Participation 

The College also recently celebrated International Education Week (IEW) held on November 12-16 with a wide range of activities to inform students of the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. IEW is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education promotes programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences.

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Mechanical Engineering Major & Mom of Two, Ramona Wilkins, is Writing Her Own Future

Mechanical Engineering Major & Mom of Two, Ramona Wilkins, is Writing Her Own Future
Ramona Wilkins is pictured at left above, with Shareef Alhanshaly, a LaGuardia electrical engineering student who recently completed an internship at Boyce.
“Calculus II was my nemesis,” says Ebaneeka “Ramona” Wilkins-Kolkmeyer, age 29. “I had to drop it a few times and start over, but I never gave up. I’ve gone from remedial math to differential math and linear equations. I’m a mom with aging parents; I’m not the perfect student. But I stick with it and give it my all.”

Today, Ramona is planning to graduate from LaGuardia Community College in June 2019 with her associate’s in Mechanical Engineering, and then pursue a bachelor’s in the same field.

“I’m proud that I’ve gotten this far,” says Ramona, who was born in NYC, where she and her family lived until they moved to Montego Bay, Jamaica when Ramona was nine-years-old. “I’m grateful I got to experience two very different cultures.”

After finishing high school in Jamaica, she moved to Queens and enrolled at the Vaughn College of Aeronautic Engineering, Aviation, and Technology to pursue a certificate in aviation maintenance. “I’ve always had a passion for aviation,” she says.

“Then my daughter was born, which helped me see the importance of having a career in a field that I loved. I realized that I wanted to design airplanes, not just repair them. I wanted to find a field that also involved two of my other interests: science and machinery. I visited a few four-year colleges and spoke to engineers working in the field, and decided to enroll at LaGuardia Community College. The engineering program here was well-respected, the college was affordable, and I learned that most if not all credits would be applied towards my major when I transfer to a four-year college.”

She started at LaGuardia in September 2013, and enrolled her then 18-month-old daughter, Sophie, in the college’s on-campus, subsidized daycare, the Early Childhood Learning Center (ECLC).

Not having done much math since high school, she placed into pre-algebra, a developmental math course, which she was required to pass before she could take college-level math courses. “I embraced having to take pre-algebra. I got to relearn math I’d done in the past, and learn new things.”

She passed pre-algebra and continued taking math courses, which went well until she got to Calculus II. The first time she took it, she was overwhelmed with a new baby that kept her up nursing at all hours. During the second round, she had a miscarriage mid-semester, and then took off time to care for her mother who was battling cancer. So, she took it a third time, which was going great until she had a major respiratory issue. She took it a fourth time, and at last passed it, with an A-.

“I worked so hard for my A-!” says Ramona. “Calculus II was a real character-builder for me. It taught me how to study better, how to teach myself, and how to focus. I’ve had truly phenomenal professors. They challenged me and set high expectations. I was like, ‘Wow—I’ve got to be on it. Life’s real, buck up.’ The professors really care about students—if you put work in, they definitely care.”

Ramona also learned how to ask for help. “I’ve gone to the Math Lab so often that literally everyone there knows me.”

“I couldn’t have gotten here without LaGuardia’s Early Childhood Learning Center,” says Ramona. “Going to school is hard; majoring in engineering is hard. Being able to have my children on campus with me, in an enriching environment where I know they’re being well-taken care of and are learning so much, is incredible. They have swimming classes, and go on field trips. And it’s affordable! It made me feel like there was no reason for me to not go to school and better myself.”

Her son, Leon “Jack,” is in pre-K at the Center; Sophie is now in first grade at a school near the family’s home in East Elmhurst, Queens.

Having access to affordable on-campus childcare allowed Ramona to have two career-developing internships secured through First Big Break, LaGuardia’s Honors Internship Program.

She worked for two years at MTA Bridges and Tunnels, first in its archive and then in its Mechanical Group. “I wouldn’t have gotten this internship if I hadn’t taken learned about Robert Moses, the urban planner who shaped New York City’s highways, tunnels and bridges, in a social sciences class at LaGuardia. This showed me that the core curriculum is there for a good reason, even if you don’t know how it’ll benefit you at the time. It’s important to be a well-rounded individual. Life has an incredible way of bringing many experiences into a full circle.”

Currently, Ramona is an intern at Boyce Technologies, a Long Island City company that manufactures communications devices for the NYC Subway, among other products. At Boyce, Ramona works in R&D with mechanical engineers, doing odd jobs like making gussets and circuit board chassis. “I absolutely love it here. The culture is great. It’s fast-paced. I get to put my skills to the test, as well as learn invaluable insights of the engineering world through my mentors. This internship has helped me determine that I definitely want to pursue a career in mechanical engineering.”

Ramona thanks the professors who have challenged her and supported her journey. In mathematics, Mahamane Traore, Tao Chen, Frank Wang, Abdou Drame, Mahdi Majidi-Zolbanin, and Rudha Meangru. She credits Professor Philippe Mercier for giving her an appreciation for chemistry. And she says that Physics Professor Roman Senkov taught “one of the best classes I ever had.”

“LaGuardia has been amazing for me,” says Ramona. “By the time I graduate, I’ll have been here for about five years. I’ve met wonderful people here and I’ll miss them all very much.”

• • • •
LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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CCNY visiting poet Nicole Sealey wins Hodder Fellowship

Visiting Poet at CCNY and Hodder Fellowship winner Nicole Sealey. Photo by Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Award-winning poet and author Nicole Sealey is adding another accolade to her numerous honors. The Doris Lippman Visiting Poet in The City College of New York’s MFA in Creative Writing Program is one of five winners internationally of 2019-2020 Hodder fellowships.

The awards are presented by Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts. They provide artists and humanists in the early stages of their careers, with “much more than ordinary intellectual and literary gifts,” an opportunity to undertake significant new work.

Sealey’s fellow nationally renowned co-recipients are:

Announcing the awards, Michael Cadden, chair of the Lewis Center, said, “Mrs. Hodder recognized the need for what she called ‘studious leisure’ to give people the time they need to tackle major projects. Her model was John Milton’s father, who underwrote the research necessary to the creation of Paradise Lost. In the University’s role as a patron of the arts, we’re happy to welcome these five talented artists to the Princeton community. We hope they experience their Hodder year as ‘paradise regained.’”

Past Hodder Fellows have included Librarian of Congress James H. Billingtonnovelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, playwright and actor Danai Gurira, choreographer Nora Chipaumire, and composer and lyricist Michael Friedman.

Born in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Sealey is the author of “Ordinary Beast,” a finalist for the 2018 PEN Open Book Award and the 2018 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and “The Animal After Whom Other Animals Are Named,” winner of the 2015 Drinking Gourd Chapbook Poetry Prize.

Her other honors include the Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize from The American Poetry Review, a Daniel Varoujan Award, and the Poetry International Prize. She has, in addition, received fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, CantoMundo, Cave Canem, MacDowell Colony, and the Poetry Project.

Sealey’s work has appeared in numerous publications including The New Yorker and The New York Times.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by The Chronicle of Higher Education out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
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York College Student Named NYC Youth Poet Laureate

Camryn Bruno hopes to raise awareness of social issues – and help others find new ways to speak about them – through poetry. Now that she has been named NYC Youth Poet Laureate for 2019, the first-year York College student has a platform to do just that.

“We are very proud of Camryn Bruno and the fact that York College is host to New York City’s 2019 Youth Poet Laureate,” says Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Through her words, Camryn encourages us all to think critically about the world and to become civically engaged. As Camryn progresses through CUNY and beyond, we know she will continue to call attention to important issues in our society.”

The 19-year-old Bruno distinguished herself among a field of 15 finalists in the poetry contest, held at Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum on Nov. 5. The NYC Youth Poet Laureate program, sponsored by Urban Word NYC and NYC Votes, provides a platform for young writers to spark change through literary excellence and civic engagement. Bruno currently is majoring in communications technology, with minors in sociology and English. She expresses a love of working with children, and says she would enjoy becoming a teaching artist, hosting workshops and teaching children about poetry.

Bruno, who came to New York City from Tobago one year ago, calls herself a fierce advocate for women, immigrants and minorities and writes about injustice in its many forms, including the societal constructs that keep people in poverty.  Her work also focuses on colorism – discrimination based on skin color – racism and the Black Lives Matter movement. Looking at society and “the way of life of people,” she draws her inspiration from news stories and her Twitter feed, and says her poetry “really comes from the heart.”

“I think it’s more about getting the social issues out there, and that’s where I started off, writing about teenage pregnancy and the school-to-prison pipeline,” says Bruno. “It’s really about finding social issues and finding a new way to speak about them.”

