School/Class News





SUCCESS AT THE 11TH ANNUAL FIRST-YEAR STUDENT SHOWCASE

Success At The 11th Annual First-Year Student Showcase

 

On December 6, John Jay held its 11th annual First-Year Student Showcase, highlighting the research and creativity of the freshman class. The showcase gave students—many of whom have never conducted research or presented in front of a large group—the opportunity to shine. More than 375 presentations covered a broad array of topics, from immigration and the opioid epidemic, to police brutality and medical insurance. After thanking the 73 faculty members, staff professionals, and student coaches that helped guide the first-year students through their research, President Karol V. Mason got the crowd going by calling out each of the groups heavily represented at the event—APPLE CorpsACEAdelanteEarly Start, and SEEK. “I’m excited to walk around and see all of your research,” said Mason. “And please walk around and learn from each other. That’s what we’re here for.” To find out more about the First-Year Student Showcase experience, we had the opportunity to interview two incredible students before and during the event.

Yi-Chen Wu

Yi-Chen Wu

 

“When we were presenting, our classmates were by our sides, so it was not as intimidating as we thought it would be.” —Yi-Chen Wu

 

Yi-Chen “Tina” Wu
Wu is an international student from Taiwan, majoring in Forensic Psychology and is in the Early Start Program. For her First-Year Student Showcase project, Wu and her team researched black police brutality victims with missing internal organs. Before the showcase the team reviewed lawsuit documents, autopsy reports, news broadcasts, and even popular films, like Get Out, to help understand the topic. “There was a case that we reviewed in class about Everett Palmer Jr. He was a 41-year-old veteran who died in custody,” said Wu. “The law enforcement agencies immediately concluded his death as a suicide. But what makes it suspicious is that his brain, heart, throat, and spine were missing. We looked into how surviving relatives can file federal civil rights lawsuits.”

Wu went on to explain that coming from Taiwan she wasn’t familiar with racism in America, but to give her research context, she researched discrimination against black Americans both currently and historically, specifically Dr. James Marion Sims’ medical experimentation on enslaved black women without anesthesia. “They justified their practices by saying that blacks are insensitive to pain and that they are subhuman,” said Wu. “In Get Out, they took away black people’s organs because they believed that blacks were physically supernatural.” Wu hopes that her presentation helps others become more aware of their rights when a deceased victim’s internal organs go missing, and she hopes to go back to Taiwan and help formerly incarcerated people transition back into society.

As for the experience presenting at the First-Year Student Showcase, Wu was happy to have teammates. “During the presentation, my group members helped each other out by picking up where you left off,” said Wu. “Luckily, when we were presenting, our classmates were by our sides, so it was not as intimidating as we thought it would be.”

Maral Artykova

Maral Artykova

 

“I learned to be patient and listen to my groupmates, which led to us having a great project and research.” — Maral Artykova

 

Maral Artykova
Artykova is an immigrant from Turkmenistan who moved to the United States when she was 15 years old. As members of the APPLE Corps program, Artykova and her team researched how litter affects the perception of criminality in a neighborhood for their First-Year Student Showcase project. Prior to the event, the team went to five different New York City neighborhoods, asking people questions about their quality of life and how it changed throughout the years. “We asked, ‘Have you seen littering in this neighborhood? What do you think about the litter in this neighborhood? Is it a big or small problem?’” said Artykova. “At the end, our whole analysis came to the conclusion that people who saw someone litter that day had a bigger perception of criminality in that neighborhood.”

Understanding the conclusions of her research, Artykova urged everyone not to create stereotypes about those that live in litter-filled neighborhoods. “We talked to the people in the neighborhoods that had a bunch of litter, and they were very nice and interested in this topic,” said Artykova. “It’s very wrong for us to assume that because there is litter in a neighborhood that it’s a dangerous place and no one should go there.” Artykova hopes that her presentation helps others become more aware of the labels people create based on initial perceptions.

“I am interested in breaking down stereotypes because I am an immigrant and I advocate for those who are wrongly accused of being bad people,” she said. “One of my solutions for this project was to look into the Department of Sanitation’s budget and see how we can allocate some money into cleaning up these neighborhoods and changing the stereotypes.” Using this presentation as a stepping stone, Artykova is looking forward to one day working in the Community Affairs Bureau of the NYPD where she can use her public speaking and people skills to improve communities.

Artykova was grateful for what she learned from the First-Year Student Showcase experience. “The showcase taught me patience. I was rushing because I wanted to get everything done quickly and my groupmates told me I had to be patient. They didn’t want to rush or jump to conclusions,” said Artykova. “I learned to be patient and listen to my groupmates, which led us to having a great project and research.”

 

More scenes from the event:

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

President Karol Mason speaking at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Students at First Year Student Showcase

Student at First Year Student Showcase


Baruch College’s MA in Corporate Communication Program Named a Finalist in PRWeek Awards 2019 Competition

 

Second straight year the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences degree program selected among the top five for the “Outstanding Education Program” of the year award

The Master of Arts in Corporate Communication program at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences is a finalist for a 2019 PRWeek Award in the category of “Outstanding Education Program.”

This represents the second consecutive year the MA in Corporate Communication program has been selected a finalist for the award by the leading industry magazine.

Baruch will compete against American University, Boston University, DePaul University, and Elon University for this category’s trophy at the 20th annual event on March 21, 2019 in New York City.

“In the U.S., there are over 180 graduate programs with a similar focus, and being recognized as among the top five for two years in a row underscores the value and quality of the program,” said Michael B. Goodman, PhD, Director of the MA in Corporate Communication program. “Our students, faculty, alumni, and professional advisors take full advantage of the mission of Baruch College and our location in Manhattan as the platform for the best practitioners in the profession.”

PRWeek’s “Outstanding Education Program” award recognizes achievements and innovations in the following areas: curriculum, faculty, enrollment, impact on the industry, and placement success. PRWeek said, “special attention will be paid to effectiveness in preparing students for long-term success.”

Graduates of Baruch’s MA in Corporate Communication program have successful careers in public and private companies, not-for-profits, government agencies, public relations firms, and as independent consultants. There are approximately 60 students enrolled in the program for the 2018-19 academic year.

A full list of the 2019 PRWeek awards finalists is available here.

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Baruch College among the “Top 25 Universities for Getting a Front-Office Job” at J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs

Ranking identifies top schools where the global investment firms recruit and those that best prepare graduates for client-facing positions

Baruch College has been ranked among the “Top 25 universities for getting a front-office job at J.P. Morgan” and the “Top 25 universities for getting a front-office job at Goldman Sachs” by eFinancialCareers, adding to the College’s growing roster of recognition for preparing students for career success.

In the two rankings, Baruch placed:

#5 for J.P. Morgan

#19 for Goldman Sachs

On both lists, Baruch College joins such prominent U.S. and U.K. schools as Harvard University, Stanford University, University of Chicago, Cornell University, University of Oxford, and University of Cambridge, among others.

“We are proud that our graduates are being hired by top financial firms,” said H. Fenwick Huss, Willem Kookyer Dean, Zicklin School of Business. “Zicklin’s business programs prepare our students to compete in the global business marketplace.”

The rankings are based on the total number of alumni from each school currently working at J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs, courtesy of LinkedIn, combined with employment data from an eFinancialCareers database that tracks the percentage of graduates from each school who work in front-office positions at the banks.

 

J.P. Morgan: “Big headliner is Manhattan’s Baruch College”

eFinancialCareers, a trade publication, reports that the highest ranked schools on the J.P. Morgan list “isn’t all that surprising,” with London School of Economics, New York University, Columbia University, and University of Pennsylvania occupying the first four spots.

“However, the big headliner is Manhattan’s Baruch College, which has been quietly feeding Wall Street for decades with its finance-heavy curriculum and its close proximity to Wall Street. More Baruch alumni currently work at J.P. Morgan than any other school, according to our research,” the publication said.

 

Goldman Sachs: “Four percent chance of receiving an offer”

The odds of landing a job at one of the world’s premier investment banks is daunting.

According to eFinancialCareers, individuals have about a four percent chance of receiving an offer if they apply for a role at Goldman Sachs. Additionally, the publication says if a job applicant did not attend an Ivy League school, their acceptance rate “drops precipitously.”

 

Starr Career Development Center

The eFinancialCareers rankings point to several factors that are hallmarks of Baruch, including: excellent academics, students known for being strivers, and a robust career center engaging with undergraduates the moment they step on campus, to Commencement, and beyond.

Baruch’s Starr Career Development Center offers a seemingly endless list of resources and support services, including skill development programs, internship and job search help, resume and interview workshops, and multiple career fairs.

Besides being student-focused, the career center cultivates relationships with prestigious and top-tier firms and organizations that open doors for students.

“Starr has helped broker a number of touch points for students to interact with recruiters and alumni from J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs,” said Ellen Stein, director of the Starr Career Development Center. “We have hosted the firms through various events on campus, and have encouraged students to attend.”

According to Stein, the Center has “a track record of Financial Leadership students obtaining internships and employment at top-tier investment firms. Alumni of this program, who are in front-office positions, come back to Baruch and participate on panels, conduct mock interviews, and network and mentor students.”

Stein added that, “Baruch alumni continue to clear the pathway for students to apply for these type of coveted positions.”

The Center’s executive summary report for 2017 reveals that over 1,100 employers hired Baruch students. Some of the top employers were JP Morgan, Ernst Young, Morgan Stanley, Deloitte, RSM, Citi, Bank of America, Moody’s, KPMG, and BNY Mellon.

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CCNY-Yale researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

Deformable particles like cells can fill complex geometries more efficiently than fixed shapes like circles. With the new deformable particle model introduced by Shattuck and O’Hern, researchers can also “simulate” deformable systems more efficiently and accurately.

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.

Mark D. Shattuck, professor of physics at City College’s Benjamin Levich Institute, and researchers at Yale developed the new efficient computational model. It allows simulated particles to realistically change shape while conserving volume during interactions with other particles. Their results appear in the latest edition of   “Physical Review Letters.”

Developing computer simulations of particles, such as sand grains and ball bearings, is straightforward because they do not readily change shape. Doing the same for cells and other deformable particles is more difficult, and the computational models researchers currently use do not accurately capture how soft particles deform.

The computational model developed by Shattuck and lead investigator from Yale, Corey O’Hern, tracks points on the surfaces of polygonal cells. Each surface point moves independently, in accordance with its surroundings and neighboring particles, allowing the shape of the particle to change. It is more computationally demanding than current simulations, but necessary to correctly model particle deformation.

“We now have an efficient accurate computational model to investigate how discrete, deformable particles pack,” Shattuck said. It also allows researchers to easily adjust cell-cell interactions, consider directed motion, and can be used for both 2D and 3D systems.

One unexpected result from the model shows that deformable particles must deviate from a sphere by more than 15% to completely fill a space.

“In our new model, if no external pressure is applied to the system, the particles are spherical,” O’Hern said. “As the pressure is increased, the particles deform, increasing the fraction of space that they occupy. When the particles completely fill the space, they will be 15% deformed. Whether it’s bubbles, droplets, or cells, it’s a universal result for soft, particle systems.”

Among other applications, this technology may give researchers a new tool to examine how cancerous tumors metastasize. “We can now create realistic models of the packing of cells in tumors using computer simulations, and ask important questions such as whether a cell in a tumor needs to change its shape to become more capable of motion and eventually leave the tumor.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


2018 ANNUAL DAY OF GIVING RAISES OVER $204,167 FOR STUDENTS

2018 Annual Day of Giving Raises over $204,167 For Students

 

On Wednesday, November 14, the John Jay community came together to raise over $204,167 for our students. Our initial goal of raising $50,000 for the Student Emergency Fund was surpassed, raising $104,167—over seven times the amount raised last year for the fund. And, the first $50,000 will be matched two-to-one by the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation.

 

“Your actions on the Annual Day of Giving demonstrates our community’s compassion and support for the most vulnerable among us. —Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College

 

The Student Emergency Fund is critical for many students facing food and housing insecurity, family crises, and catastrophic events. Its main purpose is to help students overcome these obstacles, allowing them to stay in College, and reach the graduation finish line.

The Annual Day of Giving was also a tremendous success in terms of community support and spirit. Almost 100 volunteers manned the phones, and over 352 people donated generously to the fund. “So many of you participated from every corner of our community, including administrators, faculty, staff, alumni, and students,” said President Karol V. Mason. “Your actions on the Annual Day of Giving demonstrates our community’s compassion and support for the most vulnerable among us. Thank you.”

 

“I’m glad we beat our fundraising goal by such a large amount.” —Fatime Uruci, ’18

 

For Fatime Uruci, Class of 2018 Student Council President, making phone calls was actually her favorite part of the day. “It really was heartwarming to see how many people showed up this year,” said Uruci. “It was also a nice surprise to see that the care-kit initiative our Student Council started was being highlighted as one of the things that John Jay is doing to help our students in need. I was happy to help out even in the slightest way, and I’m glad we beat our fundraising goal by such a large amount.”

Scenes from the day:

President Karol V. Mason with Jules Kroll, Chairman of the Board of John Jay College Foundation, Inc. Board of Trustees

President Karol V. Mason with Jules Kroll, Chairman of the Board of John Jay College Foundation, Inc. Board of Trustees

Mason getting psyched up for calls. 

Mason getting psyched up for calls. 

Mason greeting a four-legged friend.

Mason greeting a four-legged friend. 

Students and staff manning the phones

Students and staff manning the phones. 

Senior VP Steven Titan connecting with a donor

Senior VP Steven Titan connecting with a donor

The John Jay Cheerleading Squad with two excited bloodhounds

The John Jay Cheerleading Squad with two excited bloodhounds

Bloodhound spirit!

Bloodhound spirit! 

President Karol V. Mason talking a “volunteer” through the process

President Karol V. Mason talking a “volunteer” through the process

 

Success!

Success!


CUNY SPH’s Center for Innovation in Mental Health partners with Coordinated Behavioral Care to help support New York City Medicaid recipients

NEW YORK – [December 11, 2018]—The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Center for Innovation in Mental Health (CIMH), a collaboration with the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), has partnered with Coordinated Behavioral Care (CBC), a New York City not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of care for Medicaid beneficiaries with serious mental illness, chronic health conditions, and/or substance use disorders, to evaluate programs across the CBC Network, conduct quality improvement initiatives, and establish innovative best practices.

The CBC Network is comprised of more than 50 community-based behavioral health organizations offering a comprehensive and integrated delivery system of mental, substance use, medical, and social determinants of health services that impact close to 100,000 New York City Medicaid recipients.

The natural alignment between CIMH’s specific expertise and CBC’s rising need to identify and scale innovative best practices across a growing network, makes this a unique and exciting partnership that will continue to enhance direct services.

“The CIMH team is excited to partner with CBC,” said CIMH director Dr. Virna Little. “It’s a great opportunity to show the impact that behavioral health networks can have on the populations and organizations they serve.”

“The community-based behavioral health service providers that CBC represents, whether through our Health Home and/or Independent Practice Association (IPA), are at the forefront of innovative program design and delivery,” said Dr. Jorge Petit, CBC’s President and CEO. “This partnership will allow us to shine a light on the innovative practices, programs and services that exist within the CBC Network, and with the help of CIMH, we will be able to offer a more formal evaluation structure that will allow these efforts to be scaled to impact practice delivery, influence policy, and inform needed alternative payment initiatives and VBP.”

Partnerships like that of CBC and CIMH enhance the ability of both organizations to impact the quality and value of care and realize better outcomes for the residents of New York City. Through the development of a CBC Network Practice-Based Hub with the support and guidance of CIMH, the NYC behavioral health sector will benefit from the dissemination of these Practice-Based Approaches (PBAs). PBAs are considered innovative or distinctive community-based interventions, programs or services. They are designed to address clients’ needs and focus on effectiveness and improving individuals’ health outcomes.

About Coordinated Behavioral Care (CBC)

CBCis a not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of care for New Yorkers with serious mental illness, chronic health conditions and/or substance use disorders. CBC brings together over fifty community-based health and human services organizations which provide access to quality treatment, housing, employment and other needed services. CBC operates a Health Home that provides care coordination services to tens of thousands of New Yorkers of all ages, with 50+ community-based care management agencies located in all five boroughs. CBC also operates an Independent Practice Association (IPA) including a citywide network of New York State-licensed primary care, mental health and substance use treatment services, thousands of units of supportive housing, primary medical, recovery and support services, and assistance with concrete needs such as food, employment and housing. Among CBC’s innovations is the Pathway Home program, offering Care Transition services during the transition to the community following discharge from a psychiatric admission.

About CIMH

The Center for Innovation in Mental Health (CIMH)  as the academic and evaluation arm of the NYC Department of Health Innovation Lab, provides coordination between the NYC Department of Health and other researchers, investigators, and academic institutions; in addition, it provides direct research and evaluation services to assist the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on all aspects of mental health quality improvement, technical assistance, evaluation, best practices dissemination, and data development, analysis, and management. CIMH is a part of the City University of New York (CUNY) School of Public Health, and hosts training activities for all CUNY students and NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) including a Mental Health Methods Series, the Interdisciplinary Academy for Professional Development in Mental Health, and quality improvement initiatives to improve clinicians’ skills in process improvement.

Contact Information :

Coordinated Behavioral Care

http://www.cbcare.org/

Jorge R. Petit, MD

646-930-8803

 

Center for Innovation in Mental Health

https://www.cunycimh.org/

Virna Little, PsyD

     Coordinated Behavioral Care logo


Baruch College’s Abdourahamane Diallo Named a 2020 Schwarzman Scholar

BaruchCollegeStudentNamed2020SchwarzmanScholar

 

Zicklin School of Business undergraduate selected for program designed  to prepare future global leaders

Abdourahamane Diallo ’18 has been selected as Baruch College’s first Schwarzman Scholar, one of the worlds’ most prestigious graduate fellowships.

The Zicklin School of Business senior is one of 147 students selected among more than 2,800 candidates from around the globe following a rigorous application process that assessed the highest level of leadership potential and academic ability. Along with his fellow scholars, Diallo will pursue a master’s degree in global affairs at Tsinghua University, one of the country’s leading universities, beginning in August 2019.

Diallo vividly recalls when he first learned of being chosen as a Schwarzman Scholar.

“I was on campus reading news on my phone when I got an email alert that said ‘congratulations, you were selected for the Schwarzman Scholarship,”’ Diallo said in an interview. “I screamed a little bit and thought ‘oh my god.’ It was exciting news and a great moment.”

Diallo joins students from 38 countries and 119 universities who comprise the class of 2020. His fellow scholars include a medical doctor who founded a science policy think tank in partnership with London City Hall and the European Commission, a writer of a winning essay that named the NASA Mars rover – Curiosity, and an activist who successfully petitioned the Obama White House to increase the number of Syrian refugees admitted to the United States.

“Schwarzman Scholars are known for their outstanding leadership potential, good character and motivation to work together to create globally minded solutions to the world’s shared challenges,” said Valeria Hymas, Deputy Director of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising at Baruch College.

Hymas added, “Abdourahamane Diallo is emblematic of these ideals. His remarkable achievement of becoming a Schwarzman Scholar is an example of Baruch’s students’ exceptional level of dedication, rigor, and commitment to envisioning positive global changes.”

Leadership, Character and Motivation

Diallo will graduate in December 2018 from Baruch’s Zicklin School of Business majoring in finance investment and a minor in communication studies (conflict resolution). While attending Baruch, he obtained internships with some of the largest American companies: Blackrock Inc. as a quantitative risk analyst, the U.S. Department of Commerce as an international trade specialist, and JP Morgan Chase as an investment banking risk analyst.

His other activities and interests extended well beyond study time and office hours.

Diallo volunteered for the Baruch Math Department as a note taker for disabled students. He founded the Guinean Students Association at Baruch and expanded the club to other City University of New York campuses, which has become a non-profit organization called Guineans Succeeding in America. Diallo has also held prominent leadership roles in several College clubs, including Le Club Francais at Baruch, Baruch Toastmaster, and Sigma Alpha Honor Society.

Outside of campus, Diallo is actively involved with the community. He is currently the Secretary General of the African Advisory Council of the Bronx and is a member of the Bronx Community Board #3. Diallo is also the founder of the Guinean New Generation Movement.

Goals: Helping home country to Harvard University

Originally from Guinea, Diallo is looking to leverage his time in China to build a network with local manufacturers and entrepreneurs. With an interest in international trade, he wants to learn how his native country can essentially be a “bigger player in the global market in terms of trading.”

After completing the Schwarzman Scholars program, Diallo intends to pursue another MBA at Harvard University.

“Abdourahamane’s success should serve as an inspiration to all Baruch students that prestigious fellowships are well within their grasp,” Hymas said. “His time in China at Tsinghua University will provide him with a transformative academic and professional experience that will equip him with the skills, knowledge and community to bolster his continued success in any future endeavor he envisions.”

About the Schwarzman Scholars Program

The Schwarzman Scholarship program is designed to “prepare future leaders for success in a world where China plays a key global role.” The program was inspired by the Rhodes Scholarship hosted by Oxford University, but with the goal of confronting the difficult challenges of the 21st century.

Scholars chosen for this program have “demonstrated exemplary leadership qualities and the potential to bridge and understand cultural and political differences.”

Stephen A. Schwarzman, Chairman, chief executive and co-founder of the private equity firm The Blackstone Group, created the Schwarzman Scholars Program. Many current and former world leaders are on the Schwarzman Scholars advisory board, including Tony Blair, Colin Powell, Condoleeza Rice, Henry Kissinger, and Nicolas Sarkozy.

Baruch students interested in applying for the Schwarzman Scholarship or other nationally competitive awards can visit the College’s Fellowships website.

 

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CUNY Expands Its Promising ‘ACE’ Program to Lehman College in Partnership with Robin Hood Foundation

The City University of New York is expanding its promising Accelerate, Complete and Engage (ACE) program to Lehman College, thanks to a $1.1 million grant from the Robin Hood Foundation. ACE, launched at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Fall 2015, also with initial seed funding from Robin Hood, aims to double four-year baccalaureate graduation rates.

The program at Lehman will begin in Fall 2019 and serve 125 first-time, full-time freshmen, and 125 full-time transfer students who enter with an associate degree. CUNY aims to further expand ACE to its other senior colleges.

“With the generous support of Robin Hood, more CUNY students will have the benefit of an innovative program of proven efficacy that will enable them to finish their bachelor’s degrees in four years,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The ACE program, based on CUNY’s successful ASAP program that has more than doubled timely graduation rates in associate degree programs, is another example of CUNY’s commitment to its students’ success and its impact in public higher education.”

ACE is modeled on CUNY’s successful Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), launched in 2007 to help students complete associate degrees as quickly as possible. Both programs help mitigate obstacles that often prevent a student from graduating in a timely manner, if at all, by providing students with academic, social and financial supports.

ASAP was conceived and launched with the goal of helping students obtain an associate degree in no more than three years and will serve 25,000 this year, thanks to support from the State and City of New York. ACE was conceived to support baccalaureate students in the same manner, helping them graduate in no more than five years. The ASAP three-year graduation rate of 53 percent is more than three times higher than the national urban community college three-year graduation rate of 16 percent, and more than double that of similar CUNY associate degree-seeking students at 25 percent. The expectation is that ACE’s trajectory of impact and eventual systemwide scaling will follow that of ASAP.

Participating students receive a set of financial resources and structured supports to ensure timely degree completion: tuition waivers to close any gap after need-based financial aid; free unlimited monthly MetroCards to defray commuting expenses; textbook assistance; early registration options to ensure their enrollment in the courses they need to fulfill requirements; and summer and winter course-taking opportunities. Students work with an assigned personal adviser and a career specialist, who monitor and guide their progress from freshman year through graduation. They also receive assistance finding internships and applying for research opportunities and scholarships.

“Half of the students that attend Lehman come from families that make less than $30,000 a year. These students don’t have access to the ‘extras’ that so many people take for granted, the hidden advantages that make succeeding in college easier,” said Lehman College President José Luis Cruz. “But an education is the way to upward mobility for these students, so we’re thrilled that Robin Hood is making it possible for more students to succeed.”

The ACE program’s great promise to raise four-year bachelor’s graduation rates is already visible. CUNY evaluation data show that ACE students have stronger retention and degree momentum rates than a matched comparison group of similar students. As of Fall 2018, 70% of the ACE students who entered John Jay in Fall 2015 were on track to graduate at the end of this year, compared with 37% of similar non-ACE students, a phenomenal interim result. Additionally, CUNY evaluation data that ACE participation benefits all subgroups of students, with noticeable narrowing of achievement gaps by ethnicity and race.

The program requires students to pursue a major from an approved list of ACE majors; enroll in at least 15 credits each semester; attend one ACE seminar per month; meet at least once per month with an ACE academic adviser; participate in academic support activities such as math study groups and writing workshops; and complete a series of career-development activities.

ACE is beginning its fourth year at John Jay College and receives funding through Robin Hood, the Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women.“We were proud partners with CUNY on its ASAP program, a game changer for helping thousands of New Yorkers to find sustainable pathways out of poverty for themselves and their families,” said Wes Moore, C.E.O. of Robin Hood. “Robin Hood is thrilled to once again partner with CUNY to make a similar impact with ACE, creating high-impact innovation that benefits New York City’s residents, neighborhoods, and its future.”

Additional funding from Robin Hood is essential to the expansion of ACE to Lehman College. Robin Hood is New York City’s largest poverty-fighting organization, providing nonprofits with financial, material and managerial support. Robin Hood supports schools, food pantries, homeless shelters, health care facilities and workforce training centers.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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SPH doctoral candidate accepts award for union’s role in passing new California labor law

Pamela Vossenas and union members accepting award at APHA 2018 meeting

At the American Public Health Association meeting last month, CUNY SPH doctoral candidate Pamela Vossenas accepted the Tony Mazzocchi Award for Grassroots Activism from the Occupational Health and Safety Section on behalf of UNITE HERE, a labor union representing service workers across the US and Canada, for the passing of a law to prevent injuries to hotel housekeepers. Hotel housekeepers and representatives from UNITE HERE California local unions were also on hand to accept the award that recognized their role.

As UNITE HEREs director of Safety and Health, Vossenas was tasked with coordinating with the local unions to craft the law. After a six-year effort, California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA)Title 8, §3345: Hotel Housekeeping Musculoskeletal Injury Prevention, which requires that employers establish an injury prevention plan that involves housekeepers and their union representatives to reduce hazards, took effect on July 1, 2018.

Hotel housekeepers played a key role in the passage of this law,” emphasized Vossenas.

Nearly 300 UNITE HERE member housekeepers across the state were part of Cal/OSHA’s process over time with half as many giving testimony.The passage of the law marks the first time that an ergonomics-based standard has been enacted especially for the hospitality industry. It may set a precedent for similar worker safety standards beyond California.  Hotel housekeepers are at a disproportionate high risk for musculoskeletal injuries.

This effort was aided by my coursework leadership, case study, risk assessment, ergonomics, corporations and health, research methods,” says Vossenas. I applied what I learned as a doctoral student. The support and expertise of CUNY SPH faculty and classmates contributed as well.

Vossenas chaired a panel session at the 2018 APHA Meeting with hotel housekeepers, worker advocates and occupational experts sharing their perspectives on the collective efforts that won the law. 


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, Week of December 10, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

We have ten instructional days until Winter Break. Please note that we have a full-day of instruction on Friday December 21st. However all after-school programming is cancelled on Friday, December 21st.

  • Thank you to our Kindergarten Team–Aurora Downer, Stacey Gohari, Patricia Salguero & Kate Zelles for creating last week’s All About Me Celebration.
  • Thank you to Upper Grades Computer Science Teachers Margaret Tanzosh & Van Nguyen (plus chaperones Assistant Principal Greg Farrell, Library Media Specialist Roy Whitford & World Languages Teacher Carolina Barriero) for taking NEST+m’s CS50 students to Yale’s CS50 Semester-One Showcase.
  • Tuesday December 11 at 9:00am: Our 5th grade students shine as they take the stage for NEST+m’s annual Ballroom Dancing Celebration.
  • Friday December 14th, 8:30-9:15am: Grades One & Two Family Friday Celebrations

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Important notes about our 2018-2019 📅School Calendar📅

As you plan your family’s activities, please visit our Calendar page of the school website. You will see a Google calendar of our school events as well as other important items, such as the A/B Calendar, the Department of Education Calendar as well as the January and June New York State Regents Exam Schedules.

Note that the Regents exam testing schedule is very late this year; some 8th grade students and Upper Grade students are going to have Regents exams during the last week of school. 12th grade and 8th grade graduation ceremonies are going to be on June 26th, the very last day of school! Please keep this schedule in mind as you make your family’s summer plans.


JOHN JAY COLLEGE AWARDED A $7-MILLION GRANT FOR ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH

John Jay College Awarded a $7-Million Grant for Alzheimer’s Research

 

A record, $7.6 million grant awarded by the National Institute on Aging [part of the National Institutes of Health] to the Department of Psychology puts John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the forefront of research into Alzheimer’s disease.

“At John Jay, we are proud of our roots and international expertise in criminal justice, but we are also a liberal arts institution with professors on the leading edge of research and innovation in the sciences and humanities,” said John Jay College President Karol V. Mason. “Research sits at the core of our mission to educate for justice in all its forms and the work of our faculty perform will have a lasting, positive impact on our society.”

Last year, John Jay professors were awarded more than $31 million in grants from outside sources, the most ever for the College and almost double the amount of five years earlier. John Jay is regularly awarded grants in areas as diverse as policing, art exhibitions, theater, and effective treatment of cancer and infectious diseases.

National Institute on Aging logo

“The National Institute on Aging recognizes that John Jay faculty members and their students are conducting top-tier research in a wide variety of fields. It’s an exciting research environment, with student mentees actively engaged every step of the way” said Psychology Department Chair Angela Crossman. “This may be the largest single, research grant, but it is one of the many grants and awards our psychology professors have received to carry out research in areas including; eyewitness testimony, stigma around severe mental illness, and plea bargaining.”

The NIH grant is in the R01 category, which is dedicated to health-related research and development projects.

“This is the largest and most competitive type of NIH grant,” said Amrish Sugrim-Singh, the Assistant Director of the College’s Office of Sponsored Programs, who helped prepare the proposal and will administer the grant. “To be awarded a grant of this stature shows the results of John Jay’s increased institutional support for faculty and the growing importance that research plays at the College.”

The Office for the Advancement of Research expects John Jay will again top the $30 million mark for the 2018-19 school year. Last year the college ranked third among all CUNY colleges.

John Jay professors also ranked first in 2017 in per capita scholarly productivity among the 11 CUNY senior colleges with an average of 2.0 books, chapters or journal publications produced per faculty member.

Learn about the Impact of research by John Jay professors


JOHN JAY HOSTS THE NEW YORK CITY DEBUT OF THE LAVENDER SCARE

John Jay Hosts The New York City Debut Of The Lavender Scare

 

The thought of federal employees being dragged into humiliating interrogations because they didn’t wear lipstick, seemed too masculine or feminine, or went to a bar or a party with other gay people, seems preposterous and outright illegal to us today. But the truth of the matter is, this unconscionable government-sponsored witch hunt happened for decades, ruining the lives of gay people, sending them into hiding and prohibiting them from fruitful careers. That’s why The Lavender Scare, a documentary from Josh Howard, Producer and Director, and Kevin Jennings, Executive Producer, was screened at John Jay on December 5, to shed light on this historical injustice. The film revealed how the U.S. government fired federal employees they discovered to be homosexual.

Josh Howard and Mitchell Draizin enjoying time with John Jay students and faculty

Josh Howard and Mitchell Draizin enjoying time with John Jay students and faculty

 

“They were targeted simply because they were gay. They were dismissed without any kind of justice.” —Josh Howard

 

The Injustice
Just as McCarthyism, or the Red Scare, spread fear and accusations of communist influence, the Lavender Scare made people question if gay men and lesbians were security risks or communist sympathizers—all without a single case or example supporting this theory. “These were loyal hard-working Americans who were serving in the military and civil-service jobs. They were targeted simply because they were gay,” said Howard. “They were dismissed without any kind of justice. They didn’t have a hearing or the ability to present their side of the story. In many cases, they didn’t know who accused them of being gay.” Howard went on to explain that many young people today don’t really understand how difficult life was for LGBTQI people in the beginning of the 1940s and the years that followed. “Homosexual acts were illegal in 49 out of 50 states, and so gay people were criminals. They were mentally ill, and that’s how the government, society, and religion treated us,” said Howard. He went on to describe how police would raid gay bars and practice mass arrests of people in gay bars for no other reason than that it was a gay bar. “I talk to young people today and they say, ‘Are you sure that really happened?’ We’ve come so far from those difficult days.”

The Spark
The events depicted in The Lavender Scare happened long before Stonewall, and long before the Gay Rights Movement was fully underway. In fact, out of fear and intimidation, most of the federal employees that were targeted in the documentary painfully accepted their terminations and tried to move on without drawing more attention to their situations. “Probably thousands of people had been fired before any one of those people stood up and said, ‘Why am I being fired and what did I do wrong?’” said Howard. “Then Frank Kameny, a Harvard trained astronomer and brilliant scientist, was fired because there was an anonymous allegation that he was gay. He was the first person to fight back and appeal his dismissal and file court cases.” Kameny and nine other people picketed the White House in 1965. It was the first Gay Rights demonstration that was ever held, igniting the Gay Rights Movement.

 

“It’s a film that reminds us how easily fear and uncertainty foster acts of discrimination, rolling back the rights of an entire class of people,” —Karol V. Mason

 

The Responsibility
As a college focused on justice issues, President Karol V. Mason reminded the audience that the documentary spoke directly to our mission of exploring justice in its many dimensions. “It’s a film that reminds us how easily fear and uncertainty foster acts of discrimination, rolling back the rights of an entire class of people,” said Mason. “I’m hoping that this is a call to action and a reminder for all of us about why we need to stay vigilant.” She went on to say that CUNY enrolls an estimated 17,000 LGBTQI students, and reminded them that they have a strong network of support, including: Christorpher Rosa, Interim Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs; David Rivera, Co-Chair of the Center for LGBTQI Studies; and Mitch Draizin, the Chair of the CUNY LGBTQI Leadership Council, who helped make the film screening possible. We talked with a some John Jay students at the event, and learned more about their interest in the docmentary.

Yuliya Brodska, Josh Howard, Gina Capone

left to right,Yuliya Brodska, Josh Howard, Gina Capone

Gina Capone ’19
The Lavender Scare screening was an incredible opportunity to be exposed to a justice issue widely discussed on our campus through a different lens. Having the director there for a Q&A also reinforced the notion that giving these stories a platform is always necessary—especially in our current day and age.”

left to right, Dillon Epperson, Annie Tenantitla, Marianne Mba

left to right, Dillon Epperson, Annie Tenantitla, Marianne Mba

Marianne Mba ’20
“I’m gay and I’m an Economics major, so I’ve had a lot of conversations about the Red Scare in relation to Communism. Recently, I saw another documentary on Netflix, and there was a small clip about the Lavender Scare in it. That made me really interested in the topic. I think it’s important that we’re having this film screening here on campus.”

Learn more about the documentary The Lavender Scare

Learn more about the CUNY LGBTQI Leadership Program


New York Public University Systems Embark on Multilateral Academic Collaborations with Dominican Republic Education Ministries

New York –Leaders from the City University of New York (CUNY) and the State University of New York (SUNY) today joined Representative Adriano Espaillat (NY-13), Dominican Republic Consul General Carlos Castillo and education officials from the Dominican Republic to formalize their commitment to embark on a series of necessary and valuable academic collaborations. The joint agreements are between CUNY, SUNY, the State Education Department and the Dominican government ministries that oversee K-12 and higher education. The initiative, spearheaded by Rep. Espaillat, will enable colleges and universities to develop teacher trainings, academic exchange programs and collaborative research in the areas of energy and the environment, management and mitigation of disasters, and information and communication technologies, among others. CUNY and SUNY count a total of more than 40,000 students who are of Dominican descent.

New York’s two public university systems were represented at Friday’s signing ceremony at the SUNY Global Center by CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. and Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz; SUNY Board of Trustees Chairman H. Carl McCall and Sally Crimmins Villela, SUNY Associate Vice Chancellor for Global Affairs. They joined Espaillat, Castillo, Minister Alejandrina Germán of the Dominican Republic Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology, and Vice Minister Victor Sánchez of the Dominican Ministry of Education.

“Education plays a critical role in upward mobility for students and teachers, and this holds especially true for vulnerable and low-income communities,” said Rep. Espaillat. “It remains critical that we work together to ensure a solid foundation for innovation, progress and achievement to better prepare our students and teachers for a global competitive society today and in the future. I am proud of the work with have accomplished to bring forth this agreement that will have a tremendous benefit on students today and future students with the SUNY, CUNY system.”

“This agreement represents a great opportunity for New York’s CUNY and SUNY students to learn, develop and strengthen ties with the Dominican Republic,” said New York State Secretary of State Rossana Rosado. “Among New York’s foreign-born residents, the majority are from the Dominican Republic. These are our true neighbors and we are proud to work together to see students thrive.”

“As America’s great urban university system, the diversity of CUNY’s student population mirrors that of New York, the world’s most diverse city,” said CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr.“Just as Dominicans constitute the largest immigrant group in the five boroughs, they represent the largest ethnic group in the university, with more than 22,500 undergraduates and 1,200 graduate students who comprise 8.7 percent of CUNY’s total enrollment. In an important sense, then, we are all one people – and it will behoove us all to make the most of this great opportunity.”

“We are thrilled to enter into this momentous partnership with our colleagues here and in the Dominican Republic, a place that many New Yorkers think of as home,” said SUNY Chairman H. Carl McCall. “My special thanks to Congressman Adriano Espaillat for his foresight to bring us all together and arrange for our first meeting with President Danilo Medina. It is evident the country’s priorities include education, and we are proud to partner on the STEM fields and teacher training, while enhancing student and faculty exchange.”

“We at CUNY are delighted to enter framework agreements with the Education Ministries of the Dominican Republic,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz.“Students of Dominican descent number over 22,000 at CUNY, and are a key constituency for our University. One of the well-conceived aspects of these framework agreements is that they are open-ended in regard to their potential application. We could establish new pipelines for students who receive an associate degree to continue working toward a bachelor’s degree. We could create channels to more easily enable students to pursue graduate studies. Through the sharing of knowledge and collaborations among faculty, we can help each other to master and apply needed forms of pedagogy in areas, such as the STEM fields, that have been identified for strategic impact. We can broaden students’ horizons of experience, give them the expectation, and – eventually – the assurance, that they can thrive in their professional lives wherever they chose to practice.”

“SUNY students’ lives are further enriched when excellence in education is matched with applied learning experiences,” said SUNY Chancellor Kristina M. Johnson. “That’s why we’re pleased to have a significant role in this collaboration with CUNY, the Ministry of Education of the Dominican Republic, the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology of the Dominican Republic, and the New York State Education Department. Strategic partnerships are imperative, especially as we focus on training and scientific research, as well as arts, humanities, and other fields of study.”

Each New York university system will enter into an independent agreement with each Dominican ministry, and the agreement signed Friday provided a framework for future arrangements between the individual universities and colleges in each system. In practice, each institution will explore ways in which they might develop academic cooperation through future projects, programs and activities. These could include the development of refined trainings for primary and secondary school teachers; exchange initiatives that provide academic and professional experiences; and sharing of academic and scientific information of mutual interest, and participation in international networks and events.

About the City University of New York

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

About the State University of New York

The State University of New York is the largest comprehensive system of higher education in the United States, with 64 college and university campuses located within 30 miles of every home, school, and business in the state. As of Fall 2017, more than 430,000 students were enrolled in a degree program at a SUNY campus. In total, SUNY served nearly 1.4 million students in credit-bearing courses and programs, continuing education and community outreach programs in the 2016-17 academic year. SUNY students and faculty across the state make significant contributions to research and discovery, resulting in $1 billion of externally sponsored activity each year. There are 3 million SUNY alumni worldwide, and one in three New Yorkers with a college degree is a SUNY alum. To learn more about how SUNY creates opportunity, visit www.suny.edu.

 

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Pamela Wheeler appointed to Foundation Board of Directors

Pamela Wheeler

Pamela Wheeler (© Karl Ferguson Jr.)

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Foundation is pleased to welcome Pamela Wheeler to its Board of Directors.

Wheeler is a woman of firsts. She was the first woman appointed to lead a professional sports union, was the founding Director of the Women’s National Basketball Players Association (WNBPA) and negotiated the first collective bargaining agreement in women’s professional sports.

As founding Director, Wheeler created the organizational infrastructure of the WNBPA and was responsible for improving the lives of professional women basketball players both on and off the court. Whether through collective bargaining, establishing programs for players or developing alternative income sources, she consistently implemented strategies that resulted in significant advances for WNBA players. Under her leadership, player benefits, salaries, and resources increased by 300 percent from 1998 to 2014.

In addition, Wheeler consistently worked to enhance the working conditions and social welfare of WNBA players both during and after their playing careers. She championed women’s health issues and social justice by advocating for maternal health benefits, maternity leave and gender pay equity. To that end, she implemented and administered a myriad of Association and joint labor/management programs, including anti-drug, graduate school tuition reimbursement, career assessments & apprenticeships, financial planning and Rookie orientation.

Prior to the WNBPA, Wheeler was the Director of Business Development for the Continental Basketball Association, where she finalized stalled negotiations with New Line Cinema to create a national branding platform based on merging sports and entertainment. Before that, she served as General Counsel & Marketing Manager at Bob Woolf Associates, creating sports and entertainment marketing programs for institutional clients and negotiating marketing agreements for athletes.

She earned a BA from Dartmouth College and a JD from Boston University. She has been profiled in a number of traditional and sports publications, including the Sports Business Journal, Sports Illustrated, Black Enterprise, and Essence Magazine.

View the full board of directors here!


Educational theatre program presents “High School Musical Jr.” on Dec. 14

PS 161 students rehearsing for High School Musical Jr.

PS 161 students rehearsing for “High School Musical Jr.”

The Graduate Program in Educational Theatre at The City College of New York is collaborating with PS 161 for a presentation of Disney’s “High School Musical Jr.” This is the eighth collaboration with the Harlem-based school.

The students of PS 161’s drama club have been working under the direction of Wendy Rojas, drama teacher and CCNY education theatre alumna, and candidates in The Graduate Program in Educational Theatre.

Candidates in the graduate program, directed by Jennifer Katona, provide technical theatre support as students from the drama club prepare for the performance. The showcase is part of the Fundamentals of Teaching Technical Theatre course in partnership with the Roundabout Theatre Company.

The middle school students will sing songs from the Disney musical including “We’re All in This Together,” “What I’ve Been Looking For” and “Get’cha Head in the Game.”

“High School Musical Jr.” takes place on Friday, December 14 at 6 p.m. with a community potluck at 5 p.m. before the show. The performance is free and open to the public, and tickets can be reserved here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


JOHN JAY PRESENTS AT THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY

John Jay Presents at the American Society of Criminology

 

This year in Atlanta, the American Society of Criminology held its 74th Annual Meeting from November 14 – 17, under the theme “Institutions, Cultures and Crime.” More than 150 John Jay faculty, research staff, and students attended the conference with the purpose of presenting their scholarship and learning more about the work of criminology taking place in institutions around the world. To share the presenters’ work with the entire John Jay community, we’ve put together a roundup of highlights from the event.

The Truth About School Shootings
Joshua D. Freilich, is both a professor of criminal justice as well as the creator and co-director of the School Shooting Database. In his presentation on “Understanding the Causes of School Violence Using Open Source Data,” Freilich was able to release some preliminary findings from analysis of the database—which includes incidents from 2006-2016—after more than a year of collection and study. Freilich noted that, while the media tends to focus on non-typical instances of mass casualty incidents in schools, most are non-fatal. In another notable departure from the common narrative, his data showed that school shootings do not seem to be increasing in number, and shooters, though often portrayed as irrational actors, do appear to be making rational choices, and are therefore likely susceptible to diversion or prevention by effective interventions.

Closing Rikers Island
As the movement to close the jail complex on Rikers Island gathers momentum, New York City will need to see a significant reduction in the jail population in order to find capacity to move those currently incarcerated there to other carceral facilities. In a session sponsored by the Misdemeanor Justice Project (MJP), John Jay graduate students Quinn Hood, Olive Lu, and Shannon Tomascak presented papers exploring aspects of how this could be accomplished. In one project, Hood noted an unexplained increase in the number of “bed days” for certain categories, which drives up numbers of incarcerated despite dropping admissions numbers. And, in conjunction with New York’s Raise the Age legislation, Lu investigated whether the dynamics of criminal justice involvement for different age groups aligns with current scientific findings. Her data suggested that, while there are significant differences across age groups, emerging adults (ages 18-25) do not stand out in ways that suggest they present higher risk, raising the possibility of whether this group should still be treated as “juveniles,” a population that will no longer be housed in the Rikers facility.

Explaining Fatal Incidents
Police-involved shootings are a prevalent and emotional topic in today’s news. Graduate and undergraduate students Daniella Rice, Jason Rampersaud, Marilyn Reyes, and Magdalena Jablonowski, under the guidance of Professors Hung-En Sung and Frank Pezzella, explored different factors that may have a significant relationship with fatal officer-involved shootings. A diverse range of variables, including departmental use of force policies, racial dynamics, citizen hostility and regional culture, were considered. The presentations were followed up by a lively debate with input from active and former police, students and faculty on the role of race and what conditions would be important to consider in future research. Suggested conditions included availability of life-saving care and the use of other means of violence apart from guns.

Applying Best Practice
The State Department’s Diplomacy Lab is a partnership program that enables the State Department to “course-source” research and innovation related to foreign policy challenges by harnessing the of students and faculty experts at colleges and universities across the United States. One such project was led by Professor of Sociology Rosemary Barbaret, whose students reported on radicalization and disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) policies in other countries that could be applied to U.S. policy in Iraq. Elizabeth Aguilar, Catherine Minaya, Sarah Durrant, and Rachel Fiegler outlined DDR best practices in Uganda and Colombia, with an eye toward what would work best to reintegrate child soldiers swept up by the Iraq conflict. Lilla Heins discussed her research into Islamic radicalization in the South Caucasus, sharing her recommendations for dealing with returning soldiers. The session wrapped up with a talk-back with a Foreign Service Officer, including avenues for future research.

Immigration and Enforcement
An all-John Jay immigration-themed panel featured Sociology Professor David Brotherton and two Criminal Justice Ph.D. alumni, Borough of Manhattan Community College Professor Shirley Leyro, and John Jay’s Research Director Daniel Stageman. Leyro began with preliminary data from her seminal CUNY Belonging Study, which explores feelings of belonging and membership among CUNY noncitizen students. Stageman and Brotherton then presented on their current projects, focused respectively on the explosion of local police involvement in immigration enforcement under the Trump administration, and the wonton cruelty on display in deportation court.

David Kennedy at ASC

David Kennedy at ASC

Moving Towards Reform
Since its 2014 launch, the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice (NI), coordinated by the National Network for Safe Communities (NNSC), has produced substantial increases in community trust and confidence in police among its six pilot sites, the Urban Institute announced during a panel on Wednesday, November 14, previewing findings from its formal NI evaluation. The Urban Institute also found that police departments from the six NI sites have, likewise, bought into the initiative’s core ideas—enhancing procedural justice, reducing the impact of implicit bias, and fostering reconciliation. Earlier this year, NNSC released an extensive report on Reconciliation Between Police and Communities. “Actual exposure to the content of the National Initiative’s three pillars won people over,” despite some initial skepticism, NNSC Director David Kennedy said. He credited much of this success to clever strategies law enforcement agencies employed to encourage buy-in, both in their communities and within their departments.