The winning poem, “Politics Bite,” shows Bruno’s skillful use of wordplay and conveys outrage over widespread apathy about government, despite persistent inequality and corruption.

Bruno got her introduction to poetry in 2014, when she lived in Tobago and participated in the 2 Cents Movement, a spoken-word poetry program. At a poetry and storytelling workshop, she met her future mentor, Derron Sandy, who took note of her talent in writing and performance. “I used to write all the time, but I didn’t think that what I was writing was spoken-word poetry,” Bruno says, noting that Sandy encouraged her to develop her skills.

She participated in her school’s poetry slam each year until she graduated from Tobago’s Bishop High School; she won the 2015 Zelma A. Cowie Award for Civic Mindedness, the Ms. Tobago Heritage Personality Competition, and several Trinidad and Tobago National Literary Youth Awards. And, in 2017, she became the youngest competitor to win Trinidad and Tobago’s First Citizens Bank National Poetry Slam Championship.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Enter Your Film Into the 2019 CUNY Film Festival

SHARE YOUR CINEMATIC VISION!

The New Media Lab at Macaulay Honors College is now accepting submissions for the 11th Annual CUNY Film Festival, which will take place April 12, 13 and 14 in New York City.

Students, alumni and current faculty from every CUNY campus are invited to submit their work online. Short films of up to 60 minutes are accepted in any genre. There is no submission fee and no limit to the number of recent works that filmmakers may submit.

Deadline for entries is midnight, January 24, 2019.

Film entries will be reviewed by a jury of noted filmmakers, students, media professionals and actors. Filmmakers whose work is accepted into the festival will have opportunities to promote their films, review the work of their peers, engage with industry professionals, and earn small prizes.

HOW TO SUBMIT A FILM

The CUNY Film Festival is the only student-run film festival of its kind, celebrating excellence in film and providing a platform for CUNY students and alumni to showcase their work. Since its inception in 2008, the festival has brought together filmmakers from CUNY’s senior campuses, community colleges, and graduate programs. The festival promotes creative collaboration with the larger filmmaker community and fosters engagement with industry professionals.


Historian Laurie Woodard is CCNY’s latest NEH award winner

CCNY history professor and NEH Faculty Award winner Laurie Woodard

City College of New York historian Laurie Woodard is the recipient of a 2018 National Endowment for the Humanitiesfaculty award for her book project on famed actress and civil rights activist Fredi Washington’s role in the Harlem Renaissance.  Woodard’s award is among 13 nationwide to support advanced research in the humanities by teachers at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Tribal Colleges and Universities.

Overall, 253 humanities projects nationwide will receive a total of $14.8 million in support from the NEH.

Woodard is the fourth faculty member from City College’s Division of Humanities and the Arts to receive an NEH award – all for writing projects — since 2016. Recent recipients include Václav ParisMikhal Dekel and Andras Kisery.

It’s also Woodard’s second major honor from the NEH. She received its   Schomburg Scholar-in-Residence Fellowship in 2008-2009.

In her current project, Woodard places an African American female performing artist (Washington) at the center of the narrative of the New Negro (or Harlem) Renaissance, the early 20th century movement for social, political, and economic justice led by black artists, intellectuals, and activists.

“My book illuminates the vital influence of black, female, performing artists on the movement; unifies the seemingly diverse strains of the Renaissance; and demonstrates the ways in which Washington and the New Negro Renaissance are central components of the long civil rights narrative and our understanding of the African American quest for civil and human rights,” said Woodard.

Best known for her role as “Peola” in the 1934 classic film “Imitation of Life,” Washington was active in the Harlem Renaissance (1920s – 1930s). She quit Hollywood after her last film role in “One Mile from Heaven” in 1937 to return to New York where she continued to work in theatre and civil rights activism.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by The Chronicle of Higher Education out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


JOHN JAY HOSTS ITS 37TH ANNUAL CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY PARTY

John Jay Hosts its 37th Annual Children’s Holiday Party

 

“My mom would bring us to the holiday party to get our gifts. Depending on the year, that could have been the only gift I got.”—Naomi Nwosu-Stewart

 

During this time of year, it’s pretty easy to get caught up in the holiday madness—finding the best sale, planning the perfect vacation, and tying up loose ends at work or school. You can lose sight of what the season is really about. But in the true spirit of giving, on December 7th, the John Jay community came together to bring holiday cheer to neighborhood families at the 37th annual Jack Brennan Children’s Holiday Party. The party was first organized in 1981 by friends and colleagues of Jack Brennan, a former John Jay Security Director, in honor of his memory and generosity. The purpose of the celebration has always been simple yet compelling: Assist families struggling during the holiday season, bringing young children hope and joy.

 

“No one was singled out, and it was nice knowing that there were people out there who cared about those of us who were less fortunate.”—Naomi Nwosu-Stewart

 

“The first time I went to the party I was six years old. Our pastor, Reverend Robert Helm, knew we didn’t have a lot. And, because he was a professor at John Jay, he told my mom about the holiday party,” says Naomi Nwosu-Stewart, Director of Enrollment Management Services. “After that, my mom would always bring us to the holiday party to get our gifts. Depending on the year, that could have been the only gift I got.” For young Nwosu-Stewart, the holiday celebration meant more than receiving presents. “I remember the party as a moment of joy where I could play with other children. It was a time when we didn’t have to think about our situation,” she says. “No one was singled out, and it was nice knowing that there were people out there who cared about those of us who were less fortunate.” Understanding the difference this event can make in a child’s life, Nwosu-Stewart encourages her own children to give back. “My kids ask to do chores so that they can earn money, go to the store, and buy a gift for a child at the event.”

Volunteers enjoying the event

Volunteers enjoying the event

 

“Most of the children invited come from shelters, community service agencies, and foster homes. For many of them, this will be the only holiday celebration they have.” —Stephanie DiBrienza

 

More than 20 volunteers—including Brennan’s grandson Michael Davidian and his children—participated in the event this year, handing out nearly 600 bags of toys to over 400 children. “An event like this party is a great reminder to be grateful for what we have and understand that the holidays aren’t always a bright light for everyone,” says Stephanie DiBrienza, Enrollment Management & Student Affairs Special Events Specialist. “Most of the children invited come from shelters, community service agencies, and foster homes. For many of them, this will be the only holiday celebration they have.” With food, face painting, carnival games, the John Jay Bloodhound, and Santa Claus, children and their families came to the event eager and excited to be part of this annual holiday celebration.

Jack Brennan’s grandson Michael Davidian and his children

Jack Brennan’s grandson Michael Davidian and his children

More scenes from the event:

A father and child at the John Jay Annual Children's Holiday Party

Facepainting at the John Jay Annual Children's Holiday Party

Bloodhound and volunteer at the Children's Holiday party

Family with John Jay BLoodhound at the Annual Children's Party

Bloodhound posing with kids at the John Jay Annual Children's Holiday Party

John Jay Volunteers at the Annual Children's Holiday Party

Scene from John Jay's Annual Children's Holiday Party


SUCCESS AT THE 11TH ANNUAL FIRST-YEAR STUDENT SHOWCASE

Success At The 11th Annual First-Year Student Showcase

 

On December 6, John Jay held its 11th annual First-Year Student Showcase, highlighting the research and creativity of the freshman class. The showcase gave students—many of whom have never conducted research or presented in front of a large group—the opportunity to shine. More than 375 presentations covered a broad array of topics, from immigration and the opioid epidemic, to police brutality and medical insurance. After thanking the 73 faculty members, staff professionals, and student coaches that helped guide the first-year students through their research, President Karol V. Mason got the crowd going by calling out each of the groups heavily represented at the event—APPLE CorpsACEAdelanteEarly Start, and SEEK. “I’m excited to walk around and see all of your research,” said Mason. “And please walk around and learn from each other. That’s what we’re here for.” To find out more about the First-Year Student Showcase experience, we had the opportunity to interview two incredible students before and during the event.

Yi-Chen Wu

Yi-Chen Wu

 

“When we were presenting, our classmates were by our sides, so it was not as intimidating as we thought it would be.” —Yi-Chen Wu

 

Yi-Chen “Tina” Wu
Wu is an international student from Taiwan, majoring in Forensic Psychology and is in the Early Start Program. For her First-Year Student Showcase project, Wu and her team researched black police brutality victims with missing internal organs. Before the showcase the team reviewed lawsuit documents, autopsy reports, news broadcasts, and even popular films, like Get Out, to help understand the topic. “There was a case that we reviewed in class about Everett Palmer Jr. He was a 41-year-old veteran who died in custody,” said Wu. “The law enforcement agencies immediately concluded his death as a suicide. But what makes it suspicious is that his brain, heart, throat, and spine were missing. We looked into how surviving relatives can file federal civil rights lawsuits.”

Wu went on to explain that coming from Taiwan she wasn’t familiar with racism in America, but to give her research context, she researched discrimination against black Americans both currently and historically, specifically Dr. James Marion Sims’ medical experimentation on enslaved black women without anesthesia. “They justified their practices by saying that blacks are insensitive to pain and that they are subhuman,” said Wu. “In Get Out, they took away black people’s organs because they believed that blacks were physically supernatural.” Wu hopes that her presentation helps others become more aware of their rights when a deceased victim’s internal organs go missing, and she hopes to go back to Taiwan and help formerly incarcerated people transition back into society.

As for the experience presenting at the First-Year Student Showcase, Wu was happy to have teammates. “During the presentation, my group members helped each other out by picking up where you left off,” said Wu. “Luckily, when we were presenting, our classmates were by our sides, so it was not as intimidating as we thought it would be.”

Maral Artykova

Maral Artykova

 

“I learned to be patient and listen to my groupmates, which led to us having a great project and research.” — Maral Artykova

 

Maral Artykova
Artykova is an immigrant from Turkmenistan who moved to the United States when she was 15 years old. As members of the APPLE Corps program, Artykova and her team researched how litter affects the perception of criminality in a neighborhood for their First-Year Student Showcase project. Prior to the event, the team went to five different New York City neighborhoods, asking people questions about their quality of life and how it changed throughout the years. “We asked, ‘Have you seen littering in this neighborhood? What do you think about the litter in this neighborhood? Is it a big or small problem?’” said Artykova. “At the end, our whole analysis came to the conclusion that people who saw someone litter that day had a bigger perception of criminality in that neighborhood.”

Understanding the conclusions of her research, Artykova urged everyone not to create stereotypes about those that live in litter-filled neighborhoods. “We talked to the people in the neighborhoods that had a bunch of litter, and they were very nice and interested in this topic,” said Artykova. “It’s very wrong for us to assume that because there is litter in a neighborhood that it’s a dangerous place and no one should go there.” Artykova hopes that her presentation helps others become more aware of the labels people create based on initial perceptions.

“I am interested in breaking down stereotypes because I am an immigrant and I advocate for those who are wrongly accused of being bad people,” she said. “One of my solutions for this project was to look into the Department of Sanitation’s budget and see how we can allocate some money into cleaning up these neighborhoods and changing the stereotypes.” Using this presentation as a stepping stone, Artykova is looking forward to one day working in the Community Affairs Bureau of the NYPD where she can use her public speaking and people skills to improve communities.

Artykova was grateful for what she learned from the First-Year Student Showcase experience. “The showcase taught me patience. I was rushing because I wanted to get everything done quickly and my groupmates told me I had to be patient. They didn’t want to rush or jump to conclusions,” said Artykova. “I learned to be patient and listen to my groupmates, which led us to having a great project and research.”

 

More scenes from the event:

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

President Karol Mason speaking at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Student at First Year Student Showcase


Baruch College’s MA in Corporate Communication Program Named a Finalist in PRWeek Awards 2019 Competition

 

Second straight year the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences degree program selected among the top five for the “Outstanding Education Program” of the year award

The Master of Arts in Corporate Communication program at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences is a finalist for a 2019 PRWeek Award in the category of “Outstanding Education Program.”

This represents the second consecutive year the MA in Corporate Communication program has been selected a finalist for the award by the leading industry magazine.

Baruch will compete against American University, Boston University, DePaul University, and Elon University for this category’s trophy at the 20th annual event on March 21, 2019 in New York City.

“In the U.S., there are over 180 graduate programs with a similar focus, and being recognized as among the top five for two years in a row underscores the value and quality of the program,” said Michael B. Goodman, PhD, Director of the MA in Corporate Communication program. “Our students, faculty, alumni, and professional advisors take full advantage of the mission of Baruch College and our location in Manhattan as the platform for the best practitioners in the profession.”

PRWeek’s “Outstanding Education Program” award recognizes achievements and innovations in the following areas: curriculum, faculty, enrollment, impact on the industry, and placement success. PRWeek said, “special attention will be paid to effectiveness in preparing students for long-term success.”

Graduates of Baruch’s MA in Corporate Communication program have successful careers in public and private companies, not-for-profits, government agencies, public relations firms, and as independent consultants. There are approximately 60 students enrolled in the program for the 2018-19 academic year.

A full list of the 2019 PRWeek awards finalists is available here.

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Baruch College among the “Top 25 Universities for Getting a Front-Office Job” at J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs

Ranking identifies top schools where the global investment firms recruit and those that best prepare graduates for client-facing positions

Baruch College has been ranked among the “Top 25 universities for getting a front-office job at J.P. Morgan” and the “Top 25 universities for getting a front-office job at Goldman Sachs” by eFinancialCareers, adding to the College’s growing roster of recognition for preparing students for career success.

In the two rankings, Baruch placed:

#5 for J.P. Morgan

#19 for Goldman Sachs

On both lists, Baruch College joins such prominent U.S. and U.K. schools as Harvard University, Stanford University, University of Chicago, Cornell University, University of Oxford, and University of Cambridge, among others.

“We are proud that our graduates are being hired by top financial firms,” said H. Fenwick Huss, Willem Kookyer Dean, Zicklin School of Business. “Zicklin’s business programs prepare our students to compete in the global business marketplace.”

The rankings are based on the total number of alumni from each school currently working at J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs, courtesy of LinkedIn, combined with employment data from an eFinancialCareers database that tracks the percentage of graduates from each school who work in front-office positions at the banks.

 

J.P. Morgan: “Big headliner is Manhattan’s Baruch College”

eFinancialCareers, a trade publication, reports that the highest ranked schools on the J.P. Morgan list “isn’t all that surprising,” with London School of Economics, New York University, Columbia University, and University of Pennsylvania occupying the first four spots.

“However, the big headliner is Manhattan’s Baruch College, which has been quietly feeding Wall Street for decades with its finance-heavy curriculum and its close proximity to Wall Street. More Baruch alumni currently work at J.P. Morgan than any other school, according to our research,” the publication said.

 

Goldman Sachs: “Four percent chance of receiving an offer”

The odds of landing a job at one of the world’s premier investment banks is daunting.

According to eFinancialCareers, individuals have about a four percent chance of receiving an offer if they apply for a role at Goldman Sachs. Additionally, the publication says if a job applicant did not attend an Ivy League school, their acceptance rate “drops precipitously.”

 

Starr Career Development Center

The eFinancialCareers rankings point to several factors that are hallmarks of Baruch, including: excellent academics, students known for being strivers, and a robust career center engaging with undergraduates the moment they step on campus, to Commencement, and beyond.

Baruch’s Starr Career Development Center offers a seemingly endless list of resources and support services, including skill development programs, internship and job search help, resume and interview workshops, and multiple career fairs.

Besides being student-focused, the career center cultivates relationships with prestigious and top-tier firms and organizations that open doors for students.

“Starr has helped broker a number of touch points for students to interact with recruiters and alumni from J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs,” said Ellen Stein, director of the Starr Career Development Center. “We have hosted the firms through various events on campus, and have encouraged students to attend.”

According to Stein, the Center has “a track record of Financial Leadership students obtaining internships and employment at top-tier investment firms. Alumni of this program, who are in front-office positions, come back to Baruch and participate on panels, conduct mock interviews, and network and mentor students.”

Stein added that, “Baruch alumni continue to clear the pathway for students to apply for these type of coveted positions.”

The Center’s executive summary report for 2017 reveals that over 1,100 employers hired Baruch students. Some of the top employers were JP Morgan, Ernst Young, Morgan Stanley, Deloitte, RSM, Citi, Bank of America, Moody’s, KPMG, and BNY Mellon.

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CCNY-Yale researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

Deformable particles like cells can fill complex geometries more efficiently than fixed shapes like circles. With the new deformable particle model introduced by Shattuck and O’Hern, researchers can also “simulate” deformable systems more efficiently and accurately.

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.

Mark D. Shattuck, professor of physics at City College’s Benjamin Levich Institute, and researchers at Yale developed the new efficient computational model. It allows simulated particles to realistically change shape while conserving volume during interactions with other particles. Their results appear in the latest edition of   “Physical Review Letters.”

Developing computer simulations of particles, such as sand grains and ball bearings, is straightforward because they do not readily change shape. Doing the same for cells and other deformable particles is more difficult, and the computational models researchers currently use do not accurately capture how soft particles deform.

The computational model developed by Shattuck and lead investigator from Yale, Corey O’Hern, tracks points on the surfaces of polygonal cells. Each surface point moves independently, in accordance with its surroundings and neighboring particles, allowing the shape of the particle to change. It is more computationally demanding than current simulations, but necessary to correctly model particle deformation.