Stephen Lurie, Alex Acevedo, Kyle Ott

l-r: Stephen Lurie, Alex Acevedo and Kyle Ott  

The Less Than 1%
On ASC’s second day, NNSC Research and Policy Advisor Stephen Lurie, Data Analyst Kyle Ott, and Data Analytics Associate Alex Acevedo showcased empirical proof for one of the organization’s key research findings—that a tiny portion of a community’s population is responsible for a disproportionate amount of its violence—during a presentation on groups and the extreme concentration of urban violence.

Lurie, Ott, and Acevedo incorporated data from 23 sites that NNSC’s Group Violence Intervention (GVI) has worked with since 2014 to illustrate that less than 1 percent of the sample cities’ populations were connected with roughly 50 percent of homicides and non-fatal shooting incidents. Their presentation is part of a paper that will be submitted for peer review.


CUNY’s Single Stop Program Offers Prompt Help to Needy Students to Continue Their Education

In an effort to help alleviate stressors that can hinder a student’s academic career, The City University of New York offers Single Stop, a program that helps students obtain nutrition benefits, health insurance, legal and financial services and tax preparation assistance, in short order, right on campus. Single Stop services are available at every CUNY community college and at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

“The demands of college can overwhelm a student facing hardships outside the classroom,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The campus-based Single Stop makes it easier for students to get a range of non-academic help so they can stay focused on their studies.  This initiative is another way that CUNY works to help students overcome obstacles to academic success and degree completion.”

From 2009 through 2017, Single Stop and its partners have connected 107,569 families and individuals with $274,113,613 in benefits, tax refunds and supportive services CUNY-wide.

To determine eligibility for benefits, students and their families participate in a short question-and-answer session. Single Stop counselors then direct students and their families to federal, state or local benefits that they are eligible to receive.

Single Stop offers the following services, confidentially and free of charge:

  • Benefit screening for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); and Women, Infants and Children (WIC)
  • Available food pantries
  • Financial Counseling
  • Legal Counseling
  • Tax Assistance
  • Health Care Enrollment

Single Stop ensures that it is accessible to students by funding and training at least one dedicated benefits counselor who is an employee of the college. The counselors are located onsite at the student services or financial aid office, where they can help students with whatever they need.

Students who desire more information are encouraged to visit Single Stop at CUNY.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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African classic “Things Fall Apart” turns 60, CCNY & Achebes celebrate

The late Chinua Achebe

Former SA Pres. Kgalema Motlanthe to deliver Achebe lecture

First published in 1958, Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart” is hailed as the most widely read book in modern African literature. It’s sold more than 20 million copies and been translated into more than 50 languages. In celebration of the novel’s 60th anniversary, The City College of New York and the Christie and Chinua Achebe Foundation host the Chinua Achebe Leadership Forum Lecture on Dec 12. Former South African interim President and Deputy President Kgalema Petrus Motlanthe is the speaker, 6:30 — 8:30 p.m. in CCNY’s Aaron Davis’ Hall Theater B.

Organized by CCNY’s Black Studies Program, the event is free and open to the public but registration is required. Click here to register.

The Achebe Leadership Forum discusses Africa’s challenges in keeping with   Achebe’s work. Motlanthe’s lecture will be followed by a roundtable discussion featuring the South African politician and a distinguished panel of scholars.

Christie Achebe, the author’s widow, and son Chidi Achebe will also attend the event. Chinua Achebe, who died in 2013, was a visiting professor at City College in 1989.

About “Things Fall Apart”
Set in the 19th Century, the 215-page book is a classic narrative about Africa’s cataclysmic encounter with Europe as it establishes a colonial presence on the continent. It is told through the fictional experiences of Okonkwo, a wealthy and fearless Igbo warrior. Former U.S. President Barack Obama has described the book as: “A true classic of world literature . . . A masterpiece that has inspired generations of writers in Nigeria, across Africa, and around the world.”

Former South African President Kgalema Motlanthe, guest speaker at the Achebe Lecture.

About Chinua Achebe
Nigerian-born, Achebe wrote more than 20 books – novels, short stories, essays and collections of poetry. His first book, “Things Fall Apart” (1958),   was published when he was 28 and over the years became a global bestseller.

His other notable books include “No Longer at Ease,” “A Man of the People,” and “Anthills of the Savannah.”  In addition to his writing, Achebe lectured and taught widely internationally. Among the U.S. institutions where he held faculty positions were Bard College and Brown University.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Education Center Opens at LaGuardia Community College

Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Education Center Opens at LaGuardia Community College

A ribbon cutting was held on Tuesday, December 4th, 2018 to mark the opening of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Education Center at LaGuardia Community College. Pictured from left to right: Roy Castro, CEO of the D.M. Ice Cream Corporation in Long Island City and a 10,000 Small Businesses graduate, Goldman Sachs Chairman Lloyd Blankfein, LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow, New York State Commissioner Howard Zemsky, and LaGuardia Community College Vice President of Administration & Finance Shahir Erfan.

New York State, under Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s leadership, awarded LaGuardia Community College $5 million to build the new center.

The 10,000-ft2 brand-new space is a venue for 10,000 Small Businesses trainings, lectures, alumni events, and more.

The 10,000 Small Businesses program launched in 2010 as a partnership between LaGuardia Community College and Goldman Sachs to support and help local entrepreneurs to grow their businesses and create jobs. Often described as a “mini-MBA,” 10,000 Small Businesses provides training in business development, capital building, contract negation, systems management, and more. Immediate and sustained business growth for the alumni of the program have resulted. To date, the program at LaGuardia Community College has helped more than 830 business owners. Based on this success, Goldman Sachs expanded the program. Today, it’s served nearly 8,000 small businesses across all 50 U.S. states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.

For more, visit http://www.LaGuardia.edu/10KSB.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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CCNY’s Mini-Medical School talk highlights the opioid crisis

CCNY Mini-Medical School talk to address opioid crisis

According to data from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in 2017 alone, 1,487 New Yorkers died from unintentional drug overdose.

  • One New Yorker died every six hours from an overdose.
  • More than eight in ten (82%) overdose deaths involved an opioid
  • Fentanyl, a potent opioid that is 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine, was involved in 57% of the overdose deaths.
  • By age group, the largest increase in the rate of overdose death was among New Yorkers 55 to 84.

The topic of the next Mini-Medical School session at The City College of New York will be “Opioids Everywhere: A Practical Guide to Understanding and Combatting the Current Crisis.” The speaker is Dr. Howard Greller, Director of Research and Medical Toxicology in the Emergency Department at St. Barnabas Hospital Health Systems, who will focus on the current opioid crisis impacting the city and the nation.

The talk is free and will be held Wednesday, Dec. 12, at 5:30 p.m. on the City College Campus, 160 Convent Avenue, in the North Academic Center (NAC) Ballroom. Refreshments will be served.

The CUNY School of Medicine, located on the campus of the City College of New York, hosts a series of free health information sessions for the Harlem community. Mini-Medical School provides an opportunity to explore various health topics, empowering community members with the knowledge to actively take part in their healthcare and that of their families. With no prior educational requirements, this program is open to all members of the Harlem community. Information is presented in an engaging, easy-to-understand style by health professionals and experts in related fields.

We welcome everyone in the community to attend. RSVP here.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility index. This measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.


Bronx workers doubly impacted by environmental hazards, at work and at home

plastic recycling facility in the Bronx, NYSocioeconomically disadvantaged populations and racial/ethnic minority populations often reside in areas with more environmental hazards than other population groups, which may lead to poor health outcomes and worsen health disparities. But little research explores how occupational groups may be differentially distributed with respect to ambient environmental exposures.

In a study recently published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Andrew Maroko and Assistant Professor Brian Pavilonis used spatial analyses to examine exposure of people in vulnerable occupational groups to neighborhood-level environmental pollutants in the Bronx borough of New York City.

The study revealed several spatial relationships among occupational groups, neighborhood environmental exposures, and demographics. The most vulnerable occupational groups (those with the highest likelihood of poor health outcomes or high exposure to pollutants in workplace environments) were positively associated with neighborhoods with higher concentrations of PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm) and black carbon. These same neighborhoods also tend to have higher proportions of vulnerable populations on the basis of race/ethnicity and income levels.

The confluence of high-risk occupational groups and environmental neighborhood exposures may further contribute to, or exacerbate, health disparities in regions like the Bronx.

“Since certain jobs are likely to have high exposures to pollutants, combining the chronic work and the home exposures could effectively put these residents in ‘double jeopardy,’” says Maroko.

Maroko AR, Pavilonis BT. Occupational Groups and Environmental Justice: A Case Study in the Bronx, New York. Prev Chronic Dis 2018;15:180344.


CUNY SPH alumni gather for the holidays

CUNY SPH alumni came together to celebrate the holiday season at the Alumni Holiday Gathering on December 3rd, 2018 at 3 Columbus Circle, hosted by the Office of Alumni Relations and the Alumni Network Core Group. The event was held in an impressive space which was generously donated by Dr. Destry Sulkes, a member of the CUNY SPH Foundation Board. Alumni gathered to mingle and network with each other over dinner and drinks. Dean Ayman El-Mohandes and Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Alumni Relations Lynn Roberts delivered delivered inspiring remarks to the gathered alumni. Representatives from the Alumni Network Core Group addressed the room as well, welcoming the alumni and kicking off the evening with an icebreaker. It was a festive event with many smiles and holiday cheer.

A special thanks to the CUNY SPH Foundation for their support in making this event happen!

Don’t miss out on future alumni events! Please contact alumnirelations@sph.cuny.edu to make sure you are on the alumni email list.

Alumni holiday gathering

Dean Ayman El-Mohandes addresses alumni at the Alumni Holiday Gathering.

 

Alumni holiday gathering

Dean Ayman El-Mohandes

 

Alumni Holiday Gathering 2

Dean Ayman El-Mohandes addressing alumni gathered for the Holiday Event

 

Alumni holiday gathering

The Alumni Network Core Group addresses gathered alumni

 

Alumni holiday gathering

Representatives from the Alumni Network Core Group. From left to right: A.J. Brown, Rodrigo Arce Cardozo, Ritu Jain

 

Alumni holiday gathering 7

Alumni Holiday Gathering

 

Alumni holiday gathering 9

Alumni mingling at the Holiday Gathering

 

Alumni holiday gathering 8

Alumni gathered for dinner, drinks, and socializing

 

 

 

 

 


Capital One Funds Year Three of BCC Cybersecurity Program

Bronx Community College was awarded a Year Three $150,000 grant from the Capital One Foundation in continued support of the College’s Cybersecurity and Networking Noncredit to Credit Training Program. Support from the Capital One Foundation was instrumental in the creation of BCC’s Cybersecurity and Networking 30-credit certificate and 60-credit degree program and their continued funding will facilitate the program’s continued development, including the delivery of professional development opportunities for faculty and staff and summer boot camps for students, preparing them to earn critical industry certifications.


THE ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT CENTER CELEBRATES 10 YEARS

The Academic Advisement Center Celebrates 10 Years

 

“The Academic Advisement Center is a critical element in the equation for student success.” —Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College

 

On November 30, John Jay’s Academic Advisement Center (AAC) celebrated its 10-year anniversary. The room was filled with laughter, hugs, and joy as previous AAC deans, advisors, and coordinators mingled with students and professors. President Karol V. Mason kicked off the event, first noting the energy of the crowd. “I have to tell you, you guys are a lot of fun.” Then she praised the AAC’s visionary and founder, Jane Bowers, current Interim Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost at CUNY. “I’m so glad that Jane Bowers is here to celebrate with us, because this is her dream. My number one priority here at John Jay is student success,” said Mason. “But, it’s because of the work that everyone in this room does that it’s a reality. When I go around talking about what’s happened in the last three years, Jane gets the credit for that because she was the team leader, moving the graduation rate 11 percentage points in three years.” Mason went on to say that she was committed to finding more resources for the center, because, “the Academic Advisement Center is a critical element in the equation for student success.”

President Mason and students at the AAC 10-year celebration

President Mason and students at the AAC 10-year celebration

Jane Bowers and Sumaya Villanueva

Jane Bowers and Sumaya Villanueva

 

“Tonight’s celebration celebrates recognizing a problem and advocating for a solution.” —Jane Bowers, Founder of John Jay’s Academic Advisement Center

 

Seeing The Need
When Bowers spoke to the group, she shared the reason why she was determined to create the AAC 10 years ago. Before she became the Provost at John Jay, Bowers served as the Undergraduate Dean, and during that time, it became clear to her that there was a gap in student advisement. “On a daily basis in the the Dean’s office, I saw the results of this problem. Students would arrive at graduation audit not having completed the courses they needed to graduate. They would have to stay an extra semester just to take two courses. Other students would fail to find their academic committee, and graduate with tons of excess credits that they would have to pay for themselves,” said Bowers. That’s when she made it her goal to create an academic advisement center to help students. But first she had to bring the lack of advisement into sharp focus. “I stood up in a Town Hall and declared that John Jay did not provide their students with any academic advisement, and that this was unacceptable and it had to end.” Once she had the support she needed, Bowers hired a director and a small staff. Then they developed a plan to provide mandatory advising for first-year students. “Tonight’s celebration celebrates recognizing a problem and advocating for a solution,” said Bowers.

Making A Difference
If anyone is at the front lines of student advisement, it’s Sumaya Villanueva, the AAC’s Senior Director, who’s held the position since the center’s inception. Over the years, Villanueva has had to be very creative in the ways the AAC maximizes its reach with limited resources. But, she’s never lost sight of Bowers’ initial goals, and she finds herself inspired every day watching students thrive and overcome challenges. “One of my favorite AAC stories is of a student who started off having a lot of difficulties progressing in her degree because English wasn’t her first language. Louise Freymann—one of our original three advisors—started working with her and suggested that she go to a CUNY program to help with her English skills,” said Villanueva. “When she came back to John Jay, you could immediately see a difference in her. She graduated with honors and went on to pursue a master’s degree.” Villanueva believes that the AAC was the crucial element that helped guide that student in the right direction, moving her toward a degree instead of giving up and dropping out.

Dara Byrne and Andrew Bandini

Dara Byrne and Andrew Bandini

 

“With the AAC, what we have is a College that is thriving. People know how to implement, trouble shoot, and think about student success and outreach.” —Dara Byrne, Dean of Undergraduate Studies

 

Evolving To Success
To fully appreciate the work that’s being done now at that AAC, Dara Byrne, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Retention & Dean of Undergraduate Studies, looked back at how life was before the center’s creation. She remembers simply getting an invitation to serve as a volunteer adviser. “They assigned me five or six students to advise, without any training on what to advise them on,” said Byrne. “We were just supposed to listen and talk about their career goals, but there were no details on planning, course selection, understanding financial aid, understanding roadblocks, making better decisions, or switching majors. It was terrible for students and faculty. Now, with the AAC, what we have is a College that is thriving. People know how to implement, trouble shoot, and fully think about student success and outreach.”

Playing A Pivotal Role
As a current honors student on track to graduate this coming May, Andrew Bandini, Secretary of Student Council, knows how important the AAC is to his friends and peers. “I’m lucky to get academic advisement from the honors program directly, but students come to student council all the time asking us what courses mean and what they need to fulfill their requirements,” said Bandini. “I’ve referred them to the AAC, and I’ve seen how the center plays an integral role in students’ lives. The advisors perform one of the hardest jobs here at the College, convincing students who are overwhelmed and stressed that they can succeed.” Villanueva agreed, explaining that the center now plays a role in the academic planning of most undergraduate students. And, she was happy to share with the group the AAC’s two latest programs: Nudge to the Finish Line, a text messaging pilot, which is part of the National Research Project led by researchers at the University of Virginia; and CUSP, which stands for Completion for Upper-division Student Program, a Price Family Foundation two-year grant funded project that works exclusively with upper seniors to help get them to graduate.

 

“There’s no shame in getting help. Take advantage of every support that is offered to you, because then you are going to be more successful.” —Jane Bowers, Founder of John Jay’s Academic Advisement Center

 

Seeing The Full Picture
When we asked Bowers how she defines student success, her answer showed both her love of learning and her respect for the true value of an education. “A lot of people consider success graduating, but I don’t fall into that camp,” said Bowers. “I know that completion is important. We want to make sure those students who start their degrees finish them in a timely manner. But to have the fullest undergraduate experience I urge students to take advantage of opportunities, get to know some faculty really well, connect to the institution deeply, and really push yourself. It’s the experiences that you have that make the difference between success and failure.” And, when asked what one word summed up the AAC best, her answer turned out to be a message to all John Jay students. “Essential. Students can’t succeed without academic advisement, and they need it from the minute they enter the door.” It’s Bowers’ staunch belief that asking for help is a sign of strength. “There’s no shame in getting help. Take advantage of every support that is offered to you, because then you are going to be more successful.”

Learn more about the Academic Advisement Center

More scenes from the evening

President mason with students

Dara Byrne with Andrew Bandini

The Academic Advisement Center 10-year Celebration

The Academic Advisement Center 10-year Celebration

Andrew Bandini

Sumaya Villanueva


A Visit from New York City’s First Lady

Young minds and young bodies got a workout when a special visitor dropped in on BCC’s Early Childhood Center. Chirlane McCray, activist and wife of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, came to campus on November 29, which also happened to be her birthday. A chirping chorus of “Happy Birthday To You!” greeted the happy First Lady, who declared the morning “The best birthday I ever had!”

The visit marked the third anniversary of ThriveNYC, a program led by First Lady McCray that is committed to creating a mental health system that works for everyone. The EEC was specifically chosen by City Hall as an ideal example of the iniative in action — the entire staff of ECC has participated in Thrive NYC’s “Trauma Smart” professional development, where they received training in Trauma Informed Practice for children and families.

The First Lady read “The ABCs of Yoga for Kids” and led BCC youngest scholars in various alphabetically-themed yoga poses — the favorite being L for Lion, which gave her audience the opportunity to roar impressively. Homemade cupcakes were served as the children presented their guest of honor with a Thank You card they fashioned themselves. You can see the fun here.

The Early Childhood Center offers an accredited preschool education to the sons and daughters of BCC students while their parents are studying elsewhere on campus.


In the Balance: Kary Moss

Kary Moss, a class of ’88 graduate, is laser-focused on democracy. Not only is the ACLU’s Director of Affiliate Support and Nationwide Initiatives, she is also married to Doug Baker, class of ’87 and an appellate criminal defense attorney, and mother of Jessa Baker-Moss, now 28. Here, she tells us how she gets it done.

On her typical morning

I love my early morning exercise time and guard it and good coffee first thing. For the last 30 years I’ve driven every day at least an hour to Detroit and used that time to think, listen to podcasts, or get phone calls out of the way. With this new position, I will have a short commute or long walk from downtown Brooklyn to the Financial District and will have to find other quiet time to think.

 

On leading ACLU of Michigan in the investigation of Flint’s water supply in 2014

Helping to uncover the water crisis in Flint was a transformative experience both professionally and personally. The ACLU of Michigan became involved as part of a larger effort to investigate the consequences of the state imposition of emergency managers over financially troubled communities and, in so doing, eliminating democracy at the most local level. In Michigan, this had stark racial justice consequences. At one point, over half of the African American population was living in a city controlled by an emergency manager who had complete authority over all decisions.  

We understood that we could not successfully mount a legal challenge to the law itself and had no chance of persuading the legislature to repeal the law. So we set out to discover what happened in cities governed by emergency managers by hiring an investigative reporter, Curt Guyette. He began investigating the complaints of residents and the state’s water tests which, we discovered, had been doctored. That work merged with an organic an alliance of Flint residents, scientists, media, and attorneys who came together without knowing exactly where it would lead.  Everyone played an indispensable role in uncovering the crisis and then forcing a complete replacement of the lead pipes through a $100 million settlement agreement with the State.

The experience reinforces the importance of working close to the ground and listening carefully to affected communities. It also is perfect example of how business expertise transplanted onto government can have horrific unintended consequences when the financial bottom line is the driver of decisions that affect public health. And, it is a perfect example of the dangers of insularity – that is, when government officials (or anyone!) only listen to a limited number of voices they will, inevitably, make poor decisions.

 

On how she stays motivated to fight for what she believes in

Winning helps (!) I’ve been especially inspired by the grassroots activism that has emerged following the 2016 Presidential election. I haven’t seen anything like it during my career and it has created real opportunities. The number of women and people of color running for office has been energizing.  

In Michigan, we knew we had a chance to protect democracy and guard against voter suppression by launching a voting rights ballot initiative that included same day registration and no excuse absentee voting.  These, and the other policies in the proposal, have the potential to increase turnout by 2-9% or 400,000 votes in a state where the President won by only 10,000+ votes. Our national office made a significant financial investment out of the gate which empowered us to build a strong coalition, get it on the ballot, and win by a whopping 67% statewide and in 80 of 83 counties.  It’s success moved Michigan from the back of the pack to the front on November 6.

The ACLU’s greatest strength is its network of 54 state affiliates, the 1,100+ staff who work out of the state offices, and the partnerships the state offices cultivate with community activists.  Our on the ground presence makes the organization capable of responding quickly and forcefully. As a multi-issue organization we have incredible expertise across the organization that can be leveraged everywhere. While resources vary from state to state, the states can really set the agenda. And the talent and resources in the organization means that we are always capable of meeting new challenges.

 

On clerking at the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit after law school

I understood early in my career that I would have a chance to see, firsthand, the best and worst of lawyering. I don’t believe clerkships are essential though; I do think it’s important to find supervisors and colleagues who will set a standard of excellence as lawyers, writers, critical thinkers, and leaders.

 

On her work as an ACLU staff attorney for its Women’s Rights Project founded by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

I had interned at the WRP before and during law school and believed in the work.  When I began I was assigned to work primarily on cases that involved the arrest of pregnant women for alcohol or drug dependency. I quickly learned the importance of building and working in coalitions that included the public health community. And that experience shaped my approach to always build bridges across disciplines in any social justice work.

I love that RBG has become a cultural icon. For me, her legacy is very much about the value of innovative thinking when trying to shape and change culture. She understood that dismantling gender bias required convincing men that it harmed them. And she understood that lawsuits alone can’t solve complex social problems. What they can do is give voice to the voiceless and challenge cultural stereotypes publicly. She was patient and hunkered down for the fight.

 

On how she spends her downtime

Love being with my daughter, yoga, knitting and some binge-worthy tv shows which I shall keep to myself because people get judgy.

 

On the decision to serve on the Detroit News Editorial Page Advisory Board

The Detroit News has the reputation of being the more conservative paper in Michigan. I was honored to be invited to join because I think it is important to challenge and be challenged. I learned a lot and developed relationships that I very much value.

In addition to subscribing to every paper that we can, I try to take heart that the attacks on a free press have created a teachable moment for the next generation about democracy, the First Amendment, and the sanctity of science and data.

 

On what she will do at her new position at the ACLU

What will you do in this position: I will lead a department whose staff members develop and implement initiatives and programs that strengthen and maintain the connections between the ACLU and its 54 affiliates as a cohesive nationwide organization. We work to advance the ACLU’s state and federal litigation and advocacy, build their capacity, and help ensure the organization’s commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion is furthered across the country. I will also lead efforts to share knowledge, talent, and skill across the organization, hoping to build the next generation of civil rights leaders and position the organization for future challenges.

 


Queens College Choral Society to Perform Handel’s Messiah for its Annual Winter Concert on December 8

— Performance to Feature a Full Orchestra, Professional Vocalists, and Singers Ranging in Age from Teenagers to Senior Citizens —

FLUSHING, NY, November 29, 2018—The Queens College Choral Society will perform Handel’s beloved Messiah in concert on Saturday, December 8, at 7:30 pm in Colden Auditorium. The Choral Society will be accompanied by a full orchestra. Soprano Anna Marie Wood, mezzo-soprano Linda Collazo, tenor David Szabo, and baritone Robert Balonek will perform the vocal solos. James John, professor and music director of the Choral Society, will conduct.

The Choral Society comprises singers from both the college and the public. Members range from high school musicians—who participate through the high school outreach program—to singers who have performed with the society for over 40 years. Accompanied by an orchestra, the Choral Society typically presents two concerts a year, in winter and spring, that highlight masterpieces of choral literature such as Brahms’s Requiem, Bach’s Mass in B Minor, and Mendelssohn’s Elijah. The Choral Society has also performed multiple premieres of new works, including pieces composed by Queens College Music Department faculty members.

Tickets for the winter concert are $20 and can be purchased through the Kupferberg Center Box office at (718) 793-8080 or online at www.kupferbergcenter.org. Group discounts for high school students and teachers are also available. To take advantage of this offer, visit www.qcchoralsociety.org.

Click here for a campus map and here for directions to Queens College.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 20,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


JOHN JAY COLLEGE PROVOST YI LI NAMED AAAS 2018 FELLOW

John Jay College Provost Yi Li Named AAAS 2018 Fellow

 

John Jay College of Criminal Justice Provost Yi Li has been named a 2018 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for his contributions to mathematics.

AAAS recognized Dr. Li “For distinguished contributions to the field of nonlinear partial differential equations and their applications, and for leadership in increasing participation of underrepresented groups in mathematics.”

Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

“Provost Yi Li fully understands and promotes the transformative power of higher education,” said Karol V. Mason, President John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “His passion for mathematics, appreciation of education, and commitment to equality inspires us all. I’m tremendously pleased, but not surprised, that Provost Li has been named a 2018 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. On behalf of the entire John Jay community, I offer him our heartfelt congratulations.”

The 2018 fellows will be recognized in the November 29, 2018 issue of the journal, Science, and are invited to a formal ceremony as part of the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. on February 16.

Dr. Li joined John Jay College as Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs in 2018 and brings with him more than three decades of higher education leadership, including award-winning research, scholarship and a proven track record for increasing gender and ethnic diversity in STEM programs and launching innovative student success programs (More on Provost Li).

Founded in 1848, the AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science . It has awarded the honor of Fellow since 1874, designating honorees because of their “scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.”

See Provost Li in the Journal, Science

Learn about Provost Li in his own words


The Democratic Party’s Problem is Voter Registration and Participation in Arizona, Florida, Georgia and Texas

A New Report from the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies at The Graduate Center, CUNY Assesses these Issues

NEW YORK, Dec. 3, 2018—The Graduate Center of the City University of New York’s Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies (CLACLS) has released a report on the voter registration and participation rates in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, and Texas for the last Midterm Elections. The report highlights that if Democratic demographic constituencies – African Americans, Latinos, and young voters between 18 and 29 years of age – would have voted at even slightly higher rates, each Democratic candidate would have won by comfortable margins.

“The challenge facing the Democratic Party as it prepares for 2020 is graphically underlined by the results in these four states” said the report’s author Laird W. Bergad, director of CLACLS and a distinguished professor at Lehman College and The Graduate Center. “Innovative registration and mobilization strategies are needed to get Democratic backers to the polls and this is especially acute among 18-29 year olds of all races.”

The report, titled The 2018 Mid-Term Election: Estimated Voter Participation Rates by Race and Age in Arizona, Florida, Georgia and Texas shows that in each of these state elections, Democratic-leaning constituencies voted at significantly lower rates than the principal Republican constituencies. For example, non-Hispanic whites were 66 percent of all voters in November 6, 2018 in Florida, compared to 13 percent African Americans. Latinos comprise 20 percent of the total electorate, but they were only 15 percent of the cast ballots. These rates are similar across all four states.

The challenge for the Democratic Party as it faces the critical 2020 election is clear. Can the party find innovative ways to register and mobilize the demographic constituencies which support Democratic candidates in nearly every key swing state that will determine the outcome of the next presidential election?

Key findings include:

  • Rates by race: In Arizona, 35.3 percent of Latinos voted in the elections, compared to the 53.5 percent non-Hispanic whites who voted. Only 21.5 percent of African Americans and 18.3 percent of Asians voted in the elections. In Florida, Latinos had a voter participation rate of 41.1 percent; non-Hispanic whites had 58.6 percent; African Americans, 49.3 percent; and Asians, 48.8 percent. In Georgia, Latinos had a voter participation rate of 56.1 percent, making it higher than the non-Hispanic whites (54.6 percent) and African Americans (50 percent). In Texas, non-Hispanic whites had a 49.9 percent voter participation rate, compared to 42.1 percent for African Americans, 40.4 percent Latinos and 36.4 percent Asians.
  • Rates by age: In Arizona, voters between 18 and 29 years of age were only 8 percent of cast ballots, while those 50 years of age and older were 58 percent of all actual voters. In Florida, the rates were 10 percent and 68% respectively. In Georgia, these groups accounted for 14 percent and 52 percent of the total voters respectively. In Texas, the younger cohort was 15 percent of the total voters, while the older group accounted for 53 percent.

What does this mean? This study underlines the inescapable fact that comparatively lower voter participation rates among younger voters, African‐Americans, and Latinos are the keys for understanding why it is that a President with a huge disapproval rating among the general public is able to influence, and even sway, elections in favor of Republican candidates in states with diversified populations.

Democratic constituencies by race/ethnicity, as has been repeated over and again, vote at considerably lower rates. Especially striking are the low voting rates among younger voters who overwhelmingly vote Democratic irrespective of race when they go to the polls. Elections in all four states were dominated by voters 50 years of age and older who voted largely Republican; as well as by non‐Hispanic whites who voted at rates which were much higher than their overall share of the electorate or even populations, in each state.

Media Contact: Tanya Domi, 212-817-7283, tdomi@gc.cuny.edu

About The Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies
The core mission of CLACLS is to actively support and advance the study of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the U.S. in the doctoral programs of the Graduate Center, and to provide opportunities for Latino students at the Ph.D. level. CLACLS’s flagship program is the Latino Data Project, established in 2003 by Laird W. Bergad founding and current CLACLS director. Professor Bergad is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Latin American, Puerto Rican, and Latino Studies at Lehman College and with the Ph.D. Program in History at the Graduate Center. The Latino Data Project conducts detailed quantitative research on the Latino population of the United States and New York City metropolitan region, analyzing raw data files produced by the U.S. Census Bureau and other government agencies.

About The Graduate Center, CUNY
The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) is a leader in public graduate education devoted to enhancing the public good through pioneering research, serious learning, and reasoned debate. The Graduate Center offers ambitious students more than 40 doctoral and master’s programs of the highest caliber, taught by top faculty from throughout CUNY — the nation’s largest public urban university. Through its nearly 40 centers, institutes, and initiatives, including its Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC), The Graduate Center influences public policy and discourse and shapes innovation. The Graduate Center’s extensive public programs make it a home for culture and conversation.


NIH Grant Program Helps CUNY Community College Students Advance to Science Degrees and Research Careers

NIH GrantA $1.6 million grant to Queensborough Community College from the National Institutes of Health will extend for another five years CUNY’s participation in a program that has helped hundreds of its students advance from associate degrees to baccalaureates in the sciences — and in some cases ultimately all the way to doctoral and medical degrees.

Students and faculty at Queensborough, LaGuardia Community College and the New York City College of Technology have been part of the NIH’s Bridges to the Baccalaureate program since its inception in 1993. The federal initiative was started to help community college students, particularly those from underrepresented minority groups, transition to four-year degrees and pursue careers in the biomedical or behavioral sciences.

“The National Institutes of Health has consistently awarded these five-year grants to CUNY for a quarter-century, but the student experience provides a far richer illustration of the impact,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The program’s success can be observed in the hundreds of CUNY students, primarily those from underrepresented groups, who have completed associate’s degrees, continued their science education at CUNY senior colleges and later launched their careers.”

One such success story is Carlos Correa, who emigrated from Colombia when he was 16 and thought his status gave him little chance of fulfilling his childhood dream of becoming a doctor. He began to think differently after one of his teachers at Queensborough invited him to apply for the Bridges program. It led to research opportunities in microbiology — and a newfound belief that he could pursue his aspirations. Correa graduated with a biology degree from City College this year and he’s been accepted by two medical schools for next year.

“The Bridges program opened the door for me to the world of science and gave me the boost of confidence I desperately needed,” Correa said, adding: “There are many students like me out there with the potential to succeed and accomplish great things, but who need a little push in the right direction. This is especially true for minority students who often face more significant challenges in education.”

The five-year NIH grants go to colleges that award associate’s degrees and forge partnerships with four-year colleges to offer research training, experience and mentoring to promising students. Nearly 700 CUNY students have been part of the program at Queensborough, LaGuardia, and City Tech since its inception. About half have gone on to graduate with baccalaureate degrees —nearly four times the rate for community college students overall. Dozens have completed master’s degrees and 18 alumni of the program have earned medical degrees or science Ph.D.s. Several others are currently in medical school or doctoral programs.

Vanessa Almonte, a Queens College graduate and now a Ph.D. candidate focused on cardiovascular biology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, says her interest in science as a career began when she was selected to participate in the Bridges to the Baccalaureate program at Queensborough. “When I started college I had no idea what biomedical science meant,” Almonte said. “But in retrospect the Bridges program was a perfect fit for me. I developed a strong curiosity for biology and I learned first-hand how to design and conduct an experiment, perform literature searches and foster long-lasting relationships with mentors. Eventually I presented my research findings at national conferences.”

CUNY’s participation in the NIH Bridges program dates to 1993, when LaGuardia was awarded one of the first rounds of grants. Some 400 LaGuardia students have taken part since then. “Community college students typically don’t see themselves going beyond two-year degrees, and the important thing this program does is open them to bigger possibilities,” said Hendrick Delcham, a professor of natural and applied sciences who oversees the program at LaGuardia. “It gets them to think not only about four-year degrees but far beyond. It allows the faculty to involve students in their research, and that gets them to think about science as a career path.”

One of Delcham’s former Bridges students, Saima Ishaq Machlovi, graduated with a neuroscience and chemistry degree from Hunter College and is now a fourth-year Ph.D. student in neuroscience, studying the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “I came from Pakistan when I was 17 and went to LaGuardia to take basic English courses,” she recalls. “But I really wanted to discover what my potential was, and the Bridges program helped me do that. It tapped into what I’m passionate about.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY o ffers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

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Scott C. Ratzan, MD, MPA, named Senior Scholar

Dr. Scott RatzanDean Ayman El-Mohandes and CUNY SPH are delighted to announce the appointment of Dr. Scott C. Ratzan, MD, MPA, to the role of Senior Scholar at the school.

Dr. Ratzan is a pioneer in health communication, health literacy and strategic diplomacy with three decades of experience both in the U.S. and abroad. He is currently a Senior Fellow with the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government at the Harvard Kennedy School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is also the founding Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives, which was established in 1995. Over the course of five years at Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABInBev), he was the architect of a ground-breaking initiative to help reduce harmful drinking.

Prior to joining ABInBev, Dr. Ratzan was Vice President of Global Health at Johnson & Johnson for eleven years including time in Brussels as VP of Government Affairs. Before his private sector engagement, he worked at the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in Washington DC, designing the framework for the Bureau of Global Health communication efforts. He launched his career in Boston spending a decade in academia as a professor and Founding Director of the Emerson-Tufts master’s program in Health Communication. In addition to a number of publications in the health field, he is the co-author of the definition of health literacy adopted by the US Government and incorporated in the Affordable Care Act. (See Dr. Ratzan’s full CV here.)

Appointed by the Dean, Senior Scholars can play a significant role in supporting our faculty in planning and developing new initiatives and educational programs. Dr. Ratzan will work on growing the domain of Health Communications as a growing focus of interest in public health education and research. He will play a collaborative role in developing a new Certificate/MS degree in Health Communication and Social Change with Associate Professor of Community Health and Social Sciences Chris Palmedo, and he will also advise students interested in the field and work to expand our research capacity as well.

“Scott and I have ambitious plans to create a master’s degree program in health communications for social change,” said Dr. Palmedo. “Our goal is to provide students with deep knowledge and skills in communications strategy, social marketing, health literacy, and media production. We’ve already begun collaborating and brainstorming on this exciting endeavor and look forward to offering this fully online degree program to students all over the world in fall 2020.”


RACHEL DOLCINE ’06 SHEDS LIGHT ON BEING A LAW ENFORCEMENT WIFE

Rachel Dolcine ’06 Sheds Light On Being A Law Enforcement Wife

 

Rachel Dolcine ’06 has never been one to shy away from a challenge. She emigrated to New York from Jamaica as a child, grew up in the East Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, and enrolled at John Jay in pursuit of a career as an FBI profiler. But before she earned her degree, she started dating a Marine named Pierre, who told her that he wanted to become a police officer. After Pierre landed a job in the Baltimore Police Department, the couple got married. “Then, in 2004, with just two semesters left, I dropped out of John Jay because I was pregnant with my son,” says Dolcine.

“I trekked from Maryland to John Jay College twice a week for my last two semesters. Nothing was going to stop me from finishing school,” —Rachel Dolcine ’06

 

Getting Back To John Jay
In February of 2005, Dolcine gave birth to her son Julius, and the following fall she signed up for classes at John Jay. “I trekked from Maryland to John Jay College twice a week for my last two semesters. Nothing was going to stop me from finishing school,” says Dolcine. Sometimes she’d find someone in Maryland to watch little Julius, other times he’d make the ride up with her and stay with a family friend in Brooklyn. All of her professors understood her situation and accommodated her however they could. “That degree that I got in 2006 from John Jay, it wasn’t just a piece of paper to me. It was my commitment to getting my degree and finishing my studies in an area that I was very passionate about, Deviant Behavior and Social Control.”

Rachel Dolcine

Rachel Dolcine

Finding A New Path

Being a police officer’s wife gave Dolcine special insight into the world of law enforcement. “I realized how intense that career field was,” she says. “My husband told me stories of the things he saw at work, and that helped me decide that I wanted to help young people who were in trouble.” In 2010, after receiving a master’s degree in Public Administration at The University of Baltimore, Dolcine started working at the Y in Central Maryland. “I ran programs in at-risk communities. My undergrad degree from John Jay gave me the ability to be more intuitive with people. It helped me learn how to be empathetic and really look at people as a whole.”

“One of the voices that you never hear are the voices of the spouses that serve alongside the police officers.” —Rachel Dolcine ’06

 

Expressing A Spouse’s Story 
Looking at people as a whole became the driving reason behind Dolcine writing her new book Love Behind The Blue Line: Stories of Love, Courage, Hope & Legacy. “One of the things that has always bothered me as a police officer’s wife is that the media has their perspective on policing. Politicians have their perspective on policing. Communities have their perspectives. But one of the voices that you never hear are the voices of the spouses that serve alongside the police officers,” says Dolcine. Her book, which is a collection of stories from the wives of police officers, offers up a broader picture of the law enforcement experience. Her goal was to breakdown misconceptions about the people behind the uniform, helping others understand that police officers have feelings just like everyone else—with good days, and bad days—but that they don’t have the luxury of letting those feelings show. “Pierre has told me stories about finding bodies in bathtubs that have been there for days because no one has checked on them. He’s found babies that someone killed and wrapped up in a blanket,” says Dolcine. “I think police officers feel a lot, and it takes strength to see what they see and be able to turn off the rage, sadness, or even wanting to cry.”

“If it weren’t for John Jay, I would not be as perceptive and empathetic to other human beings.” —Rachel Dolcine ’06

 

Looking Back At John Jay
Dolcine credits her education at John Jay for helping her understand the depths of other people’s experiences. “My classes at John Jay made me curious and made me want to dig deeper when it comes to human behavior,” says Dolcine. “If it weren’t for John Jay, I would not be as perceptive and empathetic to other human beings. I would not understand to look deeper into what someone else has been through.”


CUNY researchers investigate food insecurity among community college students

student standing at vending machine in bleak cafeteriaFood insecurity is prevalent among community college students across the United States, yet little research examines how these students experience hunger or proposes solutions to the problem.

To address this gap, Dr. Rositsa T. Ilieva, Director of the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute’s Food Policy Monitor, Dr. Tanzina Ahmed, Assistant Professor at Kingsborough Community College, and Anita Yan, a Research Assistant at Brooklyn College, led a study recently published in the Journal of Public Affairsexamining how 50 low‐income minority students in an urban community college access food on campus and how the features of their college foodscape shape their food insecurity. The researchers also explored how students’ ability to access food on campus shaped their perceptions of the college institution and their academic endeavors.

The study found high levels of food insecurity among participants. Students’ expressed a desire for more appealing and affordable food on campus and revealed a distrust of the college institution due to its creation of a difficult campus foodscape. Students largely reported that their food insecurity impeded their ability to concentrate on academic tasks.

The research team concluded that the accessibility of food on campus appears to affect students’ perceptions of their community college institution and has implications for their emotional and academic development. They recommend that both researchers and college institutions examine the inadvertent signals that institutions send to food insecure students through their food policies.

“We often forget that college campuses are a vital part of a city’s urban food system,” Dr. Ilieva says. “If we are serious about making New York City the ‘fairest city in America’ — a central goal of the City’s OneNYC plan — we can hardly succeed by failing to address persistent food and health inequalities on college campuses. Our pilot study shows that community colleges deserve to take centerstage in the city’s ongoing equity and food policy efforts. Just think about it, if we took this challenge head on, we could make a difference in the lives of nearly 90,000 community college students and their families in NYC alone.”

Rositsa T. Ilieva, Tanzina Ahmed, Anita Yan. Hungry minds: Investigating the food insecurity of minority community college students. J Public Affairs, 19 November 2018


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, Week of December 3, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you for joining us during last week’s Parent-Teacher Conferences!

Your partnership is valued and essential.

Did you know that NEST+m has a Sustainability Team—a team of teachers and faculty who are dedicated to ensuring that our classrooms and school community are zero waste? Our sustainability team has crafted a newsletter that requests your participation in our sustainability efforts. Please see it HERE.

As we’ve entered the December Holiday Season, please be mindful of the following public safety announcements.

  • Students are asked to leave valuable items at home. Valuables such as personal electronics must be off from 8:20am to 2:40pm and secured on a child’s person or locked using a padlock during the regular school day.
  • All schools within the New York City Department of Education align with the Citywide Behavioral Expectations to Support Student Learning (Discipline Code). This document, which is developmentally modified for Grades K-5 and 6-12 features Supports & Interventions as well as the range of disciplinary consequences that schools take to ensure the safety and wellbeing of our school community.

Finally, in the category of cross-cultural exchange, Happy Hanukkah from the late Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings to all who are celebrating Hanukkah which begins at sundown this evening.

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Let’s Soar!

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Monday, December 3, 8:30am – Vaping Info Session for Parents by Dr. Debra Friedman, MD, City Medical Specialist, Office of School Health RSVP HERE

 


OPERATION SONG GIVES VOICE TO VETERANS

Operation Song Gives Voice To Veterans

 

The feeling of pride had faded since Briana Sammons ‘18 returned from her service as Corporal in the United States Marine Corps, but as the notes sprang from the guitar and her words flowed from the mouth of a professional songwriter, the sense of pride came back to her in full force.

“I’m grateful for the Marine Corps and I wouldn’t be where I am today without it.”—Brianna Sammons 

“I thought of my grandfather who was a Marine and was the reason why I joined, and how proud he would be of all of my accomplishments if he was still alive,” said Sammons, who graduated from John Jay College of Criminal Justice in May.  She previously served in Japan, worked on a Joint Special Operations Task Force in the Philippines, then finished her last year of service in San Diego.

Briana Sammons

Briana Sammons

Sammons is one of a dozen John Jay veterans who worked this fall with award-winning songwriters from Nashville and New York as part of Operation Song, an organization that pairs professional songwriters with veterans as a way to work through the post-active duty stress and acclimating to civilian life.

Bob Regan founded Operation Song in 2012 after spending time on several Armed Forces Entertainment tours.

“I was taken aback by the age range as well as the demographic depth and breadth of the men and women who were serving and the toll that repeated deployments were taking on them,” said Regan. “Songwriters are kind of armchair therapists and I thought maybe if we sat down and helped them tell their stories we could convey their experiences in a different way and help them sort things out — give them a resolution they might not have had before.”

 

 

Briana Sammons

Briana Sammons at her graduation ceremony

“They came last semester and I thought they did an amazing job bringing our veterans stories to life and shedding light on some touchy subjects so I thought that this time around it would be a great opportunity for me to share mine,” said Sammons who graduated with a Criminal Justice degree and is now pursuing a career in law enforcement on the local or federal level. “They were very open and excited to hear my story. We had fun and just talked. The more we talked the words to the song just started flowing these guys are so incredibly talented.”

 

 

John Jay is home to more than 500 veterans, the largest number among all CUNY campuses, and has a vibrant and active Office of Military and Veteran Services led by former Navy Chaplain Richard Pusateri.

“The results have been stunning,” said Pusateri. “In their lyrics, veterans shared a whole range of their feelings about their military service—some poignant, some humorous, many expressing pride in what they did, and many personal remembrances of the people, places and experiences of their military careers.”

“We see people start out reticent and within themselves and then, after a couple of hours with our songwriters, they open up and share things. It’s fun to see that light go on,” added Regan.

“In their lyrics, veterans shared a whole range of their feelings about their military service—some poignant, some humorous, many expressing pride in what they did.” —Richard Pusateri 

“I knew each of Operation Song volunteers really well, yet when I heard their finished songs I learned things important and precious about their military experience that I never knew,” added Pusateri.  “They shared things in their songs that even their closest John Jay veteran friends hadn’t heard before.”

Sammons’ song, “I’ll Never Be The Same Again,” tells the story of her transformation from a girl to a woman struggling in a macho environment. The refrain, ‘Semper Fi Fidelis is tattooed on my skin’ shows her pride in the work she did as a Marine.

“What people see on media outlets of service members is not how it actually is. I got to travel all over the world and really have an impact on people who are living in terrible conditions and unsafe environments,” said Sammons. “I’m grateful for the Marine Corps and I wouldn’t be where I am today without it.”

Learn about the Office of Military and Veteran Services.


ICYMI: It’s time to rethink remedial education

Education Dive published an op-ed by CUNY Board of Trustees Chairman William C. Thompson Jr. and CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. The text of the op-ed is available below. The op-ed can be seen here.

By William C. Thompson Jr. and Vita C. Rabinowitz

The nation’s soaring higher education debt burden and its painfully low college graduation rates, particularly at two-year institutions, are at least in part the products of failed remediation policies at colleges and universities across the country.

Traditional remediation programs cause students to burn through limited financial aid to pay for non-credit bearing courses and to fall behind their peers in the pursuit of credits and a degree.

Worse still, the courses are often unnecessary. Students who could succeed at credit-bearing coursework with the appropriate supports are placed in remedial programs on the basis of standardized tests of dubious predictive value. Indeed, a major study found that as many as 29% of students who tested into English remediation could have earned a B or better in a credit-bearing course — without the benefit of any remedial help.

And the remedial programs themselves serve only to make it more likely that a student will end up dropping out.

A large body of rigorous research over the past decade plainly shows that traditional remediation — sequences of noncredit courses typically taught in the lecture-and drill-format — is simply not effective. The City University of New York’s (CUNY’s) outcomes mirror findings across the country: Even after two years of attending college, most students who start in traditional remediation lag far behind their classmates in making progress toward their degrees.

Not only are such students failing to complete general education requirements, but they are effectively barred from starting majors that might engage them in their studies. They are also exhausting their financial aid.

Not surprisingly, only about 28% of community college students who start college in remediation earn a degree in eight years. Additionally, research shows students who are assigned to remediation are much less likely to earn a degree than students not assigned to remediation.