“We now have an efficient accurate computational model to investigate how discrete, deformable particles pack,” Shattuck said. It also allows researchers to easily adjust cell-cell interactions, consider directed motion, and can be used for both 2D and 3D systems.

One unexpected result from the model shows that deformable particles must deviate from a sphere by more than 15% to completely fill a space.

“In our new model, if no external pressure is applied to the system, the particles are spherical,” O’Hern said. “As the pressure is increased, the particles deform, increasing the fraction of space that they occupy. When the particles completely fill the space, they will be 15% deformed. Whether it’s bubbles, droplets, or cells, it’s a universal result for soft, particle systems.”

Among other applications, this technology may give researchers a new tool to examine how cancerous tumors metastasize. “We can now create realistic models of the packing of cells in tumors using computer simulations, and ask important questions such as whether a cell in a tumor needs to change its shape to become more capable of motion and eventually leave the tumor.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


2018 ANNUAL DAY OF GIVING RAISES OVER $204,167 FOR STUDENTS

2018 Annual Day of Giving Raises over $204,167 For Students

 

On Wednesday, November 14, the John Jay community came together to raise over $204,167 for our students. Our initial goal of raising $50,000 for the Student Emergency Fund was surpassed, raising $104,167—over seven times the amount raised last year for the fund. And, the first $50,000 will be matched two-to-one by the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation.

 

“Your actions on the Annual Day of Giving demonstrates our community’s compassion and support for the most vulnerable among us. —Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College

 

The Student Emergency Fund is critical for many students facing food and housing insecurity, family crises, and catastrophic events. Its main purpose is to help students overcome these obstacles, allowing them to stay in College, and reach the graduation finish line.

The Annual Day of Giving was also a tremendous success in terms of community support and spirit. Almost 100 volunteers manned the phones, and over 352 people donated generously to the fund. “So many of you participated from every corner of our community, including administrators, faculty, staff, alumni, and students,” said President Karol V. Mason. “Your actions on the Annual Day of Giving demonstrates our community’s compassion and support for the most vulnerable among us. Thank you.”

 

“I’m glad we beat our fundraising goal by such a large amount.” —Fatime Uruci, ’18

 

For Fatime Uruci, Class of 2018 Student Council President, making phone calls was actually her favorite part of the day. “It really was heartwarming to see how many people showed up this year,” said Uruci. “It was also a nice surprise to see that the care-kit initiative our Student Council started was being highlighted as one of the things that John Jay is doing to help our students in need. I was happy to help out even in the slightest way, and I’m glad we beat our fundraising goal by such a large amount.”

Scenes from the day:

President Karol V. Mason with Jules Kroll, Chairman of the Board of John Jay College Foundation, Inc. Board of Trustees

President Karol V. Mason with Jules Kroll, Chairman of the Board of John Jay College Foundation, Inc. Board of Trustees

Mason getting psyched up for calls. 

Mason getting psyched up for calls. 

Mason greeting a four-legged friend.

Mason greeting a four-legged friend. 

Students and staff manning the phones

Students and staff manning the phones. 

Senior VP Steven Titan connecting with a donor

Senior VP Steven Titan connecting with a donor

The John Jay Cheerleading Squad with two excited bloodhounds

The John Jay Cheerleading Squad with two excited bloodhounds

Bloodhound spirit!

Bloodhound spirit! 

President Karol V. Mason talking a “volunteer” through the process

President Karol V. Mason talking a “volunteer” through the process

 

Success!

Success!


CUNY SPH’s Center for Innovation in Mental Health partners with Coordinated Behavioral Care to help support New York City Medicaid recipients

NEW YORK – [December 11, 2018]—The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Center for Innovation in Mental Health (CIMH), a collaboration with the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), has partnered with Coordinated Behavioral Care (CBC), a New York City not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of care for Medicaid beneficiaries with serious mental illness, chronic health conditions, and/or substance use disorders, to evaluate programs across the CBC Network, conduct quality improvement initiatives, and establish innovative best practices.

The CBC Network is comprised of more than 50 community-based behavioral health organizations offering a comprehensive and integrated delivery system of mental, substance use, medical, and social determinants of health services that impact close to 100,000 New York City Medicaid recipients.

The natural alignment between CIMH’s specific expertise and CBC’s rising need to identify and scale innovative best practices across a growing network, makes this a unique and exciting partnership that will continue to enhance direct services.

“The CIMH team is excited to partner with CBC,” said CIMH director Dr. Virna Little. “It’s a great opportunity to show the impact that behavioral health networks can have on the populations and organizations they serve.”

“The community-based behavioral health service providers that CBC represents, whether through our Health Home and/or Independent Practice Association (IPA), are at the forefront of innovative program design and delivery,” said Dr. Jorge Petit, CBC’s President and CEO. “This partnership will allow us to shine a light on the innovative practices, programs and services that exist within the CBC Network, and with the help of CIMH, we will be able to offer a more formal evaluation structure that will allow these efforts to be scaled to impact practice delivery, influence policy, and inform needed alternative payment initiatives and VBP.”

Partnerships like that of CBC and CIMH enhance the ability of both organizations to impact the quality and value of care and realize better outcomes for the residents of New York City. Through the development of a CBC Network Practice-Based Hub with the support and guidance of CIMH, the NYC behavioral health sector will benefit from the dissemination of these Practice-Based Approaches (PBAs). PBAs are considered innovative or distinctive community-based interventions, programs or services. They are designed to address clients’ needs and focus on effectiveness and improving individuals’ health outcomes.

About Coordinated Behavioral Care (CBC)

CBCis a not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of care for New Yorkers with serious mental illness, chronic health conditions and/or substance use disorders. CBC brings together over fifty community-based health and human services organizations which provide access to quality treatment, housing, employment and other needed services. CBC operates a Health Home that provides care coordination services to tens of thousands of New Yorkers of all ages, with 50+ community-based care management agencies located in all five boroughs. CBC also operates an Independent Practice Association (IPA) including a citywide network of New York State-licensed primary care, mental health and substance use treatment services, thousands of units of supportive housing, primary medical, recovery and support services, and assistance with concrete needs such as food, employment and housing. Among CBC’s innovations is the Pathway Home program, offering Care Transition services during the transition to the community following discharge from a psychiatric admission.

About CIMH

The Center for Innovation in Mental Health (CIMH)  as the academic and evaluation arm of the NYC Department of Health Innovation Lab, provides coordination between the NYC Department of Health and other researchers, investigators, and academic institutions; in addition, it provides direct research and evaluation services to assist the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on all aspects of mental health quality improvement, technical assistance, evaluation, best practices dissemination, and data development, analysis, and management. CIMH is a part of the City University of New York (CUNY) School of Public Health, and hosts training activities for all CUNY students and NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) including a Mental Health Methods Series, the Interdisciplinary Academy for Professional Development in Mental Health, and quality improvement initiatives to improve clinicians’ skills in process improvement.

Contact Information :

Coordinated Behavioral Care

http://www.cbcare.org/

Jorge R. Petit, MD

646-930-8803

 

Center for Innovation in Mental Health

https://www.cunycimh.org/

Virna Little, PsyD

     Coordinated Behavioral Care logo


Baruch College’s Abdourahamane Diallo Named a 2020 Schwarzman Scholar

BaruchCollegeStudentNamed2020SchwarzmanScholar

 

Zicklin School of Business undergraduate selected for program designed  to prepare future global leaders

Abdourahamane Diallo ’18 has been selected as Baruch College’s first Schwarzman Scholar, one of the worlds’ most prestigious graduate fellowships.

The Zicklin School of Business senior is one of 147 students selected among more than 2,800 candidates from around the globe following a rigorous application process that assessed the highest level of leadership potential and academic ability. Along with his fellow scholars, Diallo will pursue a master’s degree in global affairs at Tsinghua University, one of the country’s leading universities, beginning in August 2019.

Diallo vividly recalls when he first learned of being chosen as a Schwarzman Scholar.

“I was on campus reading news on my phone when I got an email alert that said ‘congratulations, you were selected for the Schwarzman Scholarship,”’ Diallo said in an interview. “I screamed a little bit and thought ‘oh my god.’ It was exciting news and a great moment.”

Diallo joins students from 38 countries and 119 universities who comprise the class of 2020. His fellow scholars include a medical doctor who founded a science policy think tank in partnership with London City Hall and the European Commission, a writer of a winning essay that named the NASA Mars rover – Curiosity, and an activist who successfully petitioned the Obama White House to increase the number of Syrian refugees admitted to the United States.

“Schwarzman Scholars are known for their outstanding leadership potential, good character and motivation to work together to create globally minded solutions to the world’s shared challenges,” said Valeria Hymas, Deputy Director of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising at Baruch College.

Hymas added, “Abdourahamane Diallo is emblematic of these ideals. His remarkable achievement of becoming a Schwarzman Scholar is an example of Baruch’s students’ exceptional level of dedication, rigor, and commitment to envisioning positive global changes.”

Leadership, Character and Motivation

Diallo will graduate in December 2018 from Baruch’s Zicklin School of Business majoring in finance investment and a minor in communication studies (conflict resolution). While attending Baruch, he obtained internships with some of the largest American companies: Blackrock Inc. as a quantitative risk analyst, the U.S. Department of Commerce as an international trade specialist, and JP Morgan Chase as an investment banking risk analyst.

His other activities and interests extended well beyond study time and office hours.

Diallo volunteered for the Baruch Math Department as a note taker for disabled students. He founded the Guinean Students Association at Baruch and expanded the club to other City University of New York campuses, which has become a non-profit organization called Guineans Succeeding in America. Diallo has also held prominent leadership roles in several College clubs, including Le Club Francais at Baruch, Baruch Toastmaster, and Sigma Alpha Honor Society.

Outside of campus, Diallo is actively involved with the community. He is currently the Secretary General of the African Advisory Council of the Bronx and is a member of the Bronx Community Board #3. Diallo is also the founder of the Guinean New Generation Movement.

Goals: Helping home country to Harvard University

Originally from Guinea, Diallo is looking to leverage his time in China to build a network with local manufacturers and entrepreneurs. With an interest in international trade, he wants to learn how his native country can essentially be a “bigger player in the global market in terms of trading.”

After completing the Schwarzman Scholars program, Diallo intends to pursue another MBA at Harvard University.

“Abdourahamane’s success should serve as an inspiration to all Baruch students that prestigious fellowships are well within their grasp,” Hymas said. “His time in China at Tsinghua University will provide him with a transformative academic and professional experience that will equip him with the skills, knowledge and community to bolster his continued success in any future endeavor he envisions.”

About the Schwarzman Scholars Program

The Schwarzman Scholarship program is designed to “prepare future leaders for success in a world where China plays a key global role.” The program was inspired by the Rhodes Scholarship hosted by Oxford University, but with the goal of confronting the difficult challenges of the 21st century.

Scholars chosen for this program have “demonstrated exemplary leadership qualities and the potential to bridge and understand cultural and political differences.”

Stephen A. Schwarzman, Chairman, chief executive and co-founder of the private equity firm The Blackstone Group, created the Schwarzman Scholars Program. Many current and former world leaders are on the Schwarzman Scholars advisory board, including Tony Blair, Colin Powell, Condoleeza Rice, Henry Kissinger, and Nicolas Sarkozy.

Baruch students interested in applying for the Schwarzman Scholarship or other nationally competitive awards can visit the College’s Fellowships website.

 

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CUNY Expands Its Promising ‘ACE’ Program to Lehman College in Partnership with Robin Hood Foundation

The City University of New York is expanding its promising Accelerate, Complete and Engage (ACE) program to Lehman College, thanks to a $1.1 million grant from the Robin Hood Foundation. ACE, launched at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Fall 2015, also with initial seed funding from Robin Hood, aims to double four-year baccalaureate graduation rates.

The program at Lehman will begin in Fall 2019 and serve 125 first-time, full-time freshmen, and 125 full-time transfer students who enter with an associate degree. CUNY aims to further expand ACE to its other senior colleges.

“With the generous support of Robin Hood, more CUNY students will have the benefit of an innovative program of proven efficacy that will enable them to finish their bachelor’s degrees in four years,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The ACE program, based on CUNY’s successful ASAP program that has more than doubled timely graduation rates in associate degree programs, is another example of CUNY’s commitment to its students’ success and its impact in public higher education.”

ACE is modeled on CUNY’s successful Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), launched in 2007 to help students complete associate degrees as quickly as possible. Both programs help mitigate obstacles that often prevent a student from graduating in a timely manner, if at all, by providing students with academic, social and financial supports.

ASAP was conceived and launched with the goal of helping students obtain an associate degree in no more than three years and will serve 25,000 this year, thanks to support from the State and City of New York. ACE was conceived to support baccalaureate students in the same manner, helping them graduate in no more than five years. The ASAP three-year graduation rate of 53 percent is more than three times higher than the national urban community college three-year graduation rate of 16 percent, and more than double that of similar CUNY associate degree-seeking students at 25 percent. The expectation is that ACE’s trajectory of impact and eventual systemwide scaling will follow that of ASAP.

Participating students receive a set of financial resources and structured supports to ensure timely degree completion: tuition waivers to close any gap after need-based financial aid; free unlimited monthly MetroCards to defray commuting expenses; textbook assistance; early registration options to ensure their enrollment in the courses they need to fulfill requirements; and summer and winter course-taking opportunities. Students work with an assigned personal adviser and a career specialist, who monitor and guide their progress from freshman year through graduation. They also receive assistance finding internships and applying for research opportunities and scholarships.

“Half of the students that attend Lehman come from families that make less than $30,000 a year. These students don’t have access to the ‘extras’ that so many people take for granted, the hidden advantages that make succeeding in college easier,” said Lehman College President José Luis Cruz. “But an education is the way to upward mobility for these students, so we’re thrilled that Robin Hood is making it possible for more students to succeed.”

The ACE program’s great promise to raise four-year bachelor’s graduation rates is already visible. CUNY evaluation data show that ACE students have stronger retention and degree momentum rates than a matched comparison group of similar students. As of Fall 2018, 70% of the ACE students who entered John Jay in Fall 2015 were on track to graduate at the end of this year, compared with 37% of similar non-ACE students, a phenomenal interim result. Additionally, CUNY evaluation data that ACE participation benefits all subgroups of students, with noticeable narrowing of achievement gaps by ethnicity and race.

The program requires students to pursue a major from an approved list of ACE majors; enroll in at least 15 credits each semester; attend one ACE seminar per month; meet at least once per month with an ACE academic adviser; participate in academic support activities such as math study groups and writing workshops; and complete a series of career-development activities.

ACE is beginning its fourth year at John Jay College and receives funding through Robin Hood, the Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women.“We were proud partners with CUNY on its ASAP program, a game changer for helping thousands of New Yorkers to find sustainable pathways out of poverty for themselves and their families,” said Wes Moore, C.E.O. of Robin Hood. “Robin Hood is thrilled to once again partner with CUNY to make a similar impact with ACE, creating high-impact innovation that benefits New York City’s residents, neighborhoods, and its future.”

Additional funding from Robin Hood is essential to the expansion of ACE to Lehman College. Robin Hood is New York City’s largest poverty-fighting organization, providing nonprofits with financial, material and managerial support. Robin Hood supports schools, food pantries, homeless shelters, health care facilities and workforce training centers.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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SPH doctoral candidate accepts award for union’s role in passing new California labor law

Pamela Vossenas and union members accepting award at APHA 2018 meeting

At the American Public Health Association meeting last month, CUNY SPH doctoral candidate Pamela Vossenas accepted the Tony Mazzocchi Award for Grassroots Activism from the Occupational Health and Safety Section on behalf of UNITE HERE, a labor union representing service workers across the US and Canada, for the passing of a law to prevent injuries to hotel housekeepers. Hotel housekeepers and representatives from UNITE HERE California local unions were also on hand to accept the award that recognized their role.

As UNITE HEREs director of Safety and Health, Vossenas was tasked with coordinating with the local unions to craft the law. After a six-year effort, California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA)Title 8, §3345: Hotel Housekeeping Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention, which requires that employers establish an injury prevention plan that involves housekeepers and their union representatives to reduce hazards, took effect on July 1, 2018.

Hotel housekeepers played a key role in the passage of this law,” emphasized Vossenas.

Nearly 300 UNITE HERE member housekeepers across the state were part of Cal/OSHA’s process over time with half as many giving testimony.The passage of the law marks the first time that an ergonomics-based standard has been enacted especially for the hospitality industry. It may set a precedent for similar worker safety standards beyond California.  Hotel housekeepers are at a disproportionate high risk for musculoskeletal injuries.

This effort was aided by my coursework leadership, case study, risk assessment, ergonomics, corporations and health, research methods,” says Vossenas. I applied what I learned as a doctoral student. The support and expertise of CUNY SPH faculty and classmates contributed as well.

Vossenas chaired a panel session at the 2018 APHA Meeting with hotel housekeepers, worker advocates and occupational experts sharing their perspectives on the collective efforts that won the law. 


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, Week of December 10, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

We have ten instructional days until Winter Break. Please note that we have a full-day of instruction on Friday December 21st. However all after-school programming is cancelled on Friday, December 21st.