Fortunately, there is a better way. For one, we know the best predictor of student success in college is high school grades. Like the State University of New York and other university systems across the country, at CUNY we are incorporating high school grades in our placement algorithms while keeping assessment tests, such as the SAT, as a component in determining college readiness.

In addition to knowing how to make smarter, more appropriate placements, we have learned of better ways to work with under-prepared students. Research shows “co-requisite” courses improve students’ learning, as well as their chances of earning a degree. In co-requisite courses, students with some remedial needs are enrolled directly into credit-bearing courses with mandatory additional supports, like workshops, study sections and tutoring. We are moving to transform traditional remedial courses at CUNY to the co-requisite model.

Of course, the best way to ensure our students succeed is to make sure they come to us college-ready from the start. To that end, CUNY is greatly expanding its successful pre-matriculation remedial programs, including those in public high schools. CUNY Start and Math Start have shown particularly strong results. Our Lessons in Navigating College Transitions​ (LINCT) program targets high school seniors on track to graduate from high school but who might not be CUNY proficient.

CUNY in no way is lowering its academic standards. Our graduation requirements and standards in credit-bearing courses and all majors remain unchanged.

What we are doing is removing obstacles to getting a college degree. The early returns are promising. In the fall 2017 semester, our new placement and remediation policies resulted in 900 more students taking and passing a credit-bearing math course than a year earlier, a jump of nearly 20%.

All of these initiatives are part of CUNY’s commitment to finding new ways to open the door of opportunity as wide as our students need. In doing so, we have come to believe that it is not just about our university and our students. These are challenges that face higher education across the country. We encourage our fellow academic leaders to reconsider the role of remedial education and to use the concepts we’ve developed to find their own paths to improving student outcomes.

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Legendary Hip-Hop Dancer “Kwikstep” Choreographs Piece for Queens College Fall Dance Concert, in Performance November 29 to December 2

— The Four Works in the Concert Will Explore How We Interact and Become Part of Virtual Dimensions —

Queens, N.Y., November 26, 2018—DIMENSIONS, The Queens College Fall Dance Concert, features four world premieres by Marshall L. Davis, Jr., Gabriel “Kwikstep” Dionisio, and Queens College professors Richard Move and Edisa Weeks. Harry Feiner, Queens College professor of Theatre Design, created the lighting and Amanda Shafran designed the costumes. Each work of the concert is inspired by game structures and portrays how we interact with alternate or parallel worlds.

DIMENSIONS will be performed on Thursday, November 29 and Friday, November 30 at 7 pm; Saturday, December 1 at 8 pm; Sunday, December 2 at 3 pm, in Goldstein Theater, Kupferberg Center for the Arts, on the Queens College Campus at 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York 11367-1597.

Tickets are $18, students/seniors $11. On Friday, November 30, all tickets are $5. To purchase tickets in advance, visit www.kupferbergcenter.org, call 718-793-8080, or stop by the Kupferberg Center Box Office at Colden Auditorium. Additional fees may apply. Box Office Hours: Tuesday–Saturday, 12 pm–6pm. Only cash will be accepted for tickets purchased at the door on the day of the performance.

About the Works
#Hyperlink, by Richard Move, is a modern dance that explores the increasing permeability of organic/inorganic matter and human/nonhuman objects in contemporary life. The cast of six resides in a world of synthetic materials and synthesized sounds in which connectivity between human bodies is attempted, disrupted, and ultimately, fleeting.

Soul Close, Soul Far…, by Gabriel “Kwikstep” Dionisio, is a reflection on how society is hypnotized and trapped in the dimension of social media. A “sleep” they can only come out of by moving as one, or one moving the masses through the message in the music that is at their fingertips—soul close, but yet soul far…the solution? Rocking together as “One Nation Under a Groove” is the only way to break free from this altered state they find themselves in. It’s a battle for their souls; will they lose or will they win?

The Future of Memory, by Edisa Weeks, interweaves dance, live video, interactive software by Liubo Borissov, and projection to deconstruct time and space through movement and stillness. The movement of the dancer is captured by a video camera, analyzed, and processed in real-time and projected on stage. The piece creates environments in which the dancer’s bodies deconstruct time and space through movement, while movement and time spatially deconstruct the body.

uniTy – The Rhythm of the Movement, by Marshall L. Davis, Jr., is inspired by the music of Nina Simone. The intent of this tap piece is to encourage unity and love through the art of sound and movement.

About the Artists
Liubo Borissov (Interactive Technology) is an associate professor at Pratt Institute’s Department of Digital Arts. He received baccalaureate degrees in mathematics and physics from Caltech and a doctorate in physics from Columbia, where he also studied electro-acoustic music at the Columbia University Computer Music Center. He holds a master’s in interactive telecommunications from NYU’s Tisch School, where he was a Global Vilar Fellow in the performing arts. He has taught at Harvestworks, Parsons School of Design, and the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. In his works, he explores the interface between art, science, and technology. His multimedia installations, performances, and collaborations have been featured throughout Europe, Asia, and North America, including the New Interfaces for Musical Expression Conference, the International Computer Music Conference, SIGGRAPH, the Spark Festival, the Lincoln Center Summer Festival, the Kennedy Center, and the Carnival Center.

Marshall L. Davis, Jr. (Choreographer) began tap dancing at the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center in Miami, and at age 13, he was named 1991 Star Search Teen Dance Champion. He was featured with Harold “Stumpy” Cromer at the Guthrie Theater in the musical Babes in Arms and later joined the Broadway production of Bring in Da’ Noise, Bring in Da’ Funk, choreographed by Savion Glover and directed by George C. Wolfe. Davis has performed throughout Europe, Asia, Australia, and North America. A protégé of the late Steve Condos of the Condos Brothers, Davis is a recipient of Isaac Hayes’ Breaking the Barrier award. He serves on the faculty of Queens College, Manhattan School of Music, and the Ailey Extension. Davis can be seen through motion capture performance in the film Happy Feet Two. He also worked as the associate choreographer for the Broadway musical Shuffle Along. Most recently, he was the associate tap choreographer and cast member of Encores Off-Center’s production of Don’t Bother Me I Can’t Cope. For more information, click here.

Gabriel “Kwikstep” Dionisio, a.k.a DJ KS 360, (Choreographer) started dancing at the age of six and was influenced by Soul Train and block parties in New York City. Kwikstep has performed in PBS’s Peabody Award-winning Everybody Dance Now, The Great Performances 20th Anniversary Special, and Kurt Weill’s September Songs, which was nominated for an Emmy Award. In 1991, he won a Bessie award for choreography, and in 1992 he founded the internationally-known dance company Full Circle. In 1996, Kwikstep and his wife Ana “Rokafella” Garcia established Full Circle as a non-profit, internationally-acclaimed hip-hop collective, and its members are known as Full Circle Souljahs. In 2002, Kwikstep and Rokafella wrote, choreographed, and directed a new hip-hop theater piece commissioned by the Kennedy Center called Outside the BachX. In 2017, Kwikstep was associate director and choreographer for a hip-hop theater piece, Syncing Ink, directed by Niegel Smith, which ran at the Flea Theater. Most Recently, Kwikstep and Rokafella received the 2018 Distinguished Teaching Award from American Dance Festival. Today he is an international icon in breaking and is best known for his smooth style, versatility, and signature head spins. For more info, click here.

Richard Move (Choreographer) is the artistic director of MoveOpolis!; a TED Global Oxford Fellow; resident artist at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia and Assistant Professor of Dance at Queens College.  Move’s commissions include productions for Mikhail Baryshnikov; Martha Graham Dance Company; European Capital of Culture; Guggenheim Museum; Parrish Art Museum; Deborah Harry/Blondie; Dame Shirley Bassey; and New York City Ballet Principal, Helene Alexopolous. Move’s films include Bardo, BloodWork, The Ana Mendieta Story, and GhostLight. Martha@, Move’s performances of 20th Century icon, Martha Graham, received two New York Dance and Performance Awards (“Bessies”) and tours globally. MoveOpolis! has been presented by New York Live Arts, Dance Theater Workshop, The Kitchen, Sitelines/River to River Festival, Jacobs Pillow Dance Festival, and on tour internationally. Move’s recent publications include chapters for the Oxford Handbook of Dance and Reenactment; Ally: Janine Antoni, Anna Halprin and Stephen Petronio; and Rhythm Field: The Dance of Molissa Fenley. Move received his BFA in Dance at Virginia Commonwealth University, MFA in Media Arts Production at the City College of New York, MA in Performance Studies at NYU, and will complete his PhD in Performance Studies at NYU this year.

Edisa Weeks (Choreographer) is an Associate Professor of Dance at Queens College and Director of the Dance Program. ​She founded the company DELIRIOUS Dances to create interdisciplinary multi-media work that explores our deepest desires, darkest fears, and sweetest dreams. Her work has been presented at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, Emory University, Works & Process at the Guggenheim Museum, Harlem Stage, The Kennedy Center, The Massachusetts International Festival of the Arts, Materials for the Arts, The Mermaid Parade, The National Black Arts Festival, Snug Harbor Cultural Center, Summerstages Dance Festival as well as in swimming pools, storefront windows, senior centers, sidewalks and living rooms, including living rooms in Berlin, Germany, as part of Haus der Kulturen der Welts’ 50th anniversary celebration. She has a BA from Brown University and received a full fellowship to attend New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, where she obtained a MFA in choreography. She has performed with Annie–B Parsons Big Dance Theater, Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Co., Dance Brazil, Jane Comfort, Jon Kinzel, Muna Tseng, Reggie Wilson Fist & Heel Performance Group, Kevin Wynn, Sally Silvers, Spencer/Colton Dance, among others, and is a member of the Skeleton Architecture Collective. She is currently developing THREE RITES, which is based on Life, Liberty, and Happiness, and premieres in June 2020. For more information, click here.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


BMCC Finance and Banking Team Wins New York Fed Competition

A team of students from the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNYFinance & Banking Club won first place in the final round of the Maiden Lane division of the College Fed Challenge competition, November 14, at the New York Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) in Lower Manhattan. The BMCC team bested nine other college teams in the New York Fed’s second district. This is the second time the BMCC team has won the district competition.

The BMCC team was invited to observe the national competition at the Federal Reserve Board in Washington D.C. scheduled for November 29. There, the team had an opportunity to meet Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, other members of the Board of Governors as well as other senior staff economists.

The Federal Reserve system, also known as “The Fed,” is the central bank of the United States. An important component in the nation’s economy, it sets monetary policy—such as interest rates—that impact individuals of all income levels.

As students in the BMCC Finance and Banking club have learned, the nationwide Federal Reserve Board system sets policy for 12 Federal Reserve Districts and district banks. The banks are jointly responsible for implementing the monetary policy set forth by the Federal Open Markets Committee. The New York Fed is the largest, in terms of assets, among the 12 districts, and is considered to be the most influential in terms of implementing monetary policy.

The College Fed Challenge competition is designed to bring real-world economics into the classroom. Led by Business Management Professors Ioannis Tournas and Julian Schroeder, the BMCC team took on the role of monetary policymakers by analyzing economic conditions and recommending a course for monetary policy during the New York Fed district competition.

“During the district award ceremony luncheon, judges visited our table and congratulated the student team members for their articulation and understanding of economic and finance concepts in their presentation,” said Tournas.

Fed Challenge participants develop skills—the ability to think analytically, make effective presentations, work as a team and think on their feet—that are valuable in both their academic and professional careers, according to the College Fed Challenge website.

The BMCC student team includes economics major Charles Reid; business administration majors Kimberly Plata and Mateja Tokic; financial management majors Celia Nightingale and Ambar Peralta, and business management/CIS major Jason Guan.


Excelsior Scholarship Application Period Opens For Spring 2019

The Spring 2019 application period for the Excelsior Scholarship is open. In combination with other student financial aid programs, the Excelsior Scholarship makes it possible for students to attend a CUNY college tuition-free. Students have until Monday, Jan. 14 to apply.EXCELSIOR SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION

“At CUNY, we take enormous pride in the University’s role in helping generations of low-income, underserved and immigrant students succeed,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The Excelsior Scholarship opens the door to higher education and a brighter economic future. By enabling eligible students to attend tuition-free, Excelsior Scholarships have played a significant role in the increases we are seeing in applications, enrollment and credit-taking.”

To meet eligibility requirements, a student must:

Have a combined federal adjusted gross income of $110,000 or less.
Be pursuing an undergraduate degree at a CUNY or SUNY college.
Be enrolled in at least 12 credits per semester and complete at least 30 credits each year (successively), which must be applicable toward your degree program.

Current Excelsior Scholarship recipients do not need to fill out an additional Excelsior Scholarship application.

To learn more about the eligibility requirements and to apply for the Excelsior Scholarship, go to: www.hesc.ny.gov/excelsior.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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PRE-LAW INSTITUTE BREAKFAST INSPIRES FUTURE LEGAL PROFESSIONALS

Pre-Law Institute Breakfast Inspires Future Legal Professionals

 

“We are diversifying the bar, and with what is going on in the country today, it is critical to have a legal profession that represents the demographics of our country.”—President Karol V. Mason

 

On November 13, the Pre-Law Institute (PLI) held a benefit breakfast offering students the opportunity to network with legal professionals and learn more about their respective fields. As an institution with a diverse student body, PLI understands the importance of preparing John Jay students to successfully enter the legal profession. “For those of you who don’t understand why our students are so important, 47% of our students are the first in their families to go to college. The majority come from households with incomes of $30,000 or less,” said President Karol V. Mason. “Because of PLI, we are number eight in the amount of minority applicants to law school. We are diversifying the bar, and with what is going on in the country today, it is critical to have a legal profession that represents the demographics of our country.”

(left to right) Elizabeth Broccoli, Associate Director of PLI and Center for Post-Graduate Opportunities; Rael Almonte, PLI Research Assistant; Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College; and Megil D. Patterson, PLI Student

(left to right) Elizabeth Broccoli, Associate Director of PLI and Center for Post-Graduate Opportunities; Rael Almonte, PLI Research Assistant; Karol V. Mason, President of John Jay College; and Megil D. Patterson, PLI Student 

 

“We need to remind students to use their situation as fuel for their progress.”— Charles Robert Davidson

 

Echoing President Mason’s remarks, Charles Robert Davidson, Director of the Pre-Law Institute and Center for Post-Graduate Opportunities, encouraged legal professionals to remind students to see their disadvantage as an advantage. “It is true that our students are mostly first generation college graduates. It is true that our students come from households with incomes of $30,000 or less. It is true that our students come from some of the most underserved neighborhoods in New York City,” said Davidson. “All that is absolutely true, but what we are trying to instill in them, is that this is not their liability, it’s their asset. We need to remind students to use their situation as fuel for their progress.”

Brenneis Nesbitt

Brenneis Nesbitt

 

“Because I have a criminal record, I was concerned about having the opportunity to become a criminal defense attorney. I was introduced to Dr. Davidson and where I saw my criminal history as a hindrance to my progress, he saw it as inspiration.”— Brenneis Nesbitt, ’19

 

Knowing how it feels to see their background as a setback, Brenneis Nesbitt (’19) offered students some words of encouragement and hope. “Because I have a criminal record, I was concerned about having the opportunity to become a criminal defense attorney,” said Nesbitt. “I was introduced to Dr. Davidson and where I saw my criminal history as a hindrance to my progress, he saw it as inspiration. He advised me to focus on my grades, prepare for my LSATs and that he would take care of the rest. Because of his support, I am currently a Pinkerton fellow and have interned at the Innocence Project.” Inspired and grateful for all the support they’ve received, we spoke with two PLI students and a PLI alumnus and asked them, What does the PLI mean to you? 

 

Megil D. PattersonMegil D. Patterson, ’19
Major: Humanities and Justice

PLI means hope, inspiration, and direction. I want to go to law school and become a criminal court judge who advocates for the use of non-incarceration programs instead of prisons. PLI makes me believe that these goals are possible, especially through talking with Dr. Davidson and Professor Beckett. Having these two influential role models steer me towards my dream means a lot. Without them, I wouldn’t be heading in the direction that I am today.”

 

 

 

 

 

Shanel CapellanShanel Capellan, ’19
Majors: Criminal Justice and Philosophy

“PLI has opened so many doors for me. When I first came into John Jay I didn’t know anything about law school. Coming to Dr. Davidson and Elizabeth Broccoli was a huge help. They are the best mentors that I could have asked for. They have always advised me to be proud of myself and encouraged me to reach out to them if I ever needed to speak to anyone about my academic or personal life. I want to be a civil lawyer and hopefully own a law firm. PLI has given me the opportunity to do this by allowing me to join them and providing me with great advice.”

 

 

 

 

Rael Almonte, ’18Rael Almonte
Major: Political Science

“While I was at John Jay, PLI did a lot for me. Dr. Davidson and Elton Beckett for example, advised me on what trajectory I should go on and cleared up misconceptions I had about funding and what I would study. I want to be an economist for the World Bank. I wouldn’t have the passion for international development if it weren’t for Dr. Davidson and Elton Beckett. They taught me that when people think of human rights for example, they usually think about torture or the violation of these rights, but there is another side which is economic human rights. International development is how we bring justice to people who have been oppressed in a global sense, and I think it is important work that should be done. It’s leveling the playing field. It’s not about putting somebody above or below, it’s about giving everyone the same opportunities to achieve success, in the same why PLI did for me.”

Watch the Pre-Law Institute Benefit Breakfast event.

Donate to John Jay’s Pre-Law Institute


Award-winning Poet Sonia Sanchez Examines the Power of Black Women’s Politics at Brooklyn College’s Shirley Chisholm Day Celebration

The event, which commemorated the 50th Anniversary of alumna Shirley Chisholm’s historic election to the U.S. Congress, also featured other preeminent scholars in the world of black women’s politics.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

Zinga A. Fraser, assistant professor of Africana studies and women’s and gender studies, and director of the Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism welcomed legendary poet and activist Sonia Sanchez Ph.D. to Shirley Chisholm Day 2018.

On November 27, Brooklyn College, and the nation, celebrated Shirley Chisholm Day 2018, which came in the same month as the 50th anniversary of Chisholm’s historic election to the U.S. Congress. The Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism and its director Zinga A. Fraser Ph.D. held a day-long symposium on campus featuring a keynote dialogue with activist, American Book Award- and Academy of American Poets’ Wallace Stevens Lifetime Achievement Award-winning poet Sonia Sanchez Ph.D.

Sanchez remembered Chisholm as “someone who dressed for the establishment but spoke for the people. She taught us to speak out. And she never neglected to mention the shoulders she stood upon, clearing a path for those who stand upon her shoulders.”

The standing-room-only event also featured local and state politicians, as well as two of the preeminent black women scholars in the field of political science: Christina Greer of Fordham University and Niambi Carter of Howard University.

“One of the things that really stood out to me about Chisholm was that she was early to the conversation about the racism inherent in U.S. immigration policy,” said Carter. “That critique is really important and prescient now when we’re talking about refugees at the border who are being tear-gassed, arrested, and turned away for seeking relief from political and other kinds of persecution.”

“We have Andrea Stewart Cousins as the first African-American woman New York Senate Democratic Leader, and Tish James, the first African-American woman elected statewide as Attorney General,” added Greer. “That’s only possible because of the work Chisholm did in Albany and the foundation she laid. Those women have a real, direct lineage tracing right back to her.”

Fraser—who recently spoke with the Associated Press about Chisholm’s importance and is currently working on the book, Sister Insider/ Sister Outsider: Shirley Chisholm and Barbara Jordan Black Women’s Politics in the Post-Civil Rights Era, which will be the first comparative study of black congressional women—moderated the day’s events and spoke of Chisholm’s lasting influence on politics.

“Chisholm’s political legacy is as relevant today as it was 50 years ago because it not only allowed a nation and the world to imagine a black woman as a participant in American Democracy, but also identify her as a leader that transformed Congress and democratic institutions from the inside,” Fraser said. “Chisholm’s is a story of resilience and her political career serves as a strategy for a new generation of leaders who are no longer asking for a seat at the table, but bringing their own folding chair, as Chisholm once instructed. We can see this in the new class of diverse women entering Congress in January. Because Chisholm brought a chair, they can now have a seat.”

Shirley Chisholm graduated cum laude from Brooklyn College in 1946 with a bachelor of arts in sociologyand anthropology. She was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1968. In 1972, she became first major-party black candidate for president of the United States and the first woman to run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Chisholm’s iconic “Unbought and Unbossed” and “Catalyst for Change” and campaigns united women, the working class, and racial minorities in a diverse coalition of voters. Far more than just a symbolic figure, Chisholm was a vociferous champion for policies that improved the lives of marginalized people. In the NY legislature, she pioneered the Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge (SEEK) program. The program is funded by New York State to provide financial support and individualized counseling low-income students who enroll in the CUNY system. To this day, students at all CUNY member colleges have greater access to higher education as a result of her legislative work.

She also fought for unemployment benefits for domestic workers—a measure which she considered among her proudest achievements. Later, she would also champion this issue in the U.S. House of Representatives, sponsoring a bill to ensure minimum wage to domestic workers. As a national figure, she opposed the massive war spending in Vietnam in the face of significant poverty in the United States. She advocated for the Equal Rights Amendment, enlisting more women into positions of political power, publicly funded daycare, parental leave, civil rights and political autonomy for black people, voting rights for all, and women’s reproductive freedom. Further, she was deeply concerned with issues of hunger, lending her influence to the expansion of food stamps and acting as a key architect of the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program.

Chisholm passed away in 2005 at the age of 80. That same year, Shirley Chisholm Day, which generally falls on or near her November 30 birthday, was created to remember and celebrate her life and achievements. In 2015, she was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor, by President Barack Obama. Earlier this year, it was announced that a massive 407-acre park along Jamaica Bay would be dedicated to Chisholm, with the park’s amphitheater to be named after her. The first phase of the space is set to open in the summer of 2019. Keeping Chisholm’s enduring legacy safe, the Shirley Chisholm Project maintains the world’s largest collection of Chisholm-related artifacts, archived at the Brooklyn College Library.

Information on how to support the Shirley Chisholm Project on Brooklyn Women’s Activism is available on the project’s website.


Film major, black belt, Tomás Greer fights for CCNY & USA

CCNY graduate film student and U.S. national karate team member Tomás Greer in action.

Greer

While his classmates in The City College of New York’s MFA in filmmaking program wrap up another semester of exciting projects, Tomás Greer is bracing for an action-packed December in Asia with a martial arts setting.

A first degree black belt, Greer, 23, is representing the United States and USA Karate at the World Karate Federation’s Shanghai Open in China. The competition runs through December 9.

It’s the Jamaica, Queens, native’s eighth outing with the U.S. national team, and a continuation of his bid to make the Olympic squad. Karate will make its debut as an Olympic sport at the 2020 summer games in Tokyo.

Greer, who’s been practicing karate since age 5 – he started off and still trains at the Harakinko Juku dojo in Jamaica, is a four-time U.S. national champion. He also holds two bronze medals from the Junior Pan American Championships.

At City College, Greer is in the first semester of the Division of Humanities and the Arts’ two-year MFA program led by award-winning filmmakers. He earned a BA in communications at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia.

“The program is excellent and I have a good relationship with the professors,” he says of the CCNY program. “They are all experienced and work in industry, which is important because they are able to share their experience.”

On his career goals, Greer adds: “to be a filmmaker, videographer and in karate, I hope to own a dojo and create competitors and people that want to do karate.”

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


BMCC Professors Secure Funding for Cutting-Edge Research

BMCC CIS PROFESSOR HAO TANG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) professors, administrators and staff collectively secured a series of grants in 2018 that are enabling bold pedagogy and cutting-edge research that spans disciplines from astrophysics to linguistics —from spying on distant galaxies to developing an app that helps the visually impaired. Other BMCC research endeavors undertaken in 2018 include efforts to develop computer information technology curricula that encourage participation by women in technology and a nationwide examination of Hebrew language programs at public, private and charter schools.

CIS Professor Hao Tang: $26,735 from the National Science Foundation

BMCC CIS Professor Hao Tang and a group of researchers from Rutgers University and City College of New York (CUNY) are working with New York City Innovation Hot Spot and the Lighthouse Guild, a service organization for the visually impaired, to make busy transportation hubs more accessible.  The three-year project’s goal is to develop a mobile app that will be able to provide turn-by-turn navigation in areas where there is no GPS service. Three BMCC students are also working on the project. In the United States alone, 25.5 million adult Americans 18 years old and older report experiencing vision loss. “This project will allow BMCC and CUNY students to do fantastic real-world research and development that will impact social good,” Tang said.

Dean Janice Zummo: $26,404 from the Petrie Foundation

The Petrie Foundation is funding the Math for High School Students program, a partnership between CUNY, the New York City Department of Education, LaGuardia Community College (CUNY) and BMCC. The program provides high school students in the BMCC College Now Program, who plan to pursue a non-STEM degree, with an opportunity to take a math co-requisite course. The BMCC Program is offering statistics with algebra course with an additional 30 hours focused on basic algebraic concepts that are useful in statistics. “These courses allow high school students to exit remediation while earning four college credits, getting them on the path to acquiring a college degree while they are still in high school,” said Janice Zummo, assistant dean of academic services, BMCC. “Pending additional funding, this project will continue in the spring 2019 semester.”

Academic Literacy and Linguistics Professor Sharon Avni: $21,691 subcontract with George Washington University

Academic Literacy and Linguistics Professor Sharon Avni has been working with a professor from the University of Maryland to examine Hebrew language programs at public and charter schools across the United States. Avni’s study found approximately 6,500 students studying Hebrew in over 35 traditional public and charter K-12 schools throughout the United States. “As so little is known about these programs, our study maps the field of public school Hebrew education and offers critical information to language educators about the programs’ rationales, language learning goals, instructional approaches, and curricular and staffing considerations,” said Avni.

CIS Professor Yan Chen: $20,000 from Women in Technology Program, CUNY Central

Computer Information Systems (CIS) Professor Yan Chen is further developing the two-year Women@CIS-BMCC project, which aims to support participation by women who take BMCC computer information systems courses. The grant activities include course content modification and implementation of a female peer-mentoring and tutoring program. The program will also include female role model talks and the chance for two women BMCC students to attend the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference. “As a female computer science professor, I have witnessed the gender imbalance in the field I find so fascinating,” said Chen.  “My goal is to help women realize that women were the pioneers of computing and women can be just as successful at men in this field.”

Science Professor Kathleen Saavik Ford: $5,619 from NASA’s Space Telescope Institute

Science Professor Kathleen Saavik Ford is using the Hubble Telescope to observe UGC 2885—the largest-known galaxy. Specifically, Ford and a team of astronomers, astrophysicists and researchers from across the country will look at different aspects of data gathered by the Hubble Space Telescope, during its orbits trained on specific sections of UGC 2885. “The big question is, ‘Where did this enormous galaxy come from and why is it a spiral galaxy, and not an elliptical galaxy?’,” says Ford. “We think UGC 2885 probably formed from a lot of gas rather than from the collisions of many smaller galaxies, but we want to see if there is more evidence for that theory.”


CUNY School of Professional Studies Makes First Undergraduate “Z Degree” Program Possible at The City University of New York

New York, NY – November 27, 2018 – Continuing its efforts to be at the forefront of the CUNY-wide initiative to save students money on textbooks by offering Zero Textbook Cost (ZTC) online courses, the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) has now made it possible for its bachelor’s degree in communication and media to be completed without students ever purchasing a textbook, making it the first undergraduate “Z Degree” at a CUNY senior college.

CUNY SPS ZTC courses use a mix of Open Educational Resource (OER) textbooks, links to scholarly and professional websites, licensed resources from CUNY library databases, and multimedia or text lectures created by CUNY SPS professors.  This semester CUNY SPS is running 133 undergraduate and graduate ZTC sections, and 149 undergraduate and graduate ZTC sections are scheduled for the Winter 2019 and Spring 2019 semesters.

“While every course in the communication and media degree program is not ZTC (yet), all of the required courses are ZTC,” says Dr. Jennifer Sparrow, associate dean of academic affairs and director of general education. “There are also multiple general education ZTC courses from which to choose, and there are enough ZTC electives in the degree program for a student to complete the degree without ever having to purchase a textbook.”

New York State has invested $8 million to promote use of OER in the CUNY and SUNY systems to increase college access and completion rates.  CUNY SPS received funding from the CUNY Central Office to sustain and enhance OER efforts at the School.

According to CBS MoneyWatch, the average cost of college textbooks has risen four times faster than the rate of inflation over the past 10 years, causing 65 percent of students to skip buying required texts during their college careers. The College Board recommends that college students budget at least $1,200 per year for textbooks and course supplies, which dramatically increases the cost of attending college.

As of Fall 2018, 34 new, converted, or refreshed ZTC courses were created with CUNY OER funding and have launched, saving CUNY SPS students an estimated $226,000 dollars in textbook costs.  Additional course conversions are planned for this year, with a possible second “Z Degree” in liberal studies on the horizon.  “The CUNY OER Initiative has been a great opportunity for professors to redesign their courses and save our students money in the process,” says Dr. Sparrow. “I appreciate the willingness of faculty and staff to engage in this important work and I am grateful for the support that CUNY and New York State have provided.”

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 5% in the Nation in U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2018 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs. Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York State.

 

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


CUNY SPH researchers assess New York City’s food policy metrics

produce stand in harlemFor the past ten years, New York City has been engaged in an effort to improve access to healthy food, reduce food insecurity, support community development, promote sustainable food systems, and improve conditions for food workers. Every year, the city publishes the Food Metrics Reports to present data on its progress using selected food system indicators.

In an article published in the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, faculty and staff from the Urban Food Policy Institute at CUNY SPH analyzed the past ten years’ reports to assess how the metrics describe the city’s progress in implementing municipal food policies set in the last decade.

Distinguished Professor Nicholas Freudenberg, Associate Professor Nevin Cohen and the institute’s Deputy Director Craig Willingham identified opportunities to enhance the measurement of food system change by tracking different dimensions of the food system, such as the sub-populations experiencing food insecurity, using additional sources of public data such as the Department of Education’s reports on the use of school meals, and engaging stakeholders in the process of indicator development.

“Food metrics are not merely tools for technocrats,” Cohen says. “If carefully crafted, they can make the food system visible, understandable, and salient to a wider range of advocates. Metrics are essential for effective public participation in food policy.”

Freudenberg, N., Willingham, C., & Cohen, N. The role of metrics in food policy: Lessons from a decade of experience in New York City. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 8(Suppl. 2), 191–209.


PROFESSOR SUSAN KANG NAMED ON CITY & STATE’S POWER LIST

Professor Susan Kang Named On City & State’s Power List

 

City & State just put John Jay Associate Professor Susan Kang on their “Power List” of the top 10 up-and-coming leaders from Manhattan, and with good reason. The Political Science professor, and member of the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), was listed because of her grassroots movement that successfully took aim at the now dissolved State Senate Independent Democratic Conference, a caucus Kang believed didn’t represent the true concerns of their constituents. Kang was also a noted member of New York Congresswoman-Elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s campaign team. She even appeared in Ocasio-Cortez’s game-changing campaign video, as she fed her children and walked them around her neighborhood. We talked with Kang to learn more about her passion for politics, her experience with Ocasio-Cortez, and what she wants John Jay students to understand.

 

“I’ve got two young kids. I’ve got my job, but I’m going to figure out a way to get involved the best I can.” —Susan Kang 

 

How did you start getting involved in politics?
After Trump’s election, I was like I have to get involved. I don’t know how I’m going to do it. I’ve got two young kids. I’ve got my job, but I’m going to figure out a way to get involved the best I can. I joined an organization called the Democratic Socialist of America (DSA). And, I became really focused on the Independent Democratic Conference (IDC)—which was a group of Senate Democrats that essentially voted with the Republicans—after my State Senator, José Peralta, decided to join them. I created an organization with a bunch of mothers called No IDC NY, which is now a multi-candidate campaign committee. But back then we were an awareness group because we wanted Senator Peralta to address our concerns. We created a lot of community pressure.

What was it like when you started to get to know Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?
I was able to meet her when she started doing these meetings in people’s living rooms. I looked around the room and I saw that there were a lot of young people, diverse young people. I was impressed. I thought to myself, this is the future of Queens politics. There were South Asians, a young man from Black Lives Matter, there were communities of color that you don’t typically see represented at these events. It was like a little microcosmic Queens in that room. Then I heard her speak, and I was blown away. I don’t remember everything, but I remember she said, “My race will matter for all the other grassroots, challengers, and incumbents running in Queens today.” She just has that gift of being able to engage everyone in the room.

 

“I want our students to know that what made Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez different from every other politician was that she was brave and bold.” —Susan Kang 

 

What was it like being in her now famous campaign video?
When that video dropped, it just went viral. People went crazy. People from all walks of life were like, “Whoa, you were in the video!” This one guy stopped me in the street. He was a little bit conservative, older, white, in his mid-60s. He said, “I saw you in that video. That Alexandria, she’s something.” I asked, “Can we count on your vote?” And, he was like, “Well I’m going to sit this one out.”

What was it like when she won the Democratic Primary?
I was standing in what they call a polling station, handing out cards. My friend just kept saying, “Can we win this? Can we win this?” The poll closed and we started walking to the bar where we were going to have our satellite election party. That’s when we saw a young man on a skateboard get hit by a car. The young man didn’t want to get in an ambulance because he couldn’t afford it. He didn’t want to go to the hospital because he was afraid he couldn’t afford the emergency room bill. He was a 19. He was Latino. His first concern was affording medical care. We saw right in front of us how important someone like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is. One of the bedrocks of her campaign was affordable medical care.

What do you want John Jay students to take away from your experience?
I want our students to know that what made Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez different from every other politician was that she was brave and bold. She was authentic about who she was, and for most establishment types who work within the system, that’s a liability. People say you need to wait in line, pay your dues, don’t cause too much of a fuss, make sure you are not ruffling any feathers—particularly those of powerful white men. But she didn’t wait for permission or her turn. She felt that she had something to contribute and that her experiences as a woman of color, as an immigrant, as someone from the Bronx, were valuable attributes, and she needed to have a seat at the table.


JOHN JAY LES DA LA BIENVENIDA A LOS FUTUROS ESTUDIANTES

John Jay les da la bienvenida a los futuros estudiantes

 

“John Jay College es una institución única. Es un lugar donde todos, estudiantes de primera generación, estudiantes que trabajan, inmigrantes, padres y veteranos, pueden transformar sus vidas con una educación centrada en la justicia”. —Presidente Karol V. Mason

 

En el 18 de noviembre, John Jay celebro su jornada de puertas abiertas de otoño de 2018 para futuros estudiantes. Con recorridos en el campus, talleres, y sesiones de bienvenida, este evento brindó a los futuros estudiantes la oportunidad de aprender más sobre nuestra institución. “John Jay College es una institución única. Es un lugar donde todos, estudiantes de primera generación, estudiantes que trabajan, inmigrantes, padres y veteranos, pueden transformar sus vidas con una educación centrada en la justicia”, dijo el presidente Karol V. Mason. “Hoy, obtendrás una idea clara de cómo este campus está vivo con energía y pasión. Estoy seguro de que te impresionará y descubrirás que John Jay es el lugar adecuado para ti”. Ofreciéndole a los estudiantes la oportunidad de hablar con profesores que están comprometidos con la excelencia; aprender sobre varios programas académicos; y descubra por qué la experiencia de vida estudiantil de John Jay ha sido clasificada entre las mejores de CUNY, los futuros estudiantes de Open House se fueron con una comprensión completa de por qué los estudiantes de John Jay se enorgullecen de llamarse feroces defensores de la justicia. En el evento, hablamos con varios futuros estudiantes y les preguntamos: ¿Por qué John Jay?

 

Giana RomeroGiana Romero
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: Derecho y sociedad

“Mi hermana es una alumna de John Jay y ella me dijo que esta es una gran escuela, y quiero ser una abogada de justicia penal. Quiero pelear por la gente, y quiero ser una abogada defensora, por lo que esta universidad está a la altura. Es la escuela perfecta para lo que quiero hacer”.

 

 

 

Michael RodriguezMichael Rodriguez
Estudiante de intercambio
Mayor potencial: La seguridad cibernética

“Estaba viendo muchas escuelas, pero me gustaba John Jay por sus programas. John Jay es la única universidad con una especialización que solo dice ‘La seguridad cibernética’. Las especializaciones en otras universidades dicen algo como ‘Ciencias de la Computación’, y eso no es lo que quiero hacer”.

 

 

 

Esmeralda Hernandez
Esmeralda Hernandez
Estudiante de primer año entrante

Mayor potencial: No declarado

“John Jay es una escuela grande y muy diversa. Tal vez quiera ser abogado, y sé que John Jay ofrece muy buenos programas para ayudar en ese campo. Quizás también quiera ser investigador o detective, y esto sería una buena base para eso”.

 

 

Michael CabarcasMichael Cabarcas
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: Justicia penal

“Jay es una muy buena escuela para la justicia penal y está cerca de casa. Sé que hay un programa de justicia penal en el que puedes obtener tu licenciatura y maestría en cinco años”.

 

 

 

Destiny ChongDestiny Chong
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: No declarado

“Decidí mirar a John Jay porque estoy realmente interesado en la ciencia forense y la psicología forense. Estar en el campo de la justicia penal es beneficioso para mí y para mis compañeros. Me veo a mí mismo como un intérprete de lenguaje de señas, un intérprete de ASL, ya sea trabajando independientemente o trabajando para la ciudad”.

 

 

 

David CrishomDavid Crishom
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: Ciencias políticas

“Mi hermana estudio aquí y dijo que realmente le gustaba el campus de John Jay, el ambiente y los maestros”.

 

 

 

 

Karla OsornoKarla Osorno
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: No declarado

“John Jay ofrece muchas carreras de justicia penal y siempre me ha interesado eso”.

 

 

 

 

Jack GawrelckJack Gawrelck
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: Investigación de fraude

“Estoy pensando en John Jay porque aparentemente tienen un programa de investigación de fraudes realmente bueno aquí y quiero ser un contador forense algún día”.

 

 

 

Joyce EscatelJoyce Escatel
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: Ciencia forense

“Quiero venir a John Jay porque son una de las únicas escuelas públicas que ofrecen análisis forense. Quiero ir a la escuela de medicina para convertirme en un patólogo forense”.

 

 

 

Juan VelezJuan Velez
Estudiante de primer año entrante
Mayor potencial: Justicia penal

“Quiero trabajar en el departamento de policía y mis maestros en la escuela secundaria me recomendaron a John Jay”.

 


JOHN JAY HOSTS AN OPEN HOUSE FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS

John Jay Hosts An Open House For Prospective Students

Read in Spanish

“John Jay is a unique institution. It’s a place where everyone—first-generation students, working students, immigrants, parents, and veterans—can transform their lives with a justice-focused education.” —President Karol V. Mason

 

On November 18, John Jay held its Fall 2018 open house for prospective students. With campus tours, workshops, and welcome sessions, this event provided future students with the chance to learn more about our College. “John Jay is a unique institution. It’s a place where everyone—first-generation students, working students, immigrants, parents, and veterans—can transform their lives with a justice-focused education,” said President Karol V. Mason. “Today, you’ll get a clear sense of how this campus is alive with energy and passion. I am confident that you’ll be impressed and discover that John Jay is the right place for you.” Offering students the chance to speak with faculty who are committed to excellence; learn about various academic programs; and find out why John Jay’s student-life experience has been rated among the best in CUNY, the prospective students at Open House left with a complete understanding of why John Jay students proudly call themselves fierce advocates for justice. At the event, we spoke with several future students and asked them, Why John Jay?

 

Giana RomeroGiana Romero
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Law and Society

“My sister is an alumna of John Jay and she told me that this is a great school. I want to be a criminal justice lawyer. I want to fight for the people and become a defending attorney, so this college falls right in line. It’s the perfect school for what I want to do.”
 

 

 

Michael RodriguezMichael Rodriguez
Transfer Student
Potential Major: Cybersecurity

“I was looking at a lot of schools, but I liked John Jay because of its programs. John Jay is the only college with a major that only says ‘Cybersecurity.’ The majors at other colleges say something like ‘Computer Science,’ and that’s not what I want to do.

 

 

Esmeralda Hernandez
Esmeralda Hernandez
Incoming Freshman

Potential Major: Undeclared

“John Jay is a big school and very diverse. I might want to be a lawyer, and I know that John Jay offers very good programs to help with that field. I might also want to be an investigator or detective, and this would be a good foundation for it.”

 

 

Michael CabarcasMichael Cabarcas
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Criminal Justice

“John Jay is a very good school for criminal justice and it is close to home. I also know that there’s a criminal justice program where you can get your bachelors and master’s degree in five years.”

 

 

Destiny ChongDestiny Chong
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Undecided

“I decided to look into John Jay because I’m really interested in Forensic Science and Forensic Psychology. Being in the criminal justice field is beneficial to me and my peers. I see myself being a sign language interpreter—an ASL interpreter—either freelancing or working for the city.”

 

 

David CrishomDavid Crishom
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Political Science

My sister came here and she said that she really liked the John Jay campus, the atmosphere and the teachers.”

 

 

 

Karla OsornoKarla Osorno
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Undeclared

“John Jay offers a lot of criminal justice majors and I have always been interested in that.”

 

 

 

Jack GawrelckJack Gawrelck
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Fraud Investigation

“I’m thinking about John Jay because you guys apparently have a really good Fraud Investigation program here, and I want to be a forensic accountant someday.”

 

 

 

Joyce EscatelJoyce Escatel
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Forensic Science

“I want to come to John Jay because they are one of the only public schools that offer forensics. I want to go to medical school to become a forensic pathologist.”

 

 

 

Juan VelezJuan Velez
Incoming Freshman
Potential Major: Criminal Justice

“I want to work in the police department and my teachers in high school recommended John Jay to me.”

 


Perceptions of childhood obesity prevention policies among parents in Turkey

young girl with green appleChildhood obesity is a major health issue in Turkey. The World Health Organization recently found that between 20 and 25 percent of Turkish children aged 10–19 years are overweight or obese. A recent study of fourth grade children in Ankara found over one-third to be overweight or obese, much higher than anticipated.

CUNY SPH is collaborating with Hacettepe University in Turkey’s capital city of Ankara to strengthen the research and translation capacity in a region that is heavily affected by obesity and type 2 diabetes. To decipher perceptions of obesity prevention measures among parents by socio-economic strata (SES), CUNY SPH faculty Sean Haley, Terry Huang and Sheng Li led a study which was recently published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing.

The study found strong recognition of childhood obesity as a problem among parents in Ankara, suggesting acknowledgement of the health issue across economic strata. Industry and the media were ranked high as influencers. While schools were seen as important in obesity prevention, healthcare providers and government were ranked lower. Overall, parents reported greatest support for school-based interventions, more limitations on marketing to children, greater opportunities for physical activity and restrictions on unhealthy foods. Fiscal policies such as taxes on unhealthy foods received the lowest support. Degree of support for obesity prevention policies was generally higher among high-SES parents compared to those from lower SES groups.

“Future research will seek to more clearly identify opportunities for prevention interventions by SES and gender,” Haley says.

Haley S, Huang T, et al. Perceptions of Obesity Prevention Policies: Socioeconomic Assessment in the Turkish Capital. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families , Volume 0 , Issue 0


GC’s Stone Center Receives $1.2 Million Gift to Launch Postdoctoral Program

The James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Foundation awarded a gift of $1.2 million to the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality, based at The Graduate Center, to launch a new postdoctoral scholars program. The new gift highlights the foundation’s continuing commitment to expand scholarship on inequality at The Graduate Center.

“An excess of wealth concentration, what I call ‘sequestering of wealth’ at the top, is an increasing issue for society’s coherence and for democracy,” said James Stone. “We welcome the opportunity to support a cohort of scholars at the postdoctoral level who will tackle crucial questions related to income and wealth disparities. The GC’s Stone Center is an excellent home base for this new program.”

James and Cathleen Stone, donors to The Graduate Center, CUNY

James M. and Cathleen D. Stone, whose gift will support a new postdoctoral scholars program (photo credit: John Werner)

Each scholar will spend two years in the program, producing empirical research on topics such as earnings, income, and wealth inequality. The gift will support two scholars starting in the 2019-2020 academic year and two starting in the 2020-2021 year. In addition to salaries, scholars will receive funding for out-of-pocket research expenses and for hiring Graduate Center students as research assistants. The gift also helps support the costs of the Stone Center’s administrative and communications work.

“My colleagues and I are absolutely thrilled by this new gift,” said Professor Janet C. Gornick (Political Science, Sociology), director of the Stone Center. “We have long hoped to have the resources to add a postdoc program so that we could integrate a group of early-career scholars into the center. Our future postdocs will expand our research agenda, and we look forward to offering them options for collaboration and mentoring.”

The James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality, which renamed and expanded The Graduate Center’s Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Center, was launched in 2016 with a $2.5 million gift from the Stone Foundation. The foundation also funds inequality projects at Harvard Kennedy School, Brown University, and INSEAD, a business school based in France.

The Stone Center’s mission is to build and disseminate knowledge related to the causes, nature, and consequences of multiple forms of socioeconomic inequality. Although its six core faculty members and affiliated students have diverse interests and utilize a range of methods, all share a commitment to scholarship that is quantitative, data-driven, interdisciplinary, and policy-oriented, and that addresses questions that are cross-nationally comparative or global in scope.

Learn more about the postdoctoral programs here.


ICYMI: Amazon Fits Beautifully With CUNY: The City’s Public Universities Are Traning People To Fill The Jobs The Tech Giant Is Creating

The New York Daily News published an op-ed by CUNY Board of Trustees Chairman William C. Thompson Jr. and CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. The text of the op-ed is available below. The op-ed can be seen here.

By William C. Thompson Jr. and Vita C. Rabinowitz.

Over the coming decade, Amazon will develop a waterfront campus in Long Island City, Queens, with 4 million square feet of commercial space, and within 15 years the headquarters size could be doubled. The one thing the company will not have to build from scratch is a diverse, vibrant workforce.

Much of the early response to the terms of Amazon’s New York City expansion has centered on the benefits to Amazon; lost in much of the discussion, however, is the great promise of opportunity, guaranteed in the agreement, for thousands of New Yorkers of diverse backgrounds and means.

We cannot attach too great a significance to the compounding value of an economic development initiative that promises to directly create 25,000 good-paying jobs within the upcoming decade — jobs with an average salary of more than $150,000 — along with the multiplicative effects the project will have in accelerating the region’s emergence as a nationwide tech hub. Amazon’s arrival comes with a vast potential to drive positive change, and CUNY is positioned to be one of the key engines of that success, and to help the tech community diversify its ranks on a grand scale.

CUNY is a lead partner in Amazon’s expansion as the great public institution of higher education in New York City. The rich diversity of our student body — 35% of CUNY undergraduates were born outside the U.S. mainland and 76% are from under-represented minority groups — mirrors that of the city. Because of our vast reach, and unparalleled ability to scale educational opportunities to the needs of so many different types of students, CUNY is positioned to equip large numbers of diverse New Yorkers to take advantage of these opportunities, and to provide Amazon and other tech companies with a robust pipeline of talent.

Our 25 campuses are staffed by educators who prize the role they serve as mentors to students hungry for opportunity. The university counts among its core competencies its ability to prepare students to work in STEM fields — Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. In fall 2017, CUNY counted a total of 47,349 STEM enrollees — that’s about 11,000 more than the total undergraduate enrollment of the University of Michigan.

The work we already do with IBM through our Pathways in Technology Early College High School, or P-Tech, makes us a natural collaborator in the establishment of Amazon’s on-campus public high school. Students who attend P-Tech, primarily from lower-income backgrounds, are earning their high school diploma along with a cost-free associate degree in a STEM field.