  • Thank you to our Kindergarten Team–Aurora Downer, Stacey Gohari, Patricia Salguero & Kate Zelles for creating last week’s All About Me Celebration.
  • Thank you to Upper Grades Computer Science Teachers Margaret Tanzosh & Van Nguyen (plus chaperones Assistant Principal Greg Farrell, Library Media Specialist Roy Whitford & World Languages Teacher Carolina Barriero) for taking NEST+m’s CS50 students to Yale’s CS50 Semester-One Showcase.
  • Tuesday December 11 at 9:00am: Our 5th grade students shine as they take the stage for NEST+m’s annual Ballroom Dancing Celebration.
  • Friday December 14th, 8:30-9:15am: Grades One & Two Family Friday Celebrations

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.

Note that the Regents exam testing schedule is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.


JOHN JAY COLLEGE AWARDED A $7-MILLION GRANT FOR ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH

John Jay College Awarded a $7-Million Grant for Alzheimer’s Research

 

A record, $7.6 million grant awarded by the National Institute on Aging [part of the National Institutes of Health] to the Department of Psychology puts John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the forefront of research into Alzheimer’s disease.

“At John Jay, we are proud of our roots and international expertise in criminal justice, but we are also a liberal arts institution with professors on the leading edge of research and innovation in the sciences and humanities,” said John Jay College President Karol V. Mason. “Research sits at the core of our mission to educate for justice in all its forms and the work of our faculty perform will have a lasting, positive impact on our society.”

Last year, John Jay professors were awarded more than $31 million in grants from outside sources, the most ever for the College and almost double the amount of five years earlier. John Jay is regularly awarded grants in areas as diverse as policing, art exhibitions, theater, and effective treatment of cancer and infectious diseases.

National Institute on Aging logo

“The National Institute on Aging recognizes that John Jay faculty members and their students are conducting top-tier research in a wide variety of fields. It’s an exciting research environment, with student mentees actively engaged every step of the way” said Psychology Department Chair Angela Crossman. “This may be the largest single, research grant, but it is one of the many grants and awards our psychology professors have received to carry out research in areas including; eyewitness testimony, stigma around severe mental illness, and plea bargaining.”

The NIH grant is in the R01 category, which is dedicated to health-related research and development projects.

“This is the largest and most competitive type of NIH grant,” said Amrish Sugrim-Singh, the Assistant Director of the College’s Office of Sponsored Programs, who helped prepare the proposal and will administer the grant. “To be awarded a grant of this stature shows the results of John Jay’s increased institutional support for faculty and the growing importance that research plays at the College.”

The Office for the Advancement of Research expects John Jay will again top the $30 million mark for the 2018-19 school year. Last year the college ranked third among all CUNY colleges.

John Jay professors also ranked first in 2017 in per capita scholarly productivity among the 11 CUNY senior colleges with an average of 2.0 books, chapters or journal publications produced per faculty member.

Learn about the Impact of research by John Jay professors


JOHN JAY HOSTS THE NEW YORK CITY DEBUT OF THE LAVENDER SCARE

John Jay Hosts The New York City Debut Of The Lavender Scare

 

The thought of federal employees being dragged into humiliating interrogations because they didn’t wear lipstick, seemed too masculine or feminine, or went to a bar or a party with other gay people, seems preposterous and outright illegal to us today. But the truth of the matter is, this unconscionable government-sponsored witch hunt happened for decades, ruining the lives of gay people, sending them into hiding and prohibiting them from fruitful careers. That’s why The Lavender Scare, a documentary from Josh Howard, Producer and Director, and Kevin Jennings, Executive Producer, was screened at John Jay on December 5, to shed light on this historical injustice. The film revealed how the U.S. government fired federal employees they discovered to be homosexual.

Josh Howard and Mitchell Draizin enjoying time with John Jay students and faculty

Josh Howard and Mitchell Draizin enjoying time with John Jay students and faculty

 

“They were targeted simply because they were gay. They were dismissed without any kind of justice.” —Josh Howard

 

The Injustice
Just as McCarthyism, or the Red Scare, spread fear and accusations of communist influence, the Lavender Scare made people question if gay men and lesbians were security risks or communist sympathizers—all without a single case or example supporting this theory. “These were loyal hard-working Americans who were serving in the military and civil-service jobs. They were targeted simply because they were gay,” said Howard. “They were dismissed without any kind of justice. They didn’t have a hearing or the ability to present their side of the story. In many cases, they didn’t know who accused them of being gay.” Howard went on to explain that many young people today don’t really understand how difficult life was for LGBTQI people in the beginning of the 1940s and the years that followed. “Homosexual acts were illegal in 49 out of 50 states, and so gay people were criminals. They were mentally ill, and that’s how the government, society, and religion treated us,” said Howard. He went on to describe how police would raid gay bars and practice mass arrests of people in gay bars for no other reason than that it was a gay bar. “I talk to young people today and they say, ‘Are you sure that really happened?’ We’ve come so far from those difficult days.”

The Spark
The events depicted in The Lavender Scare happened long before Stonewall, and long before the Gay Rights Movement was fully underway. In fact, out of fear and intimidation, most of the federal employees that were targeted in the documentary painfully accepted their terminations and tried to move on without drawing more attention to their situations. “Probably thousands of people had been fired before any one of those people stood up and said, ‘Why am I being fired and what did I do wrong?’” said Howard. “Then Frank Kameny, a Harvard trained astronomer and brilliant scientist, was fired because there was an anonymous allegation that he was gay. He was the first person to fight back and appeal his dismissal and file court cases.” Kameny and nine other people picketed the White House in 1965. It was the first Gay Rights demonstration that was ever held, igniting the Gay Rights Movement.

 

“It’s a film that reminds us how easily fear and uncertainty foster acts of discrimination, rolling back the rights of an entire class of people,” —Karol V. Mason

 

The Responsibility
As a college focused on justice issues, President Karol V. Mason reminded the audience that the documentary spoke directly to our mission of exploring justice in its many dimensions. “It’s a film that reminds us how easily fear and uncertainty foster acts of discrimination, rolling back the rights of an entire class of people,” said Mason. “I’m hoping that this is a call to action and a reminder for all of us about why we need to stay vigilant.” She went on to say that CUNY enrolls an estimated 17,000 LGBTQI students, and reminded them that they have a strong network of support, including: Christorpher Rosa, Interim Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs; David Rivera, Co-Chair of the Center for LGBTQI Studies; and Mitch Draizin, the Chair of the CUNY LGBTQI Leadership Council, who helped make the film screening possible. We talked with a some John Jay students at the event, and learned more about their interest in the docmentary.

Yuliya Brodska, Josh Howard, Gina Capone

left to right,Yuliya Brodska, Josh Howard, Gina Capone

Gina Capone ’19
The Lavender Scare screening was an incredible opportunity to be exposed to a justice issue widely discussed on our campus through a different lens. Having the director there for a Q&A also reinforced the notion that giving these stories a platform is always necessary—especially in our current day and age.”

left to right, Dillon Epperson, Annie Tenantitla, Marianne Mba

left to right, Dillon Epperson, Annie Tenantitla, Marianne Mba

Marianne Mba ’20
“I’m gay and I’m an Economics major, so I’ve had a lot of conversations about the Red Scare in relation to Communism. Recently, I saw another documentary on Netflix, and there was a small clip about the Lavender Scare in it. That made me really interested in the topic. I think it’s important that we’re having this film screening here on campus.”

Learn more about the documentary The Lavender Scare

Learn more about the CUNY LGBTQI Leadership Program


New York Public University Systems Embark on Multilateral Academic Collaborations with Dominican Republic Education Ministries

New York –Leaders from the City University of New York (CUNY) and the State University of New York (SUNY) today joined Representative Adriano Espaillat (NY-13), Dominican Republic Consul General Carlos Castillo and education officials from the Dominican Republic to formalize their commitment to embark on a series of necessary and valuable academic collaborations. The joint agreements are between CUNY, SUNY, the State Education Department and the Dominican government ministries that oversee K-12 and higher education. The initiative, spearheaded by Rep. Espaillat, will enable colleges and universities to develop teacher trainings, academic exchange programs and collaborative research in the areas of energy and the environment, management and mitigation of disasters, and information and communication technologies, among others. CUNY and SUNY count a total of more than 40,000 students who are of Dominican descent.

New York’s two public university systems were represented at Friday’s signing ceremony at the SUNY Global Center by CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. and Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz; SUNY Board of Trustees Chairman H. Carl McCall and Sally Crimmins Villela, SUNY Associate Vice Chancellor for Global Affairs. They joined Espaillat, Castillo, Minister Alejandrina Germán of the Dominican Republic Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology, and Vice Minister Victor Sánchez of the Dominican Ministry of Education.

“Education plays a critical role in upward mobility for students and teachers, and this holds especially true for vulnerable and low-income communities,” said Rep. Espaillat. “It remains critical that we work together to ensure a solid foundation for innovation, progress and achievement to better prepare our students and teachers for a global competitive society today and in the future. I am proud of the work with have accomplished to bring forth this agreement that will have a tremendous benefit on students today and future students with the SUNY, CUNY system.”

“This agreement represents a great opportunity for New York’s CUNY and SUNY students to learn, develop and strengthen ties with the Dominican Republic,” said New York State Secretary of State Rossana Rosado. “Among New York’s foreign-born residents, the majority are from the Dominican Republic. These are our true neighbors and we are proud to work together to see students thrive.”

“As America’s great urban university system, the diversity of CUNY’s student population mirrors that of New York, the world’s most diverse city,” said CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr.“Just as Dominicans constitute the largest immigrant group in the five boroughs, they represent the largest ethnic group in the university, with more than 22,500 undergraduates and 1,200 graduate students who comprise 8.7 percent of CUNY’s total enrollment. In an important sense, then, we are all one people – and it will behoove us all to make the most of this great opportunity.”

“We are thrilled to enter into this momentous partnership with our colleagues here and in the Dominican Republic, a place that many New Yorkers think of as home,” said SUNY Chairman H. Carl McCall. “My special thanks to Congressman Adriano Espaillat for his foresight to bring us all together and arrange for our first meeting with President Danilo Medina. It is evident the country’s priorities include education, and we are proud to partner on the STEM fields and teacher training, while enhancing student and faculty exchange.”

“We at CUNY are delighted to enter framework agreements with the Education Ministries of the Dominican Republic,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz.“Students of Dominican descent number over 22,000 at CUNY, and are a key constituency for our University. One of the well-conceived aspects of these framework agreements is that they are open-ended in regard to their potential application. We could establish new pipelines for students who receive an associate degree to continue working toward a bachelor’s degree. We could create channels to more easily enable students to pursue graduate studies. Through the sharing of knowledge and collaborations among faculty, we can help each other to master and apply needed forms of pedagogy in areas, such as the STEM fields, that have been identified for strategic impact. We can broaden students’ horizons of experience, give them the expectation, and – eventually – the assurance, that they can thrive in their professional lives wherever they chose to practice.”

“SUNY students’ lives are further enriched when excellence in education is matched with applied learning experiences,” said SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson. “That’s why we’re pleased to have a significant role in this collaboration with CUNY, the Ministry of Education of the Dominican Republic, the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology of the Dominican Republic, and the New York State Education Department. Strategic partnerships are imperative, especially as we focus on training and scientific research, as well as arts, humanities, and other fields of study.”

Each New York university system will enter into an independent agreement with each Dominican ministry, and the agreement signed Friday provided a framework for future arrangements between the individual universities and colleges in each system. In practice, each institution will explore ways in which they might develop academic cooperation through future projects, programs and activities. These could include the development of refined trainings for primary and secondary school teachers; exchange initiatives that provide academic and professional experiences; and sharing of academic and scientific information of mutual interest, and participation in international networks and events.

About the City University of New York

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

About the State University of New York

The State University of New York is the largest comprehensive system of higher education in the United States, with 64 college and university campuses located within 30 miles of every home, school, and business in the state. As of Fall 2017, more than 430,000 students were enrolled in a degree program at a SUNY campus. In total, SUNY served nearly 1.4 million students in credit-bearing courses and programs, continuing education and community outreach programs in the 2016-17 academic year. SUNY students and faculty across the state make significant contributions to research and discovery, resulting in $1 billion of externally sponsored activity each year. There are 3 million SUNY alumni worldwide, and one in three New Yorkers with a college degree is a SUNY alum. To learn more about how SUNY creates opportunity, visit www.suny.edu.

 

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Pamela Wheeler appointed to Foundation Board of Directors

Pamela Wheeler

Pamela Wheeler (© Karl Ferguson Jr.)

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Foundation is pleased to welcome Pamela Wheeler to its Board of Directors.

Wheeler is a woman of firsts. She was the first woman appointed to lead a professional sports union, was the founding Director of the Women’s National Basketball Players Association (WNBPA) and negotiated the first collective bargaining agreement in women’s professional sports.

As founding Director, Wheeler created the organizational infrastructure of the WNBPA and was responsible for improving the lives of professional women basketball players both on and off the court. Whether through collective bargaining, establishing programs for players or developing alternative income sources, she consistently implemented strategies that resulted in significant advances for WNBA players. Under her leadership, player benefits, salaries, and resources increased by 300 percent from 1998 to 2014.

In addition, Wheeler consistently worked to enhance the working conditions and social welfare of WNBA players both during and after their playing careers. She championed women’s health issues and social justice by advocating for maternal health benefits, maternity leave and gender pay equity. To that end, she implemented and administered a myriad of Association and joint labor/management programs, including anti-drug, graduate school tuition reimbursement, career assessments & apprenticeships, financial planning and Rookie orientation.

Prior to the WNBPA, Wheeler was the Director of Business Development for the Continental Basketball Association, where she finalized stalled negotiations with New Line Cinema to create a national branding platform based on merging sports and entertainment. Before that, she served as General Counsel & Marketing Manager at Bob Woolf Associates, creating sports and entertainment marketing programs for institutional clients and negotiating marketing agreements for athletes.

She earned a BA from Dartmouth College and a JD from Boston University. She has been profiled in a number of traditional and sports publications, including the Sports Business Journal, Sports Illustrated, Black Enterprise, and Essence Magazine.

View the full board of directors here!


Educational theatre program presents “High School Musical Jr.” on Dec. 14

PS 161 students rehearsing for High School Musical Jr.

PS 161 students rehearsing for “High School Musical Jr.”

The Graduate Program in Educational Theatre at The City College of New York is collaborating with PS 161 for a presentation of Disney’s “High School Musical Jr.” This is the eighth collaboration with the Harlem-based school.

The students of PS 161’s drama club have been working under the direction of Wendy Rojas, drama teacher and CCNY education theatre alumna, and candidates in The Graduate Program in Educational Theatre.

Candidates in the graduate program, directed by Jennifer Katona, provide technical theatre support as students from the drama club prepare for the performance. The showcase is part of the Fundamentals of Teaching Technical Theatre course in partnership with the Roundabout Theatre Company.

The middle school students will sing songs from the Disney musical including “We’re All in This Together,” “What I’ve Been Looking For” and “Get’cha Head in the Game.”

“High School Musical Jr.” takes place on Friday, December 14 at 6 p.m. with a community potluck at 5 p.m. before the show. The performance is free and open to the public, and tickets can be reserved here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


JOHN JAY PRESENTS AT THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY

John Jay Presents at the American Society of Criminology

 

This year in Atlanta, the American Society of Criminology held its 74th Annual Meeting from November 14 – 17, under the theme “Institutions, Cultures and Crime.” More than 150 John Jay faculty, research staff, and students attended the conference with the purpose of presenting their scholarship and learning more about the work of criminology taking place in institutions around the world. To share the presenters’ work with the entire John Jay community, we’ve put together a roundup of highlights from the event.

The Truth About School Shootings
Joshua D. Freilich, is both a professor of criminal justice as well as the creator and co-director of the School Shooting Database. In his presentation on “Understanding the Causes of School Violence Using Open Source Data,” Freilich was able to release some preliminary findings from analysis of the database—which includes incidents from 2006-2016—after more than a year of collection and study. Freilich noted that, while the media tends to focus on non-typical instances of mass casualty incidents in schools, most are non-fatal. In another notable departure from the common narrative, his data showed that school shootings do not seem to be increasing in number, and shooters, though often portrayed as irrational actors, do appear to be making rational choices, and are therefore likely susceptible to diversion or prevention by effective interventions.

Closing Rikers Island
As the movement to close the jail complex on Rikers Island gathers momentum, New York City will need to see a significant reduction in the jail population in order to find capacity to move those currently incarcerated there to other carceral facilities. In a session sponsored by the Misdemeanor Justice Project (MJP), John Jay graduate students Quinn Hood, Olive Lu, and Shannon Tomascak presented papers exploring aspects of how this could be accomplished. In one project, Hood noted an unexplained increase in the number of “bed days” for certain categories, which drives up numbers of incarcerated despite dropping admissions numbers. And, in conjunction with New York’s Raise the Age legislation, Lu investigated whether the dynamics of criminal justice involvement for different age groups aligns with current scientific findings. Her data suggested that, while there are significant differences across age groups, emerging adults (ages 18-25) do not stand out in ways that suggest they present higher risk, raising the possibility of whether this group should still be treated as “juveniles,” a population that will no longer be housed in the Rikers facility.