Earlier this year, the New York City Economic Development Corp. named CUNY to play a leading role in the implementation of a $30 million initiative to develop New York City into a worldwide center for cybersecurity innovation. The effort will include the development of industry-informed courses and new vehicles for their delivery, along with a Tech-In-Residence program that will help equip students with the tools to apply their classroom lessons to actual industry needs. At LaGuardia Community College in Long Island City — walking distance from the Amazon headquarters site — plans are already in place to offer preparatory courses to adults from the community who have limited prior exposure to information technology.

Amazon’s arrival represents an extraordinary opportunity to build on these and other ongoing initiatives, and to enable CUNY to expand its mission of service to low-income, underserved and immigrant students to unprecedented levels. We are working closely with the state, city and Amazon to learn more about the company’s needs and plans, to determine what CUNY must do to ensure that students at all our colleges and schools have access to this exciting universe of opportunity.

 


CCNY Grove School researchers receive $1.5M grant to build social media platform for STEM students

Joseph Barba is a professor of electrical engineering at the Grove School of Engineering.

Joseph Barba is a professor of electrical engineering at the Grove School of Engineering.

Joseph Barba, professor of electrical engineering at the Grove School of Engineering, is advancing the aims of the Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program by building a social media platform designed specifically for students entering, continuing, or transferring into STEM majors at The City College of New York.

The project is being realized due to a $1.5 million grant over five years from the National Science Foundation. Principal investigator Barba along with co-principal investigators will develop the social media platform during the first year of funding, which supports community building and information sharing interventions assisting students during critical transitions early on.

“We want to address culture shock that the students are going through as they transition; students come here to a completely new environment, and they feel alienated, don’t know where resources are, and tend to be more isolated,” said Barba. “We are targeting Hispanic students to improve the retention and graduation rates of underrepresented minorities.”

Co-principal investigators include:

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, Week of November 26, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

We hope you had a rest-filled and meaningful Thanksgiving.

We are excited to see you for Parent Teacher Conferences this week. Please remember that there are no afterschool programs in session on Thursday or Friday, and also that Friday is a half day with dismissal at 11:30am.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Parent Teacher Conferences:
  • – Thursday November 29th – 4:45pm – 7:45 pm – Rapid dismissal 2:40pm, no After3 or SONYC programs in session
    – Friday November 30th – 12:40pm – 2:40pm – Dismissal at 11:30am; no After3 or SONYC programs in session
  • Monday, December 3, 8:30am – Vaping Info Session for Parents by Dr. Debra Friedman, MD, City Medical Specialist, Office of School Health RSVP HERE
  • Principal Coffees: Dates to be rescheduled in consultation with PTA Co-Presidents. Revised dates will be announced soon.

Parent Teacher Conferences are right around the corner after we return from Thanksgiving Recess.
NEST+m follows the high school schedule for these conferences; we will hold Parent Teacher conferences on Thursday November 29th from 4:45pm – 7:45 pm and on Friday November 30th from 12:40pm – 2:40pm.

Please note the following important details:

  • On Friday, November 30, all students will be dismissed at 11:30am. DOE and private buses will leave school after the 11:30am dismissal – please make schedule adjustments accordingly. Transportation questions for DOE buses should be directed to Marcy Duran at MDuran22@schools.nyc.gov. Private bus questions should be directed to your parent bus coordinator.
  • Both days will be rapid dismissal days and NO After3 or SONYC programs will be in session.
  • The PTA has posted K-8 Parent Teacher Conference Sign-Up sheets. You can visit this page of the PTA websiteto sign up for a conference time for your child. Upper Grades teachers will post sign up sheets outside their classrooms. A Room directory list will be posted in the Lobby.

CCNY-Schomburg partnership a boon for undergraduate researchers

arthur-alfonso-schomburg

Schomburg Center founder Arthur Schomburg. The Harlem-based center is one of the world’s leading cultural institutions devoted to the research, preservation, and exhibition of materials focused on African American, African Diaspora, and African experiences. Photo credit: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Prints Division, The New York Public Library.

For decades, City College of New York student researchers have trekked down Hamilton Heights to the famed Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture on 135th St. and Malcolm X Blvd. in search of knowledge.  Now it’s about to get better for students of global black history.

A new collaboration between City College and the Schomburg, a research division of The New York Public Library, will help undergraduates hone their   research skills and enrich their access to this treasure trove of more than 11 million items.

Conceptualized by CCNY’s English Department and its MFA in Creative Writing Program, this joint effort includes a new undergraduate course to be taught by William Gibbons, assistant professor in CCNY’s Library Archives, next spring.

Entitled “Engl 37100 — Selected Topics in African-American Literature:  The Evidence of Things Unseen:  Art, Archives and Harlem,” the course will offer students first-hand experience working with rare and important archival materials related to Harlem’s role as an important artistic and political center.

“Our partnership with the Schomburg is part of a broader initiative to anchor creative writers in their communities while also taking advantage of Harlem as a vital cultural setting,” said Michelle Y. Valladares, director of the MFA creative writing program.

Founded in 1925 and named a National Historic Landmark in 2017, the Schomburg is one of the world’s leading cultural institutions devoted to the research, preservation, and exhibition of materials focused on African American, African Diaspora, and African experiences. Its diverse programming and collections spanning over 11 million items that illuminate the richness of global black history, arts and culture.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


“A Christmas Carol in Harlem” at CCNY, Nov. 27-Dec. 8

A Christmas Carol in Harlem 2018

“A Christmas Carol in Harlem” presented by the City College Center for the Arts and The Classical Theatre of Harlem featuring Dan Echevarria as Fezz and Marley Understudy.

The Classical Theatre of Harlem and the City College Center for the Arts present “A Christmas Carol in Harlem,” a reimagining of the Charles Dickens’ classic in present day Harlem. The performance—Tuesday, Nov. 27-Dec. 8–takes place in The City College of New York’s Aaron Davis Hall.

The play is adapted by Shawn René Graham, directed by Steve H. Broadnax III and choreographed by Tiffany Rea-Fisher, and it will include original music and classic holiday carols influenced by gospel, hip-hop, pop and R&B.

“We are on the precipice of the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance,” said Ty Jones, producing artistic director at The Classical Theatre of Harlem.  “What a remarkable opportunity to launch into the next century by complementing the existing holiday programming downtown, with a show that has a unique uptown, New York City aesthetic.”

The adaptation places Ebenezer Scrooge as a real estate mogul who has made his fortune at the expense of others. Scrooge foregoes using his wealth to affect positive change within his Harlem community and instead lives a life of miserly solitude until three unexpected visitors arrive on Christmas Eve to show him that the value of family and the impact of cooperation will lead to a healthy, thriving and prosperous community.

A “Christmas Carol in Harlem” touches on issues of gentrification and social inequality that affect New Yorkers today. The Classical Theatre of Harlem veteran, Anthony Vaughn Merchant, will lead the cast as Ebenezer Scrooge and features dancers from from Elisa Monte Dance.

Performances will be on Tuesday-Saturday at 8 p.m. with select Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday matinees at 1 p.m. For more information, or to purchase tickets, please visit The Classical Theatre of Harlem website.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


WHAT JOHN JAY STUDENTS ARE THANKFUL FOR

What John Jay Students Are Thankful For

 

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, we asked John Jay students an important question: What are you thankful for? As you read their thoughts, you might find yourself agreeing with their feelings of gratitude, or you might find yourself learning more about another person’s thankful experience. We’re thankful for everyone in the John Jay community. Thank you for sharing your stories with us. Thank you for your commitment to public service. And thank you for being fierce advocates for justice. Happy Thanksgiving.

 

Zoe Dela CruzZoe Dela Cruz,
Class of 2019,
Major: Political Science 

“I’m thankful… to be alive. I’m a veteran and I got out in 2014. I’m currently in the reserves. My first deployment was Afghanistan, and I’m lucky to be home to celebrate every Thanksgiving and every holiday. I appreciate being alive, not giving up, having great resources, an outlet, and support. I’m thankful for the military. I wouldn’t be graduating from John Jay without the benefits of the armed forces.”

 

 

George MarmolejosGeorge Marmolejos,
Class of 2020,
Major: Criminal Justice Institutional Theory and Practices

I’m thankful… for my mother, Carmen, and everything she’s done for me and sacrificed just to get me to where I’m at right now. She has worked two jobs and given me everything that I need to succeed and become the strongest version of myself.”

 

 

 

Samantha YurkowSamantha Yurkow,
Class of 2019,
Masters: Public Administration, Inspection and Oversight; Advanced Certificate in Forensic Accounting

“I’m thankful… that I became a yoga teacher. I’m going to start teaching next month and I’m working out how I’m going to run my class. Everyone has been incredibly supportive. I’m really excited to start.”

 

 

 

Hao ChenHao Chen,
Class of 2019,
Major: International Criminal Justice

“I’m thankful… for the professors at John Jay. They are so nice and help me a lot, both within the classroom and outside the classroom. My professors use their personal time to email me information and resources to help write papers and do my homework.”

 

 

 

Lizeth BarbosaLizeth Barbosa,
Class of 2020,
Major: Forensic Psychology

“I’m thankful… for my friends, their support, their love, and their guidance. My friends support my studies and my mental health. They support me by accepting me and it’s hard finding acceptance these days. My friends have always appreciated me regardless of my flaws. They love me unconditionally.”

 

 

 

Richard BravoRichard Bravo,
Class of 2020,
Major: Political Science

“I’m thankful… for my job because I’m able to feed myself and pay for my expenses. I work for a junk removal company, and this job is helping to build my customer service skills. It’s also helping to build my self-esteem which has allowed me to handle tasks that I normally would not have been able to do.”

 

 

 

Krysti Stern-RodriguezKrysti Stern-Rodriguez,
Class of 2020,
Major: Law and Society

“I’m thankful… for my family, especially my daughter Myra Rose, who makes me strive even harder. My daughter is eight. She has autism and she motivates me to work hard to show that you can do anything.”

 

 

 

Michael MarsMichael Mars,
Class of 2020,
Major: Criminal Justice

“I’m thankful… for the ability to be able to return to John Jay soon and finish my education. I’m also thankful for the NYPD, that’s what I want my career to be in. I have always wanted to be a cop and I feel like I’m right for the job.”

 

 

 

Cruz IxcoyCruz Ixcoy,
Class of 2020,
Major: Forensic Psychology

“I’m thankful… for my family that’s always supporting me, my academic achievement, and my job. I’m grateful for getting good grades, graduating soon, and hopefully becoming a criminal profiler.”

 

 

 

Christopher SpellChristopher Spell,
Class of 2020,
Major: Fraud Examination and Financial Forensics

“I’m thankful… that I can come to such a great school, get an excellent education, and give myself the opportunity to succeed in the future.”

 


PRESIDENT MASON INSPIRES FUNDRAISERS ON NATIONAL PHILANTHROPY DAY

President Mason Inspires Fundraisers On National Philanthropy Day

 

On Monday, November 19, President Karol V. Mason helped observe National Philanthropy Day at a breakfast held by the Association of Fundraising Professionals New York City Chapter. The morning event had four “storytellers” inspiring the audience with their experiences in philanthropy: President Mason; Tammy Tibbetts, Co-Founder & CEO She’s the Firsts; Jennifer Jones Austin, CEO Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies (FPWA); Eduardo Vilero, Artistic Director & CEO of Ballet Hispánico; and Veronica Dagher, the event’s emcee and host of the podcast “Secrets of Wealthy Women.”

“I tell people that I have no shame asking for money, because I want you to feel as good as I do.” —Karol V. Mason

 

Mason was the first to kick off the stories, and she wasted no time telling the crowd where she got her first experience in fundraising. “How many of you remember Jerry Lewis telethons? I grew up excited about Labor Day weekend when my brothers and I could stay up watching the telethon,” said Mason. “We each wanted to make our own call to give in the telethon, and watch that number go up. That was my formative experience in giving money.” She went on to explain how she honed her fundraising skills at her alma mater, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and when she raised money for President Barack Obama. “When I first started raising money for President Obama, I did it because he was a friend,” said Mason. “Then I was invited to join his national development council—which is a fancy word for big fundraiser—and I got home and wondered, What am I going to do? My best friend Valerie Jarrett said, ‘Honey, you’re competitive, you’ll be fine.’ And that was it.” Mason nurtured a friendly competition with her fundraising counterpart, and raised millions of dollars.

But she told the audience that fundraising for John Jay holds a special place in her heart because of the students, their stories, and what they represent. “I’m not ashamed of crying,” Mason said. “We had a young man come and say how he had been involved in the criminal justice system, and now John Jay’s Pre-Law Institute gives his life meaning and purpose. It’s those stories that get me up in the morning every day. I tell people that I have no shame asking for money, because I want you to feel as good as I do.”

“I’m at the age where it’s not about achieving things anymore. It’s about what am I going to do, so that when I look back I can be proud of who I helped lift up.” —Karol V. Mason

 

For Mason, philanthropy gives your life meaning. It’s helping you leave something behind, something that’s changing the world and making it a better place. Helping students at John Jay is a way to feel connected, giving you an opportunity to make someone’s life better. “I’m 61 and proud of it. I’m at the age where it’s not about achieving things anymore,” said Mason. “It’s about what am I going to do, so that when I look back, I can be proud of who I helped lift up.”

The audience went on to hear how Tibbett created opportunities for young women around the world—from students fighting to be the first female presidents of their organizations in Tanzania, to an 8-year-old girl raising thousands of dollars with a “cheese curd crawl” in Wisconsin. Jones Austin made the connection from church and synagogue collection plates to today’s modern fundraising efforts. Using the biblical quote, “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach him how to fish and you feed him for a lifetime,” Jones Austin explained that philanthropy helps people “learn how to fish.” And in true dancer fashion, Vilero got the crowd on their feet with a few energizing dance moves before he took us on his journey from artist to fundraiser.

At the end of the event, every fundraising professional in the room felt more energized to do what they do best, support worthy organizations, activities, and institutions like John Jay. “It’s making a difference in the world, letting people see how their contributions can truly help somebody else succeed,” said Mason.


Scenes from APHA 2018

CUNY SPH was well represented this year by faculty, students, and alumni at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting in San Diego, California.

CUNY SPH booth at APHA 2018

The CUNY SPH booth at the 2018 APHA Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA

 

Dean and students at APHA

From left to right: CUNY SPH doctoral students Amanda Nace and Jennifer Carmona with Dean Ayman El-Mohandes

 

Dean's dinner for students 2

Dean’s dinner for students at APHA, an annual CUNY SPH tradition

 

SPH faculty authors and textbook at APHA

From left to right: Dean of Research Michele Kiely, Professor Chris Palmedo, and Professor Meredith Manze showcase their newly published textbook “Personal Health: A Population Perspective”, which seeks to engage students in understanding relevant personal health issues within a broader population health framework.

 

Lyndon Haviland and Ayman El-Mohandes at APHA 2018

CUNY SPH Foundation Board Chair Lyndon Haviland and Dean Ayman El-Mohandes talk about the success of the Haviland/El-Mohandes Fund in helping public health students attend the APHA Annual Meeting. This year, 48 students were able to attend APHA thanks to assistance from the fund.

 

Haviland/El-Mohandes Fund Award Recipients

Lyndon Haviland and Ayman El-Mohandes are seated in the middle of this year’s group of students that received awards from the Haviland/El-Mohandes Fund to attend APHA

 

Jerome Adams

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams with Dean Ayman El-Mohandes

 

Thomas Quade and Ayman El-Mohandes

Thomas Quade, immediate past president of APHA, and Dean Ayman El-Mohandes

 


OUR CELEBRATION OF LATINX HERITAGE MONTH

Our Celebration of Latinx Heritage Month

John Jay, a proud Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI), celebrated Latinx Heritage Month from September 17 through November 1. Recognizing the contributions that Latinx people have made to the United States, this extended celebration was loaded with events covering everything from serious topics on race, colonialism, and the current crisis in Puerto Rico, to lighter events like a musical performance by Folklore Urbano and a trip to Museo Del Barrio. To round out the last days of our Latinx Heritage Month celebration, La Voz, the Department of Latin American and Latina/o Studies with the co-sponsorship of other clubs, held a Day of the Dead Celebration filled with food, music, and a presentation, along with a screening of the movie Coco. Here are some highlights of the events and thoughts from our students attending them.

Professor José Luis Morín at his HSI presentation

Professor José Luis Morín at his HSI presentation

“The history books are so absent of the Latinx experience in the U.S.” —José Luis Morín

 

Understanding What It Means To Be An HSI
Professor José Luis Morín opened up his HSI Speaker Series presentation with a list of assertions about people of Latin American descent in the United States: • Most are foreign born. • Most are not U.S. citizens. • They don’t want to learn English. • They don’t want to assimilate. • They don’t pay taxes. • Immigrants from Latin America are more prone to criminal behavior than U.S.-born citizens. After he finished listing off the statements, Morín asked the audience, “Which statements are true and which statements are false? If you’re answering that some of these statements are true, that should be concerning,” said Morín, because all of them were false. He added that many of his students, when asked the same question anonymously, thought some of the statements were true. Morín connected the dots from these troubling misconceptions, to the history of Latin Americans in the U.S., to the needs and concerns our Latinx students are facing today.

Provost Yi Li, President Karol V. Mason, Professor José Luis Morín

Provost Yi Li, President Karol V. Mason, Professor José Luis Morín

“The history books are so absent of the Latinx experience in the U.S.,” he said. “When I ask students if they see themselves reflected in books, almost no hands go up. If students think so little of who they are, how can they succeed?” He went on to explain how segregation and Jim Crow took over where slavery left off, for both African-Americans and Latinx people. “The word ‘greaser’ was the counterpart to the n-word,” said Morín, explaining the wide-reaching effects of racial profiling for both groups of people. His eye-opening presentation ended with a Q&A session on how to effectively support the 51% Hispanic/Latinx population currently attending John Jay.

Watch the Speaker Series

Día De Los Muertos 
Celebrating the love and respect people have for their deceased family members is a time-honored tradition for the Latinx community. That’s why so many students were excited to celebrate with food, friends, and festivities on October 31 and November 1. We chatted with some of these students to learn more about their feelings about the event, and joined them for a screening of Coco, an animated film depicting a young boy’s experience with his family and Día De Los Muertos.

Maria Negrete, ’18
What is the Day of the Dead?  

“The Day of the Dead is a celebration, not only for the Mexican community but all throughout Latin America. We celebrate the lives of our loved ones and remember the people and ancestors that came before us.”

Maria Negrete and Michelle Sencion

Maria Negrete and Michelle Sencion

Andres Portoviejo

Andres Portoviejo, ’20
What does it mean to be Latinx?

“For me it’s the culture, the food, and the language. There are so many things that contribute to it, and there isn’t just one definition.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alondra Aea

Alondra Aea, ’20
Why is Coco an important movie for the Latinx community? 

“In general, this was one of Disney’s first Latino-based movies. When Coco came out, it was very different from what we were used to seeing. It hit those points of bringing culture into Disney and appreciating Mexican heritage. I identify as Mexican. It was nice seeing my culture portrayed in a manner that speaks positively about it rather than the negative portrayal that media shows. Having children see this culture portrayed so beautifully puts us in a platform to show that Mexicans are much more than what they see in the media.”

 

 

 

 

                                                                       

                                                                                  Karina Davila, ’20
Karina DavilaWhat does it mean to be Latinx?

“In between the Latinx community, there is a lot of intersectionality and it’s not only one box that we check off. You can be queer and Latinx. You can be undocumented and Latinx. You can be from different countries and still be Latinx. It means different things.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melanie Dominguez and Gilianne Oyola

Melanie Dominguez, ’19
Why is Coco an important movie for the Latinx community?

Coco is an important movie because it demonstrates a lot of the cultures that many people should know. When people view this movie, they get to experience a bit of the Latinx culture from Latin American countries.”

Gilianne Oyola, ’19
Why is this a good way to end Latinx Heritage Month?

“At the end of the month it’s Día de Los Muertos, and this a great way to get together and appreciate a movie that represents our culture well and that got everything accurate. It’s not a parody. It’s accurate about what the Mexican culture is like.”

 

 

 

Honoring those that came before us

Honoring those that came before us


Kingsborough: First Official CUNY Host Site for EmpoweredNYC

Brooklyn, NY — Kingsborough Community College (KCC) has been chosen as the first official host site for EmpoweredNYC within The City University of New York, an initiative between the college’s Single Stop office and the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs’ Office of Financial Empowerment. The program will provide financial counseling services to students with disabilities and those experiencing difficulties with Social Security Insurance Disability (SSI/D), Medicaid, and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, credit card debt, student loans, etc.,

The KCC Single Stop office, in conjunction with CUNY LEADS, CUNY LEEDS Plus Programs, and Access-Ability Services at Kingsborough, will coordinate the program with an EmpoweredNYC financial counselor available every Wednesday from 10:00am to 5:00pm in the Single Stop office in room V-231. The program gets underway on Wednesday, December 5, 2018. Individual hourly appointments may be made in advance by calling 718-368-5411. Walk-ins are also welcome.

Single Stop Director Hattie Elmore

Single Stop Director Hattie Elmore

Single Stop Director Hattie Elmore said, “Students should go to the Single Stop office or call to make an appointment. I recommend that students arrive early, or go to the Single Stop office in advance, so as to complete the Single Stop intake form.“

Wanda Lopez, assistant director of Special Projects in the Office of Financial Empowerment of the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs said she was excited about Kingsborough accommodating the EmpoweredNYC initiative on the college’s campus, and the ability to connect with students with disabilities.

Director Hattie Elmore added, “As a CUNY employee who provides direct services to students who face everyday challenges such as, financial hardship, food insecurities and personal trauma due to life itself, I am excited about the partnership with EmpoweredNYC. Single Stops’ goal is to support students to become self-sufficient. I am a strong advocate of self-empowerment and self-determination. Through providing tools and resources to our students with disabilities, Single Stop is committed to educating students on how to maintain a healthy relationship with their finances. Which will ultimately ensure their confidence in becoming self-sufficient.”

Kingsborough Community College is one of the CUNY Schools with the highest population of disabled students. There are currently more than 800 students registered with the Office of Access-Ability Services alone. Many of the students are marginalized and come from at-risk and socio-economically underrepresented and disenfranchised communities. Many times those students are not financially literate due to their age and lack of experience handling money. EmpoweredNYC can have a powerful impact in the lives of the students and their families, and it has the potential to increase retention and the successful graduation of students with disabilities.


Brooklyn College Global Medical Brigades Focuses on Sustainable Health in Central Panama

By ROBERT JONES JR.

On Tuesday, Nov. 27, Brooklyn College, along with all other City University of New York (CUNY) institutions, will celebrate #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving. Funds raised will support the Brooklyn College Annual Fund, which helps the college continue to create a complete and fulfilling college experience by providing resources that immediately respond to the urgent and evolving needs of the students, faculty, and campus.

The following story is an example of how giving plays a crucial role in student success. With the generous support of Bernard H. ’62 and Ethel B. Garil, Brooklyn College Global Medical Brigades students got the opportunity to work with indigenous communities in a manner that prioritized holistic prevention and empowerment.

More information about #GivingTuesday and how to support students’ academic achievements and career goals can be found on the Brooklyn College Foundation website.

The Brooklyn College Global Medical Brigades (BCGMB) are welcomed at the Maria Elena Diaz School.

Brooklyn College senior Raisa Santos and sophomore Sadiya Hoque know the importance of understanding the political and structural problems facing developing nations and their citizens. As members of the Brooklyn College Global Medical Brigades (BCGMB), they joined 11 other Brooklyn College students, and Ernesto Cuba of the Graduate Center of The City University of New York, on a weeklong trip to the towns of Cañazas, Guacuco Guna, and Guacuco Latino in Central Panama this past August. There, they spent time with the indigenous Embera-Wounaan and Ipeti Embera people, and shadowed and assisted doctors, dentists, and pharmacists while they treated patients for ailments such as muscle aches and foot pain, gave fluoride treatments to children, took temperature and blood pressure readings, and provided consolations on preventative care.

“It’s really humbling. Being there makes me ask myself, ‘How much help am I really providing these people,'” says Santos, president of BCGMB, member of the Scholars Program, intern for the English Majors’ Counseling Office, and editor for the college’s student literary magazine, Stuck in the Library. Santos is also double majoring in chemistry and creative writing. “You realize even if you’re making the smallest of differences, it matters. We just have to ensure that the way we contribute is institutionally and communally sustainable, so that the people we assist no longer have to depend on outside sources to meet their basic healthcare needs.”

The Global Medical Brigades is a nonprofit international organization that promotes student-led health and sustainable projects such as medical care, clean water, and affordable housing initiatives. It relies on student groups at colleges and universities to recruit volunteers to run the programs. After establishing a brigades presence on campus, students then must build a strong community that will have the stamina and means to finance their mission and complete their goals. Working closely with trained medical professionals and receiving intensive on-the-job training, the students engage in missions in Honduras, Panama, and Ghana.

The trip to Panama was Hoque’s first time participating in a BCGMB project. “It’s a really eye-opening experience. We were able to give back to communities that were underserved, which is what’s so fulfilling about participating,” says Hoque, a biology major who individually raised over $1,800 for her participation in the project. “Being there solidified my commitment to being of service to the world.”

Initiative is a key quality for BCGMB members. Each student engages in fundraising initiatives like bake sales, pie-eating contests, and talent shows to pay for travel, lodging expenses, toys, and activities for children, and medicine and medical supplies when they do not receive donated materials from hospitals. Sometimes, the students also use their personal funds to pay for supplies, which is why donors are crucial to BCGMB’s success.

Bernard H. ’62 and Ethel B. Garil, longtime supporters of Brooklyn College, are generous benefactors of BCGMB’s outreach and work. The Garils dedicated their lives to the fight against cancer after losing their daughter Stacey to breast cancer and son Michael to the long-term side effects of treatment for leukemia. They went on to establish several programs in honor of their children, including internships at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins University for Brooklyn College students intent on careers in cancer research; a breast cancer resource library for patients at Columbia Presbyterian; and research programs at Dana Farber and Johns Hopkins.

“As distinct from the internships we’ve sponsored in our children’s memory, the Brooklyn College Global Medical Brigades provides a different type of opportunity for Brooklyn College students to learn about providing for those in need of medical care and hopefully will encourage them to go on to a career in medicine,” said Bernard Garil, recipient of the Brooklyn College Foundation Best of Brooklyn Award, Brooklyn College Alumni Association Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Brooklyn College Presidential Medal.

The BCGMB encourages you to join them for their Thanksgiving Bake Sale, which will take place on Tuesday, November 20, 2018, 11 a.m.–4:30 p.m. in the lobby of the Ingersoll Extension.

Both Santos and Hoque share the goal of becoming doctors.

“I will become a cardiothoracic surgeon,” says Hoque. “It will be a long journey. After graduation I am looking into joining the Peace Corps for two years, at which time, I will study for the Medical College Admission Test.”

For Santos—a NYC Merit Council Scholar, Presidential Scholar, and Rosen Fellow—in addition to becoming a doctor, she is also looking into studying public health. After she becomes a licensed physician, she also wants to participate in the alumni chapter of BCGMB and Doctors Without Borders.

“BCGMB had a profound impact on my aspirations,” she says. “When I finish my applications for medical schools, I want to continue working on my creative projects.” During a study abroad in Scotland, Santos wrote the first chapter of her young adult novel.

Information about how to join or donate to the Brooklyn College Global Medical Brigades can be found at their fundraising site. Learn more about their upcoming events on their Facebook page. Sign up for the 2018 BCGMB Talent Show by completing the application before November 29.

 

CONTACT: Ernesto Mora, 212.662.9939


CUNY researchers confirm the roles of copper and zinc in ischemic heart disease

human heart and coronary artery CT imagesIschemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and, despite recent progress in prevention and control, is expected to remain the leading cause of death through 2030.

Studies have shown that diet plays a role in IHD, but it is not completely understood how. Over 40 years ago, copper deficiency was suggested as a cause of IHD, and zinc excess as possibly harmful, but the hypothesis had not been rigorously tested. To settle the score on this long-standing hypothesis, CUNY SPH Professor Mary Schooling led a Mendelian Randomization study with recent MPH alum Hanish Kodali and Assistant Professor Brian Pavilonis which was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The study found copper to be negatively associated and zinc to be positively associated with IHD.

“It was amazing to find, as expected, that copper lowers risk and zinc increases it,” Schooling says.

Further investigation of the effects, particularly of copper, on IHD may provide a practical means of reducing the leading cause of mortality and morbidity.

Kodali HP, Pavilonis BT, Schooling MC. Effects of copper and zinc on ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction: a Mendelian randomization study. Am J Clin Nutr 2018;108:237–242.


Redefining colorectal cancer subtypes

Microscopic image of colonic adenocarcinomaThere is a long-standing belief that colorectal cancer (CRC), which causes some 50,000 deaths in the United States each year, can be categorized into distinct molecular subtypes. In a paper published recently in the journal Genome Biology, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Levi Waldron and colleagues challenged this basic assumption and proposed an approach to scoring tumors that can help to better differentiate patients who may differ in their exposures, outcomes, and optimal treatments.

In the study, the authors re-processed and standardized individual patient gene expression data for more than 3,700 patients from 18 published studies, creating the largest such standardized, curated database of the CRC “transcriptome” to date. The authors first attempted to validate widely accepted subtypes of CRC and found no evidence to support these or other discrete subtypes of the CRC “transcriptome,” or combined pattern of expression of all genes.

The authors then proposed a novel method to use such a database to identify either discrete subtypes or continuous scores to provide simplifying measures of the transcriptome. They used it to identify two validated scores to better characterize a continuity of CRC transcriptomes. These subtype scores are consistent with previously established subtypes, but better represent the individual variability of CRC than do discrete subtypes. The scores are better predictors of tumor location, stage, grade, and times of disease-free survival, and can be understood as representing biological activity including inflammation and immune activity.

“This work re-examines methods that have been widely used to identify cancer subtypes across many areas of cancer research and shows that those methods may identify tumor subsets that don’t exist on further validation,” Waldron says. “But the most exciting part of this work is that it provides a new way to leverage publicly available databases to understand major patterns of transcriptome variation in a way that is robust even to widespread heterogeneity of the patient cohorts and to technical artifacts. The robustness of our proposed scoring system is clear and hard to dispute. I’m looking forward to applying this approach now for other cancer types and in the even larger databases now available, to better understand how different peoples’ tumors are similar and how they are different.”

Ma S, Ogino S, Parsana P, Nishihara R, Qian Z, Shen J, Mima K, Masugi Y, Cao Y, Nowak JA, Shima K, Hoshida Y, Giovannucci EL, Gala MK, Chan AT, Fuchs CS, Parmigiani G, Huttenhower C, Waldron L: Continuity of transcriptomes among colorectal cancer subtypes based on meta-analysis. Genome Biol. 2018, 19:142.

 


CUNY SPH professor’s genome data project receives $12 million grant

Dr. Levi Waldron

Dr. Levi Waldron

A research team co-led by CUNY SPH Associate Professor Levi Waldron was awarded $12 million in funds by the National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) to build a cloud resource for computing across large genomic and related datasets.

The Genomic Data Science Analysis, Visualization, and Informatics Lab-Space (AnVIL) project, also led by James Taylor, Associate Professor at Johns Hopkins University, will facilitate integration and computing on and across large datasets generated by NHGRI programs, as well as initiatives funded by National Institutes of Health or other agencies that support human genomics research. It will free researchers from moving large quantities of data in order to analyze them with statistical and bioinformatic software.

AnVIL will include web interfaces and tools for investigators with extensive coding experience as well as those with limited coding experience. Researchers will also have the option to upload their own data and run their own software packages on the platform once it is built. The proposal also includes training for researchers on use of AnVIL, and the use of AnVIL to teach genomic data science through Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

“Our role at CUNY will be to contribute data from the Bioconductor project for open-source bioinformatics, and to develop Bioconductor interfaces that make the AnVIL platform accessible to its broad user base,” Waldron says.

Learn more about AnVIL here.


CUNY’s Macaulay Honors College Accepts First-Ever Community College Transfer Students

From its opening in the fall of 2001, Macaulay Honors College adhered to a policy — spelled out in its charter — that restricted admission to exceptional students who enrolled directly from high school. Transfer students weren’t allowed.

Creating a new, highly selective college that offered financial and academic support to New York’s most promising students was a landmark in The City University of New York’s broad efforts in those years to raise its standards as a top-flight public university. But Macaulay’s faculty have long had reservations about the honors college’s unusual no-transfers policy. Excluding nontraditional students — those whose lives after high school were sidetracked by life circumstances, for instance, or immigrants who opted to start their American education at a community college — seemed inconsistent with CUNY’s mission of expanding access to education for students from diverse backgrounds and experience.

That point of view gained traction in recent years and now, for the first time, Macaulay has enrolled a small number of community college students in a bid to add diversity to the honors college and expand opportunities to deserving students who, for a variety of reasons, have taken indirect routes to college. Under a pilot program called Macaulay Bridge, 18 carefully selected sophomores — 10 from Bronx Community College and eight from Borough of Manhattan Community College — will earn their associate’s degrees in the spring and then continue as Macaulay at Lehman College students.

All 18 students are members of minority groups; most are Hispanic or black and a few are immigrants or children of immigrants from countries including India, Yemen and the West African nation of The Gambia. Macaulay’s overall enrollment, in comparison, is currently about 50 percent white, 34 percent Asian, 9 percent Hispanic and 7 percent black.

“The Macaulay Honors College is one of the jewels of CUNY, and we’re excited by the prospects for increasing access to it for a diverse group of transfer students,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Building a bridge between our community colleges and Macaulay reflects our core mission of expanding educational opportunity for New Yorkers.”

Macaulay Dean Mary C. Pearl said, “Our motivation is to make Macaulay a school that represents every segment of New York and better reflects the demographic profile of the senior colleges from which we draw. The diversity of our Macaulay Bridge students in terms of ethnic background, age and life experience not only expands opportunity for them, but we think it’s just a better education for all Macaulay students — the more diverse our classes are.”

Traditional Macaulay students apply as high school seniors to any of the eight CUNY senior colleges, which partner with the honors college and serve as the students’ home campuses.

Admissions decisions are made by the senior colleges, and accepted students are granted free tuition and other benefits, both financial and academic — from free laptops to personalized mentoring and priority course registration. Macaulay’s 2,000 students take most of their courses on their home campuses and come together for Macaulay seminars throughout their four years. They earn joint bachelor degrees from their senior colleges and the honors college.

Admission to Macaulay is highly competitive and attracts high school students with Ivy-level credentials. Last year about 8 percent of its 6,217 applicants were accepted and those admitted had average GPAs of 94.4 and SAT scores of 1416. But barring transfer students has been a blind spot with an unintended effect, Pearl said: “While schools like Vassar, Wesleyan and Columbia have been accepting CUNY community college students as transfers, here was CUNY’s own honors college not having access to them.”

Named dean in 2016, Pearl advanced the long-simmering idea of opening the door to exceptional community college students. She garnered support from the Macaulay board, CUNY leaders — and, crucially, funding from the Petrie Foundation and the Mellon Foundation — for a pilot program that would cover tuition and other support for up to 20 students. Lehman College, which had the smallest number of Macaulay students at 20, agreed to double its cohort, and BCC and BMCC were chosen as the pipeline campuses.

An effort to identify and recruit potential applicants began in the fall of 2017. First-year BCC and BMCC students with GPAs above 3.5 were invited to apply to a program that promised “an extraordinary and highly personalized undergraduate experience” with the financial support to allow them to graduate “debt-free and ready to lead.” The requirements included recommendations, writing samples and interviews, a rigorous process that eventually produced the 18 Macaulay Bridge scholars.

The first challenge for the students was a summer program that compressed the first two Macaulay seminar courses into an intensive six weeks. This fall, the students are continuing in their associate’s degree programs on their home campuses while taking the third Macaulay seminar at Lehman. The pilot program provides the students with all the support and financial benefits afforded traditional Macaulay students, along with a special adviser and a writing coach.

“We consider them Macaulay at Lehman students now — we wanted them as early as possible to grow in the culture of Macaulay,” Pearl said. “For a long time, one of the obstacles to accepting transfer students was that we want all our students to take four signature Macaulay seminars in their first four semesters. If they transfer in, they’ve missed that first year. So we designed the Bridge seminar over the summer to catch them up so they can join the sophomores. We’re saying to them, ‘Let’s get you mixed right in with the Macaulay students while you’re still in community college.’ The reception from Macaulay students has been nothing but positive. They like the idea of meeting and talking to these students.”

Typical of the Macaulay Bridge students is 29-year-old Rohan Sharma. After immigrating with his family from India when he was 11, Sharma was a high-achieving student at Forest Hills High School who would have been a strong contender for a Macaulay scholarship.  “But I had to drop out when I was 16, after my father died and I had to get a job to support my mother. My goal became getting a security-guard license and just a regular life. For 10 years I worked every kind of job. A couple of years ago my mother said, ‘We’re a little comfortable now, maybe you should try school.’ I said, ‘No, I don’t think it’s for me, it’s been too long.’ But I thought about it and decided to go back to school at BMCC.”

Sharma earned a high GPA his first semester and received an email inviting him to apply to a special Macaulay Honors College program. “I looked at the requirements and thought I must have gotten this must by mistake,” he said. “But I thought, why not?” He was thrilled — and astonished — when he was accepted. “I’m completely the nontraditional Macaulay student,” Sharma said during a recent roundtable discussion with half a dozen other Bridge students. “For them to tap into this demographic of students who are very talented but are never heard of because of their lack of credentials, I think it’s beautiful.”

Carlos Perez-Valle, 25, was class valedictorian at Monsignor Scanlan High School in the Bronx in 2010 but his family’s financial difficulties put a hold on his college education that turned out to last seven years. “Typically you go to college, and then you start your career, but it was the other way around for me,” he said. “I worked for educational nonprofits and eventually became a senior program specialist for a small community tutoring program serving the Mexican-American community. I grew with this organization, but I realized I was hitting a plateau, and in order to grow I had to go back to school.”

Perez-Valle recalls hoping to be accepted by Macaulay when he was in high school; eight years later, he’s found his way there through another route. “It’s the kind of college experience I always thought I would have — what I dreamed about when I was in high school,” he said.

Sahar Alsaidi, another Bridge scholar, grew up in Yemen and graduated high school three years ago as her country’s seventh-highest ranked student. But Yemen’s civil war, and its culture, disrupted her education. Her family fled, first to Jordan and then to the United States. “My dream was always to be a doctor,” said Alsaidi, who now lives in the Bronx. “But in my culture, they think girls should marry and raise kids. My father said, ‘I know you’re a good student, but it’s not your country, and you don’t know the language. So you should just stay home and find someone to marry you.’ I said, ‘No, I’m not going to do that. I want to achieve my goals.’ ”

Alsaidi enrolled in BMCC and the CUNY Language Immersion Program (CLIP).  “I learned English and started taking classes,” she said. “I was so scared, but I challenged myself. And I got A’s. I was so excited that I was the same student here as I was at home. When they emailed me about Macaulay I didn’t think I would get it. I was so happy when they said I was accepted.”

Lena Nelson may be Macaulay’s most nontraditional student: She’s 31, the mother of an eight-year-old son, and came to New York from Jamaica two years ago hoping to finally go to college. “I wanted to go to Lehman, but I didn’t have SATs so they advised me to go to a two-year college and then transfer,” Nelson said. She started at Bronx Community College in the fall of 2017 and was invited to apply to the Macaulay Bridge program after earning straight A’s her first semester. She takes her classes at night and on weekends, works full-time as a guard at a Manhattan art gallery, and says she envisions her dreams in a way she never could.

“My passion has always been to go into health care administration,” she said. “It’s a fusion of business and health, and bio, which I love. After my bachelor’s I’m going to move on to my masters and then my doctorate—that’s not an if, that’s a definite.”

As a group, the Macaulay Bridge scholars have impressed their Lehman professors with their maturity and determination. “What’s missing from this bunch entirely is any feeling of entitlement,” said Anna Purves, an English Department faculty member who taught one of the summer Bridge classes. “Some are recent arrivals who have to handle this huge navigation of a new country and the city. And all of them had to handle the intensive summer program that demanded they do so much more and so much faster than usual. They’re climbing a much steeper mountain than the regular Macaulay students.”

Pearl, Macaulay’s dean, recalls accompanying the Bridge students to a performance of Shakespeare in the Park’s “Othello” as part of the summer’s “Arts in New York” seminar. “They gave a presentation before going to the play,” Pearl said. “And I was so impressed by their comfort with ideas, their pleasure in discussing the universality of the story. That’s when I really thought, yes, these are honors students.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, Week of November 19th, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Our week ahead features three full-instructional days before schools are closed for the Thanksgiving Recess.

We hope that each of you has a meaningful Thanksgiving holiday and extended weekend.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • SLT Meeting –  Tuesday, November 20, 4:10pm, Library
  • Rapid Dismissal – Wednesday, November 21: No after-school activities. NEST+m will conduct a Rapid Dismissal at 2:40pm; (no After3 or SONYC programs in session).
  • Thanksgiving Break: Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 – school closed. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.
  • Principal Coffees: Dates to be rescheduled in consultation with PTA Co-Presidents. Revised dates will be announced soon.
  • Parent Teacher Conferences:
  • – Thursday, November 29th – 4:45pm – 7:45 pm – Rapid dismissal, no After3 or SONYC programs in session
    – Friday November 30th – 12:40pm – 2:40pm – dismissal at 11:30am; no After3 or SONYC programs in session

Parent Teacher Conferences are right around the corner after we return from Thanksgiving Recess.
NEST+m follows the high school schedule for these conferences; we will hold Parent Teacher conferences on Thursday, November 29th from 4:45pm – 7:45 pm and on Friday, November 30th from 12:40pm – 2:40pm.

Please note the following important details:

  • On Friday, November 30, all students will be dismissed at 11:30am. DOE and private buses will leave school after the 11:30am dismissal – please make schedule adjustments accordingly. Transportation questions for DOE buses should be directed to Marcy Duran at MDuran22@schools.nyc.gov. Private bus questions should be directed to your parent bus coordinator.
  • Both days will be rapid dismissal days and NO After3 or SONYC programs will be in session.
  • The PTA has posted K-8 Parent Teacher Conference Sign-Up sheets. You can visit this page of the PTA website to sign up for a conference time for your child. Upper Grades teachers will post sign up sheets outside their classrooms. A Room directory list will be posted in the Lobby.

The Knights Table Food Pantry Officially Opens in Support of Queens College Students

For Monday, November 19, 12:30 pm

WHAT:
The official opening of the Knights Table Food Pantry, a resource for Queens College students. Part of Governor Cuomo’s No Student Goes Hungry Program, the pantry will provide stigma-free food access for students in need. New York is the first state in the nation with a comprehensive program to combat student hunger.

Financial support for the pantry will be provided by the Carroll and Milton Petrie, Foundation, Inc., the campus community and by food drives and fundraisers to be held both on and off campus.

WHO:
Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez and Student Association President Carmine Couloute are the scheduled speakers.

WHERE:
Queens College Student Union, Lower-Level, Room 29
65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Directions | Campus Map

Background: The Knights Table Food Pantry is sponsored by the Office of Student Development and Leadership at Queens College. It will be accessible to currently registered students throughout the academic year. The hours of operation for the fall 2018 and spring 2019 semesters are Monday to Thursday, 10 am to 2 pm and 4 pm to 7 pm, and 10 am to 1 pm on Friday. The college is working with the New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG), the Student Association, campus clubs and organizations to encourage student support efforts.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 20,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Summer Session 2019 Registration Now Open at Queens College; Earliest Availability of Any College in the Tri-State Area

— Opportunity for Simultaneous Spring and Summer 2019 Registration for Queens College Undergraduate
and Graduate Students
; Visiting Students Welcome —

Queens, N.Y., November 16, 2018—With a November 5 start date, Queens College became the first college in the tristate area to make summer session registration available to its over 20,000 students, as well as students from other institutions. Anyone—from Queens College and CUNY students to the general public—can currently choose from over 700 undergraduate and graduate courses, some conducted online.

Classes are offered in popular majors such as accounting and psychology, and run the gamut from ancient civilizations to urban studies. Also available are biology, chemistry and mathematics courses ranging from introductory to advanced, allowing students to master a challenging science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) course at their own pace—without the pressure of taking it as part of a semester’s full course load.

Students can earn a total of 15 credits over four convenient sessions from June through August. They can take advantage of a 20% discount on the cost of enrolling their children in the college’s summer camp, and free on-campus parking. The extraordinarily diverse student body, with over 150 nations represented, provides a culturally enriching experience at an affordable price on the 80-acre campus, with its traditional college quad.

“This is a valuable opportunity for Queens College undergraduate and graduate students to begin long-term academic planning since they can register simultaneously for spring and summer classes. It also provides students at other institutions with time to explore the possibility of earning credits here. Among the many benefits of enrolling in one or more of the four available summer sessions are free on-campus parking; discounted enrollment in our well-regarded summer camp for the children of summer session students; shuttle bus service to and from major transportation hubs; and use of the college’s newly renovated athletics facilities,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

Click here to watch a video of students sharing the ways that attending Summer Session benefits their academic career.

For those who will qualify for the Excelsior Scholarship program, Summer Session credits might be counted toward completing the required 30 credits a year.​

Click here to apply for Summer Session and here for more information on a wide range of course offerings.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its over 20,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.


Baruch College Claims Two Top 10 Finishes at Traders@MIT Fall Intercollegiate Competition

Fourth year in a row that Baruch students capture second place or better

Baruch College students Xinyi Liu (left) and Cheng Ni (right) display their monetary wins from the annual Traders@MIT Fall Intercollegiate Competition

Baruch students Xinyi Liu (left) and Cheng Ni (right) display their monetary wins from the annual Traders@MIT Fall Intercollegiate Competition.

Once again, Baruch College students faced teams from top schools at the annual Traders@MIT Intercollegiate Competition in Massachusetts and brought home victories.

Out of 75 teams, Baruch claimed two top 10 finishes—2nd and 7th place—competing against such institutions as Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Princeton, Yale, Stanford, Columbia, Cornell, Berkeley, University of Pennsylvania, Carnegie Mellon, and University of Chicago.

​“Their performance continues to show that our students are extremely dedicated and can compete against the best and brightest,” said Jarrod Pickens, PhD, a math lecturer at the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences who coaches the students.

Winning Steak Continues

This year’s wins represent the fourth consecutive year that Baruch students won second place or better in the overall standings—a streak that began in 2015 with a 2nd and 5th place, and continued in 2016 and 2017 when team members captured 1st, 2nd, and 3rd in both years.

Held this year on November 11, the full-day event is the largest trading competition of its kind in the U.S, which attracts 150 well-prepared students primed to pit their trading strategies against each other head to head. Each two-person team competes in the three rigorous sessions: algorithmic options trading, dark pools (sales and trading), and stock price modeling.

In addition to claiming the 2nd and 7th place wins, the students also grabbed top places in two sessions:

  • 1st and 2nd place in options trading
  • 2nd place in the dark pools trading

All ten participating students are undergraduates in the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences:

  • Xinyi Liu – Mathematics, ’20
  • Cheng Ni – Mathematics, ’20
  • Man Jin – Mathematics, ’19
  • Zeqi Wang – Financial Mathematics, ’19
  • Serdar Doruk – Mathematics, ’18
  • Yiming Zhang – Mathematics, ’20
  • Kai Ge – Financial Mathematics, ’19
  • Zekun Ji – Financial Mathematics, ’21
  • Kaizhen Tan – Financial Mathematics, ’18
  • Suguru Kaneda – Financial Mathematics, ’19

“We were highly motivated”

To be ready, the Baruch students practice in several activities held by the Baruch Traders Club, including in-house trading competitions and training sessions. Participants also sought the advice of seniors who previously competed in the event.

“We were highly motivated before and in the competition since we knew that we were competing with some of the best institutions like MIT and Harvard,” said Cheng Ni and Xinyi Liu in an email interview, who finished second overall out of 75 teams.

“It was very exciting and meaningful that we had the chance to meet some students from other institutions and learn something from them. We were delighted with the final results because it meant our efforts were not in vain.”

Competitions to Careers

The benefits of diligent training and ongoing coaching reach far beyond the competition. Suguru Kaneda, who will work at Bloomberg as a data scientist following graduation in 2019, said participating in this event, as well as other traders club competitions, helped him prepare for job interviews.

“Trading interviews are very competitive, but employers were very impressed that I was knowledgeable and experienced with options trading and coding which is something other job candidates have never done before hands-on rather than reading a textbook,” Kaneda said.

“Even though the Baruch Trading Club is heavily reliant on math, I think anyone who enjoys chess, poker, or logical games that involve a lot of probabilities will enjoy joining the Traders Club. It requires you to be able to read and think about probabilities and outcomes that will help you beat your competition.”

Trading Competitions Achievements

Baruch has fared well in several trading competitions recently:

# # #


Catherine Seavitt Nordenson is honored by fellow architects

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, associate professor of landscape architecture, is honored.

Associate Professor Catherine Seavitt Nordenson was honored as one of three women who have changed landscape architecture, at the New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA-NY) President’s Dinner in early November. ASLA-NY is the national professional association representing landscape architects.

The award specifically recognized Seavitt Nordenson’s service and leadership, including how she pushes students to maximize the social and ecological capacity of sites along with their aesthetic potential.

A registered landscape architect and architect as well as an academic, Seavitt Nordenson is also a graduate of The City College of New York’s BS Landscape Architecture program, the predecessor to the current Master of Landscape Architecture program at the Bernard & Anne Spitzer School of Architecture.

In work on multiple continents, scales, and media, Seavitt Nordenson has addressed challenges both emerging and historical. Her work to improve the resilience of New York Harbor has been supported by grants from the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Science Foundation. She is a fellow of the American Academy in Rome and a recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for research in Brazil.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.


Submissions Invited for the 11th Annual CUNY Film Festival

(November 19, 2018, New York City)  The New Media Lab at Macaulay Honors College is now accepting submissions for the 11th Annual CUNY Film Festival, which will take place April 12, 13 and 14 in New York City.

Students, alumni and current faculty from every CUNY campus are invited to submit their work online. Short films of up to 60 minutes are accepted in any genre. There is no submission fee and no limit to the number of recent works that filmmakers may submit. Deadline for entries is midnight, January 24, 2019.

Film entries will be reviewed by a jury of noted filmmakers, students, media professionals and actors. Filmmakers whose work is accepted into the festival will have opportunities to promote their films, review the work of their peers, engage with industry professionals, and earn small prizes. Finalists will be notified in late March 2019, and prize winners announced at a gala event April 14.

15 CUNY Film Festival awards will be presented, including the Frederator Animation Award, sponsored by the well-known animation studio. A special jury of students will convene to select the new Students’ Choice Award. Also of note: the LGBTQ Image Award will honor the film that creates a strong positive image for the LGBTQ community.

Films will be screened on Friday, April 12 and Saturday, April 13, with prizes awarded to top filmmakers at a gala event Sunday, April 14. The awards event will include a panel discussion and will take place at Macaulay Honors College, 35 West 67th Street. All CUNY Film Festival events are free and open to the public.

The CUNY Film Festival is the largest and longest-running student-produced film festival of its kind. It was established in 2009 by a group of Macaulay Honors College students to provide a forum for the CUNY filmmaking community: celebrate the diversity of its artistic voices, highlight its creative contributions to filmmaking, and encourage professional connections. The festival as grown since its grassroots beginnings, attracting more entries and attendees than ever in 2018; and this year the screenings will take place at Lehman College and at Macaulay.

In addition to its importance to the filmmaking community, the CUNY film festival is run by students and provides a framework for experiential learning as they plan and produce a major public event. New Media Lab Director Robert Small says, “the festival’s production crew is made up of media students who spend the semester handling production duties, social media promotion, event management and much more for the festival.”

For more information and submission information, please visit cunyff.org

Macaulay Honors College at The City University of New York offers exceptional students a uniquely personalized education with access to the vast resources of the nation’s largest urban university and New York City itself. Selected for their top high school records and leadership potential, Macaulay students receive a full-tuition scholarship, a laptop and technology support, and an Opportunities Fund to pursue global learning, research and service opportunities. Macaulay students enroll in one of eight CUNY senior colleges (Baruch, Brooklyn, City, Hunter, John Jay, Lehman, Queens and Staten Island).

Directed by industry leader and award-winning producer Robert Small, the Macaulay New Media Lab is an atelier-style learning center where students actively engage in content development for all screens (e.g. TV, tablets, phones). They incorporate user engagement methods to create content and also learn about production models for digital studios, prototypes and pitches, digital deal-making, creation of a new media bible, and selling content to multiple distribution channels.

Contact:
Robert Small
Director, Macaulay New Media Lab
robert.small@mhc.cuny.edu
917.570.2992


JOHN JAY VIDEO PRODUCER WINS HBO FILM AWARD

John Jay Video Producer Wins HBO Film Award

You might not notice Sebastian Rea at John Jay events, but that’s probably because he’s behind a camera videotaping you, your friends, and your colleagues. “As a video producer here at John Jay, my job is to tell stories of student success through a more narrative or documentary lens, highlighting the students and faculty who are working in the field,” says Rea. He’s filmed everything at John Jay, from students helping the people of Puerto Rico, to graduating seniors celebrating at commencement. But when he’s not busy creating videos for John Jay, he’s writing, directing, and producing his own films. His most recent film, Ruta Viva, just won Best Short Film at the HBO New York Latino Film Festival.

Behind the scenes on the set of Ruta Viva

Behind the scenes on the set of Ruta Viva

 

“The film is a dark comedy. It talks about politics and how presidents divide families.” —Sebastian Rea

 

Laying the Foundation 
Rea fell in love with films when he was just three or four years old, watching Batman Returns. “My whole life after that I would tell everyone that I wanted to be a director,” says Rea. He admired the work of directors such as Tim Burton, and made it his life mission to break into the industry. At just 16 years old, Rea created his first film and was one of 20 students chosen to be a part of the Latino Smithsonian Center’s Artist Group. “I spent the whole week in D.C. meeting a bunch of people in film and entertainment that were people of color,” says Rea. “They were Latino like me and I could relate to them on a more personal level.” He went on to work at Silver Cup Studios, “carrying cables and lights on the set of Sex and the Cityand The Sopranos,” and then going to SUNY Purchase where he received a bachelor’s in Film and Political Science.

Ruta Viva Poster

Ruta Viva Poster

 

“What happens in the film happened to me in real life. I was born in Ecuador, raised in New York City, and spent my summers in Ecuador.” —Sebastian Rea

 

Telling His Story
By creating films like Ruta Viva, Rea feels that he’s giving the Latinx community a new voice. “What happens in the film happened to me in real life. I was born in Ecuador, raised in New York City, and spent my summers in Ecuador,” says Rea. His film captures a family—some coming back home to Ecuador from New York City, and some still residing in Ecuador—discussing both American and Ecuadorian politics. “The film is a dark comedy. It talks about politics and how presidents divide families,” says Rea, who admits to always feeling “in flux” when he’s in either country. “When I go back to Ecuador—no matter that I was born there, and I speak fluent Spanish—everybody calls me a gringo. When I’m here, I’m not white enough to really be in the spaces and be fully accepted because I’m not white.” At its core, the film captures what it means to be an immigrant, and how families come together, regardless of their differences, to overcome obstacles and support each other.

Rea teaching children in Haiti about filmmaking

Rea teaching children in Haiti about filmmaking

“I think our whole purpose on this planet is to find out what our meaning is. What is our goal? What can we really do to affect change?” —Sebastian Rea

 

Follow Your Dreams 
For students interested in following in his footsteps, Rea has a few pieces of advice: Don’t let anyone stop you, and network like your livelihood depends on it—because it does. “I think our whole purpose on this planet is to find out what our meaning is. What is our goal? What can we really do to affect change?” says Rea. “I understand that we have to work, and sometimes work isn’t aligned with your passion, but you have to make the time.” To help others realize their dreams of becoming film makers, Rea runs a film festival in New York City called 30 Under 30. “I started it six years ago and it came from the lack of space for young filmmakers to have our work critiqued, shared, and connected with others,” says Rea. He’s also taken his talents to underserved populations with The Brewer Foundation. This past May, Rea, along with a team of doctors, athletes, and social media artists, visited children in Haiti. “They loved the camera. So now we’re talking about making a section of this trip focused on teaching them filmmaking,” he says. And, in keeping with his goal of being a cinematic voice for today’s Latinx community, Rea is currently working on a new short film about the separation of children at the border. “It’s going to be a comedy, a magical realistic comedy,” he says. “You realize that these kids are not criminals. They’re not smugglers. They’re kids. I’m going to fuse Hispanic culture with magic in the film. Hopefully it will be good.”

Listen to the entire interview with John Jay Video Producer Sebastian Rea

Click here to watch the Ruta Viva trailer


M.F.A. Fiction Program Faculty Member Sigrid Nunez Wins National Book Award for Fiction

Her novel The Friend beat out stiff competition at the awards ceremony on November 14 at Cipriani Wall Street in New York.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

<p>Adjunct Professor Sigrid Nunez's National Book Award–winning novel, <em>The Friend</em>, explores the life of a woman suffering after the loss of her best friend and mentor, and burdened with caring for the unwanted dog he left behind. Photo by Marion Ettlinger.</p>

Adjunct Professor Sigrid Nunez’s National Book Award–winning novel, “The Friend,” explores the life of a woman suffering after the loss of her best friend and mentor, and burdened with caring for the unwanted dog he left behind. Photo by Marion Ettlinger.

Sigrid Nunez, an adjunct professor in the Brooklyn College M.F.A. Fiction Program, won the National Book Award for her novel The Friend last evening at a ceremony at New York’s Cipriani Wall Street. The award judges called the novel an “exquisitely written and deeply humane exploration of grief, literature, and memory.”

“I was very surprised to make it onto the long list and then the short list,” says Nunez, still reeling from having actually won the award. “I’m very grateful.”

Nunez began instructing in the college’s M.F.A. Fiction Program in fall 2014.

“I enjoyed teaching my first class so much because the students were excellent,” Nunez shares. “So when I was asked to continue teaching at the college, I was very eager to do so. My experiences with Brooklyn College students have been wonderful. They are truly talented.”

The program in which Nunez teaches is one of the most competitive and revered in the nation, attracting and producing a host of acclaimed writers.

“Nunez is a brilliant writer and an important figure in the literary world,” says Joshua Henkin, award-winning author, professor, and coordinator of the M.F.A. Fiction Program. “She teaches the reading seminar to our first-year M.F.A. fiction students, and she engages and challenges them in all the right ways. We are extremely fortunate to have her on our faculty.”

Born to and reared in New York by German and Chinese-Panamanian parents, Sigrid Nunez has published six novels, including A Feather on the Breath of GodThe Last of Her Kind, and Salvation City. She is also the author of Sempre Susan: A Memoir of Susan Sontag. In addition to her recent National Book Award win, Nunez is the recipient of four Pushcart Prizes, a Whiting Writer’s Award, a Berlin Prize Fellowship, and two awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters: the Rosenthal Foundation Award and the Rome Prize in Literature.

Sigrid Nunez’s website contains more details about her work. More information about the Brooklyn College M.F.A. Fiction Program is available on the program’s website.

Brooklyn College is able to provide its students with the most exceptional faculty experts to help them hone their artistic skill thanks in part to the generosity of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. Learn about the various ways to contribute to student success through the foundation.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora, 212.662.9939


CCNY Grove School duo wins Thornton Tomasetti engineering scholarships

 

Lee Petrella Memorial Scholarship recipient Abraham Rubel.

Grove School of Engineering seniors Abraham “Avi” Rubel and Xinbin Xu are the recipients of scholarships from international engineering firm Thornton Tomasetti. The awards were established by the Manhattan-based company in memory of former executives and City College of New York alumni Lee Petrella ’80, and Daniel A. Cuoco ’67.

Rubel is the winner of the 2018 Lee Petrella Memorial Scholarship and Summer Internship. The award provides a $5,000 scholarship and a paid internship to a civil engineering major. Rubel, who’s specializing in structures, interned with Thornton Tomasetti’s Structural Engineering practice last summer.

Thomas Scarangello, Thornton Tomasetti chairman and CEO, said competition for the Petrella Scholarship had been fierce, and stands as a testament to Petrella’s dedication as a mentor and brilliant engineer. “Our structural engineering team thoroughly enjoyed collaborating with Avi throughout his summer internship in our New York office and we look forward to his continued academic success.”

A leader in the firm’s Structural Engineering practice, Petrella was a vice president in Thornton Tomasetti’s New York Madison Avenue office when he died in 2012. He spent more than 30 years with the company and was involved in many of its signature projects. These include the Shanghai Tower in China, New York’s World Financial Center and Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan. He graduated from CCNY with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering.

Xu is the winner of the Daniel A. Cuoco Endowed Memorial Scholarship.  It provides $5,000 annually to a structural engineering student.

Cuoco’s career with Thornton Tomasetti spanned 40 years. The former president and CEO helped establish the firm as a world leader in structural design and forensics. Cuoco, who died in 2014, was an early adopter of emerging technologies, such as building information modeling, and was an active mentor to young engineers.

“As we at Thornton Tomasetti continue to celebrate the life of Daniel Cuoco, we are proud to provide top engineering students like Xinbin with a scholarship in Daniel’s memory that will help them achieve their goals and move forward in their careers,” said Scarangello.

Daniel A. Cuoco Endowed Memorial Scholarship recipient Xinbin Xu

About The Grove School
Established as The City College School of Technology, the Grove School is celebrating its centennial. Approximately 3,300 students pursue degrees at the baccalaureate, masters and PhD levels in seven disciplines: biomedical engineering, civil engineering, chemical engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering and mechanical engineering. Named for Andrew S. Grove, ’60, one of the founders of Intel Corp., it is the only public school of engineering within New York City and one of the most diverse engineering schools in the nation.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CCNY’s Marlene Camacho-Rivera is a Herbert W. Nickens Faculty Fellowship recipient

Marlene Camacho Rivera is a Herbert W. Nickens Faculty Fellowship recipient

Marlene Camacho Rivera, a Herbert W. Nickens Faculty Fellowship recipient.

Marlene Camacho-Rivera, assistant professor, CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York, focuses her research on improving chronic disease self-management in the areas of asthma and cancer within urban minority communities. As a Herbert W. Nickens Faculty Fellowship recipient, Camacho-Rivera will continue her research in those areas receiving recognition for her contributions to underrepresented ethnic and racial minorities in medicine.

Given by the Association of American Medical Colleges, the fellowship recognizes an outstanding junior faculty member who has demonstrated leadership in the United States in addressing inequities in medical education and health care; has demonstrated efforts in addressing educational, societal, and health care needs of racial and ethnic minorities; and is committed to a career in academic medicine.

Camacho-Rivera’s asthma research includes the development, implementation and evaluation of mobile health technologies and wearable devices to improve asthma education and medication adherence among minority adolescents and adults with asthma. She is also a co-investigator on the Bedford-Stuyvesant and Bushwick Cancer Health Impact Program.

As the course director of sociomedical sciences, Camacho-Rivera teaches minority health and health equity topics through an assets-based framework. She serves as an investigator and faculty mentor within The City College of New York and Memorial Sloan Kettering Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity program, and she is currently evaluating the integration of social determinants of health topics within the medical curriculum and serves as the chapter representative within the Social Medicine Consortium’s Campaign Against Racism.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY Board Of Trustees Chairperson Thompson, Chancellor Rabinowitz Welcome Amazon To NYC, Emphasize University’s Commitment To Provide Pipeline For Talent

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio today announced an agreement with Amazon for the company to establish a new corporate headquarters in Long Island City, Queens. The transformational project will generate an estimated $27.5 billion in city and state revenue over 25 years and create some 40,000 jobs by 2034, with an average salary of $150,000. The agreement includes commitments to build a 10,000-square-foot onsite employment center to connect New Yorkers with jobs and training, and CUNY students stand to benefit from this welcome pathway to tech careers.   

CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. said: “The City University of New York is thrilled to be a lead partner in Amazon’s exciting headquarters expansion, which promises to have a transformative impact on New York City’s economy and our collective ability to spur employment opportunities and growth. CUNY is America’s largest urban university system, and we will commit our considerable college assets to ensure that Amazon has a strong pipeline for talent, ideas and innovation.”

CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz said: “CUNY stands ready to work with Amazon and our partners in government to provide skilled graduates ready to compete for Amazon’s 40,000 new jobs. We look forward to contributing the talent and creativity of our faculty, staff and students to shape a wide-ranging collaboration over the years.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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PROFESSOR MONICA VARSANYI’S NEW BOOK WINS AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY AWARD

Professor Monica Varsanyi’s New Book Wins American Society of Criminology Award

In November 2018, Monica Varsanyi, Professor of Political Science, along with her co-authors, will receive the 2018 Outstanding Book in Policing Award by the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Division of Policing. Titled Policing Immigrants: Local Law Enforcement on the Front LinesVarsanyi’s book uses data from three national surveys, to analyze the role of law enforcement within current society. “When we started this research back in 2009, there wasn’t a lot of data. There was this energy to try to get local law enforcement involved in immigration and a lot of police chiefs didn’t know what to do,” says Varsanyi. “Our study was the first to provide this information to people.” With chapters covering immigrant policing, conflicting politics around immigration control, and the understanding between community members and law enforcement, this book offers insight on localized immigrant policing and provides recommendations on how we can move forward. We sat down with Varsanyi to learn more about her book, the ASC award, and the advice she has for John Jay students.

Q: What is the role of local law enforcement in policing immigration?

MV: The role of police in immigration enforcement varies across the country. It’s what we call a patchwork of approaches. For much of the 20th century, the federal government was in charge of immigration enforcement. First it was through Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), and then in 2003, INS turned into U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). As a result of laws passed in 1996, the federal government reached out to local police agencies and offered for them to get involved in immigration enforcement. What ended up happening was that some police agencies across the country wanted to do more immigration enforcing and some agencies did not, because they wanted to be a sanctuary—a place that wouldn’t get involved in immigration enforcement. The role of police depends on where you are. There are some places that are enforcement oriented and other places that embrace their immigrant population.

 

“Research has shown that in places with restrictive policies on immigration—where police are working closely with immigration enforcement—immigrants are far more likely not to speak to law enforcement.”—Monica Varsanyi

 

Q: How have the actions of local law enforcement helped shape the immigration policies that we have today?

MV: Over the last decade, there has been a lot of research done showing that in places with policies reaching out to their immigrant communities and doing community policing—neighborhood foot patrol, meetings in churches and schools, and anonymous hotlines—have immigrants that are more likely to speak to them. Research has shown that in places with restrictive policies on immigration—where police are working closely with immigration enforcement—immigrants are far more likely not to speak to law enforcement. If you have places where immigrants will speak to law enforcement and places where they won’t, that doesn’t just affect the immigrant community, but impacts the community as a whole. For example, if somebody is a victim of a crime and an immigrant witnesses it, if that immigrant fears deportation and takes off, it’s going to have an impact on everybody. In pro-immigrant places, police have found that public safety is upheld at a higher standard than in places that have a more restrictive approach where public safety ultimately suffers.

Varsanyi's book Policing Immigrants

The cover of Varsanyi’s book

Q: How do the views of immigrants in different communities shape the way local law enforcement police those areas?

MV: The data we used came from three national surveys of police chiefs and sheriffs, where approximately 800 responded. We also did case studies in seven cities across the country like Dodge City, Kansas; New Haven, Connecticut; and Salem, Oregon. Generally speaking, in those places, the police were not swayed by the political feelings of the community. We had a set of survey questions that asked police chiefs to share their opinions about a certain issue and contrast that with what they believed their community thought about that issue. In one case, the police chief felt that it was important to gain the trust of the community, and had the impression that his community didn’t feel that way. In most cases, the police are a less tied to the politics of their areas.

Q: How is the relationship between law enforcement and communities important in policing immigration?

MV: If an immigrant is a victim of a crime like domestic violence and they know that the police are focused on immigration enforcement, it dampens the relationship between police and immigrant communities because immigrants won’t want to speak to police. Mainly, the immigrants just have fear that they will be swept up in deportation. One of our case studies was in Braille, Durham, North Carolina. The city police had a non-cooperation policy in place, but the county in which the city was located was a little more enforcement oriented. The county is where the jail is. From the late 2000s to the 2010s, the program Secure Communities was implemented in every jail across the country—it is mandatory; no one can opt-out of it. What this program does, is anyone who gets arrested and brought into jails, gets screened against immigration processing even if they are ultimately not guilty of a crime. People become afraid that they are going to get deported. In places like North Carolina, individual officers knew that if they arrested someone, and took them to jail, that the person would be screened for immigration violations. Even though the city couldn’t maintain less cooperation with ICE, individual officers had discretion about who they arrested.

Q: Why is the topic of policing immigration important for the John Jay community?

MV: There are a lot of people in the John Jay community who have some connection to policing. Being aware of the dynamics of immigration and policing across the country is an important part of one’s training, especially if they are heading into law enforcement. Certainly having knowledge of this issue and being trained in it is an important thing. From the immigration side, John Jay has lots of immigrants who are part of our student body and it’s incredibly important for them to understand these dynamics as well.

 

“Don’t feel isolated or alone in these issues. There are really vibrant groups of scholars in immigrant communities who are struggling with the same problems and working on these issues, so no one should feel alone.”—Monica Varsanyi

 

Q: You received an award from the ASC, how did you feel when you first found out?

MV: I was incredibly honored. There are four co-authors on this book and we were very proud that the work we did is impacting people and providing them with good information. When we started this research 10 years ago, not many people had information about this topic. At the time we were publishing white papers and research reports, and sending them to the people who answered our surveys to tell them what we found. Getting this award brings more attention to the book and shows that people want to know more. We are delighted that this book is having an impact, particularly given the policy of this moment. We just want to get the word out there and make sure people are informed.

Q: What advice can you offer to the John Jay community to help find a way forward with immigration issues?

MV: Be as informed as possible. Don’t feel isolated or alone in these issues. There are really vibrant groups of scholars in immigrant communities who are struggling with the same problems and working on these issues, so no one should feel alone. Everyone should do what they can to feel informed and empowered through that information.


CUNY SPH researchers test a web-based tool to encourage good nutrition among urban youth

young boy using a tablet computerChildhood obesity is a serious public health challenge in the United States, especially among black and Latino adolescents. The pervasive use of technology and new media among this population creates a unique opportunity for a targeted health intervention through these avenues.

With this in mind, CUNY SPH doctoral students Sandra Verdaguer and Katrina F. Mateo and Associate Professor May May Leung of Hunter College led a study of black and Latino children in East Harlem on the usability of prototypes of an interactive, tablet-optimized manga-style comic tailored to promote increased intake of fruits and vegetables or water. The results were published in JMIR Formative Research.

The researchers recruited English-speaking Latino and black children ages 9 to 13 to participate in two rounds of usability testing to provide feedback and identify problems to help inform final development of the web-based tool. The study found the overall experience with the tool to be positive, especially related to storyline, sound effects, and color schemes. Feedback from the participants resulted in a navigation guide being added, clickable icons being made more visible, graphic designs improved and programming errors corrected.

“Future usability testing of web-based tools with youth should consider using dyad sessions since the interaction between participants while they both use the tool can lead to richer feedback,” says Verdaguer.

The finalized tool was recently tested in a two-group randomized study, the initial findings of which will be presented in March at the 2019 Society of Behavioral Medicine meeting in Washington, DC.

Verdaguer S, Mateo KF, Wyka K, Dennis-Tiwary TA, Leung MM. A Web-Based Interactive Tool to Reduce Childhood Obesity Risk in Urban Minority Youth: Usability Testing Study. JMIR Formativ Res2018;2(2):e21 DOI: 10.2196/formative.9747


CUNY SPH faculty awarded fellowship from University of Alcalá in Spain

Associate Professor Diana Romero (left) and Distinguished Professor Luisa N. Borrell

Associate Professor Diana Romero (left) and Distinguished Professor Luisa N. Borrell

CUNY SPH faculty Diana Romero and Luisa N. Borrell were awarded the Giner de los Ríos Visiting Scholar fellowship from the University of Alcalá (UAH) in Madrid, Spain. The professors will travel to Madrid for eight weeks in 2019 to work with UAH faculty on research initiatives.

The fellowship is targeted towards internationally-recognized investigators to strengthen research collaborations within the departments and institutes at UAH and to promote collaborations with international universities. The fellowship is given to 20 investigators every year. The awards facilitate collaborations as part of a memorandum of understanding between UAH and CUNY SPH.

Dr. Romero is Associate Professor and Chair of the Community Health and Social Sciences department. Dr. Borrell chairs the department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and was recently named Distinguished Professor by the CUNY Board of Trustees.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, Week of November 12, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Hoping you have had a meaningful Veterans Day and extended weekend.

School Photo days begin tomorrow, Tuesday, November 13 and continue through Tuesday, November 20.

Please refer to this schedule to find out when your child will have their school photo taken.

  • Grades K-5 will take photos with their homerooms
  • Grade 6-7 will take photos with their homerooms
  • Grade 8 will take photos with their Period 1 classes
  • Grades 9 – 11 will take their photos during their English classes
  • Seniors have already taken their photos

Thanksgiving Recess is coming up!
School will be closed on Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 in celebration of the holiday. Please note: Wednesday, November 21 is a rapid dismissal day there will be NO After3 or SONYC programs in session.

Parent Teacher Conferences are right around the corner after we return from Thanksgiving Recess.
NEST+m follows the high school schedule for these conferences; we will hold Parent Teacher conferences on Thursday November 29th from 4:45pm – 7:45 pm and on Friday, November 30th from 12:40pm – 2:40pm.

Please note the following important details:

  • On Friday, November 30, all students will be dismissed at 11:30am. DOE and private buses will leave school after the 11:30am dismissal – please make schedule adjustments accordingly. Transportation questions for DOE buses should be directed to Marcy Duran at MDuran22@schools.nyc.gov. Private bus questions should be directed to your parent bus coordinator.
  • Both days will be rapid dismissal days and NO After3 or SONYC programs will be in session.
  • The PTA will post Parent Teacher Conference Sign-Up sheets on Friday, December 16 at 10:00am. You can visit this page of the PTA website to sign up for a conference time for your child. Questions about the sign-up sheets? Email vpdatamanagement@nestmpta.org

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Term 1 Marking Period 1 ends on Wednesday November 14th.
  • PTA Meeting: Thursday, November 15 at 8:30am in the Cafeteria.
  • SLT Meeting: Tuesday, November 20 at 4:10pm in the Library.
  • Thanksgiving Break: Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 – school closed. Wednesday, November 21 is a rapid dismissal day (no After3 or SONYC programs in session)
  • Lower Grade Principal’s Coffee: Tuesday, November 27 at 8:30am
  • Middle Grade Principal’s Coffee: Wednesday, November 28 at 8:30am
  • Upper Grade Principal’s Coffee: Friday, November 30 at 8:30am
  • Parent Teacher Conferences:
    – Thursday November 29th – 4:45pm – 7:45 pm – Rapid dismissal, no After3 or SONYC programs in session
    – Friday November 30th – 12:40pm – 2:40pm – dismissal at 11:30am; no After3 or SONYC programs in session


Music major Will Fisher wins Evelyn Buckstein Scholarship

Evelyn Buckstein Scholarship recipient Will Fisher

Evelyn Buckstein Scholarship recipient Will Fisher.

Music major Will Fisher of The City College of New York has played guitar since he was eight-years-old. With dreams of working in the music industry, Fisher chose to enroll in CCNY’s Sonic Arts Center Music and Audio Technology Program to develop his producing and composing skills. As the recipient of the Evelyn Buckstein Scholarship, Fisher will continue to pursue his passion graduating with the Class of 2019.

The Buckstein Scholarship was endowed in 2007 by CCNY alumna Evelyn Buckstein, BMI Foundation board member and retired BMI assistant vice president and counsel. The program annually awards full tuition to a gifted CCNY music student who aspires to a career in professional songwriting, composition, performance and/or music education.

Fisher, a Brooklyn-based multi-instrumentalist, producer, composer and DJ, performed in a variety of different orchestras and ensembles at Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School for the Performing Arts, including pit orchestra, where he played guitar and bass in productions of “Sweet Charity” and “Grease.”

Fisher has numerous DJ credits under his belt. He also co-producer Rah-C‘s latest EP “Grey Matter,” and he plays bass for singer-songwriter Julian Giaimo.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
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CUNY Partners With ReUp Education to Bring Back Stopouts

ReUp announces its official partnership with City University of New York (CUNY) to re-enroll “stopout” students and give them a second chance at earning the most powerful tool for social mobility: an undergraduate degree.

ReUp’s mission is to improve social mobility for underserved populations and help university partners address the “completion crisis” facing America’s higher education system. Over 37 million Americans have some college but no degree, with roughly half of all college students dropping out of school.

“We look forward to partnering with ReUp in this important effort to address the completion crisis in American postsecondary education,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. RabinowitzA college degree is a primary driver of social mobility, but too many students end up putting their education on hold indefinitely. We want these so-called‘stopout’ students to come back, and with this partnership we will learn how best to persuade them.”

ReUp uses a unique blend of proprietary technology, data and personalized coaching to engage and help re-enroll stopout students. Many of the students who benefit from ReUp’s interventions have stopped out of colleges or universities that are public or have low tuition rates. Through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, ReUp is able to bring its services to underrepresented populations and develop a scalable, yet personalized, approach to engaging these students.

A core component of the Gates grant process was to identify a university partner aligned with the goal of meaningfully addressing the stopout crisis across a diverse and large population of students. Through a rigorous and competitive application process, ReUp selected CUNY as the ideal partner through which the largest impact could be made. CUNY colleges are among the top-ranked colleges on the social mobility index, with a student population that is one of the most diverse in the country and includes a large proportion of non-traditional learners. “We’re so excited to partner with CUNY to find new, innovative ways to address the stopout issue at scale and guide students back toward degree completion,” said ReUp CEO Sarah Horn.

To maximize the opportunity for learning, ReUp and CUNY have worked together to create a controlled study around the engagement of stopout students. ReUp has been given a list of 20,000 CUNY students who completed some coursework but dropped out before completing their degrees. An additional 20,000 students who match the ReUp criteria are being tracked by CUNY in order to compare results with the ReUp cohort. “We call this ‘The Science of Re-Entry’ and we’re excited to share the best practices with the broader educational ecosystem,” Horn added.

About CUNY

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

About ReUp Education

At ReUp, we support students who have taken a break from school, and often face a myriad of challenges – financial, social, and academic – that keep them from finishing. We clear the path for students to go back to school, complete their remaining credits, and graduate. ReUp is the expert in understanding, engaging, and re-enrolling stopout students. Through its unique blend of data, technology, and specialized coaching, ReUp has engaged more than 100,000 stopout students across a wide range of universities, and helped re-enroll over 4,000 students. ReUp is based in San Francisco, and is funded by leading education and social impact investors, including Entangled Ventures, University Ventures, Serious Change Investments, and The Impact Engine. ReUp has also received a grant from the Gates Foundation to create scalable solutions to help increase graduation rates.

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Baruch College Named to ScholarMatch 2018 College Honor Roll

One of the “standout” schools across the country for “going above and beyond” for first-generation and low-income students

Baruch College was named as one of the 375 schools in the U.S. selected for the 2018 College Honor Roll by ScholarMatch, a nonprofit founded by author Dave Eggers to make higher education possible for low-income and underserved youth.

The 2018 College Honor Roll recognizes schools that are offering “robust student support and are achieving excellent outcomes for this student population.”

In its announcement, ScholarMatch noted that Baruch College, along with the other selected schools, provide “excellent opportunities for low-income and first generation students.”

Each year, ScholarMatch analyzes 1,400 U.S. higher education institutions using public college data to determine which schools offer the most “supportive environments for students whose families earn less than $50,000 per year.” It then grades the schools in four categories: financial aid, academics, student support, and post-grad affordability.

Continued Recognition for Social Mobility Succcess

This latest recognition from ScholarMatch adds to Baruch College’s growing roster of accolades for advancing social mobility among its students.

In October, Baruch College ranked #1 on CollegeNET’s Social Mobility Index for the fourth consecutive year. The index analyzes “how effectively [schools] enroll students from low-income backgrounds and graduate them into well-paying jobs.”

Two months prior, Baruch College ranked #1 for social mobility among four-year public institutions, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2018 Almanac. The Chronicle’s list was drawn from findings from The Equality of Opportunity Project, a widely reported study of colleges’ impact on social mobility by a team led by Harvard economics professor Raj Chetty (formerly of Stanford University).

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Veterans Look To CUNY For Affordability, Quality And The Range Of Supports Available To Them On Campus

CUNY Veterans Look to Future
Veterans and reservists are increasingly looking to the City University of New York as a cost-effective conduit through which they can pursue their educational objectives and establish their careers. CUNY currently serves some 3,237 former service members enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs across the University’s 25 campuses, a number that has grown by 50 percent since 2010.

CUNY’s affordability enables veterans and active service members to make the most of their VA benefits, and students tout the supports they can receive on each campus. CUNY offers guidance for veterans who are transitioning to college life, focusing on students’ individual needs. Veterans are connected with housing and job opportunities, financial education and opportunities for recreation and fitness. Campus veteran clubs allow students to help each other navigate the challenges of campus life. Veterans and reservists alike say they feel a strong connection to, and camaraderie with, other students who have shared their experiences.

“CUNY is proud of its student-veterans and the accomplishments and rich life experience they bring to our campuses,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The increasing number of veterans who choose CUNY is a testament to the services and resources we provide to support their success. We welcome them and proudly acknowledge their achievements.”

There is a veteran affairs representative for each campus, ensuring that student veterans and reservists receive support for the duration of their CUNY experience. Veterans returning from active duty often find their lives have changed significantly over the years they have been gone. To help veterans get through these times, CUNY’s Office of Veterans Affairs helps them find housing and health care, get academic support, conduct job searches and prepare for interviews, manage personal finances and even find adult-care services for parents who have aged.

“The support [student veterans] will need tends to be very individualistic and can range from needing assistance in figuring out VA benefits, receiving tutoring in a subject they are struggling in, or helping them with balancing finances,” said Laura Scazzafavo, director of veteran services at the College of Staten Island. In recognition of its support for veterans who have been wounded in combat, CSI has been designated a “Purple Heart University” by the Military Order of the Purple Heart, a Congressionally chartered veterans organization. “Veterans, as they transition out of the military, struggle with the absence of regimentation, being left on their own to follow their own schedules and make their own decisions,” Scazzafavo said. “They sometimes need to be told what to do, or given guidance and pointed in the right direction.”

When U.S. National Guard member Larisa Yegorova enrolled at Medgar Evers College last spring to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in biology, the Brooklyn campus did not yet have an Office of Veterans and Military Service like the one Yegorova had utilized while she completed an Associate’s degree at LaGuardia Community College. That changed in July, when Medgar Evers opened its own OVMS, and Yegorova immediately noticed the difference. “Not having it made me feel just how important it is,” said Yegorova of the OVMS, which celebrates its formal grand opening on Nov. 13. “Since this office opened, it’s been a big benefit.”

Jazmin McBride, the Veteran and Military Service coordinator at Medgar Evers, noted that the office, which also serves as a study lounge and meeting space, enables veterans to give each other a lift. “Students are super-resilient; they know how to adapt,” said McBride. “But when they’re not able to do that, they come to the veterans lounge, talk with other student veterans and, through those interactions, they find support.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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New CCNY Mellon Mays Fellows embark on doctoral path

Mellon Fellows_2018

Four of CCNY’s six 2018 Mellon Mays Fellows from left: Fiorella Garrido-Lecca, Kiran Baldeo, Abraham Arriaga and Kendrick Zapata.

Fiorella Garrido-Lecca spent part of the summer in her native Peru researching gender-based violence and how women resist it. At UCLA, her fellow City College of New York sociology major in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, Abraham Arriaga, explored the phenomenon of pet ownership by a subgroup of the homeless population.

The two juniors are members of the latest cohort of Mellon Mays Fellows at   City College. Six CCNY students have been awarded 2018 fellowships in the national program that paves the way to doctoral careers for students from traditionally underrepresented groups and others with a demonstrated commitment to the goals of MMUF. Isabel Estrada, program director at CCNY, is proud of the progress of their research since they were selected last spring.

Since 2001, support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is credited for guiding more than a dozen talented CCNY graduates to PhDs in the humanities and social sciences. There are now more than 17 Mellon Mays Fellows from CCNY in the pipeline, thanks to approximately $2 million in funding to date from the Mellon Foundation.

Following are briefs on CCNY’s 2018 Fellows and their research focus:

Abraham Arriaga
The son of Mexican immigrants, Arriaga spent six weeks at UCLA. He looked at how animal companions diminish their homeless owners’ feeling of otherness, act as barriers and provide a sense of home and family outside of socially constructed understandings.

Kiran Baldeo
history major, Baldeo’s study of Guyanese identity focuses on why Guyanese of Indian descent and East Indians are perceived as one in the U.S. The junior is studying their respective migration histories to see how it’s shaped their different identities.

Fiorella Garrido-Lecca
The Colin Powell School undergraduate’s goal in studying gender-based violence and how women resist it is to contribute to the existing Peruvian literature on the topic in order to increase the resources available for women and the community.

Alexander Huaylinos
Another Colin Powell School student, Huaylinos’ concentration is   anthropological archaeology. His current research focuses on the theory of the Anthropocene as a framework for investigating and analyzing long-term effects of human modifications to river systems and coastal regions once inhabited by indigenous peoples.

Abir Petiwala
A CUNY Baccalaureate major with concentrations in Middle Eastern and French studies, Petiwala has been accepted into the Mellon Mays/University of Cape Town January Program. “Decolonizing the humanities and universities in Africa,” “the politics of identity,” and “urban spatial segregation,” are some of the program themes.

Kendrick Zapata
Zapata is pursuing a combined BA/MA degree in history before working toward a PhD in American studies. He focuses his research on masculinity with emphasis on how masculinity in the 21st century is being transformed by feminism. He’s also exploring how toxic notions of manhood perpetuated by men contribute to male gun violence, suicide, and depression.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


AMERICA’S FIRST WORLD WAR II DOMINICAN VETERANS MONUMENT DEDICATED AT BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE

In all of the United States, there has never been a tribute to the hundreds of courageous American servicemen and servicewomen of Dominican heritage who fought for the freedom of their country and the world during World War II.

Until now.

On Friday, November 2, on the campus of Bronx Community College, the ribbon was cut on the nation’s first “World War II Dominican Veterans Monument.” Beneath a thick canopy of clouds, leaders from the Bronx and the Dominican Republic hailed the new addition to the New York City landscape and the 351 heroes whose names are carved into its façade.

Following a bilingual invocation and performances of the national anthems of the United States and the Dominican Republic, the event opened with remarks from BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “Bronx Community College is a Hispanic Serving Institute,” the president noted. “Given the role that BCC plays in the Bronx and our location in University Heights, home to many in New York City’s thriving Dominican community, we are very pleased to be the site of this monument.”

Calling the monument “a gift to us all,” Vice Chancellor of The City University of New York Judy Bergtraum added “I hope that visitors from many places will come here to Bronx Community College to experience it, especially in these polarizing times when our nation is divided and our core values are threatened.”

Also on hand was New York City Council Member Fernando Cabrera, the driving force behind the monument — it was through his efforts that BCC was awarded $400,000 in state and local funding to erect the structure in front of Nichols Hall on the main campus walk.  “More than 300 Dominican men and women risked and sacrificed their lives for the United States during World War II,” observed Council Member Cabrera. “These soldiers have been largely left out of U.S. history and I believed their rightful and public recognition was long past due.”

The names inscribed on the monument, which include a Tuskegee Airman and a bronze and silver star winner, were identified through a joint effort between Bronx Community College and the Dominican Studies Institute, researched by a CUNY Dominican Studies Project called “Dominicans in New York.”

Family members of the honored men and women also spoke. “Sometimes this country forgets the power and the contributions of the immigrant people,” said Angelica Infante, the granddaughter of veteran Juan Infante, who enlisted to fight in World War II when he was almost 40. “We as Dominicans are extremely proud of our accomplishments. We are a mighty community. We too are Americans.”

“This is a proud day for all Americans whose loved ones fought bravely for our freedom,” said Dr. Gerrard P. Bushell, President and CEO of the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY). “DASNY is pleased to honor the sacrifices so many have made for our country and construct this memorial. To display it on Bronx Community College’s beautiful campus is a privilege.”

Other speakers included U.S. Representative Adriano Espaillat, New York State Assembly Member Victor M. Pichardo and a delegation of ten Dominican and Dominican-American leaders, led by Carlos Castillo, Consul General of the Dominican Consulate in New York.

Following the dedication, a reception was held at BCC’s Roscoe Brown Student Center, where guests were serenaded by a Bachata band and enjoyed Dominican delicacies and fond memories of those whose names are now immortalized in marble.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, Week of November 5, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

I hope you have enjoyed a beautiful fall weekend!

The Whole Child Committee will be hosting a screening of the documentary, Screenagers, tomorrow evening at 6:30pm in the Auditorium; all are welcome. Learn more about this important documentary here. Also, please remember that Tuesday, November 6th is Election Day. It is a day of professional learning for faculty but there is no school for students.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Election Day: Tuesday November 6th is Election Day. No school for students.
  • Veterans Day: Schools are closed Monday November 12th in observance of Veteran’s Day.
  • Term 1 Marking Period 1 ends on Wednesday November 14th.
  • Thanksgiving Break: Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 – school closed. Wednesday, November 21 is a rapid dismissal day (no After3 or SONYC programs in session)
  • Parent Teacher Conferences:
    – Thursday November 29th – 4:45pm – 7:45 pm – Rapid dismissal, no After3 or SONYC programs in session
    – Friday November 30th – 12:40pm – 2:40pm – dismissal at 11:30am; no After3 or SONYC programs in session

Baruch College to Celebrate International Education Week on November 12-16

Fun activities, entertainment and a career and networking night among the free events

Baruch College is celebrating International Education Week (IEW) on Nov. 12-16. This week-long event is an opportunity to celebrate culture, diversity and all the benefits of international education and exchange across the world.

IEW is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences.

Baruch is hosting a wide range of campus events that include interactive activities such as trivia and workshops, information sessions, career nights, forums and panels, and various entertainment options. The College’s International Student Service Center is working with multiple campus departments, including the Office of the Dean of Students, the Confucius Institute for Global Finance at Baruch College, National and Prestigious Fellowship Advising, STARR Career Development Center, the International Student Organization, and Conversation Partners Program, to host these activities.

The majority of events are free and open to students, faculty, alumni, and the community of Baruch College. To RSVP for certain events and learn more about IEW, visit here.

Schedule: November 12 – 16

All Week Long:

  • Contest! Instagram and Twitter Photo (Use hashtag: #BaruchIEW2018)
  • Global Map Display: pin the map, show where you were born or where you are coming from, and take a trip around the world Baruch-style (NVC, 2nd floor lobby)

Monday, November 12:

  • Opening Day Celebration (9:30-10:30 a.m.; and 4:30-5:30 p.m., NVC 2nd floor lobby)
  • Say My Name: Pronouncing our Chinese and Chinese Heritage Students’ Names Workshops (12:30-1:30 p.m., Library Building, Room 763)
  • Global Connections at The Residence Hall (7:00 p.m., 1760 3rd Avenue, New York, NY)

Tuesday, November 13:

  • Global Fun Fair (12:30-2:15 p.m., NVC, 2nd floor lobby)
  • Fulbright Fellowship International Exchange Programs – Information Session (1:00-2:00 p.m., NVC, Room 3-160)
  • Career Night for Undergraduate international students and networking (5:30-7:30 p.m., NVC, Room 14-270)

Wednesday, November 14:

  • Diplomatic Forum with the Ambassador of Kenya to the UN (12:30-2:15 p.m., NVC, Room 2-125
  • Peace Corps Panel (12:30-2:00 p.m., NVC, Room 14-270)
  • International Movie Night (6:00-9:00 p.m., NVC, Room 2-125)

Thursday, November 15:

  • International Trivia and Dumpling Day (12:30-1:45 p.m., NVC, Room 14-250) $2 entry fee.
  • Prepare Before You Go! A Workshop for International Students and Scholars (12:30-2:15 p.m., NVC, Room 8-155)
  • Career Night for Graduate international students and networking (5:30-7:30 p.m., Library Building, Room 750)

Friday, November 16: off-campus

  • Theater Outing: ‘Someone Who’ll Watch Over Me’ (7:00 p.m., Cherry Lane Theatre, 38 Commerce Street, New York, NY) $11 fee for theater ticket.

# # #


The Cultural Landscape Foundation Includes the Hall of Fame for Great Americans at Bronx Community College in Its “Landslide 2018: Grounds for Democracy” Preservation Initiative

NOVEMBER 5 — The Cultural Landscape Foundation has announced that The Hall of Fame for Great Americans on the campus of Bronx Community College (BCC) will be added to its “Landslide 2018: Grounds for Democracy” initiative. The goal of this year’s annual Landslide is to bring public attention and action to endangered sites that are key to understanding and remembering the struggles for civil and human rights in the United States. It dovetails with BCC’s own campaign to restore the colonnade.

The Hall of Fame is one of a group of structures on the BCC campus designed by the legendary architect Stanford White and constructed at the turn of the last century when the campus was then the grounds of New York University. The 96 busts of notable national figures placed between its columns are a highlight of this oldest hall of fame in the country. In 2012, White’s Beaux Arts creations were designated a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior.

In naming the Hall of Fame to its list of at-risk sites, the preservation-minded Washington, D.C.-based Cultural Landscape Foundation observed “the Hall of Fame for Great Americans is at once the birthplace of fame as an American democratic ideal and the backdrop for mid-century activism by persons of color. As current debate intensifies regarding who and what should be the subject of public commemoration, the Hall of Fame stands as a monument to another ideal: that there is one common, American concept of greatness. But the Hall is in dire need of repairs if it is to survive to reflect a more inclusive image of that ideal.”


EMILY TARRATS (’93) MAKING HER MARK AT THE U.S. POSTAL INSPECTION SERVICE

Emily Tarrats (’93) Making Her Mark At The U.S. Postal Inspection Service

 

Since graduating from John Jay, alumna Emily Tarrats (’93) has had a successful career with the United States Postal Inspector Service. We spoke with Tarrats to learn more about what she does as a U.S. Postal Inspector, her career staying-power, and her advice for current John Jay students.