Explaining Fatal Incidents
Police-involved shootings are a prevalent and emotional topic in today’s news. Graduate and undergraduate students Daniella Rice, Jason Rampersaud, Marilyn Reyes, and Magdalena Jablonowski, under the guidance of Professors Hung-En Sung and Frank Pezzella, explored different factors that may have a significant relationship with fatal officer-involved shootings. A diverse range of variables, including departmental use of force policies, racial dynamics, citizen hostility and regional culture, were considered. The presentations were followed up by a lively debate with input from active and former police, students and faculty on the role of race and what conditions would be important to consider in future research. Suggested conditions included availability of life-saving care and the use of other means of violence apart from guns.

Applying Best Practice
The State Department’s Diplomacy Lab is a partnership program that enables the State Department to “course-source” research and innovation related to foreign policy challenges by harnessing the of students and faculty experts at colleges and universities across the United States. One such project was led by Professor of Sociology Rosemary Barbaret, whose students reported on radicalization and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) policies in other countries that could be applied to U.S. policy in Iraq. Elizabeth Aguilar, Catherine Minaya, Sarah Durrant, and Rachel Fiegler outlined DDR best practices in Uganda and Colombia, with an eye toward what would work best to reintegrate child soldiers swept up by the Iraq conflict. Lilla Heins discussed her research into Islamic radicalization in the South Caucasus, sharing her recommendations for dealing with returning soldiers. The session wrapped up with a talk-back with a Foreign Service Officer, including avenues for future research.

Immigration and Enforcement
An all-John Jay immigration-themed panel featured Sociology Professor David Brotherton and two Criminal Justice Ph.D. alumni, Borough of Manhattan Community College Professor Shirley Leyro, and John Jay’s Research Director Daniel Stageman. Leyro began with preliminary data from her seminal CUNY Belonging Study, which explores feelings of belonging and membership among CUNY noncitizen students. Stageman and Brotherton then presented on their current projects, focused respectively on the explosion of local police involvement in immigration enforcement under the Trump administration, and the wonton cruelty on display in deportation court.

David Kennedy at ASC

David Kennedy at ASC

Moving Towards Reform
Since its 2014 launch, the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice (NI), coordinated by the National Network for Safe Communities (NNSC), has produced substantial increases in community trust and confidence in police among its six pilot sites, the Urban Institute announced during a panel on Wednesday, November 14, previewing findings from its formal NI evaluation. The Urban Institute also found that police departments from the six NI sites have, likewise, bought into the initiative’s core ideas—enhancing procedural justice, reducing the impact of implicit bias, and fostering reconciliation. Earlier this year, NNSC released an extensive report on Reconciliation Between Police and Communities. “Actual exposure to the content of the National Initiative’s three pillars won people over,” despite some initial skepticism, NNSC Director David Kennedy said. He credited much of this success to clever strategies law enforcement agencies employed to encourage buy-in, both in their communities and within their departments.

Stephen Lurie, Alex Acevedo, Kyle Ott

l-r: Stephen Lurie, Alex Acevedo and Kyle Ott  

The Less Than 1%
On ASC’s second day, NNSC Research and Policy Advisor Stephen Lurie, Data Analyst Kyle Ott, and Data Analytics Associate Alex Acevedo showcased empirical proof for one of the organization’s key research findings—that a tiny portion of a community’s population is responsible for a disproportionate amount of its violence—during a presentation on groups and the extreme concentration of urban violence.

Lurie, Ott, and Acevedo incorporated data from 23 sites that NNSC’s Group Violence Intervention (GVI) has worked with since 2014 to illustrate that less than 1 percent of the sample cities’ populations were connected with roughly 50 percent of homicides and non-fatal shooting incidents. Their presentation is part of a paper that will be submitted for peer review.


CUNY’s Single Stop Program Offers Prompt Help to Needy Students to Continue Their Education

In an effort to help alleviate stressors that can hinder a student’s academic career, The City University of New York offers Single Stop, a program that helps students obtain nutrition benefits, health insurance, legal and financial services and tax preparation assistance, in short order, right on campus. Single Stop services are available at every CUNY community college and at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

“The demands of college can overwhelm a student facing hardships outside the classroom,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The campus-based Single Stop makes it easier for students to get a range of non-academic help so they can stay focused on their studies.  This initiative is another way that CUNY works to help students overcome obstacles to academic success and degree completion.”

From 2009 through 2017, Single Stop and its partners have connected 107,569 families and individuals with $274,113,613 in benefits, tax refunds and supportive services CUNY-wide.

To determine eligibility for benefits, students and their families participate in a short question-and-answer session. Single Stop counselors then direct students and their families to federal, state or local benefits that they are eligible to receive.

Single Stop offers the following services, confidentially and free of charge:

  • Benefit screening for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); and Women, Infants and Children (WIC)
  • Available food pantries
  • Financial Counseling
  • Legal Counseling
  • Tax Assistance
  • Health Care Enrollment

Single Stop ensures that it is accessible to students by funding and training at least one dedicated benefits counselor who is an employee of the college. The counselors are located onsite at the student services or financial aid office, where they can help students with whatever they need.

Students who desire more information are encouraged to visit Single Stop at CUNY.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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African classic “Things Fall Apart” turns 60, CCNY & Achebes celebrate

The late Chinua Achebe

Former SA Pres. Kgalema Motlanthe to deliver Achebe lecture

First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart” is hailed as the most widely read book in modern African literature. It’s sold more than 20 million copies and been translated into more than 50 languages. In celebration of the novel’s 60th anniversary, The City College of New York and the Christie and Chinua Achebe Foundation host the Chinua Achebe Leadership Forum Lecture on Dec 12. Former South African interim President and Deputy President Kgalema Petrus Motlanthe is the speaker, 6:30 — 8:30 p.m. in CCNY’s Aaron Davis’ Hall Theater B.

Organized by CCNY’s Black Studies Program, the event is free and open to the public but registration is required. Click here to register.

The Achebe Leadership Forum discusses Africa’s challenges in keeping with   Achebe’s work. Motlanthe’s lecture will be followed by a roundtable discussion featuring the South African politician and a distinguished panel of scholars.

Christie Achebe, the author’s widow, and son Chidi Achebe will also attend the event. Chinua Achebe, who died in 2013, was a visiting professor at City College in 1989.

About “Things Fall Apart”
Set in the 19th Century, the 215-page book is a classic narrative about Africa’s cataclysmic encounter with Europe as it establishes a colonial presence on the continent. It is told through the fictional experiences of Okonkwo, a wealthy and fearless Igbo warrior. Former U.S. President Barack Obama has described the book as: “A true classic of world literature . . . A masterpiece that has inspired generations of writers in Nigeria, across Africa, and around the world.”

Former South African President Kgalema Motlanthe, guest speaker at the Achebe Lecture.

About Chinua Achebe
Nigerian-born, Achebe wrote more than 20 books – novels, short stories, essays and collections of poetry. His first book, “Things Fall Apart” (1958),   was published when he was 28 and over the years became a global bestseller.

His other notable books include “No Longer at Ease,” “A Man of the People,” and “Anthills of the Savannah.”  In addition to his writing, Achebe lectured and taught widely internationally. Among the U.S. institutions where he held faculty positions were Bard College and Brown University.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Education Center Opens at LaGuardia Community College

Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Education Center Opens at LaGuardia Community College

A ribbon cutting was held on Tuesday, December 4th, 2018 to mark the opening of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Education Center at LaGuardia Community College. Pictured from left to right: Roy Castro, CEO of the D.M. Ice Cream Corporation in Long Island City and a 10,000 Small Businesses graduate, Goldman Sachs Chairman Lloyd Blankfein, LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow, New York State Commissioner Howard Zemsky, and LaGuardia Community College Vice President of Administration & Finance Shahir Erfan.

New York State, under Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s leadership, awarded LaGuardia Community College $5 million to build the new center.

The 10,000-ft2 brand-new space is a venue for 10,000 Small Businesses trainings, lectures, alumni events, and more.

The 10,000 Small Businesses program launched in 2010 as a partnership between LaGuardia Community College and Goldman Sachs to support and help local entrepreneurs to grow their businesses and create jobs. Often described as a “mini-MBA,” 10,000 Small Businesses provides training in business development, capital building, contract negation, systems management, and more. Immediate and sustained business growth for the alumni of the program have resulted. To date, the program at LaGuardia Community College has helped more than 830 business owners. Based on this success, Goldman Sachs expanded the program. Today, it’s served nearly 8,000 small businesses across all 50 U.S. states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.

For more, visit http://www.LaGuardia.edu/10KSB.

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LaGuardia Community College loc