Finding Her Career
As a John Jay student, Tarrats never considered a career in law enforcement. “When I began at John Jay, I was completely undecided about what to study. Then I declared Forensic Psychology as my major in my third year,” says Tarrats. After graduating, and concerned about job opportunities, she decided to step outside of her comfort zone and attended a John Jay career fair. “I approached the recruiters with an open mind and found an organization that interested me,” says Tarrats. After speaking to many recruiters, Tarrats was captivated by the way inspectors of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service described their work. “The organization ensures the public’s trust in the U.S. Mail,” says Tarrats. “They look into mail theft, fraud cases, and assist during hurricane recovery efforts.” Currently employed by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Tarrats has been happily working for the organization for 17 years. “Postal Inspectors have a lot of autonomy, and you have the ability to prioritize your work,” she says. “You can start in mail theft, work your way up to mailings and narcotics, and then work in security fraud investigations.”

“Postal Inspectors have a lot of autonomy and you have the ability to prioritize your work. You can start in mail theft, work your way up to mailings and narcotics, and then work in security fraud investigations.”—Emily Tarrats, ’93

 

A Typical Day
Describing what her day looks like, Tarrats highlights the many assignments she has. “Some of my tasks include: managing cases, responding to complaints and allegations, and conducting interviews and investigations,” she says. Tarrats shares her enjoyment for the day-to-day handling of an investigation, while emphasizing her commitment to staying involved with the public. “I have the ability to engage with the public while actively contributing to the mission of the organization. I enjoy talking to Postal Inspector candidates and participating in recruitment initiatives. I also assist in hurricane recovery efforts,” she says. Throughout her career, Tarrats has learned to develop and strengthen her public speaking skills. This helps her provide the public with information, while also guiding new Postal Inspectors.

Advice For Students 
Remembering how her career began, Tarrats encourages younger students to take a chance on different job possibilities. “Many students have their hearts set on just one organization without exploring the opportunities others can offer,” she says. “Go to different career fairs, take different interviews that you might not have though of. Approach everyone you can, and try to find out everything about an agency or a business.” Tarrats also stresses the need for students to be unafraid in asking for help when they don’t know about a potential career. “Students need to engage in conversations and ask questions of other students and professors. Talk to other career representatives about their journey and their career experiences. You never know what it can lead to, for me it was a career that’s lasted almost two decades.”


CUNY School of Medicine hosts Mini-Medical School on flu prevention

Mini-Medical School to discuss flu prevention

Mini-Medical School to discuss flu prevention.

The CUNY School of Medicine (CSOM) will host its tenth Mini-Medical School on Wednesday, Nov. 14, to discuss how to stay healthy during the flu season.

This session, entitled “”Public Health Impact of Influenza: Why You Need To Get an Annual Flu Vaccine” and presented by Dr. Jane R. Zucker, Assistant Commissioner of the Bureau of Immunization at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, will explore the importance of getting an annual flu shot and other ways to prevent getting the flu.

The talk, which is free and open to the public, will take place on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 5:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m., at the CCNY Campus North Academic Center (NAC) Ballroom. Click to RSVP.

Mini-Medical School provides an opportunity to explore various health topics, empowering members of the Harlem community with the knowledge to actively take part in their healthcare. With no prior educational requirements, information is presented in an engaging, easy-to-understand style by health professionals and experts in related fields.

Save the date for the next CSOM Mini-Medical School: “Opioids Everywhere: A Practical Guide to Understanding & Combatting the Current Crisis” on Dec. 12th. The presentation will be led by Howard Greller, MD, St. Barnabas Health Systems.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.


Presentation on Moral Courage During the Holocaust by Pulitzer Prize-Nominated Author and Pioneering Psychologist Eva Fogelman

Queens College Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration
Sunday, November 11, 2 pm | Goldstein Theatre

Fogelman, the Daughter of Holocaust Survivors, Developed New Approaches for Counseling Survivors and Their Descendants

WHAT:
The annual Queens College Kristallnacht commemoration, presented by the college’s Center for Jewish Studies and Sinai Chapels of Fresh Meadows, invites participants to recommit to combating anti-Semitism and hatred.

Eva Fogelman will deliver the keynote address on Moral Courage During the Holocaust: Implications Today. A pioneer in the development of counseling methods for Holocaust survivors and their families, Fogelman is also a Pulitzer Prize-nominated author and a contributing producer of an Academy Award-nominated documentary.

The program, which is free and open to the public, will include a candle-lighting ceremony with Holocaust survivors and their descendants. There will also be a multicultural invocation and audiovisual and musical interludes, including performances by Townsend Harris High School students, and Sara Kahan, who will sing the national anthems of the United States and Israel.

WHERE:
Goldstein Theater, Kuperberg Center for the Arts, Queens College
65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Directions | Campus Map

Background: In aiming to be the premier community resource for Jewish intellectual endeavor in the Queens-Long Island area, the Center for Jewish Studies at Queens College has become one of the best-known in the country. Through its outreach and research exploring the more than three millennia of Jewish civilization, the center bridges the college’s academic Jewish studies program and the community. Its attractive educational and spirited cultural programs on campus—lectures, symposia, conferences, film festivals, and artistic performances—are open to the public, most at no cost.

Sinai Chapels of Fresh Meadows, Queens, is a funeral home serving New York’s Jewish community for four generations. It is owned and operated by Michael Resnick and his family. The Resnick family and Sinai Chapels are proud to support the Jewish Studies Program at Queens College and this special Kristallnacht commemoration.

About Eva Fogelman
Born in a displaced persons camp in Kassel, Germany, to Holocaust survivors, Eva Fogelman is a renowned psychologist, author, and filmmaker, and a pioneer in treating the psychological effects of the Holocaust on survivors and their descendants. She is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated book Conscience and Courage: Rescuers of Jews During the Holocaust, which explored the psychology and history of the people who defied German law during the Third Reich, and co-editor of Children During the Nazi Reign: Psychological Perspectives on the Interview Process. Fogelman wrote and coproduced the award-winning documentary Breaking the Silence: The Generation After the Holocaust and was a contributing producer of the Academy Award-nominated documentary Liberators: Fighting on Two Fronts in World War II.

One of the first psychotherapists to lead counseling groups for the children of Holocaust survivors, Fogelman established the first such group at the counseling center at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. As a research associate at that university, she compared Holocaust survivor families with control groups. At Brandeis University, she conducted more extensive research on the second generation of Holocaust survivor families and organized the First International Conference on Children of Holocaust Survivors in 1979 in New York City.

Together with Rabbi Harold Schulweis, Fogelman founded the Jewish Foundation for Christian Rescuers. Originally an Anti-Defamation League project, it is now known as the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous. She has written for professional and popular publications and serves on the board for the American Gathering and Federation of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Their Descendants; Hadassah Women’s Study Center at Brandeis University; Counseling Center for Women in Israel; Volunteer Training Institute for Mental Health, Child Development Research; and Hidden Child Foundation (Anti-Defamation League), among others.

Fogelman earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Brooklyn College and a master’s degree from New York University in rehabilitation counseling. She received advanced training in family therapy at the Boston Family Institute and psychoanalytic/psychotherapy training at Boston University Medical School. She earned her PhD from the CUNY Graduate Center in social/personality psychology. Her doctoral dissertation was entitled The Rescuers: A Socio-psychological Study of Altruistic Behavior During the Nazi Era.


BMCC Stages 14, a Free Play That Opens Dialogue on Undocumented Immigration

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNYDepartment of Speech, Communications and Theatre ArtsOffice of Academic Affairs and BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (BMCC TPAC), with support from the BMCC Foundation, will present on November 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18, a free production of José Casas’ play, 14, directed by Professor Daphnie Sicre.

Each performance is open to the public and will be held at BMCC in Theater 2, 199 Chambers Street. The play will be followed by talk-back sessions with the director, playwright and others.

The play 14 is based on a true-life event in which a smuggler abandoned over 20 Mexicans crossing the desert near Yuma, Arizona, resulting in 14 of them dying of dehydration, says Professor Sicre. A talk-back session will follow each performance, giving the audience a chance to engage in conversation linking the play with issues such as immigration and activism.

The cast and crew of 14 include present and past BMCC students and faculty. The creative design team, in addition to Daphnie Sicre, director, includes David Givens, stage manager; Elizabeth Chaney, scene designer; Dominic Crescente, assistant to the stage manager; Saundrell Davison, sound designer; Alex Vasquez Dheming, lighting designer; Bertie Ferdman, dramaturg; Norris Girdy, graphic designer; Vanessa Leuck, costume designer; Dania Miguel, assistant director; Jermaine Rowe, projection designer, and Karl O. Williams, theatre coordinator.

There are no reservations for 14 and seating is limited. Admission is free. Some parking is available. For more information, call the BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center box office at (212) 220-1460.

Performance and talk-back schedule

Wednesday, November 14, 2 p.m., followed by Why Is 14 Relevant Today?, a talk-back with José Cases and Daphnie Sicre, moderated by Bertie Ferdman.

Wednesday, November 14, 7 p.m., followed by Activism. How to Get Involved? The New Sanctuary Coalition of NYC,a talk-back with José Casas and Mariá Donoso Macaya, moderated by Daphne Sicre.

Thursday, November 15, 7 p.m., followed by Why Is 14 Relevant Today?, a talk-back with José Cases and Daphnie Sicre, moderated by Karl O’Brian Williams.

Friday, November 16, 7 p.m., followed by Activism. How to Get Involved? RAR’s Immigration Committee, a talk-back with Alvin Eng, moderated by Daphnie Sicre.

Saturday, November 17, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., followed by talk-back sessions after the 2 p.m. matinee.

Sunday, November 18, 3 p.m., followed by Reflections on the Show and Today’s Status Quo, a talk-back with the cast, moderated by Daphnie Sicre.


CCNY presents MLK50: “Let Freedom Ring,” Nov. 13

MLK50: Let Freedom Ring

MLK50: Let Freedom Ring is brought to you by CCNY’s Division of Humanities and the Arts and will take place on Nov. 13 in Aaron Davis Hall at 7:30 p.m.

The City College of New York’s Division of Humanities and the Arts presents MLK50: Let Freedom Ring. The event, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 7:30 – 9 p.m. in the Marian Anderson Theatre of CCNY’s Aaron Davis Hall, commemorates the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in April 1968.

Inspired by King’s teachings on dignity, freedom and equality, the commemoration includes remarks by City College President Vince Boudreau and a performance of John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” by CCNY’s Faculty Jazz Ensemble featuring professors Suzanne Pittson and Mike Holober.

In addition, jazz studies major Antonio Ciacca will perform “MLK Suite,” an original composition for a large jazz ensemble and chorus; students, from the Department of Theatre and Speech, will read some of King’s speeches; while English majors will read original poetry.  There will also be screenings of excerpts from “Selma.”

“MLK50: Let Freedom Ring,” is free and open to the public. Please RSVP at City College Center for the Arts, or call 212-650-6900 for more information.

CCNY’s own personal connection with MLK and his legacy dates more than 50 years ago when he was the Class of 1963 commencement speaker.

Later, his widow Coretta Scott King became the first female commencement speaker in CCNY history when she addressed the Class of 1971.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e: aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY SPH faculty to present at the CUNY IT Conference

Ashish Joshi

Dr. Ashish Joshi

CUNY SPH faculty Ashish Joshi and Ann Gaba were selected to present at the 17thAnnual CUNY IT Conference, which will be held November 29 and 30 at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Dr. Joshi, Senior Associate Dean of Student and Academic Affairs, will present the Student Workflow Information Management System (SWIMS) which he recently designed, developed and implemented at CUNY SPH. SWIMS is a student recruitment platform that uses informatics to strategize the admissions process. It has several components including data collection, data processing, data integration, data visualization and data communication. The system will assess the effectiveness of various approaches to graduate student recruitment and can be used to inform other graduate school admissions processes.

Dr. Gaba, Assistant Professor of Environmental, Occupational, and Geospatial Health Sciences, will present a web-based simulated hospital unit for pre-professional training of nutrition and dietetics students and interns through the ACE platform. The simulation mimics a general medical or surgical unit, including ten diverse patients “admitted” with various medical problems, their medical records, and animated short videos of patients and family members interacting with dietitians and medical residents. The on-line, virtual hospital unit will address educational needs in a unique, accessible and cost-effective way.

Learn more about the 2018 CUNY IT Conference here.

 

Dr. Ann Gaba

 


The role of schools of public health in building community partnerships

20 Community-Based Organizations located in Harlem, New York.

Schools of public health tend to be located in or near communities with limited resources and the relationship is often one sided, with schools exhaustively researching the communities without providing solutions or funds for long-term public health initiatives. This can eventually leave communities reticent to work with schools.

In a commentary published in the Journal of Community Health, CUNY SPH Assistant Professor Meredith Manze describes how CUNY SPH worked to forge relationships with community-based organizations (CBOs) when the school was founded in Central Harlem in an effort to establish engagement with its new community.

Facultyin the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences identified four CBOs whose mission aligned with the school’s research and service priority areas (sexual and reproductive health, maternal and child health, food policy, and HIV/AIDS) and invited their representatives to participate in a public panel discussion which took place in April of 2017. During the discussion, CBO representatives shared their vision for the role of CUNY SPH in the community and how a reciprocal relationship could thrive.

In the year since the discussion, CUNY SPH has achieved several of the initiatives discussed at the panel. It has connected students with CBOs for their fieldwork internships, collaborated with CBOs for MPH students to write grant proposals on their behalf as part of their coursework, created an online tool for locating health and social services and programs in Central Harlem, and partnered on a grant application where faculty can serve as program evaluators.

“Intentionally establishing strong relationships with community organizations from the start creates meaningful opportunities for collaboration and cooperation down the line,” says Manze. “Without help from these organizations, much of our work would not be possible.”

Manze, M., Maroko, A., Aguirre-Molina, M., Palmedo, P.C. J Community Health (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-018-0586-


The role of sexual identity and attraction in teen pregnancy

young pregnant woman leaning against wallTeen pregnancy is often associated with significant financial and social burdens. Rates of teen pregnancy among sexual minority adolescents are estimated at two to seven times greater than those of their non-sexual-minority counterparts, yet population-based research is scarce on pregnancy among adolescent sexual minority women (ASMW; women who identify as lesbian or bisexual).

To examine whether sexual attraction is an important predictor of sexual minority adolescent pregnancy, Dr. Margaret Paschen-Wolff, a graduate of the doctoral program at CUNY SPH, led a study stemming from her doctoral thesis which was published with CUNY SPH Faculty Christian Grov and Elizabeth Kelvin in the journal LGBT Health.

Using data from the 2002 to 2015 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), the researchers compared pregnancy among ASMW versus non-ASMW by sexual identity, attraction, and experience separately, and in a combined model in which interaction of aspects of sexuality and survey cycle was tested. The combined model was then stratified by survey cycle.

The study found that sexual minority identity and sexual minority attraction individually predicted higher pregnancy odds, although the difference was not significant in the combined model. Additionally, although sexual minority attraction predicted significantly decreased pregnancy odds in the combined 2002 to mid-September 2013 NSFG data, sexual minority attraction predicted increased odds of pregnancy in the rest of 2013-2015.

“The results suggest the importance of measuring sexual attraction when examining pregnancy disparities among ASMW,” says Paschen-Wolff.  “Attraction may be a particularly important component for measuring adolescent sexual orientation over and above sexual identity or experience since adolescents may not want to affix an identity label to their sexuality or may not yet have had partnered sexual experiences. Sex education and teen pregnancy prevention programs should take sexual diversity into account for all adolescent women.”

Margaret M. Paschen-Wolff, Elizabeth A. Kelvin, Brooke E. Wells, and Christian Grov. Sexual Orientation and Pregnancy Among Adolescent Women… LGBT Health, 31 Oct 2018


BMCC Mourns Loss of Former Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has lost one of its long-time community members.

Sadie Bragg, who served as Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs at BMCC till her retirement in 2014, passed away on Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at Harlem Hospital, New York, N.Y.

Dr. Bragg earned an M.A. and Ed.D. from Teachers College, Columbia University, and joined BMCC in 1970 as a mathematics lecturer in the Manhattan Opportunity Center (MEOC). In 1982, she joined the faculty of the BMCC mathematics department and in 1989, became the college’s Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for Curriculum and Instruction. In 1996, Dr. Bragg was promoted to the role of Vice President of Academic Affairs and in 2014, she retired as Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs. 

Sadie BraggCrop

Dr. Bragg served under five BMCC presidents, and her longest tenure was with Antonio Pérez, president of BMCC from 1995 to August 2018. “Sadie Bragg was totally dedicated to the college and ensuring that our students had all the opportunities to succeed,” said Pérez. “She was an accomplished mathematician, author, loyal colleague and friend.”

Actively involved in mathematics education at local, state and national levels, Dr. Bragg authored or co-authored over 60 mathematics textbooks for K-14 as well as numerous other publications, presentations and papers. She served on committees including the Advisory Board to the Education and Human Resources Directorate of the National Science Foundation (NSF). She was instrumental in leading two-year colleges into a global dialogue through the International Congress of Mathematics Education (ICME), and partnered with George Ekol, a mathematics educator from Uganda, to present at the ICME conference in Monterey, Mexico in 2008.

At BMCC, Dr. Bragg worked closely with faculty and staff to meet the needs of BMCC students through Phi Theta Kappa, ASAP and other groups. Recognized for her service to the field, she was awarded the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges (AMATYC) Mathematics Excellence Award in 2010.

Upon her retirement in 2014, Dr. Bragg planned to tutor children in afterschool mathematics programs and spend more time with her family and friends.

Memorial Service and Funeral Arrangements

Sadie Chavis Bragg (1944-2018)

Celebration of Life Memorial Service

Wednesday, November 7 at 10 a.m.
Abyssinian Baptist Church
132 Odell Clark Place (formerly 138th Street)
New York, NY 10026

Funeral

Saturday, November 10 at 11 a.m.
Metropolitan Baptist Church
1021 Halifax Street
Petersburg, VA  23803

The funeral will be followed by a repast at Comfort Suites Southpark, 931 South Avenue, Colonial Heights, VA 23834.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that any donations be made in memory of Sadie Chavis Bragg to BMCC Foundation, Inc. or  The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.


JOHN JAY STUDENTS PRESENT AT INTERNATIONAL CRIMINOLOGY CONFERENCE IN BOSNIA

John Jay Students Present at International Criminology Conference in Bosnia

Students in John Jay’s International Criminal Justice (ICJ) BA major participated in the European Society of Criminology conference held in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, at the beginning of this fall semester. The theme of the conference was Crimes Against Humanity, which is also a key focus area for the ICJ program. Students Raymond Hilker, Amina Majeed, Cynthia Moreno and Aline Shaban had the opportunity to submit research papers on this theme and make presentations at the conference – with faculty support and guidance, particularly Professor Mangai Natarajan, who participated in the conference as well.

John Jay students and Professor Natarajan at the Srebrenica Memorial

Srebrenica Memorial

This was the first exposure to an international conference for the undergraduate students, especially in a country that is still rebuilding after the genocide. One of the most horrific international crimes, the Bosnian genocide resulted in the death of more than 100,000 people (80 percent of them Bosniaks). The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), created by the U.N. Security Council in 1993, was the first international body to prosecute the genocide, among other war crimes.

John Jay students at the Srebrenica Museum

Srebrenica Memorial

The ICJ students also visited Srebrenica, “a city of refuge” created by the United Nations, where more than 40,000 people sought shelter from war when the Serbian army began their assault. They visited the memorial honoring the 8,000 people who died in the first wave of killings. As Professor Natarajan noted, “you become numb with sadness when you see the scale of the crimes.” The students rounded out their unique experiential learning opportunity with a visit to the Genocide Museum in Sarajevo. It was a moving experience for the participating students, and it all started with the conference, where they networked with international scholars, received feedback on their research presentations, and identified opportunities to publish their papers in journals and speak at international universities.


CCNY’s Pamela Laskin wins international fiction prize

Why No Bhine (Why No Goodbye) cover rendering (art by Bashar Ericsoossi)

Why No Bhine (Why No Goodbye) cover rendering. Art by Bashar Ericsoossi.

Pamela Laskin, a lecturer in the English Department at The City College of New York, is one of two winners of Leapfrog Fiction’s International Contest for 2018 for her book, Why No Bhine (Why No Goodbye), a young adult novel in verse. The story is told from the point of view of a fourteen-year-old boy who has been left behind in Myanmar when his mother and three of his siblings escaped to Malaysia. The boy, Jubair, writes angry letters to his mother, which she will never get to see. Meanwhile, his mother manages to smuggle letters to him, but he never reads them; he is too enraged over what he perceives to be his abandonment.

The Rohingya Muslims, around whom the novel unfolds, are the target of intense racial profiling, political persecution and genocide. Laskin has worked closely with Fortify Rights, a human rights organization in that regional area whose explicit mission is the protection of Rohingya citizens.

The book will be published in Fall 2019 by Leapfrog Press, a New York based imprint founded by the authors Marge Piercy and Ira Wood.

Laskin also directs CCNY’s Poetry Outreach Center and teaches Children’s Writing in the MFA Division. She is the author of five books of poetry, several picture books, and the lyrical novel Ronit & Jamil, a Palestinian/Israeli reimagining of Romeo and Juliet.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.


CUNY Expands Partnership With Tech Talent Developer Revature, Paving Way For All Grads To Work In Software Engineering Fields

City University of New York graduates will have the opportunity to participate in a free, four-week introductory coding course that could open the door to a career in software engineering thanks to a newly expanded partnership between the University and Revature, a leading technology talent-development company.

The partnership, Revature at CUNY, was launched in 2016 and gives students hands-on experience with the latest and most in-demand technologies. Revature recently added SPARK, a no-cost program designed for graduates of all majors who want to pursue a career in technology but have little or no prior coding experience. Participants who complete a four-week, instructor-led online course can be hired by Revature to participate in an immersive 12-week onsite training program. The next SPARK online training session begins on Nov. 27, and the deadline to apply is Nov. 17. See revature.com/spark for more information and to apply.

“CUNY’s partnership with Revature has paved the way for many of our students to launch a career in technology,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The new SPARK program will open up Revature’s invaluable training programs to every CUNY graduate, regardless of their academic emphasis or prior tech experience, and should greatly expand the success of this relationship.”

More than 100 CUNY graduates who majored or minored in STEM subjects have already been hired and trained by Revature, and moved into careers as software engineers, developers and analysts at Fortune 500 companies and large system integrators.

Among those who have benefitted from Revature at CUNY is AnnMarie Bemberry, who graduated from Medgar Evers College with an English degree in June 2017, then participated in a pilot version of the SPARK program and went on to join Revature’s Women in Technology program.

“The knowledge I have gained in such a short time is truly remarkable,” said Bemberry, who is currently working as a developer for a large software consulting firm in North Carolina. “While I will go through my entire career constantly learning new skills and concepts, Revature has provided me with an excellent, well-rounded foundation that will give me context for everything I do beyond this point.”

CUNY also offers Revature’s custom online course training, RevaturePro, to all current CUNY students and alumni. The free online training supports all levels, from beginner to advanced, and includes software development languages such as Java and Microsoft.NET, among others. Revature has ambitions to offer Revature at CUNY programs to students in each borough, and to hold another women’s boot camp in 2019.

“This was the first public-private partnership to substantially address the technology skills gap and we are proud of what we have jointly accomplished,” said Joe Mitchell, executive vice president at Revature. “Through our partnership, we have benefited greatly from hiring many talented CUNY graduates and we are delighted to see how working together has positively impacted the careers and lives of the graduates we hire. Launching the SPARK program for CUNY graduates will provide us with a platform to hire many more CUNY graduates and meet the growing demand from our corporate clients for highly skilled software engineers.”

Approximately half of the CUNY alumni who have already taken advantage of Revature’s training program have done so at the Campus Tech Incubator at Queens College, and more than a third of those were graduates of Queens College.

“Because Queens College was the first to host Revature as part of the CUNY partnership — and serves more undergraduate computer science majors than any other college in New York City — the success rate of our alumni is deeply gratifying,” said Queens College President Fėlix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Nearly all are now employed in both the private and public sectors nationwide.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

Revature is a technology talent development company providing a turn-key talent acquisition solution for corporate and government partners and no-cost coding immersion programs for university graduates. We recruit, develop and deploy enterprise-ready technology talent, enabling our corporate partners to succeed and grow. With its unique talent development strategy, Revature successfully serves a wide range of Fortune 500 enterprises, government organizations and top systems integrators.

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Ribbon Cutting Reception for Leonard & Claire Tow Center for the Performing Arts Recognizes the Contributions of Dr. Leonard Tow ’50 and Other Distinguished Guests

The state-of-the-art, LEED-certified building will house Brooklyn College’s Department of Theater and Conservatory of Music, and serve as hub for arts and culture in the borough.

By KEISHA-GAYE ANDERSON

Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson (left), Leonard Tow ’50, and Executive Director and President of the Tow Foundation Emily Tow Jackson cut the ribbon at a ceremony celebrating the opening of the Leonard & Claire Tow Center for the Performing Arts.

A ribbon cutting reception for the new Leonard & Claire Tow Center for the Performing Arts welcomed distinguished guests Leonard Tow ’50, who, together with his wife, the late Claire Tow ’52, donated $10 million toward the construction of the center; public relations mogul Don Buchwald ’59, for whom the 225-seat theater inside the complex is named; and officials from the New York State, New York City, and The City University of New York (CUNY). Both Tow and Buchwald are members of the Brooklyn College Foundation Board of Trustees.

“The new Leonard & Claire Tow Center for the Performing Arts is a magnificent addition to our beautiful campus,” said Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson. “This cutting-edge facility will serve as a much needed nexus of creativity for our talented students, as well a vibrant center for arts and culture in the borough.”

Sitting at the intersection of Campus Road and Hillel Place, the center provides a spectacular new entrance to the 35-acre campus, where many of the more than 18,000 Brooklyn College students access the college daily. The building was designed by Pfeiffer Architects, which worked closely with faculty and administrators from both CUNY and Brooklyn College to create a structure that transforms the interface between the college and its vicinity, while meeting the pressing needs of the Department of Theater and the Conservatory of Music, which are now housed in the center.

A scenic evening view of the new Leonard & Claire Tow Center for the Performing Arts.

Central to the building is the 225-seat multi-purpose Don Buchwald Theater, which provides a stage extension and seating lifts, and retained the old Gershwin Theater stage but with new variable acoustics and an acoustic shell. The space can quickly go from a proscenium theater to a classically shaped concert hall, and can accommodate a full orchestra.

The Tow Center also features a 30-foot-high orchestra rehearsal room on the second level that doubles as a performance and rehearsal space; a Performance and Media Interactive Arts (PIMA) Program sound lab; a scene shop for set construction; nine music studios; three percussion practice rooms; and a recording studio.

Through their foundation, Leonard and Claire Tow have contributed generously to their alma mater, where they first met. For more than two decades, The Tow Foundation has provided endowments for student internship programs and student scholarships. They have also supported faculty travel fellowships, and undergraduate travel stipends for students to conduct research outside of the United States.

 

Brooklyn College is able to provide its students with the state-of-the-art learning environments they need to flourish in their artistic and career endeavors thanks to the generosity of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To learn about the various ways to contribute to student success, please visit the foundation website.

 

CONTACT: Ernesto Mora, 212.662.9939


Andrew Sloin Awarded Dorothy Rosenberg Prize from the American Historical Association

First book authored by Professor Sloin at Weissman School of Arts and Sciences among this year’s winners from more than 1,500 finalists

Andrew Sloin, assistant professor at Baruch College's Department of History

Andrew Sloin, an associate professor of history at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, was awarded the American Historical Association’s (AHA) 2018 Dorothy Rosenberg Prize for his first book The Jewish Revolution in Belorussia: Economy, Race, and Bolshevik Power.

The AHA offers annual prizes honoring “exceptional books, distinguished teaching and mentoring in the classroom, public history, and other historical projects.” The Dorothy Rosenberg Prize recognizes the most distinguished work of scholarship on the history of the Jewish diaspora published in English during the previous calendar year.

AHA’s prize committee considered more than 1,500 finalists for all of the 2018 awards. Since 1896, the Association has conferred over a thousand awards.

Political Transformation after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917

Sloin’s book focuses on the economic and political transformation of Belorussian Jewry in the aftermath of the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The story follows the arc of Bolshevik history but shows how the broader movement was enacted in factories and workshops, workers’ clubs and union meetings, and on the Jewish streets of White Russia (present-day Belarus).

The book’s characters are shoemakers, speculators, glassmakers, peddlers, leatherworkers, needleworkers, soldiers, students, and local party operatives who joined the Bolshevik project. Sloin emphasizes the fundamental relationship between economy and identity formation as officials dealt with the Jewish Question in the wake of the revolution.

WATCH: In this “Weisman College Talk” video interview, the School’s Dean Aldemaro Romero, Jr. interviews Professor Sloin about his interest in history, teaching students at Baruch College, and his research for his first book.

“What made writing about Belorussia so appealing to me was the fact it was a place in the center of what was the old Jewish-Pale settlement, and so it was the area of the former Russian empire where most Jews were confined legally to reside,” Sloin said in the video. “When the revolutions came in 1917, there was a particular dynamic where you had a revolution that broke out in a multinational region where Belorussians, Ukrainians, Russians, Pols, and Jews played a prominent role in the revolution.

Sloin added, “After the revolution, Jews became a very prominent political factor in both Soviet and Bolshevik party life. And Belorussia actually became one of the few places to recognize Yiddish as one of four national languages. So the national dynamics and history of the region make it a particular unique case that I would argue is quite exceptional for thinking about that tension between politics and nationality in the Soviet Union.”

At Baruch College, Sloin specializes in teaching about Russian, East European, Soviet, and Jewish history. His research focuses on the relationship between economy, politics, and culture in the Soviet Union during the interwar period.

Sloin’s Next Book: Examining the Writing of History

Sloin is working on his second book, which will examine the relationship between the writing of popular history in the transnational Yiddish public sphere and the development of Jewish Socialist politics between 1871 and 1948. This project will utilize Yiddish pamphlets produced in centers of Yiddish life throughout the Jewish Diaspora.

“In this book, I plan to examine how the writing of history itself became an explicitly political practice through which radical intellectuals sought to construct new concepts of community, internationalism, and emancipation in a period beset by recurrent, systemic political and economic crisis,” Sloin said. “The goal of the book is to examine how this new medium of global communication served to create new forms of Jewish, internationalist historical consciousness.”

# # #


U.S. News & World Report ranks CCNY among top schools globally

In its fifth annual rankings of the Best Global UniversitiesU.S. News & World Report places The City College of New York in the top half of the world’s 1,372 elite institutions from 75 countries.  City College is ranked #669, tied with New Mexico State University at Las Cruces.

In addition, U.S. News ranks CCNY #471 [tied with Heriot Watt University of Britain] in its Best Global Universities for Physics. This category recognizes:  “well-regarded universities from around the world (that) have shown strength in producing research in a wide range of topics related to physics – the study of matter and energy. Topics include particle and nuclear physics, mathematical physics, quantum physics and theoretical physics. These are the world’s best universities for physics,” U.S. News emphasizes.

Overall, CCNY is the highest ranked CUNY school. Hunter College, at #853, is second. CCNY also tops several other New York institutions, including Hofstra University (#927) and Fordham University (#1005).

The Best Global Universities rankings were produced to provide insight into how universities compare globally. Since an increasing number of students plan to enroll in universities outside of their own country, the Best Global Universities rankings – which focus specifically on schools’ academic research and reputation overall and not on their separate undergraduate or graduate programs – can help those applicants accurately compare institutions around the world.

Photo credit: Carlos Parker

This is the second major global ranking of universities that CCNY, whose student population hails from more than 150 nations, features in prominently.

Last year, the Center for World University Rankings listed CCNY in the top 1.2 % of more than 25,000 degree-granting institutions of higher education worldwide. CWUR conducts the largest academic ranking of global universities.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


BMCC Prepares to Launch NSF-Funded Summer Research Program

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has received a two-year $227,267 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund a new undergraduate summer research program studying plant products beginning in Summer 2019.

The grant is part of the NSF’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program— which supports active research participation by undergraduate students. BMCC was one of two community colleges in the CUNY system to receive the NSF REU funding. BMCC was also one of ten colleges and research institutions across New York state to receive the award.

Students will receive financial assistance to work one-on-one with their mentors doing hands-on research driven projects. The research they conduct has the potential to advance the current body of knowledge regarding plant products and food science.

Specifically, the aim of the REU project is to analyze the bioactivity of natural plant products at different levels of biological organization.

Science Professors Aldolfina Koroch, Alexander Gosslau and Christine Priano will serve as co- Principal Investigators (PI) on the project. In addition to the three PI’s, five more BMCC faculty will also serve as mentors to one student each throughout the summer. Funding from the grant will allow for summer salaries as well as the stipends for each of the eight students.

“The REU research program is a fantastic opportunity for recruiting and retaining underrepresented undergraduate minority students to learn how to conduct research in our state-of-the-art laboratories at BMCC,” said Koroch.

“Our program also includes boot camps, workshops, field trips, and social events that will not only improve the students’ confidence working in a lab environment, but also support interaction among peers,” Gosslau said.

The three Principal Investigators say the invaluable research experience gained by students during the summer will not only improve their STEM education but also will facilitate a smooth transition to senior colleges or to other important stages in their scientific careers.

“We are truly honored to be recognized by the NSF with this innovative and exciting initiative to increase students’ interest in plant science and to promote the participation of diverse groups in research careers,” said Priano.

The REU mentors and their research projects include: Science Professors Aldofina Koroch (PI), Project: Investigating the potential antioxidant capacity of natural extracts; Alexander Gosslau (PI), Project: “Effects of natural extracts on the stress response”; Christine Priano (PI), Project: Effect of natural extracts on microbial life in fresh water and marine ecosystems; Brian Raffery,

Project: Effect of natural extracts on microbial life in fresh water and marine ecosystems; Abel Navarro, Project: Use of plant polymers on nutrients and heavy metal; Jun Liang, roject:Effect of natural extracts on modulation of stress response and life span in Caenorhabditis elegans; Lalitha Jayant, Project:Effect of natural extracts on viability of sea urchin eggs and Peter Nguyen, Project, Microbiota and their effects on degradation of a black tea extract


“Zincotron” shines for CCNY at international Chem-E-Car Finals

“Zincotron,” the latest student designed CCNY vehicle to excel at AIChE’s annual Chem-E-Car Competition®.

City College of New York’s student-designed “Zincotron” scored a double at AIChE’s annual Chem-E-Car Competition®, taking third place against foreign and domestic opposition, and winning the Spirit of Competition Award for the fourth year running. Forty teams competed in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers finals at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Zincotron won AIChE’s Mid-Atlantic competition last spring – City College’s third successive victory in that regional event – to qualify for the finals in Pittsburgh. The objective of the Chem-E-Car competition is for students to build a car, the size of a shoebox, which runs and stops at a precise distance via one or more chemical reactions.

In Pittsburgh, cars were required to carry 390 ml of water over 25.3 meters,   with the entry closest to the target distance being declared the winner.

Zincotron was 0.120 m from the target line, the closest a CCNY car has   achieved in competition. The winning team was Georgia Institute of Technology at 0.010 m (1.0 cm) from the target distance, and second was Rutgers University at 0.050 m away.

“The competition was stiff this year, with eight teams reaching within 0.265 m from the target line. Several years ago this would have been sufficient for first or second place,” said Elizabeth Biddinger, assistant professor, chemical engineering, in the Grove School of Engineering, and the team’s faculty advisor.

Other CCNY team members (all chemical engineering majors unless indicated) were:

  • Captain Sujana Shifon, senior;
  • CCNY’s Che-E-Car team with some AIChE officials in Pittsburgh.

    Co-captain Sana Ilyas, junior;

  • Co-captain Sara Rasmussen, junior;
  • Nahida Alam, junior;
  • Adam Chan, junior;
  • Aasif Chowdhury, senior, electrical engineering;
  • Akib Chowdhury, junior, mechanical engineering;
  • Huan Dao, junior;
  • Hamad Haider, senior;
  • Ariella Himelstein, junior;
  • Mir Ahnaf Hussain, senior;
  • Safae El Kaddouri, junior;
  • Valeriya Misyura, junior;
  • Yash Patel, senior;
  • Yifan Qiu, junior; and
  • Fawaz Yusuff, junior, mechanical engineering.

This was CCNY’s sixth straight trip to the AIChE finals. Previous honors include a second place finish in 2013 with “REAKTER,” and Spirit of Competition awards in2014 with “Grover,” 2015 with “RuSTi,” in 2016 with “Iodonator” and in 2017 with “Sulfurious.”

Significant support was provided to the team by the CCNY-based CUNY Energy Institute, the Grove School’s chemical engineering department, faculty and staff; the Metro NY AIChE section and Carl Liggio.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY Newswire 2018-11-01 17:57:16

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) has received a two-year $227,267 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to a fund a new undergraduate summer research program studying plant products beginning in Summer 2019.

The grant is part of the NSF’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program— which supports active research participation by undergraduate students. BMCC was one of two community colleges in the CUNY system to receive the NSF REU funding. BMCC was also one of ten colleges and research institutions across New York state to receive the award.

Students will receive financial assistance to work one-on-one with their mentors doing hands-on research driven projects. The research they conduct has the potential to advance the current body of knowledge regarding plant products and food science.

Specifically, the aim of the REU project is to analyze the bioactivity of natural plant products at different levels of biological organization.

Science Professors Aldolfina Koroch, Alexander Gosslau and Christine Priano will serve as co- Principal Investigators (PI) on the project. In addition to the three PI’s, five more BMCC faculty will also serve as mentors to one student each throughout the summer. Funding from the grant will allow for summer salaries as well as the stipends for each of the eight students.

“The REU research program is a fantastic opportunity for recruiting and retaining underrepresented undergraduate minority students to learn how to conduct research in our state-of-the-art laboratories at BMCC,” said Koroch.

“Our program also includes boot camps, workshops, field trips, and social events that will not only improve the students’ confidence working in a lab environment, but also support interaction among peers,” Gosslau said.

The three Principal Investigators say the invaluable research experience gained by students during the summer will not only improve their STEM education but also will facilitate a smooth transition to senior colleges or to other important stages in their scientific careers.

“We are truly honored to be recognized by the NSF with this innovative and exciting initiative to increase students’ interest in plant science and to promote the participation of diverse groups in research careers,” said Priano.

The REU mentors and their research projects include: Science Professors Aldofina Koroch (PI), Project: Investigating the potential antioxidant capacity of natural extracts; Alexander Gosslau (PI), Project: “Effects of natural extracts on the stress response”; Christine Priano (PI), Project: Effect of natural extracts on microbial life in fresh water and marine ecosystems; Brian Raffery,

Project: Effect of natural extracts on microbial life in fresh water and marine ecosystems; Abel Navarro, Project: Use of plant polymers on nutrients and heavy metal; Jun Liang, roject:Effect of natural extracts on modulation of stress response and life span in Caenorhabditis elegans; Lalitha Jayant, Project:Effect of natural extracts on viability of sea urchin eggs and Peter Nguyen, Project, Microbiota and their effects on degradation of a black tea extract


BMCC Faculty Exhibition Showcases Wide Range of Mediums

Faculty artists who teach in the Art Foundations Program of the Music and Art department at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) will be featured in a group exhibition, In Form, opening with a reception on November 8 from 5 to 8 p.m.

The exhibition, which will be presented in the Shirley Fiterman Art Center (SFAC), 81 Barclay Street in lower Manhattan, will be on display through December 15. Filling the SFAC’s two spacious galleries, it provides an overview of the breadth of works produced in a broad range of mediums by BMCC art faculty.

Crypto by Keegan

“This dedicated presentation underscores the college’s continued support for a growing art department,” said Lisa Panzera, director of the Shirley Fiterman Art Center.

The BMCC Art Foundations Program offers an Associate in Science (A.S.) in Studio Art and Associate in Arts (A.A.) in Art History degree programs. Students take part in their own annual exhibitions and complete arange of courses in studio art, design and art history. Guided by their professors, the students gain the fundamental training required for successful transfer to four-year colleges and build portfolios of work to enable their transition to top art and design schools.

Silver Chronicle by Sarah Haviland

“The faculty can draw on their professional experiences in class and relate to students where they are because we have been in their position as students, too,” says Professor Peter Greenwald, whose work is part of the faculty exhibition and who finds that concepts covered in class echo formal concerns about design and color in his own artwork.

“Pulling the color out of a tone, designing negative shapes as carefully as positive shapes, moving the eye through a composition—these are important ideas that I discuss in class and that I think about outside of class,” he says. “My experience has been that teaching can feed studio work and vice-versa.”

Uibopuu by Tyler

Presenting a variety of approaches to art making, In Formprovides insight into the processes and techniques in use by BMCC faculty, from modes of traditional painting and sculptural form, to installation work, experimental photography and works employing computer technology.

Featured artists

Faculty artists presented in the exhibition include Aisha Tandiwe Bell, Zeke Berman, Gianluca Bianchino, Tess Bilhartz, Bernardo Justin Campoy, Simon Carr, Betty Copeland, Jody Culkin, Elisa Decker, Cathy Diamond, Pat Genova, John Goodrich, Xico Greenwald, Joe Haske, Sarah Haviland, Ann Hjelle, Jayne Holsinger, Alessandro Keegan, Thea Lanzisero, JJ Manford, Michael Paris Mazzeo, Siobhan McBride, Alisa Minyukova, Jung He Mun, Lisa Nicchi, Carol Pereira, Thaddeus Radell, Jessica Ramirez, Kimberly Reinhardt, Julia Res, Judy Richardson, David Rothenberg, Erik Saxon, Adele Shtern, Rachelle Street, Janet Esquirol Sylvan, AC Towery, Terttu Uibopuu, Michael Volonakis and Phillip Weisman.

 

 

Works shown, top to bottom:

  • Cathy Diamond, Vying For, Oil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches 
  • Alessandro Keegan, Through the CryptochromeI, 2018, Oil on linen, 38 x 52 inches
  • Sarah Haviland, Silver Chronicle, Steel, galvanized mesh, wood, cage and rock, 61 x 30 x 30 inches 
  • Terttu Uibopuu, Tyler, 2014, 20 x 16 inches, archival pigment print

 


National Higher Education Leader Kay McClenney to Present Guided Pathways Open Forums

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) is a member of the Guided Pathways 2.0 national effort from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) to improve the learning experience for all students. The Guided Pathways model involves redesigning each part of the student experience, from enrollment to remediation, course completion, graduation and further education or starting a career.

Kay McClenney, American Association of Community Colleges

On November 7, Kay McClenney, AACC Senior Advisor to the President and CEO, will be presenting two open forums to discuss Guided Pathways. Each of the open forums is open to all members of the BMCC community: faculty, staff and students. The open forums are scheduled at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., in Fiterman Hall, Room F-1304.

McClenney has served as a faculty member, program director, system administrator, author and interim CEO during her career. She currently is a senior adviser to the president and CEO of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) as well as an independent consultant and partner in Mc2 Consultants. Throughout her career, McClenney has been recognized as a force in promoting diversity and equity in higher education, often bringing needed emphasis to issues of structural racism and disproportionate outcomes. She has served as a consultant to education institutions, state higher education systems, state government, and professional associations in 47 states and internationally.

Research conducted by the AACC has shown that through Guided Pathways, students are more likely to complete a degree in a timely fashion. In the Guided Pathways model, the students choose a program and develop an academic plan early on. They have a clear road map of the courses they need to take to complete a credential, and receive guidance and support to help them stay on plan.

For more information about the open forums, call the Office of Academic Affairs, (212) 220-8320.


BMCC Presents Significant Findings Speaker Series

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Office of Academic Affairs premiered its speaker series, Significant Findings, October 25 in Richard Harris Terrace at 199 Chambers Street. The series is free and open to the public.

Criminal Justice Professor Shirley Leyro, the first featured speaker, shared initial findings from her research project, CUNY American Dream Machine? Exploring Feelings of Belonging and Membership by CUNY Noncitizen Students.

Twice each semester, BMCC’s Significant Findings speaker series will showcase BMCC faculty scholar research, ideas and conversations of public relevance. The event is supported by the Dr. Joshua Smith Faculty Development Fund, administered by the BMCC Foundation. The next Significant Findings is scheduled for November 8 with Sociology Professor Elizabeth Wissinger.

“Many of our faculty are working on publicly relevant societal issues such as Professor Leyro’s work on the impact of immigration status on belonging and mental health,” said Helene Bach, director of research, BMCC. “We are hoping this event will gain traction and public support and contribute scholarly input from our faculty to discussions that impact our urban communities.”

BMCC Associate Dean of Faculty Jim Berg says faculty often feel isolated from one another and the Significant Findings event offers an opportunity to connect with other faculty.

“Faculty may want to offer support to their colleagues, find out what they are working on, and maybe even find connections to their own work,” said Berg.

Leyro’s research explores how the fear of deportation affects CUNY students.  She found that students who are not facing deportation themselves, are still impacted by the fear that a relative or friend might face deportation.

Immigrant students from 35 countries and varying status—green card holders, undocumented, documented and others—were recruited to the study from CUNY campuses. Survey data was gathered online. Questions centered around a wide range of topics including whether or not participants felt as if they belong, questions of identity and self esteem. Leyro’s findings show anxiety levels and fear related to deportation are high among those surveyed.

“Students who participate in on-campus activities and are involved in college groups feel a higher level of membership than those who do not. However, even among those who say they feel a sense of belonging, students still express sentiments that indicate membership and belonging is tenuous,” said Leyro.

After Leyro’s presentation, Berg led a question- and-answer session between Leyro and audience members. One student’s question illustrated the grim reality many immigrant students worry could impact them, especially in today’s political climate.

The student asked if there were options that might be available in other countries if deportation happens.

Leyro explained that unfortunately, deportation by U.S. Immigration and Customs (ICE) entails apprehension, then being flown back to the immigrant’s native country—nothing else.

CUNY is home to large numbers of immigrant students and Leyro argues that all campuses should provide Immigrant Resource Centers, such as the Immigrant Student Success Center at John Jay College (CUNY). She also says more scholarship money for immigrant students would allow them to stay in school.

“The fact that they are excluded from funding sources that would allow them to stay in school contributes to their anxiety and sense of not belonging– any exclusionary practices would make a student feel that way,” Leyro said.

For more information about services BMCC offers immigrant students, visit the Immigrant Support page.

 

 


BMCC Hosts CUNY English Summit to Share Strategies for Remediation Reform

The annual CUNY English Summit was hosted October 26 by Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), in the Fiterman Hall Conference Center.

CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz joined BMCC Interim President Karrin E. Wilks to welcome attendees from BMCC, across CUNY and community colleges around the country.

The daylong event examined strategies proven to close the achievement gap in English and writing courses. Speakers shared insights on how to scale up—apply successful strategies to a larger segment of students—and implement remediation reform across college systems, and with different groups of students.

CUNY Chancellor Vita Rabinowitz and BMCC Interim President Karrin Wilks

At BMCC, supporting students whose academic success includes remedial requirements is an important component of the college’s Designing for Success initiative.

The complexity—and urgency—of that initiative is echoed by community colleges across the country, and the summit opened with a panel on the national perspective of remediation reform, facilitated by David Crook, Associate University Provost, CUNY.

“Change takes time,” said Maria Cornier of the Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College, Columbia University, who was joined on the panel with Jamey Gallagher of the Community College of Baltimore County, and Summer Serpas of Irvine Valley College and the California Acceleration Project.

Another panel, “The Case for Change: What CUNY Data Tell Us,” featured Michael Guy, University Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies, CUNY, and Sarah Truelsch, Director of Policy Research, CUNY.

Implementing co-requisite instruction—classes in which developmental and credit-bearing content is blended, in order to move students more effectively through remediation—was the subject of a panel facilitated by Caroline Pari-Pfisterer, a deputy chair at BMCC.

Panelists included CUNY professors Heidi Johnsen, LaGuardia Community College; Donna Kessler-Eng, Bronx Community College, and Jane Hindman, Guttman Community College.

“CUNY Start and Faculty: Working Together Toward Transformation” was a panel featuring Susannah Thompson, director of curriculum and instruction, CUNY Start/Math Start, along with participants from Queensborough Community College, CUNY, including David Humphries, Interim Assistant Dean of Faculty; Bonnie Flaherty, CUNY Start/Math Start director; Elizabeth Carroll, CUNY Start instructor and Beth Counihan, a professor of English.

Jamey Gallagher and Summer Serpas presented a lunch workshop on principles of teaching co-requisite writing courses, and BMCC Acting Provost, Erwin Wong, delivered closing remarks.

“Regardless of where we come from, we have a common theme—our commitment to student success,” said Wong. He acknowledged the wide scope of findings and insights presented at the day’s sessions and reminded the audience, “One size does not fit all. If you have just two or three significant takeaways from today’s sessions, that is what might make a difference to the percentage of students in your classes who are not doing as well as they could be.”

Whatever approach is used, “We have to connect with our students,” he said. “Once they know you care, they will work very hard to reach their goals.”

 

 

For more information on strategies to improve remediation outcomes at BMCC, please contact Acting Provost Erwin Wong, ewong@bmcc.cuny.edu.


Forum Energizes Community to Redesign Systems for Student Success

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) faculty and staff filled Theatre 2 on October 16 as they gathered for a community forum led by Interim President Karrin E. Wilks.

President Karrin WilksThe purpose of the forum was to provide updates on BMCC’s  Designing for Successinitiative, collective campus-wide efforts to increase student success “not incrementally, but dramatically,” said Wilks. “We are incrementally improving rates of student retention and graduation but that leaves thousands of students out of the success narrative. We need a sense of urgency and passion in order to improve student success in a more dramatic way.”

President Wilks’ talk was punctuated with two videos telling the stories of recent BMCC graduates, first-generation students who are continuing their higher education at four-year schools. These included business administration alumna Ytzel Flores Cristiansen and video arts and technology alumnus Timothy Rivera.

“These are the kinds of stories we want to increase, and we can’t assume we can do that by doing the same thing that we have always done,” said Wilks. “Our students want degrees. This is what they are telling us. They want upward mobility. We need to redesign what we are doing, in order to create different outcomes.”

Changing strategies, for better outcomes

Retention rates are going down, said President Wilks, and equity gaps are revealed when retention data is disaggregated by race, ethnicity and gender.

“This is the fundamental challenge we need to address, in our planning process,” she said. “We can’t keep doing what we’re doing and achieve a different level of results than this.”

The college’s collective efforts—through five working groups—to buoy student success rates comprise the first phase of BMCC’s Designing for Success initiative, which is part of the BMCC 2015-2020 Strategic Plan: Reaching Greater Levels.

The BMCC Equity and Inclusion initiative is also part of that planning and redesign process.

To put it all in context, President Wilks provided a data-based overview of BMCC student performance in first-year college-level English and math courses and in their three-year graduation rates, disaggregating the data by gender, race and other factors.

The data also reflected students who have reported food and housing insecurity, and the graduation rates of those who have transferred to baccalaureate programs.

Designing for Success Forum 2018

Designing for Success is centered on a core belief that students can learn anything under the right conditions, Wilks said, stressing the responsibility of all BMCC employees, “to make students feel welcome, respected and cared for, through every interaction.”

One data-based strategy for student success, she said, has been to create Guided Pathways for students; degree maps and math pathways for all majors. Another strategy is blending developmental and credit-bearing courses so that students move more quickly and efficiently toward graduation. Other efforts include tuition waiver programs and professional development for faculty—especially adjuncts—and staff.

Working groups and a call for charrettes facilitators

Toward the end of President Wilks’ talk, co-chairs of the five Designing for Success working groups presented their groups’ mission and strategies so far.

The Designing Career Maps working group, which focuses on career development activities inside and outside the classroom and by major, is co-chaired by Sunil Gupta, Mahatapa Palit and Lesley Rennis.

The Implementing Career Communities group, which has helped cluster academic majors by labor market field, is co-chaired by Janet Esquirol, Eda Henao and Michael Hutmaker.

The Redesigning Onboarding group, which examines student experience from their earliest interest in BMCC to enrollment and registration, is co-chaired by Joel Barker, Deanne Southwell and Kristin Waters.

The Designing First Year Success group focuses on strengthening student skills as they transition from high school to college and is co-chaired by Joseph Ginese, Carei Thomas and Janice Walters.

The Designing Pedagogy and Research for Student Success group, which strives to help improve teaching and learning, is co-chaired by Jim Berg, Cheryl Comeau-Kirschener and Yevgeniy Milman.

The Equity and Inclusion Initiative, which informs the Design for Success process, is comprised of the Listening Tours subcommittee, chaired by Peter Hoontis; the Professional Development for Faculty and Staff subcommittee, chaired by Kelly Rodgers, and the Formats for Programs to Collaborate Regarding Equity Issues and Advancing Equity, chaired by Ashtian Holmes.

Business Management Professor Peter Hoontis, who chairs the listening tours subcommittee, urged BMCC students, faculty and staff who want to lead, take part in or help coordinate a small focus group, also known as a “charrette”—to contact him at their earliest convenience: phoontis@bmcc.cuny.edu.

Feedback from the BMCC community

Following President Wilks’ presentation, members of the audience took the mic and shared thoughts and questions related to the Designing for Success initiative.

“I’m very excited about the new direction we’re headed,” said Deborah Harte, Student Life Manager in the BMCC Single Stop office who suggested that information about student services be more prominently featured in the student onboarding and intake experience. “It’s important to get a sense early on, of our students’ needs, and connecting them to services earlier in the process,” Harte said.

BMCC Designing for Success Forum 2018

Professor James Blake congratulated the Designing for Success working teams who presented updates on their work, and shared a concern about BMCC students’ first-year experience and transition from high school to college. “Research shows that a first-year course is an effective way to link students to the services they need,” he said, and proposed that such a course be re-integrated into the first-year curriculum at BMCC.

Eric Glaude, BMCC Coordinator of Student Veterans Services, brought up the importance of counseling as a component in the Redesigning for Success approach.

Another audience member stressed the importance of not referring to developmental education as “support,” when developmental course content is blended with credit-bearing content to move students more efficiently through remediation. “If it’s seen as a support, the value and expertise of those who are teaching developmental education is diminished,” he said. “We have to think of vocabulary—it’s not just support. It’s a lot more than that.”

English Professor Jason Schneiderman commented that it is exciting to see the college “invested in systems and the integration of systems,” and reported that attendance has “crept up,” in his department’s co-requisite course which blends developmental and credit-bearing instruction.

“Lower class size is better,” he said, bringing up the challenge of maintaining the integrity of programs, when they are taken to scale.

Lisa Rose, a professor in the human services department, made the point that “faculty work very hard. They teach lots of courses and do their own research. Staff is stretched, too. While we want to get involved, it would be helpful if the committees would talk about what participation means in terms of commitment, how time is going to be allotted to these efforts.”

Public Affairs Photographer and Digital Marketing Coordinator Louis Chan commented on the importance of staff development for BMCC’s more than 1,500 staff members. “The growth mindset that we maintain in support of students is equally important as we support staff at the college,” he said.

President Wilks provided constructive feedback for each participant’s comments, and encouraged BMCC community members to participate in working groups and charrettes opportunities that are part of the Equity and Inclusion, Listening Tours sub-committee.


What Alumni Mentorship Means for Student Success

Renee Blumenfrucht ’15 was prepared to give up on securing a dream job—until Leonardo Rizzi ’93 and the Brooklyn College Magner Career Center intervened.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

Renee Blumenfrucht ’15 (left) is grateful for the mentorship and career advice she received from Leonardo Rizzi ’93, which helped her obtain employment at one of the biggest financial firms in the world.

During her senior year at Brooklyn College, Renee Blumenfrucht ’15 went on an interview at Goldman Sachs to apply for an internship. Imagine her surprise when she was instead offered a full-time position set to begin right after she graduated. She believes she was able to impress the employer because of advice she received from one person in particular: Leonardo Rizzi ’93.

“He was incredibly instrumental and encouraged me to apply to Goldman, and I got the position I applied for. This experience taught me that while it is crucial to do well in school and have the requisite skills and qualifications, having someone who can vouch for you when you are first starting out helps you to get your foot in the door quicker,” says Blumenfrucht, who received her bachelor of science in actuarial science and financial mathematics and is currently a senior analyst at Goldman. She returns to the college often to mentor students looking to break into business and finance fields. “I often tell Brooklyn College students that while it’s helpful to know someone in order to get your foot in the door, once your foot is in the door, it’s up to you to keep it there.”

A recipient of the Presidential Scholarship, the Lorraine Levine Memorial Award in Mathematics, the Claire and Leonard Tow Scholarship, and the Anna and Joseph Weisinger Scholarship, Blumenfrucht says that she had initially given up on working for Goldman after she twice applied for internships at the company but it never materialized. Then, Natalia Guarin-Klein, director of the Brooklyn College Magner Career Center, sent out an e-mail to students informing them of an opportunity to meet with alumni who worked at Goldman. Guarin-Klein reached out to Blumenfrucht personally to tell her that she should meet with Rizzi, who was at the time a vice president and head of operations division vendor risk management at Goldman.

“Natalia is amazing and one of Brooklyn College’s most valuable resources,” says Blumenfrucht. “She helped me tailor my résumé and put together my LinkedIn page. She helped me to secure many interviews across various firms as well as mentorship opportunities. She even connected me with Marge Magner ’69, who helped me determine which prospective firms I should seek opportunities with. I would say Natalia is probably the most critical part of my academic and professional success.”

Blumenfrucht had a casual meeting with Rizzi, even though she had already received an offer from another firm, because she valued Guarin-Klein’s advice and guidance.

“From the minute I met her, I knew she had what it takes to succeed. She only had to focus on being more confident,” Rizzi says of Blumenfrucht, adding that Brooklyn College students are among the smartest and most determined he has ever come across.

On his end, he informed Goldman’s human resources department about the potential possessed by the college’s students.

“I know Brooklyn College is not a target school for us, but I have been working with some of the students closely and they are very bright. I’m not asking for promises or commitments; I’m asking for a chance to bring a few students in for internship interviews. Renee was the first to come through the door.”

A former vice president at Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, and now a vice president at The Clearing House—Rizzi sees his own success as a blessing and believes it is part of his responsibility, and a full show of gratitude, to pass that blessing on. He does so through mentoring and also by participating on panels and in workshops organized by the Magner Center. And his connection to Brooklyn College students and other alumni is not fleeting, exemplified by the fact that he still mentors and advises Blumenfrucht to this day.

Rizzi’s is the classic Brooklyn College story. Born in Italy, he immigrated to the United States with his parents when he was just seven months old. They arrived in Brooklyn, where Rizzi lived for 30 years before moving to Staten Island. He is the first person in his family to receive a college degree—a bachelor of science in business management and finance.

“I grew up in a blue-collar, immigrant neighborhood, where most young people didn’t have access to the people who worked at the Goldman Sachses and Morgan Stanleys of the world. For me, there was no grand plan like, ‘I’m going to go to college; this is what I’m going to do and this is my dream.’ It was more like, you can go to college after high school or you go to work—just don’t go to jail.”

For Rizzi, the definition of success has nothing to do with money. Instead, success for him it means improving processes at the organizations he works for and having a positive impact on the lives and careers of the people he comes in contact with. He says he focuses on standing out in two specific ways.

“First, in any situation, I won’t be outworked. And when it comes to dealing with difficult circumstances, being direct while simultaneously empathic is something I always strive for.”

 

The Magner Career Center is able to provide students the assistance, skills, values, and opportunities that are essential to fulfilling their career aspirations thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To learn about the various ways to contribute to student success, please visit the foundation website.

 

CONTACT: Ernesto Mora 212.662.9939


Translational Medicine grads win international pitch competition with wearable menopause management technology

Team MenoPal (from left) Bo Guan, Chaya Edelman, Mican Meneses and Cira Cardaci with fellow CCNY alum and Nestle SHIELD senior medical director and head of medical innovation Dr. Warren Winkelman.

The Master’s in Translational Medicine (MTM) program at The City College of New York (CCNY) is an exciting collaboration between The Grove School of Engineering and The CUNY School of Medicine. A new kind of graduate degree program, MTM is gaining traction in the rapidly growing New York City healthcare landscape, educating the next generation of leaders in medical technology innovation.

Earlier this month, an MTM alumni Biodesign team won the Nestlé Skin Health SHIELD “Journey to Innovation in Skin Health” Pitch Event. MenoPal, a team comprised of 2017-2018 MTM graduates, is working on a “Wearable Medical Device for Menopause Management.”  The team will receive $25,000 in project funding and, importantly, the opportunity to work with SHIELD on further development of their product.  MenoPal was also recently awarded a National Science Foundation I-Corps™ grant to conduct customer discovery around their product.

SkInsight, a second team comprised of MTM alumni, won an honorable mention for their software application that aimed to help individuals dealing with symptoms associated with atopic dermatitis.

“We are excited and inspired to see talented biotech engineers and developers offering a solution for the shockingly underaddressed needs of menopausal women,” said Dr. Warren Winkelman, Senior Medical Director and Head of Medical Innovation for SHIELD. “MenoPal empowers women in a data-driven and quantified way to take control over what can be a distressing transition and minimize their discomfort, uncertainty, and stress. Further, we see this collaboration as an important opportunity to elevate a new narrative in the face of continuing stigma associated with aging and menopause.” Dr. Winkelman is also a proud City College alumnus who has sponsored MTM teams and worked to integrate the mission and growth of the program.

Few scientific degree-granting programs have attempted to integrate business practices with the skills that are necessary to design effective clinical solutions. City College’s MTM program explores and examines all facets of the medical technology development process from creating a functional prototype to the build-out of business and clinical strategies.  The program prepares graduates for careers in industry, start-ups, medicine, and clinical research.

“We are thrilled with the success of our MTM graduates at the SHIELD pitch event,” said Jeffrey S. Garanich, Ph.D., Director of the MTM Program.  “We envision that a number of our student teams will continue development of their Biodesign technologies after they complete the program.  We hope that SHIELD’s recognition of MenoPal and SkInsight shows that MTM provides its graduates with the foundation required to bring a new medical technology to market.”

MTM’s 3-semester Biodesign course sequence and project teach students a hands-on approach to developing a new medical technology that addresses an unmet clinical need. Students have the opportunity to interact with outstanding faculty, thought leaders and cutting edge experts in the medical technology industry who provide up-to-date advice and training in the quickly developing field of translational medicine.

This approach is engaging for engineers, scientists, researchers and others with a STEM background. By completing a stimulating curriculum and challenging program that fosters leadership, entrepreneurship, and innovation, MTM graduates are ready to create and develop the medical technologies that will change the future of healthcare. Applications are currently being accepted for the 2019-2020 academic year and interested individuals can learn more about the program here.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.​

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437

View CCNY Media Kit.​


Educator, author Greg Williams & NBC meteorologist Chris Cimino ’83 receive CCNY honors

 

Gregory H. Williams, CCNY’s former president, and award-winning NBC 4 “Today in New York” meteorologist Chris Ciminoare the 2018 John H. Finley Award recipients.  The award is given out by the Alumni Association of The City College of New York for exemplary and dedicated service to the City of New York.

In addition, the alumni association will honor six City College alumni for outstanding post-graduate achievement. They’ll receive the Townsend Harris Medal at CCNY’s 138th annual alumni dinner in CCNY’s Great Hall.

The 11th president of City College (2001-2009), Williams is a nationally recognized leader in higher education. He’s also the best-selling author of “Life on the Color Line: The True Story of a White Boy Who Discovered He Was Black.”

Cimino, from CCNY’s Class of 1983, has worked at NBC since December 1995, winning awards for his professional excellence and humanitarianism. The latter includes honors from the United Cerebral Palsy and Holy Name Medical Center.

The six Townsend Harris medalists are:

  • Anthony Belli ’76, healthcare executive, author, nationally prominent sales consultant and speaker;
  • Peter Delfyett ’80EE, internationally recognized professor and inventor in ultrafast photonics at The College of Optics & Photonics, University of Central Florida;
  • Michael J. Del Giudice ’64BBA, investment banker; chair, New York State Committee on Scholastic Achievement; Trustee Emeritus, CUNY; Chair, New York State Racing Association;
  • David Laub ’42CE, former professional player with the Troy Celtics in the American Basketball League, one year before the NBA was founded; Alumni Varsity Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; retired from the construction business in 2016 at age 95;
  • Jack Laub ’47, generic pharmaceutical pioneer, decorated World War II veteran, former NBA player and CCNY Alumni Varsity Basketball Hall of Fame inductee;
  • Yvette Noel-Schure ’86, publicist to many iconic stars including Beyoncé, Mariah Carey, Will Smith, Jessica Simpson, John Legend and Prince.

Established in July 1853 by the first graduating class of what was then known as The Free Academy, the Alumni Association of The City College of New York is the oldest continuously running alumni association at a public college in the United States.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and

scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Some of the honorees at CCNY’s 138th annual alumni dinner from the top: former CCNY president Gregory H. Williams, NBC 4 meteorologist Chris Cimino and celebrity publicist Yvette Noel-Schure.

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Office Hours with Professor Nermeen Arastu

Coming from an immigrant background herself, Professor Nermeen Arastu has always been in awe of stories of immigration. She has adopted the story of her own grandparents’ leap of faith as they migrated to Pakistan from India after the partition, the journey her parents made a generation later when they immigrated to the United States, and many more as a humbling legacy of courage and resilience.

She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and has a soft spot for Carolina blue skies, southern sweet tea, and the cobble-stone lined streets of Philadelphia.

 

 

What will you be teaching this year at CUNY Law?

I will continue to co-direct the Immigrant and Non-Citizen Rights Clinic, a 16 credit in-house clinic, where CUNY Law students represent non-citizen clients at risk of deportation and/or those subject to indefinite detention by the U.S. government.

 

Is there anything you’re excited to bring with you to your new gig?

When I was in law school, I searched for mentors who looked like me and could identify with my life experiences as a first-generation immigrant but was hard pressed to find that type of diversity in law faculties and amongst the legal bar. I am excited to add to the diversity of the CUNY Law faculty and bring my specific life experience to my client representation, teaching, and service to the law school.

 

What is the best thing you can remember about your time at law school?

The best moments were being able to apply the analytical skills and doctrine that we studied in the first years to real-time client representation during my clinical year. Finally putting my “lawyer skills” to the test gave me life after the monotony of classroom learning in the first years and a framework to understand what client-centered lawyering truly is. I was so impacted by my clinical education that my dream job became to teach in a law school clinic myself.

 

If you could recruit anyone to guest lecture in your class, who would it be – and what would they talk about?

There is nothing more important for those wishing to serve communities than hearing directly from impacted communities. Year after year, our students comment that the classes that taught them the most about social justice lawyering were those where impacted individuals taught us how best to serve them, their communities and causes. I couldn’t agree more.

 

Do you have a top study tip or trick you’ve picked up along the way?

You can’t help the world if you haven’t taken care of yourself. Find ways to engage in self-care regularly, you will be a better student and lawyer and hopefully stay in the pursuit of social change permanently.

 

Let’s pretend your students have time to read non-assigned material. What would you recommend? What are you reading that you can’t put down?

Poetry feels medicinal in these brutal times. I have been returning time and again to an anthology called Indivisible: An Anthology of Contemporary South Asian American Poetry, where poets grapple with questions about dual identities, migration, diaspora and faith and more.

 

If you weren’t a law professor, what would you be most likely to be doing in life?                            

Either park ranger in our national parks or a dairy farmer. My mind is always partially daydreaming about my next hike in the woods.

 

If you’re new to New York, what are you most excited about as you make the city your home?

After a decade in the New York metropolitan area, I am currently obsessed with exploring the natural beauty of our state parks. It is incredible that we live in an area where you can be eating the best Nepali food in Queens in the morning, and hiking the Hudson Highlands by afternoon.


City Tech Commemorates Kristallnacht: 80 Years After and 30 Years Beyond

On this 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht, we not only remember the incomparable genocide of Jews on the night of November 9,  1938, but also reflect on the varied means of telling the stories of its survivors and witnesses, and express deep concern for the future of this tragic history.

On November 7, 2018, at noon, the New York City College of Technology’s (City Tech) Jewish Faculty & Staff Association (JFSA) will host its 30th Kristallnacht anniversary program in the College’s Atrium Amphitheater, 300 Jay Street. The program will feature Suzanne Loebl, a Belgian hidden child, who will receive the City Tech JFSA Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of her outstanding efforts in preserving the Holocaust’s history. Moreover, philanthropist Edith Everett will receive the Distinguished Humanitarian Award in recognition of her outstanding humanitarian efforts throughout the years. The Consul General of Belgium, Mrs. Cathy Buggenhout, will also attend in honor of both women’s remarkable lives.

Albert Sherman, JFSA President and longtime City Tech staff member noted, “There are few public programs at the College that endure actively for 30 years. This is a testament to the dedication of the JFSA community for three decades.”

As time passes, the question of how to remember the Holocaust increases in importance. Now well into the 21st century, we have many books, films, and much theater, music and other media to keep the story of this tragedy alive. Nevertheless, most impactful of all are the survivor testimonies, which are paramount in telling personal history and preserving memories. These become increasingly urgent as every day the survivor community diminishes in numbers. They are also that much more significant amidst the rise in heinous hate crimes we have seen of late.

JFSA Program Director, Dr. James Goldman, reflects, “This anniversary in itself is significant, and more so every year with fewer survivors and witnesses remaining to tell and share their stories. Furthermore, these stories are now even timelier with the rise of antisemitism throughout the world, as we have seen in this weekend’s massacre at the Tree of Life Synagogue, in Pittsburgh.”

During the commemoration, there will be a screening of 116 Cameras, a film about Holocaust survivor Eva Schloss, who embarks on a project to preserve her memories via an interactive hologram that will tell her story forever. The screening will encourage the audience to contemplate the ways in which such stories will be preserved and told in years to come.

In past years, City Tech has welcomed many distinguished and celebrated speakers through the College’s JFSA Distinguished Speakers Series. Prominent speakers such as Daniel Libeskind, Edwin Schlossberg, Pete Hamill and Menachem Rosensaft have honored the College with timely and inspiring words and greetings during City Tech’s Kristallnacht anniversary programs in November.

Some of this year’s co-sponsors include Brooklyn Historical Society, Hidden Child Foundation/ADL, Interfaith Committee of Remembrance (ICOR), Jewish Community Relations Council of New York, Remember the Women Institute, New York Board of Rabbis, City Tech Foundation, and City Tech Faculty Commons.

City Tech’s Kristallnacht 80th anniversary program is free and open to the public. For more information, contact JFSA Program Director, Dr. James Goldman, at jgoldman270@hotmail.com.


Memories of Ntozake Shange

Memories of Ntozake Shange
By Dr. Brenda M. Greene

The Center for Black Literature at Medgar Evers College mourns the passing of renowned, celebrated and Obie Award-winning renowned poet, playwright and novelist Ntozake Shange, a powerful literary force who carried forth the legacy of the Black Arts Movement in America. The work of Shange touched our lives and those of people in the African diaspora in many ways.

Scholar Farah Jasmine Griffin reflects on this in her essay “A Daughter’s Geography: The Poetics of Diaspora,” The African Presence and Influence on the Cultures of the Americas (Cambridge Scholars, 2010). She states that in her poetry collection, A Daughter’s Geography (1983), her novel, Liliane: Resurrection of the Daughter (1994), and her cookbook, If I Can Cook, You Know God Can (1998), Shange uses her poetry and narrative to articulate a vision and politics of Diaspora. She notes that Shange has always privileged the experiences and voices of women.

A number of years ago, I had an opportunity to interview Ntozake Shange in her Brooklyn home. Ntozake was warm, humble, and regal in a way; she exhibited an inner peace and reflected on the process that she used to write her award-winning play, for colored girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf (1974) and on the ways in which race, gender, and ethnicity impact her writing. On the subject of race, Shange said the following:

“I encounter various kinds of racism and sexism on a daily basis like any other woman of color. And I have to transfer that into something interesting and delightful for my readers. It is not easy to make racism delightful. So that’s what the hard part of my job is, finally, making people laugh or making them cry, without turning myself into a batting ball. But I’m pushed to do something that happened in the world.”

To read more of the interview, please visit www.centerforblackliterature.org, or go to http://centerforblackliterature.org/ntozake-conversation.

The Center for Black Literature will pay tribute to Ntozake Shange at its 2019 National Black Writers Symposium: “Playwrights and Screenwriters at the Crossroads.” The life of Ntozake Shange symbolizes the issues faced by Black playwrights and screenwriters.

We extend our heartfelt condolences to her family and loved ones. We will miss you Ntozake Shange. Thank you for your light and may your legacy continue to shine!


CCNY’s rail transit energy research receives $320K boost

Electrical engineer Ahmed Mohamed [center] and PhD student members of his CCNY research team [from left]: Tamer Ibrahim, Mahdiyeh Khodaparastan, Oindrilla Dutta, Mahmoud Saleh and Jason Baldorado [graduate student].

As he continues research that could make the rail transit system more energy efficient, City College of New York electrical engineer Ahmed Mohamed is the recipient of $320,000 in funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to advance his pioneering work. It is over two years.

The funding brings to more than half a million dollars the support Mohamed, an assistant professor in CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering, has received for the project since last year.  He was awarded $210,000 by ConEd in 2017.

Mohamed’s quest is to develop technology that can capture the regenerative braking energy released by trains whenever they brake.

“When trains stop, they reproduce some of the energy they use during acceleration,” he said. “Under the current system, regenerative energy can’t be recaptured.”

The idea is to harness this energy and either store it or redirect it to the energy grid, said Mohamed.

One benefit of recapturing regenerative energy would be to allow trains to move to the nearest station in case of an outage.

Other outcomes, if the project is successful, would be:

  • Financial savings on energy by the New York City Transit system; and
  • A reduction in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in line with New York State requirements.

Research participants include students from the department of electrical engineering in the Grove School, which is celebrating its centennial.

Mohamed is founding director of the Smart Grid Laboratory. He is also affiliated with other CCNY-based CUNY Research Centers.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
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Critic, author Hilton Als wins CCNY’s Langston Hughes Medal

 

Hilton Als, 2018 recipient of CCNY’s Langston Hughes Medal

Hilton Als, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning cultural critic with “The New Yorker,” adds another honor to his name when he receives the Langston Hughes Medal at The City College of New York on Thursday, Nov. 15.

The medal is awarded to highly distinguished writers from throughout the African American diaspora at CCNY’s annual Langston Hughes Festival, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. It recognizes honorees for their impressive works of poetry, fiction, drama, autobiography and critical essays that help to celebrate the memory and tradition of Langston Hughes. Past award winners include: James Baldwin;

  • Gwendolyn Brooks;
  • Toni Morrison;
  • August Wilson;
  • Maya Angelou; and
  • Octavia Butler.

Als, who’s written for The New Yorker since 1989, is the author of “The Women.” His most recent book, “White Girls,” won the Lambda Literary Award in 2014 and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Als won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 2017. His other accolades include a Guggenheim for creative writing (2000) and the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism (2002-03). In 2016, he received Lambda Literary’s Trustee Award for Excellence in Literature.

A symposium on Als’ work, 12:30 p.m. in CCNY’s Aaron Davis Hall will precede the award ceremony. The talk features Thelma Golden, head of The Studio Museum in Harlem; Pulitzer winning critic and author Margo Jefferson, playwright Brandon Jacob-Jenkins; and CCNY faculty members Boukary Sawadogo and Salar Abdoh.

Vanessa K. Valdés, author and associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese at CCNY, will moderate the discussion on the significance of Als’ work. Click here to get a free ticket.

The award ceremony, at 6:30 p.m. in Aaron Davis Hall, includes a reading by Als, a conversation between him and writer Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, and a performance by special musical guest Helga Davis. Click here for a free ticket.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

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Faculty Development Model Pioneered by LaGuardia Community College Foundation Licensed by Faculty Guild

Exclusive agreement enables national implementation of the foundation’s research-based faculty development model, including technology-enabled personalized coaching, communities of practice and pedagogical analytics

Faculty Guild, an educational services and technology organization focused on improving student outcomes through purposeful teaching, today announced that it has exclusively licensed the research, methodology and assets of the Global Skills for College Completion (GSCC) project, led by the LaGuardia Community College Foundation. LaGuardia Community College is one of 24 institutions within The City University of New York.

“For years, we’ve seen a wide range of college and university investments in important student success initiatives. What has been underrepresented, however, is the voice of the faculty — those with the most frequent and closest contact with students,” said David Yaskin, CEO of Faculty Guild. “By authentically engaging faculty in evidence-based, purposeful teaching, we have an opportunity to get to the heart of student success in a way not previously considered. We are honored to build on LaGuardia’s impressive work — scaling their approaches to serve the diverse needs of higher education.” Yaskin is the founder and former CEO of Starfish Retention Solutions, now part of Hobsons.

Founded in 2009 under the leadership of Dr. Gail Mellow, president of LaGuardia Community College, and with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Kresge Foundation, GSCC began as a research project to demonstrate that higher education teaching matters and that pedagogy is a determining factor in student success and completion. Changes in student achievement in the tested cohorts of both full-time and part-time faculty were promising, affecting retention and pass rates with differences ranging from 4 percent to 8 percent improvement. The results of the work are documented in the book Taking College Teaching Seriously: Pedagogy Matters!

“Improving teaching is not just about exposing faculty to evidence-based practices — those are widely documented in many pedagogy books and a variety of prescriptive curriculum programs. The hard part in faculty development is getting faculty and their institutions to embrace a growth mind-set of continuous improvement — and to stick with it. This takes regular practice, time and community,” said Dr. Mellow. “The model we developed, that Faculty Guild is now bringing to scale, was designed by faculty for faculty. It leverages the latest thinking in adult learning theory to engage faculty in a way that is immediate and important while preserving their privacy and independence. We are excited Faculty Guild will continue this important work in a way that will benefit the students our foundation serves, for years to come.”

The model was developed over six years with the support of hundreds of faculty members from dozens of institutions. The project, including the refinement of 20 evidence-based instructional practices, was evaluated by Stanford Research Institute. The model consists of placing faculty members in small, online teaching circles of their peers where they each journal (in a highly structured format) about a weekly classroom activity, connect that work to any of the 20 evidence-based instructional practices, and participate in peer-to-peer analysis and feedback using appreciative inquiry.

Inspired by this work, Faculty Guild provides a software platform that powers a national network of facilitators and faculty members as they work together to explore evidence-based teaching practices. Specifically, Faculty Guild offers full-time and part-time faculty members, as well as graduate assistants, two-term fellowships. Part-time faculty members receive an honorarium from Faculty Guild at the completion of each term.

“We are excited to be a founding partner institution with Faculty Guild. The work is promising and aligns nicely with our commitment to supporting faculty as they seek to make a difference in the lives of our students,” said Dr. David A. Vanko, interim provost of Towson University. “We have a cohort of faculty participating now — leveraging the model originally developed by the work of GSCC. Our faculty members are appreciating the opportunity to spend time reflecting on their work, connecting it in a natural way to evidence-based instructional practices and getting to see and learn from their peers across the country.” Towson University is one of more than 35 institutions, including four- and two-year institutions, that have joined Faculty Guild.

Going forward, Dr. Mellow and other project staff will serve as advisors to the company. In addition, the LaGuardia Community College Foundation will receive an ownership interest in Faculty Guild to support the foundation’s mission of helping students succeed.

• • • •

About Faculty Guild
Faculty Guild believes purposeful teaching is vital to student success. We offer a multi-term fellowship where faculty members bolster their existing teaching practices. Fellows learn by reflecting on their own teaching — not from disconnected, general guidance. Additionally, their institutions receive aggregated, non-identified data to measure return on investment. Our approach has been tested by hundreds of faculty members and is based on more than six years of research, originally led by Dr. Gail Mellow. For more information, please call 844-776-3374 or visit www.facultyguild.org.

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit  www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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CUNY to Honor More Than 3,200 Student-veterans and Others Who Have Served With a Monthlong Calendar of Programs

Honoring Those Who ServedMore than 300 student-veterans will be recognized for their stellar academic achievement in an event scheduled to precede Veterans Day, Nov. 11 – part of an array of activities and programs planned throughout November by The City University of New York to honor more than 3,200 military veterans who are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs across the University.

The Central Office of Veterans Affairs will present the academic awards as part of a daylong CUNY Veterans Summit and Professional Networking & Resources Fair on Nov. 2 at The CUNY Graduate Center. The awards, given each year since 2013, recognize CUNY senior college student-veterans who have completed at least 90 credits with a 3.5 GPA or higher, and community college student-veterans who have met the same standard and completed at least 36 credits.

“CUNY is proud of its student-veterans and the accomplishments and rich life experience they bring to our campuses,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The increasing number of veterans who choose CUNY is a testament to the services and resources we provide to support their success. We welcome them and proudly acknowledge their achievements.”

The 25 CUNY schools count a total of 3,237 student-veterans, an enrollment that has increased by more than 50 percent since 2010. The student-veterans are exceptionally diverse in their personal backgrounds, as well as their military service in all branches of the U.S. armed forces, with experience including deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq.

The Nov. 2 CUNY Veterans Summit will include the Veteran Academic Recognition presentations, which are to be shown on screens throughout the day; in the afternoon, there will be a Veteran Professional Networking and Resource Fair that includes sessions on CUNY undergraduate and graduate admissions, financial aid and ROTC. Information will also be provided on wellness, STEM careers, career readiness, interview prep and veteran resources.

Here are some of the many veteran-themed events planned across CUNY in November:

Veterans Day Events Calendar

11/2

CUNY Veterans Summit presented by CUNY Central Office of Veteran Affairs; a daylong event that includes veteran academic recognitions and the 2018 Veterans Professional Networking/Resource Fair (concourse level, 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.), which features professional development sessions (12:30 to 4:30 p.m.) including a LinkedIn workshop, forums on job readiness and STEM opportunities and an array of resources for student-veterans; admission is free but register here; at CUNY Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Ave. New York, N.Y., 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 11/6

Baruch College: President’s Luncheon; To honor veteran & family members faculty, staff, and students at Baruch; RSVP to President@baruch.cuny.edu, Library Building, seventh floor conference center, 151 E. 25th St., New York, N.Y., 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Queensborough Community College: Vital workshop, information session regarding health care and VA benefits, Veterans Lounge, Student Union lower level, 222-05 56th Ave., Bayside, N.Y. 11364, noon.

11/7

Queensborough Community College: Reflection and Remembrance, Charles F. Bova Veterans Memorial Grove, located inside the main campus gate at 222-05 56th Ave., Bayside, N.Y., 9:30 a.m.

Queensborough Community College: Boot Camp, feel the burn of Advanced Military Training (AIT), boot camp is a physical fitness workshop that will be guided by the U.S. Marines. It is informal, and all Queensborough students are invited; presented by the USMC (Flushing), Athletic Track, 222-05 56th Ave., Bayside, N.Y., 3:30 p.m.

LaGuardia Community College: Wellness for Veterans, Warrior Fitness Boot Camp will be on campus to offer free training sessions to all students. WFBC incorporates parts of the signature O-Course used by the USMC to offer one of the best workouts in the city. This will be followed by meditation, yoga and nutrition classes, M-Building Gym, 31-10 Thompson Ave., Long Island City, N.Y., 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.  

Hunter College: Presentation on Veterans Services, presented in partnership with Weill Cornell/NY Presbyterian Military Family Clinic, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. To attend, RSVP to svrc@hunter.cuny.edu

11/8

Baruch College: Vet-working event, hosted by Baruch Student Veterans Association. Networking event for Baruch veterans will feature recruiters from Moody’s, Bloomberg, Bank of America, Yelp and Maximus; 151 E. 25th St., New York, N.Y., 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

College of Staten Island: Keys to Progress Ceremony for annual vehicle giveaway program by Progressive; Fort Hamilton Army Base, Brooklyn, N.Y., 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Queensborough Community College: Veterans Dinner; Student Union Lobby, 222-05 56th Ave., Bayside, N.Y., 5:30 p.m.

New York City College of Technology: Veteran Support Services will host a screening of “When I Came Home” (2006), a documentary that follows the struggles of Herold Noel, an Iraq war veteran who becomes homeless in New York City after returning from combat with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; City Tech Atrium Amphitheater, 320 Tech Place, Brooklyn, N.Y., 6 p.m.

11/9

Queens College: Veterans Day Luncheon Hosted by New York City Councilmember Rory Lancman; RSVP veterans@QC.cuny.edu, Student Union, Queens College Faculty and Staff Club, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, N.Y., noon to 2 p.m.

11/11

NYC Veterans Day Parade: Student veterans from across CUNY will join the annual march in Manhattan, and CUNY will have a float. Route is along Fifth Ave. from 25th to 56th streets, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

11/12

College of Staten Island: Flags for the Fallen, in a tribute to Veterans, CSI annually places flags on Alumni Walk (from Building 1C to the Library); 2800 Victory Blvd., Staten Island, N.Y., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (through Nov. 17).

College of Staten Island: Gallery Tribute to Veterans, an annual display in the library gallery salutes the contributions and sacrifices of veterans through student and community veteran portraits and artifacts; Building 1L, 2800 Victory Blvd., Staten Island, N.Y., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (through Nov. 17).

LaGuardia Community College: Veterans Appreciation Day, A daylong event to honor and recognize our student veterans. Special guests will be on campus to offer veteran-specific services, and children from the Early Childhood Learning Center will hold a dedication to thank our men and women who have served the country; Poolside Cafe, 31-10 Thompson Ave., Long Island City, N.Y., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

New York City College of Technology: Veterans Day Free Dental Hygiene Care; Department of Dental Hygiene will offer free dental hygiene services including oral cancer examinations, periodontal disease screenings, fluoride treatments and many others; call (718) 260-5074 to schedule an appointment, walk-ins also welcomed. Bring veteran ID or other proof of service. Academic Building, seventh floor, 285 Jay St., Brooklyn, N.Y., Clinic hours from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.  

Medgar Evers College: Flag Raising, traditional military-style ceremony to acknowledge Veterans Day and the start of MEC Veterans Week. Refreshments to be served afterward in the MEC Café; Front of Library, 1650 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y., 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

11/13

Medgar Evers College: Office of Veterans and Military Service Grand Opening; Ribbon-cutting ceremony to mark opening of office for OVMS, includes raffle drawing provided by PROVE. Light refreshments and swag items available throughout the day; C Building, room 306, 1650 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y., 10:30 a.m.

11/14

LaGuardia Community College: Classroom student-veterans discussion with Human Services; topics will include mental health, alienation and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder with students and faculty from the Human Services Department along with student-veterans. The discussion will be guided by screenings of a documentary, Almost Sunrise,” and a series of TEDTalks. Room E-500, 31-10 Thompson Ave., Long Island City, N.Y., 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., and Room E-265, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Medgar Evers College: #MECVets Meet & Greet, an event to introduce Student Veteran Services to the larger MEC community. Office of Veteran and Military Services will provide information on veteran benefits, resources and the MEC Vets Club. Room AB1 Front Lobby, 1650 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y., 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: “John McCain: For Whom the Bell Tolls” screening of HBO documentary highlighting the life and sacrifice of late Sen. John McCain. Haaren Hall room 630, 899 10th Ave., New York, N.Y., 6:30 p.m.

11/15

New York City College of Technology:  Coming Home – Veterans tell their stories of military service and the road home. Brief Q&A to follow, hosted by Veteran Support Services. City Tech Atrium Amphitheater, 320 Tech Place, Brooklyn, N.Y., 6 p.m.

Medgar Evers College: #MECVets Military Pride event to introduce student veteran services to the larger MEC community. Office of Veteran and Military Services and #MECVets Club will provide information on veteran benefits and resources and take photos of those who wear military apparel. Room AB1 Front Lobby, 1650 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y., 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

11/16

Medgar Evers College: #MECVets Lunch, Appreciation lunch to recognize MEC student veterans and their families. Room C-310, 1650 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y., 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.

11/27

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: SALUTE Veterans Honor Society, Ceremony and Banquet to celebrate the ceremonial induction of honorary and student-veteran inductees. Moot Court NB, 524 W. 59th St., New York, N.Y. 6 p.m.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Doctor Luisa N. Borrell named Distinguished Professor

Dr. Luisa BorrellWe are delighted to announce that on Monday, October 29, the CUNY Board of Trustees voted unanimously in favor of the appointment of Dr. Luisa N. Borrell as Distinguished Professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy. Dr. Borrell is among three faculty at CUNY SPH who have received this significant recognition by the university.

Dr. Borrell is an internationally recognized leader in the social determinants of health and the role of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic indicators and neighborhood conditions as factors that shape disease and health in populations. Her experience as a dentist, coupled with her training as an epidemiologist, have paved the way for truly novel work in the area of oral health and health disparities.

Through her excellence in research and outstanding academic leadership, Dr. Borrell has been raising the national profile of the school and CUNY. In addition to over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, many in top journals in the fields of epidemiology and public health, and significant recognition by her peers as measured by the thousands of citations her work has received, Professor Borrell has received over $7 million in external grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson and R.W. Kellogg foundations.

As a faculty member and as chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dr. Borrell has mentored many graduate students and sponsored six doctoral students including the first DPH graduate from CUNY SPH. She also works very closely with junior faculty throughout their non-tenured years to help them develop the portfolio needed for a successful tenure application.

Dr. Borrell is an asset to our school, the university, and the field of public health. We congratulate her on achieving this distinct honor.


CUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES CONFIRMS APPOINTMENT OF JOY CONNOLLY AS INTERIM PRESIDENT OF THE CUNY GRADUATE SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY CENTER

The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York today confirmed Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz’s appointment of Joy Connolly as interim president of The CUNY Graduate School and University Center, succeeding Chase F. Robinson who will be leaving in December. The appointment is effective  The appointment is effective Dec. 8, 2018.

Connolly has served as Provost and Senior Vice President of the Graduate Center since August 2016. A distinguished professor of classics, she is a scholar of Roman literature and political thought and their transformation in the modern era. As Provost, Connolly has emphasized the Graduate Center’s commitment to innovative education and the pursuit and circulation of knowledge for the public good.

“Joy Connolly is a passionate advocate for public higher education and for the Graduate Center’s students and faculty, and I am confident in her capacity to lead New York’s premier public institution of graduate education,” said Interim Chancellor Rabinowitz. “I have come to know her as an enormously talented and creative academic leader who has made transformative contributions to the Graduate Center and the entire University.”

Robinson is leaving the Graduate Center to become the Dame Jillian Sackler Director of the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and Freer Gallery of Art at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

Connolly has brought the Graduate Center to the forefront of innovation in graduate education through a number of initiatives. Earlier this year, she secured $2.27 million from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to transform doctoral education. One of the projects the grant is funding is an ambitious PublicsLab, which will coordinate and amplify the public-facing scholarship of GC students and faculty. Her efforts to support student research include the new Quantitative Resources Consulting Center. She oversaw the administrative transition of the Advanced Science Research Center to the Graduate Center and has recruited highly accomplished and diverse faculty and administrators. Under her leadership, the provost’s office has expanded the GC’s master’s programs and is adding new nondegree programs that will diversify the GC’s reach and improve its financial resilience.

“It is an honor to have the opportunity to lead this remarkable institution and to build on the momentum we’ve established in advancing the GC’s vital mission and ensuring its academic strengths,” said Connolly. “I am grateful to Chase for his leadership and friendship and wish him well in his new role. The GC is a stronger institution because of his tireless service.”

Connolly earned an A.B. (magna cum laude) from Princeton University and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Classical Studies. After serving as an assistant professor of classics at the University of Washington in Seattle and at Stanford University, she joined the classics department at NYU, where she reached the rank of full professor.  At NYU she served as director of the College Core Curriculum, a comprehensive arts and sciences program required for most NYU undergraduates, and then as dean for humanities, where she oversaw nearly 400 faculty in over 30 departments and research institutes and hired dozens of faculty, including a MacArthur “genius” and a Carnegie Fellow.

A holder of fellowships at the Center for Human Values at Princeton and the Netherlands Institute of Advanced Study, Connolly is the author or editor of three books, over 30 articles, and nearly 40 book reviews. She serves on a number of editorial boards, including the Journal for the History of Ideas, and her writing has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, The Village Voice, The Times Literary Supplement, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Bookforum and The Nation.  Her CV can be found here.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate School and University Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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A Message from CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. and Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz

Dear CUNY Community:

We write today to condemn the hatred and bigotry that have gripped the country in recent days. The senseless murder of 11 Jews who were worshiping in the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh was the worst anti-Semitic attack in our nation’s history. Those slayings came only days after two African-Americans were randomly murdered while they shopped for groceries in a Louisville suburb, by a white man who had failed to gain entry to a predominantly African-American church. We were also all horrified by the discovery of explosive devices, some found near CUNY campuses, that were sent to national leaders last week.

We extend our heartfelt condolences to the victims and families of these vile crimes, and to all those across the country who have felt wounded by these most un-American acts, the impacts of which extend far beyond the communities directly targeted. The effects of hate-provoked violence are harmful to every person who treasures America’s legacy of pluralism and inclusion, to say nothing of the religious freedoms that are a bedrock principle of our Constitution. It is important that we stand together in defense of these values, and in condemnation of those who would seek to undermine them. Hatred and violence have no place in our society, and it is imperative that we redouble our efforts to combat them.

The City University of New York was established to enable those of every race, religion and background to obtain a high-quality education and the promises of opportunity. The many campuses that comprise our great University are buoyed and enriched by our diversity, vitality, and harmony. Members of CUNY’s Interfaith Council have been asked this fall to work with University and community leaders, pursuing strategies to bridge our differences and find common ground where it exists.

Sincerely,

William C. Thompson Jr.
Chairperson of The City University of New York Board of Trustees

Vita Rabniowitz
Interim Chancellor of The City University of New York


CUNY School of Professional Studies Student Leonard Blades Appointed to University Student Senate Steering Committee

New York, NY – October, 29, 2018 – The CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) is proud to announce that MS in Disability Services in Higher Education student Leonard Blades has been appointed to serve as Vice Chair of Disabled Student Affairs on the University Student Senate (USS) Steering Committee for the 2018-2019 academic year.

The USS Plenary unanimously elected Blades to this position due to his extensive personal experience with disability combined with the leadership and advocacy he has exercised on behalf of students with disabilities in the CUNY community. In addition to currently serving as the USS graduate delegate, Blades is an active member of the School’s Student Association, Accessibility and Inclusion Committee, Abilities and Resources Committee, Professional Development Grant Committee, and Special Events Committee.

“As Vice Chair for Disability Student Affairs elect, I will have the opportunity to further demonstrate and fine tune my advocacy skills on behalf of the over 12,000 students with disabilities who attend CUNY,” says Blades. “United in coalition, we can accomplish amazing things throughout CUNY, NYC, and the State. I’m humbled at the possibility.”

In his new position, Blades plans to advocate for multiple platforms affecting CUNY students with disabilities, including ensuring equal access to technology fee benefits, developing a publicized emergency evacuation plan, encouraging faculty to develop a “disability statement” on all syllabi, and lobbying the NYS Legislature for an increased contribution to the Americans with Disabilities Act lump sum allocation to CUNY.

About the University Student Senate

The University Student Senate of CUNY was founded in 1972 with the mission of preserving the accessibility, affordability, and excellence of higher education within the University. The organization is charged with protecting the rights of the student body, furthering the cause of public higher education, and promoting the general welfare of its student constituents and the University. The USS delegates are responsible for the representative governance of the 500,000 students of the 25 CUNY campuses.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 5% in the Nation in U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2018 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs. Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Letter to Students & Families, Week of October 29, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

This is Spirit Week!

As previously announced, students are welcome to wear festive attire aligned with the following themes:

  • Monday: Wacky Tacky/Denim Day
  • Tuesday: Dress Like a Tourist Day
  • Wednesday: Halloween
  • Thursday: Pajama Day
  • Friday: Multiples Day

As always students are prohibited from bringing anything sharp including fake weapons. Students are also prohibited from wearing masks, sunglasses, attire that attacks the dignity of others or disrupts the educational process.

Please note that there will be a rapid dismissal on Wednesday October 31, 2018: No after-school activities including After3 and SONYC.

In addition to the positive, optimistic and upbeat nature of Spirit Week, please join me by speaking at home and with your family about one of NEST+m’s core values: Inclusivity.

Now more than ever we must ensure that every NEST+m student, family, teacher and faculty member is seen, valued and cared for.

It is our work, together, to take an explicit stance that celebrates the diversity within our school community while explicitly declaring our opposition to bias of any kind.

How to do this? First: Make it public. Let our students and families know that we are an anti-racist, anti-homophobic, anti-bias school community that values and celebrates the diverse lived experiences of our students, families teachers and faculty.

Next: It is our job together to ensure that students are upholding our expectations of kindness and Respect for All.

The following resources have been shared with NEST+m’s Teachers and Faculty. I am writing to share them with you too.

Please see:

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Election Day: Tuesday November 6th is Election Day. No school for students.
  • Veterans Day: Schools are closed Monday November 12th in observance of Veteran’s Day.
  • Term 1 Marking Period 1 ends on Wednesday November 14th.
  • Save the Date: Parent Teacher Conferences are:
    – Thursday November 29th – 4:45pm – 7:45 pm – Rapid dismissal, no After3 or SONYC programs in session
    – Friday November 30th – 12:40pm – 2:40pm (dismissal at 11:30am; no After3 or SONYC programs in session

CUNY researchers gauge hypertension prevalence among residents of Haitian slums

Slum housing in Port au PrinceResidents of urban slums are vulnerable to poor health outcomes because of a confluence of poverty, inadequate healthcare access and environmental and social disadvantage. Hypertension is increasingly common in Haiti, where 74 percent of the urban population live in slums.

To estimate the prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors among adults in four slum communities in Port-au-Prince, a research collaboration of the Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH) at CUNY SPH, Weill Cornell Medical College, and the Haitian Study Group on Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections (GHESKIO) Centers, conducted a population-representative study recently published in the Journal of Hypertension.

The analysis, led by Olga Tymejczyk, a research scientist at the ISPH, found that hypertension prevalence was high across the age spectrum. Overweight/obesity was the most common risk factor (20.6 percent among men, 48.5 percent among women), while smoking was less common (11.8 and 3.9 percent, respectively). Increasing age and high hypertension prevalence in immediate surroundings were associated with greater odds of hypertension among residents. Among men, having migrated to the current community from other parts of Port-au-Prince or Haiti in the three years prior was also associated with hypertension. The study highlights the need to better understand the possible effects of intraurban migration and environmental risk factors on hypertension and ensure that the benefits of cost-effective prevention and treatment programs extend to this economically disadvantaged population.

“Slum populations are growing worldwide, with increasing urbanization,” Tymejczyk says. “These communities face multiple sources of disadvantage that may not be well captured in research focused on urban health more broadly. Addressing the growing burden of non-communicable diseases requires focused efforts to examine the health status of slum communities and to make their health needs visible.”

Tymejczyk, O; McNairy, ML; Petion, JS; Rivera, VR; Dorélien, A; Peck, M; Seo, G; Walsh, KF; Fitzgerald, DW; Peck, RN; Joshi, A; Pape, JW; Nash, D. Hypertension prevalence and risk factors among residents of four slum communities… Journal of Hypertension. 10.10.18


Neighborhood “greening” may lead to gentrification and displacement

Entrance to the Joseph Daniel Wilson Gardens in HarlemMany post-industrial cities have areas of vacant and derelict land (VDL) which can have negative health and environmental impacts on nearby residents. VDL is located predominantly in poorer neighborhoods, posing a disproportionate risk upon these communities. Repurposing these areas into green spaces and community gardens may mitigate the risk of health and environmental hazards, but they may also result in unintended adverse impacts on the community, particularly displacement stemming from rises in property values due to new-found developer interest in the area.

Using Brooklyn, New York as a case study, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Andrew Maroko and Professor Juliana Maantay of Lehman College examined whether proximity to community gardens in less affluent neighborhoods is associated with an increased likelihood of gentrification. The results were published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

The researchers used Geographic Information Systems and two spatial methods: a census block group proximity analysis, and a hot spot analysis, to determine the potential impact of proximity to community gardens in lower-income areas. The researchers found that proximity to community gardens is associated with significant increases in per capita income over the five years study period, which is indicative of areas undergoing gentrification. This has implications for environmental justice because existing lower-income residents are likely to be displaced after their community is improved environmentally.

“We think community led responses to environmental equity issues are extremely important, and our concern is the possibility that the very things which a community can do to improve their local environment may ultimately contribute to their displacement from it,” says Maroko.

Juliana A. Maantay and Andrew R. Maroko, Brownfields to Greenfields: Environmental Justice Versus Environmental Gentrification. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2233; doi:10.3390/ijerph15102233


Alumnus Art Antin: “I was in that seat”

Alumnus Art Antin

Art Antin is a proud alumnus of Bronx Community College. But his visit on Thursday, October 4, was the first time he had been on the historic University Heights campus since it became the home of BCC in 1973 — he graduated in the 1960s. In the intervening years, Mr. Antin went into business, becoming the co-founder of Veterinary Centers of America (VCA), the largest animal health care company in the world with over 800 animal hospitals in 43 states and five Canadian provinces and providing diagnostic services to more than 17,000 independent hospitals. It was acquired by Mars, Inc. in 2017 for over $9 billion.

Mr. Antin came to BCC as part of the Trailblazers series, in which successful alumni return to share the knowledge they’ve acquired in their careers with students dreaming of the careers ahead of them. In that capacity, Mr. Antin spoke to a classroom of business and animal care majors in North Hall and Library about what goes into the creation of a successful business.

“I loved the opportunity to come back and share my story,” he said. “I know that the students are not sure of what they want to do or where they’re going to end up. I sat in that seat.”

His basic message: “Stay in school. BCC was the stepping stone for everything I did. I know I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t get my degree and went on from there.”

After the class, Mr. Antin toured Meister Hall’s science labs with President Isekenegbe and other administrators, noting “Everybody in this room is here only because we are educated.”

Mr. Antin’s appearance was only part of his involvement in BCC life. Over the summer, a VCA regional vice president visited the campus to help establish ties between the College and the company, with an eye towards sending future speakers to BCC to talk to students who might be considering futures in veterinary medicine. “There’s a market for people with those skills,” Mr. Antin observed. Also discussed during his visit — the possibility of a pop-up clinic to which BCC students could bring their ailing pets.


City Tech’s Dental Hygiene and Vision Care Clinics Give Back to Veterans on November 12

The clinical healthcare programs at New York City College of Technology (City Tech), in Downtown Brooklyn, have made a commitment to veterans in conjunction with Veterans Day: “We serve those who have given so much in service to us.” On Monday, November 12, veterans can receive free care in the College’s Dental Hygiene Clinic as well as its Vision Care Clinic.

The Dental Hygiene Clinic is available, with 1 PM and 6 PM clinic start times. Vets can receive a wide range of services free of charge, from oral cancer exams to selective polishing, and everything in between. Appointments should be made in advance by calling 718.260.5074. The clinic is accredited by the American Dental Association’s Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) and the services offered are more complete than one would likely receive in a dentist’s office.

The Vision Care Clinic is available by appointment on November 12, from 8:30 AM until 2:00 PM. Appointments can be made by calling 718.260.5298. Vets will receive free eye exams and free frames if they purchase lenses (at least 30% below retail prices).

Robert Timmins, coordinator of the Office of Veterans Support Services said, “We are delighted that City Tech is offering these services to veterans. It is our great privilege to work with the more than 250 veterans seeking a City Tech degree.”

Dr. David Smith, dean of the School of Professional Studies at City Tech said, “It is my very great pleasure to support our service-related disciplines, and even more so when we can help honor those who have put their lives on the line in the defense of our country.”

Both clinics are in City Tech’s new Academic Complex at 285 Jay Street, at the corner of Tillary and Jay. The Dental Hygiene Clinic is on the 7th floor, with the reception area adjacent to the elevators. The Vision Care clinic is on the 8th floor, in room 803.


Mexican novelist Carmen Boullosa delivers CCNY’s Cátedra Vargas Llosa lecture

Acclaimed Mexican writer and poet Carmen Boullosa

Carmen Boullosa, the internationally acclaimed Mexican writer, concludes The City College of New York’s sixth Cátedra Vargas Llosa, Friday, Oct. 26, with a lecture on Mario Vargas Llosa’s2003 novel “El paraíso en la otra esquina” (The Way to Paradise). It starts 7 p.m. at the Instituto Cervantes of New York.

Boullosa and Raquel Chang-Rodríguez, Distinguished Professor in City College’s Division of  Humanities and the Arts, led the 2018 Cátedra that focused on El paraíso. The novel revolves around two non-fictional characters, the Peruvian Flora Tristán (1803-1844) — a binational writer and activist who has been called the first feminist of the Americas — and her grandson, the French painter Paul Gauguin (1848-1903).

Boullosa and Chang-Rodríguez compared the two characters’ attitudes towards artistic creation, money, social institutions, notions of modernity, and “Primitivism.” They examined Flora Tristán’s memoirs, “Peregrinaciones de una paria” (1838); explored some of Gauguin´s paintings, and considered Vargas Llosa’s approach to narrative strategy as presented in his essays on the art of the novel.

For information on Boullosa’s lecture, contact CCNY’s Department of Classical and Modern Languages & Literature at 212-650-6731, or email rchangrodriguez@ccny.cuny.edu .

Launched at CCNY in 2013 as the first of its kind in the United States, the Cátedra Vargas Llosa is offered through CCNY’s Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures, with the cooperation of the Instituto Cervantes. It honors the Peruvian-born Nobel laureate.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Baruch College Ranks #1 for Social Mobility from CollegeNET

Fourth Consecutive Year Earning Top Spot on CollegeNET’s Social Mobility Index

Baruch College continues to earn national recognition as an engine of social mobility.

In CollegeNET’s 2018 Social Mobility Index (SMI), released on October 23, Baruch ranked #1 for the fourth consecutive year. The SMI analyzes 1,380 four-year colleges and universities nationwide according to “how effectively they enroll students from low-income backgrounds and graduate them into well-paying jobs.”

“I am pleased that CollegeNET continues to recognize Baruch College’s success in promoting student social mobility,” said Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, president of Baruch College. “Our success in this area is the result of factors that benefit all of our students: strong academics, an engaged faculty, high affordability, and comprehensive support services that enable students to complete their studies expeditiously and to succeed in professional environments and graduate studies.”

He added, “Since the College’s founding 50 years ago, Baruch has strived to deliver these essentials to our hard-working and striving students, many of whom are—as they always have been—immigrants to the United States and frequently the first in their family ever to attend college.”

Supporting Students at Every Step

CollegeNET said the goal of the SMI is to “recast the competition for ‘prestige’ among institutions so that it drives factors that improve access, affordability and graduation rate, and thereby advances higher education’s contribution to economic mobility.”

In its nationally distributed press release, CollegeNET credits Baruch College’s “start-to-finish program that makes college affordable and that supports low-income students every step of the way — from matriculation to career placement.”

Read more about the 2018 SMI rankings and methodology here.

Social Mobility Leader

CollegeNET recognized Baruch College as a “social mobility innovator” earlier this year. To illustrate Baruch’s success in advancing social mobility, this announcement featured interviews with four Baruch undergraduates and alumni who shared their personal stories of achieving academic and professional achievement because of Baruch’s encouraging environment, career services, and opportunities ranging from mentorships to networking.

In August, Baruch College ranked #1 for social mobility among four-year public institutions, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2018 Almanac. The Chronicle’s list was drawn from a widely reported study of colleges’ impact on social mobility by a team led by Harvard economics professor Raj Chetty (formerly of Stanford University). The team’s 2017 study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility,” tracked students from nearly every U.S. college, including nongraduates, and measured their subsequent earnings against millions of anonymous tax filings and financial aid records.

Baruch was also prominently highlighted in bestselling author Steven Brill’s book Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty-Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It. Brill points to Baruch as an example of a higher education institution that is “laying the foundation for real, lasting change.” In the section about the College, “A Non-Elite Mobility Engine,” Brill writes that Baruch “has developed a menu of programs that leaves little to chance and that offers a road map for how more higher education institutions can create new kind of meritocracy that is not nearly as generationally entrenched.”

See below for coverage of Baruch College additional recognitions during 2018.

# # #


CCNY researchers find K-core as a predictor of structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems

A network metric called the K-core could predict structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems, according to research by physicists at The City College of New York. The K-core appears able to forecast which species is likely to face extinction first, by global shocks such as climate change, and when an ecosystem could collapse due to external forces.

Led by Flaviano Morone and Hernán A. Makse, the physicists from CCNY’s Division of Science used state of the art network theory to predict the tipping point of an ecosystem under severe external shocks like a global increase of temperature. They determined that a network metric termed the K-core of the network can predict the terrifying tipping point of climate Armageddon.

The idea applies to any network — from species interacting in ecosystems, like plant-pollinators or predator-prey — to financial markets where brokers interact in a financial network to determine the prices of stocks and products.

In all these networks a hierarchical structure emerges: each species in the ecosystem belong to a given shell in the network: the so called K-shells. In the periphery of the network is where the commensalists live. These are species that mainly receive the benefits from the core of the network but give nothing back (not to be confused with parasites which benefit from but at the same time harm the network core).

“Amazingly, these peripheral shells are highly populated, indeed, there are many commensalist species in most ecosystems and markets,” noted Makse. “These species are predicted to go extinct first and much before the entire ecosystem collapses.”

Fortunately, the CCNY theory provides early warning signals that can be monitored to predict this collapse well in advance.  Indeed, monitoring the health of the vital inner K-core of the network is the clear marker to anticipate the ecosystem collapse.

“The theory has enormous implications for not only monitoring ecosystem’s health but also financial markets,” said Makse.

The study, whose other co-author is research associate Gino Del Ferraro, appears in the current issue of Nature Physics. Click here to read the entire paper.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


LESSONS IN LEADERSHIP FROM COLLEGE PRESIDENTS

Lessons in Leadership From College Presidents

 

On October 22, 2018, in front of 180 guests at the Princeton Club, Women in Development brought together three powerful college presidents to discuss leadership, management, fundraising, and careers. John Jay’s President Karol V. Mason, was joined on stage with Rev. Dr. Serene Jones, President of Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York; and Laura Sparks, President of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Their stories and advice encouraged everyone in the room. Here are some of our favorite parts of their enlightening conversation.

“Don’t be afraid to take a step back. I was a deputy for someone who was 10 years younger than me, and that was okay, my ego was intact. I was there to learn.” —Karol V. Mason 

 

Their Road To Leadership

KM: My first job at the Department of Justice was a deputy for someone. I was offered an opportunity for a Senate-confirmed job, but I said no because I knew what I didn’t know. I knew nothing about government. Don’t be afraid to take a step back. I was a deputy for someone who was 10 years younger than me, and that was okay, my ego was intact. I was there to learn. As a result of that, four years later, I did become a Senate-confirmed person for the Office of Justice programs. At the DOJ, I did a lot of work with John Jay, and that’s how I became familiar with the College. When President Jeremy Travis decided he was stepping down, I realized taking this position was the perfect circle of my life.

SJ: My father had been the president of a small liberal arts college where I grew up. This actually had the opposite effect on me. It made me swear that I would never go down that career path because I saw the impact it had on our family. So when the search person called and asked me if I would be interested in my current position, I said no. Then she asked me to describe what the next president of Union needed to do. As I began to describe what revitalizing spiritual education meant, I ended up describing myself into the position.

LS: A recruiter called me and said that they had an interesting proposition, and told me about Cooper Union. I questioned why I would go to this school, and like any good recruiter does, they told me not to say no right away. When I learned more about the institution, I completely fell in love with the founding vision. There was a vision that quality education should be accessible to everybody, and I have seen through my prior work how important access to education is.

“In your job you can be uncertain about a particular decision, but you can still have confidence.” —Laura Sparks 

 

Their Lessons In Leadership

LS: In your job you can be uncertain about a particular decision, but you can still have confidence. That confidence comes from experience. It comes from learning about people and having made some mistakes. Every day I try very hard to take in as much information as I can.

KM: The night before I started this job, I called up my best friend Valerie Jarrett and I said I was scared. She told me it would be okay. That’s what you need, somebody to bump you back up and say that it will be okay. It’s okay to be scared and admit your vulnerability in the right place and the right time. To me it’s like jumping into a cold pool of water. I was terrified, now I’m fine with it. You just jump into the pool of water and develop the skills overtime.

SJ: There’s not a single day that I’m not uncertain and I’m not shaken by something that I don’t have an answer for. I used to think that CEO types had to know all the answers. I actually had to go home and process what it meant for me to be asked a question, and then say, “I don’t know.” I realized that when I say, “I don’t know,” many times no one else in the room actually knows either. But that’s an invitation to a conversation.

Karol V. Mason and Serene Jones

(left to right) Karol V. Mason and Serene Jones

 

“As a black woman, I have spent my life exceeding other people’s expectations. I find it to my advantage, because they don’t know what’s coming.” —Karol V. Mason

 

Their Best Advice

KM: Make choices that maximize your options. It’s your choice which way you want to go in your career, and it’s your job not to pass up opportunities that could open your career down another path. Don’t worry about other people’s preconceived notions about you. As a black woman, I have spent my life exceeding other people’s expectations. I find it to my advantage, because they don’t know what’s coming.

SJ: Before I started my job, I was sent to Harvard’s President School for a week. They teach you to take off one day of the week, one weekend of the month, and one month a year. It’s a simple thing, but it makes a huge difference.

LS: Understand that lots of different perspectives are important and valid. It can be uncomfortable to have somebody push back on your ideas, but learning to live in that discomfort is really important. Also, gratitude is important. I have a tremendous team, and nothing happens without them. Recognizing this and being grateful for it is really important.


CCNY & partners develop GPS-type app for the visually impaired

CCNY computer scientist Zhigang Zhu at a conference in Munich, Germany, where he presented his research on ASSIST.

Navigating a busy airport or bus terminal can be a challenging proposition for anyone, let alone the visually impaired or disabled. Enter ASSIST, an app for indoor navigation in development by a City College of New York-led consortium. The ASSIST app is part of the SAT-Hub project, which has received a boost from a $750,000 three-year grant from the Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) Program at the National Science Foundation.

This brings to $850,000 the NSF’s support for the app’s development. Last year, the foundation awarded City College a $100,000 Smart & Connected Community (SCC) planning grant.

In addition, Bentley Systems, Inc., a software development company and the primary industrial partner on the SAT-Hub project, is providing an additional $75,000 over three years in industrial support.

SAT-Hub stands for “Smart and Accessible Transportation Hub”. The acronym for “Assistive Sensor Solutions for Independent and Safe Travel,” ASSIST will provide GPS-type assistance to users ranging from the blind or visually impaired to autistic and disabled people.

“It will help them navigate large public transportation hubs such as airports and bus stations which can be very complicated for the visually impaired or autistic,” said Zhigang Zhu, Herbert G. Kayser Chair Professor of Computer Science at City College and the project leader.

According to Zhu, ASSIST will help users find the best path to avoid foot traffic, tell them where they are and how to get to their destination.

The primary research is being done in CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering, where Zhu, who also teaches at The Graduate Center, CUNY, directs City College’s Visual Computing Laboratory. CCNY students, both graduate and undergraduate, are engaged in the research.

CCNY’s major research partners include Rutgers University which carries out research in building modeling and transportation management, and the not-for-profit Lighthouse Guild, dedicated to reducing the burdens of vision loss and to improving the quality of life for those with reduced vision.

The SAT-Hub project started with a Summer Research Team project led by Zhu at Rutgers’ DHS Command, Control and Interoperability Center for Advanced Data Analysis.  Lighthouse Guild joined the team for testing the app with users.

Click here for a YouTube video of SAT-Hub’s potential.

The Borough of Manhattan Community College, Goodwill, New Jersey Passaic County, New Jersey Transit, the New York City Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities, New York City Regional Innovation Node at CUNY and the New York State Commission for the Blind are some of the other partners.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


STUDENT OPENING OF THE IMMIGRANT STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER

Student Opening of the Immigrant Student Success Center

 

On October 16th, the John Jay community celebrated the opening of the Immigrant Student Success Center. As a safe space where students can receive help and guidance through the many hurdles regarding their immigration status. The center aims to provide undocumented students the support they need to achieve their career and life goals. “Any student, regardless of status, can come here and ask for resources,” says Cynthia Carvajal, Manager of the Immigrant Student Success Center. “No human being is illegal, and in that capacity, students have the right to experience joy and learning. We have several systems that are failing our students. So this space is meant to help them.”

 

Cynthia Carvajal

“No human being is illegal, and in that capacity, students have the right to experience joy and learning.” —Cynthia Carvajal, Manager of the Immigrant Student Success Center

 

The student opening of the Center created an opportunity for bonding over food, games, music, and dancing. The students had the chance to learn more about the Center and interact with John Jay classmates, faculty, and staff. We spoke to several students to learn more about what the center means to them, what they hope it will provide, and what it means to be an immigrant.

Fortune Kuverua

Fortune Kuverua

Fortune Kuverua
Graduate Student, International Crime and Justice
“To be an immigrant means to be an American. America without immigrants is not America. We are the melting pot. Wherever we come from, we bring that culture and that experience, and the desire to be part of this country. Once upon a time, America brought people here by force. Today we are willing to come and want to study. We are telling everyone that we are capable and can do it.”

 

Lisa Cho

Lisa Cho

Lisa Cho
Junior, Criminology and Dispute Resolution Certificate
“This center has given me a place where I feel safe. When I first came to John Jay, I didn’t feel as welcomed because I didn’t have a community to go to. But once this center was created, there were a lot more people who were willing to come out and say ‘Hi, my name is, and I’m undocumented.’ To be able to connect with them is such a great opportunity.”

 

Arom Contreras

Arom Contreras

Arom Contreras
Senior, Latin America and Latina/o Studies
“This center means a lot to me, considering that both my parents are immigrants from Guatemala. I’m not an immigrant myself, but I am so glad that we now have a resource center that will offer support, especially for student immigrants who are facing difficulties during these times.”

 

Diana Gonzalez

Diana Gonzalez

Diana Gonzalez
Freshman, Law and Society
“In my high school there was no support for undocumented students. It was hard my junior and senior years, because the counselor didn’t have any idea how to handle students with my status. I had to travel all the way to SoHo to work with a counselor who knew more about helping undocumented students. It was nice having her help, but I lived far away, and I had to travel a long way to get there. Having this center here and accessible, means the world to me. It’s a huge weight off my shoulder.”

 

Elza Kochueva

Elza Kochueva

Elza Kochueva
Senior, Law and Society
“I really hope this center will provide fellowship or internship opportunities for the students. I heard that a lot of undocumented students do not get paid while doing internships. So I hope that they can get some type of stipend.”

 

Scenes from the event…

Students from Immigrant Student Success Center

Students from Immigrant Student Success Center

Students from Immigrant Student Success Center

Students from Immigrant Student Success Center


FALL CAREER & INTERNSHIP FAIR OFFERS NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES

Fall Career & Internship Fair Offers Networking Opportunities

 

On September 20th, 1,209 John Jay students attended the Career and Internship Fair, taking advantage of the 111 recruiters there. Sponsored by the Dallas Police Department, Portland Police and the U.S. Army, recruiters were eager to meet with students and offer internship opportunities as well as full-time and part-time employment.

“Fairs like these are critical because it gives employers the opportunity to meet our students, and offers students the chance to practice their networking skills. In this day in age, we need to be doing more than hiding behind the computer sending off resumes. We need to be on the front lines advocating for ourselves,” said Kristina Simonsen, Assistant Director for Employer Relations. “As they say, it’s not just what you know but who you know. It’s never too early to start building your network. Start with rehearsing your elevator pitch, then put it into practice at our fairs. You will be better positioned to land a job or internship upon graduation if you have a curated network of professionals in your corner.” We asked students and recruiters what they hoped to gain from this year’s fair; here is a sampling of their thoughts:

 

Renise Williams, Director of Recruitment & Selection, Blue Engine
“We are an education non-profit and it’s great to see students who want exposure to things outside of what the university is known for, which is criminal justice. We tend to get a lot of students who are opened to explore other opportunities, and John Jay students are pretty well prepared for the career fair when they come.”

Renise Williams and Abbie Galloway

Renise Williams and Abbie Galloway

 

John E. Mitchell, Officer & Recruiter, Baltimore County Police Department
“John Jay is like the melting pot for recruiting. For us in law enforcement it’s a really good college to come to mainly because a lot of the students are criminal justice majors and trying to pursue a career in law enforcement.”

John Mitchell

John Mitchell

 

Daniel Lebron, Officer with the Department of Public Safety, Syracuse University
“This is my first year recruiting at John Jay and I heard that it was a college for law enforcement. Basically a lot of students who are interested in law enforcement will come over to our desk and see what benefits we have that other agencies don’t offer, like schooling. If you don’t have your bachelor’s degree, you are able to get it for free with our department. If you are working towards your master’s degree, the only thing that you will have to pay for is the taxes. It’s a win-win situation.”

Daniel Lebron

Daniel Lebron

 

Dannerys Fuccillo, Human Resources Generalist, 1-800-Flowers
“Recruiting here at John Jay gives students the opportunity to know of other positions and organizations they can apply to that are not within the criminal justice industry.”

Dannerys Fuccillo

Dannerys Fuccillo

 

Camille Beckles, Project Manager, Center for Policing Equity
“John Jay students have a really high caliber of work ethic; they’re really interested in the justice arena and for our purposes they have a really great research background. We found that in working with John Jay students, they bring great ideas to the table and have proven to be hard workers, which is important for our organization.”

Camille Beckles

Camille Beckles

 

Andy Chen, sophomore at John Jay
“I hope to get an internship that helps me gain experience and more knowledge on my potential career field.”

Andy Chen

Andy Chen

 

David Lemieux, Officer with the Portland Maine Police Department
“Just looking at the amount of people here, there are almost 1,000 people. We have gone to several different colleges throughout the state of Maine and they don’t have as many people, so coming down here to a diverse college like this, it’s nice to have the students come and talk to us and see what we have to offer.”

David Lemieux

David Lemieux

 

Debbie Fischer, Talent Acquisition Manager, Enterprise Holdings
“We’ve been coming here for years. We’ve had a long standing relationship with John Jay and I notice that the students here are very committed, and I always find great talent here. We are usually looking for management trainees and interns and sometimes if students are more interested in business we will have opportunities for them at Enterprise.”

Debbie Fischer

Debbie Fischer

 

Sarahn O’Uhuru, Recruitment Coordinator, New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner
“John Jay has passionate students who are eager to learn and contribute.”

Sarahn O'Uhuru

Sarahn O’Uhuru

 

Anthony Ali, Director of Dispute Resolution, Better Business Bureau of New York
“The students are amazing. We always get a great turnout here for our career fairs. This is probably the eighth or ninth time that we are here and I will say that our internship goes well with the students—50% of our office is made up of John Jay students both internship and part-time. This is the school that we look forward to coming to the most because of the students, the turnout and how great the experience is.”

Anthony Ali

Anthony Ali

 

Leslie Hernandez, Trainee and Outreach Coordinator, New Alternatives for Children, Bridges to Health Program
“For New Alternatives for Children, this is a great opportunity for us to meet with academic students who are interested in our field, and we always have a great time because all the students are prepared and look forward to learning more about our program.”

Leslie Hernandez

Leslie Hernandez

 

Darrin Kazlauskas, Program Manager Recruiting, Portland Police Bureau
“John Jay has great students who are well prepared. We have interviewed and hired several students from this college and they’re always of better quality and caliber than students we may find elsewhere.”

Darrin Kazlaukas and Rashida Saunders

Rashida Saunders and Darrin Kazlaukas 


LaGuardia Community College has receives a $1.5M grant to expand capacity of our on-campus daycare, the Early Childhood Learning Center

LaGuardia Community College has been awarded a four-year $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education that will enable the college to expand support for student-parents.

The grant, from the federal Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program, will enable the College to increase the number of children served by LaGuardia’s on-campus subsidized daycare, the Early Childhood Learning Center (ECLC), by 20 percent—from 219 to upwards of 263 children. As well, the ECLC is establishing a program to address the emotional and mental health of parents, and providing subsidies for the lowest income student-parents.

“I could not imagine dropping off my son somewhere, and then coming to LaGuardia,” said LaGuardia student Tracy Mingo, a 35-year-old single mom. “Here, it’s a one-stop shop. Knowing my son is nearby gives me so much comfort.”

The grant is part of nearly $6 million awarded by the U.S. Department of Education to six CUNY campuses, including LaGuardia, to support on-campus child care centers.

Read a CUNY press release about the grants.

Read an amNY article about the new funding.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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Panel of Five Business and Media Experts to Discuss Challenges of Marketing to Millennials Across Ever-Changing Media Platforms

Business Forum Breakfast
Friday, November 9, 2018
8:00 – 10:00 am

— Free Presentation by NBC, HULU, and AMC Executives, Queens College Expert Media Theorist, and Leading Marketing Consultant —

WHAT:
A panel discussion on Beyond Millennials: Advertising in the Age of New Media, by
Bob Broussard, president of Distribution, AMC Networks; Asaf Davidov, director, Ad Sales Research, Hulu; Susan Goldberg, founder and CEO of Susan Goldberg Leadership Consulting; Douglas Rushkoff, Queens College media studies professor, author, and documentarian; and Alan Wurtzel, former president of Research and Media Development, NBCUniversal.

Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5210, or register online here. Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background
Launched in 2005, the QC Business Forum brings together the business community, local government, academia, and students to provide an opportunity for town and gown to interact. Influential leaders in a number of fields serve as keynote speakers at its breakfast and lunchtime lectures, touching on issues vital to the local business community.

Bob Broussard, President of Distribution, AMC Networks
Bob Broussard is a graduate of Queens College and New York University School of Law. In 2006, Broussard became the president of distribution for AMC Networks, where he oversees multiplatform content licensing and affiliate marketing of several of the most popular and award-winning networks in cable television, including AMC, IFC, Sundance, and WE TV, as well as BBC AMERICA. Broussard also oversees the distribution of the Video on Demand offerings from IFC Films, IFC Midnight and Sundance Selects. Finally, he is responsible for developing and directing AMC Networks Inc.’s distribution strategy and leads the centralized AMC Networks distribution team, widely recognized as a leader in its field.

Asaf Davidov Director, Ad Sales Research, Hulu
Asaf Davidov oversees the day-to-day operations of Hulu’s ad sales research department. Davidov is responsible for leading third-party measurement innovation and solutions, ad-effectiveness and attribution studies, and custom sales research initiatives, including consumer behavior models and future advertising models. He also currently leads the sales team in research positioning and thought leadership activations through the market-facing portal, Hulu Insights. Davidov spent five years at NBCUniversal, where he focused on both consumer and advertising research for editorial and sales. Davidov began his career at Knowledge Networks, now GfK, as a research analyst.

Susan Goldberg, Founder and CEO of Susan Goldberg Leadership Consulting
After graduating from Washington University in St. Louis with a BA and Pace University with an MBA in International Economics and Marketing, Susan Goldberg began working as an independent marketing consultant. Her first business, Susan Goldberg Executive Search Consulting, launched in 2001, helped clients find and place the right leadership within their companies. In September 2016, she launched her refocused business, Susan Goldberg Leadership Consulting, which specializes in developing millennial talent through services that range from small group coaching sessions to speaking at board meetings and retreats. Her extensive knowledge on emerging leadership led her to co-author the book Leadership in Wonderland, a unique approach on how to become a more confident leader.

Douglas Rushkoff, Academic, Author, and Documentarian
Named one of the “world’s ten most influential intellectuals” by MIT, Douglas Rushkoff is an author and documentarian who studies human autonomy in a digital age. His 20 books include the upcoming Team Human, based on his podcast, as well as the bestsellers Present ShockThrowing Rocks and the Google Bus, and Program or Be Programmed, among others. He also made the PBS Frontline documentaries “Generation Like,” “The Persuaders,” and “Merchants of Cool.” Rushkoff’s work explores how different technological environments change our relationship to narrative, money, power, and one another. A leading voice for applying digital media toward social and economic justice, Rushkoff is a research fellow of the Institute for the Future and founder of the Laboratory for Digital Humanism at CUNY/Queens, where he teaches media theory and digital economics. His novels and comics, Ecstasy ClubA.D.D, and Aleister & Adolf, are being developed for the screen.

Alan Wurtzel, Former President of Research and Media Development for NBCUniversal
Alan Wurtzel has taught at the University of Georgia and Queens College. Wurtzel has written many articles for both academic journals and consumer publications, and his textbook Television Production served as a standard in the field for over 20 years. His media industry career spans more than 40 years; most recently, he was the president of research and media development for NBCUniversal. In addition, Wurtzel led the company’s broadcast standards and practices department, which oversees program content, advertising and commercial clearance. Throughout his tenure, Wurtzel oversaw numerous research initiatives for the company, including developing the TAMi, or Total Audience Measurement Index, a compilation of data designed to measure the total exposure to any one program across multiple media platforms. He continues to serve as a senior advisor for NBC.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its eighty years of service to the City and State through its outstanding liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its 19,000+ students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report’s Best College and a Forbes magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


In memoriam: Dr. Elizabeth Fee

Dr. Elizabeth FeeThe Women’s Caucus of APHA has asked that we share this moving tribute, authored by one of Dr. Fees close colleagues (and former advisee), Dr. Anne-Emanuelle Birn, Professor of Social & Behavioral Health Sciences Division with the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto.

A tribute to Dr. Elizabeth Fee

We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of Dr. Elizabeth Fee. Dr. Fee was a remarkable and influential public health historian, whose personal and professional trajectories led her to speak truth to and about power in public health, past and present.

From 1974 to 1995, Dr. Fee was a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health (now Bloomberg School), first in health humanities, then international health, and finally health policy, infusing historical and critical perspectives into each of these fields. Deeply curious about her institutional base, in 1987 she published Disease and Discovery: A History of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, 1916-1939. In this first-ever biography of the first-ever school of public health, Dr. Fee crafted what might have been a staid institutional history into an engaging and eyebrow-raising account that retraces the powerful forces, figures, and ideologies that shaped the school’s founding and early trajectory.

In 1990 Dr. Fee took over editorship of a rather moribund historical section of the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), called “Public Health, Then and Now” (which had earned the moniker of “Public Health, Now and Then” due to its infrequent appearance!). Together with Ted Brown, she transformed this section into one of the most dynamic aspects of the journal, making it a go-to venue for cutting-edge history of public health scholarship.

After influencing countless students and many colleagues over two decades at Johns Hopkins (where I was privileged to be her advisee), in 1995 Dr. Fee was named Chief of the History of Medicine Division (HMD), National Library of Medicine (NLM), at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, USA. In 2011, she became the Chief Historian of the NLM, a position she held until her retirement just a few months ago. At NLM, Dr. Fee added leadership and administrative skills, as well as a talent for engaging with broader publics, to her teaching and writing finesse.

In 1994 Liz helped cofound the Spirit of 1848, which is a Caucus affiliated with the American Public Health Association (APHA) and is committed to underscoring and analyzing the integral connections between social justice and public health. Both its listserv and its sessions at the APHA annual meeting are aimed at addressing the professional, practical, and scholarly isolation many progressives experience – and at working collectively and in dialogue, to understand and change how social divisions based on social class, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and age affect the public’s health. With the Spirit of 1848’s history committee consciously linked to the Sigerist Circle, Liz helped infuse historical passions and sensibilities into the Spirit of 1848’s various activities around the politics of public health.

Dr. Fee was the recipient of numerous honors, including Kellogg and Fulbright fellowships, the National Library of Medicine Regents Award, the Arthur Viseltear Award from APHA’s Medical Care Section, as well as endowed lectures across the world. Her more than 200 articles and chapters cover topics as diverse as bioterrorism, sin vs. science in the racialized treatment of syphilis in Baltimore, and popularizing the toothbrush, ever posing the question of whether there is anything to learn from history and speaking to both specialists and a broad public of all ages.

In recent years, despite facing multiple health challenges, Liz continued to write prolifically, particularly short pieces with a wide audience in mind that shed light on often little-known revolutionary figures and movements.

This small snapshot could not possibly capture the scholarly, professional, and personal contributions that Liz made across her lifetime. Without a doubt, the work of Elizabeth Fee, the doyenne of public health historians, will endure and continue to inform the critical progressive work of the many communities of practitioners, activists, politicians, and scholars around the world whose lives Liz touched and whose work she inspired.

–Anne-Emanuelle Birn, for whom Liz was a gem of a comrade, friend, & mentor.

*Dr. Fee’s beloved wife and sometime co-author, Mary Garofalo, has asked that donations in honor of Liz be made to the ALS Foundation and to progressive public health causes across the world.


Baruch College Ranks #3 among the “Best Colleges for Business Majors” by Money Magazine

Zicklin School of Business rises four spots from last year

Baruch College ranks #3 among the “Best Colleges for Business Majors,” according to Money magazine’s 2018 analysis of 50 schools in the U.S.

Moving up four spots from a year ago, Baruch places ahead of institutions such as University of Pennsylvania, University of Southern California, Georgetown University, and Boston College.

In its profile of Baruch College, Money cited that “students in Baruch’s well-known Zicklin School of Business benefit from the college’s New York City home—they’re just a few miles from Wall Street and close to the headquarters of many major corporations.”

“We are pleased to be ranked among the country’s top three best colleges for business majors,” said Fenwick Huss, the Willem Kooyker Dean of the Zicklin School of Business. “This latest national recognition brings well-deserved attention to Zicklin’s innovative undergraduate, graduate and executive programs that fully prepare our students to become future global business leaders.”

All 18 undergraduate degree programs at Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business provide students with the specialized knowledge and essential analytical and communications skills that are necessary to be successful in this field.

WATCH VIDEO: Learn more about the Zicklin School of Business in this virtual tour.

Baruch College: #1 in New York State

This top recognition for Baruch’s business school follows additional high marks in Money’sBest Colleges 2018” list, which evaluated 727 institutions nationwide based on educational quality, affordability and alumni success.

Baruch College ranked:

Advancing Social Mobility

Baruch placed among the top-10 schools due to the success of its recent graduates. Money reports that Baruch alumni earn an average of $54,500 in their early careers, which is about 16% higher than graduates from similar universities. Money also calls attention to the College’s above-average graduation rates, where “roughly two-thirds of Baruch students graduate within six years — a rate that is nearly 28% higher than at schools with students from similar academic and economic backgrounds.”

A detailed explanation of this year’s methodology is available at money.com/bestcolleges.

# # #

 


CCNY presents Pulitzer winner Tyehimba Jess and Juniper recipient Hasanthika Sirisena

 

Writer and CCNY alumna Hasanthika Sirisena.

Tyehimba Jess, the 2017 Pulitzer Prize winner, and Hasanthika Sirisena,   winner of the 2016 Juniper Prize for Fiction, are this month’s Kowald Reading Series guests at The City College of New York.

Sirisena, a 2006 alumna of City College’s MFA program in creative writing in the Division of Humanities and the Arts, reads from her work 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, in the Rifkind Center, NAC room 6/316.

In addition to the Juniper Prize, Sirisena received the 2008 Rona Jaffee Award, a top honor presented to emerging women writers of exceptional talent.

Jess will read in CCNY’s Shepard Hall room 95 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Oct. 30.

He won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry with his book “Olio.” The collection also earned the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and received an Outstanding Contribution to Publishing Citation from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association.

Olio was also nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN Jean Stein Book Award, and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Jess’ other book of poetry “Leadbelly,” was a winner of the 2004 National Poetry Series. The Library Journal and Black Issues Book Review both named it one of the “Best Poetry Books of 2005.”

The Kowald Series is made possible through the generosity of The Estate of Kenneth Kowald Fund for Advancing American Literature and the Rifkind Center for the Humanities. All the events are free and open to the public.

Pulitzer Prize winner Tyehimba Jess.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


BOXING CHAMP HEATHER HARDY ’05 GIVES KNOCKOUT ADVICE

Boxing Champ Heather Hardy ’05 Gives Knockout Advice

At this year’s New Student Convocation, alumna Heather Hardy ’05 wowed the crowd with a rousing keynote address. New students and transfer students walked out of the event fired up to fulfill their dreams. We decided that everyone in the John Jay community could be inspired by her story, and we wanted to learn more about Hardy’s long journey to becoming a boxing sensation.

What was your proudest moment from being a student at John Jay?
When I was a student at John Jay, I worked 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Then I traveled from downtown to take night classes. I think my proudest moment was when I made it to graduation. It wasn’t something anyone in my family had ever done, and at the time, very few people in my neighborhood had graduated from college. It was so satisfying taking that walk at Madison Square Garden and holding up my diploma.

What was a typical day like for you back when you were a student? What advice would you give a current John Jay student facing similar circumstances?
I was a working student at John Jay. I worked a full time 9:00 to 5:00 on the Bowery as a secretary in a lighting store. I would take the Q train to 57th and walk across to John Jay. I took four or five classes a semester. Then I would take the trains down to South Brooklyn, and I usually wouldn’t get home until 11:00 at night. I knew that if I ever wanted to make anything of my life, I would need a college degree. My advice to college students now is a quote I always take to heart from the late Mohammed Ali. He said, “I hated every minute of training, but suffer now, and live the rest of your life as a champion.”

Heather Hardy

Heather Hardy speaking at New Student Convocation

“There were times it felt like I had to take two steps back to take one step forward, but success lies in focusing on the forward motion.” —Heather Hardy ’05

 

Your ascent in the boxing world has been amazing. Can you tell our students about a moment when you doubted yourself, and a moment when you knew you had made it?
My rise in women’s boxing has been unprecedented. My coach believed in me long before I started to believe in myself. The best advice I can give anyone is to trust and have faith in the whole journey. There were times it felt like I had to take two steps back to take one step forward, but success lies in focusing on the forward motion. There were so many times I was ready to throw in the towel—boxing repeatedly turned its back on me in my career. For my 20th pro fight I was defending my WBC title at the Barclays Center. I sold $40k in tickets myself, I had news crews and sponsors present, and not only was my fight not being televised, they put me on first, before they even opened the doors for the fans to come in and cheer me on. I made my walk to the ring with no one clapping for me. The seats were all empty. I could’ve given up, but I decided to take another route and spent one year in professional MMA with Bellator. I used the exposure they were giving me to talk about the sad state of women’s boxing, and now, two years after that walk I took to the ring in an empty stadium, I will be boxing for my first world title, at Madison Square Garden, and it will be on HBO. Never give up on your dreams, because they might come true.

What’s the hardest part of boxing? How do you deal with it?
The hardest part of my job is making weight. Boxing is a weight-based sport, and I have to be in tip-top fighting shape to compete 10 full rounds. The month leading up to my fight is a strict diet, and the week before is basically just juice, water, and workouts three times a day. I love to eat so this is torture.

“Without John Jay, I wouldn’t be where I am today. What separates me from my competitors is my intelligence.” —Heather Hardy ’05

How would you finish this sentence? Without John Jay…
Without John Jay, I wouldn’t be where I am today. What separates me from my competitors is my intelligence. John Jay prepared me with the life skills I needed to run a business, maintain professional relationships, understand competitor strategies, and be aware of the way the world operates around me. I have my degree in forensic psychology, perhaps the furthest thing from boxing, but I never would’ve been able to rise above the rest without having that upper hand.

Can you tell us something surprising about yourself? 
One thing about me people that surprises people is that I didn’t start boxing until I was 28, long after graduating from John Jay. I wasn’t in college with the goal of becoming a professional athlete. My goal in college was to learn as much as I could and get my degree. My advice to students who are in school now, not knowing what they want to do with their lives, is to take all your required classes. Any degree is better than no degree. You have plenty of time to figure the rest out.


JOHN JAY SUPPORTS PURPLE THURSDAY

John Jay Supports Purple Thursday

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Today, John Jay President Karol V. Mason, students, faculty, and staff, are showing their support by wearing purple on “Purple Thursday.” This month-long observance reminds us to recognize, report, and prevent domestic violence.

President Karol Mason, VP Laura Ginns and two John Jay students at Purple Day

President Karol Mason with two John Jay students


GREATER GOTHAM GRABS PRESTIGIOUS AWARD FOR JOHN JAY COLLEGE’S MIKE WALLACE

Greater Gotham Grabs Prestigious Award for John Jay College’s Mike Wallace

(New York, NY) With a focus on the metamorphosis of New York City at the start of the 20th century, John Jay College Professor Mike Wallace’s Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898 to 1919 (Oxford University Press) tells a story so compelling it was selected for the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award presented by Phi Beta Kappa at its Annual Book Awards dinner.

“It’s a great honor to be chosen by such a prestigious and long-lived society (founded in 1776!),” said Wallace, a Distinguished Professor of History. “I’m particularly pleased to join such distinguished recipients, including my mentor Richard Hofstadter.”

Established in 1960, the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award is offered for scholarly studies that contribute significantly to interpretations of the intellectual and cultural condition of humanity. It carries a $10,000 prize.

Greater Gotham covers a period of immense change and growth in New York City; including the consolidation with Brooklyn, the introduction of massive infrastructure and a maturing of the financial economy. Over the past 100 years the city has continued to grow and change but still maintains its core identity.

“New York is constantly upgrading itself, but the version that emerged in the early 1900s is definitely recognizable, both for its iconic structures (skyscrapers, railroad terminals, public libraries), and macroeconomic sectors (banking, corporate headquarters, media center, tourist mecca), and the diversity — and inequality — of its citizenry,” said Professor Wallace who is also director of the Gotham Center for New York City History.

Greater Gotham is the sequel to the Pulitzer Prize winner Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898 which was co-written by Wallace and Edwin G. Burrows.

Wallace is already deep into the writing of the next book in the series, which will chronicle New York City from the end of World War I to the end of World War II. “Further volumes will depend on sufficient longevity!” added Wallace.

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: 
An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York is a Hispanic Serving Institution and Minority Serving Institution offering a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu and follow us on Twitter @JohnJayCollege.


City College chosen once again as a leading green college

City College selected as a top green campus.

The City College of New York has once again been selected as one of the 399 most environmentally responsible colleges for 2018 according to The Princeton Review Guide to 399 Green Colleges.

The Princeton Review chose the schools for this ninth annual edition of its “green guide” based on data from the company’s 2017-18 survey of hundreds of four-year colleges concerning the schools’ commitments to the environment and sustainability.

The City College of New York is an established leader in sustainability, with an expert faculty conducting groundbreaking research and providing innovative, interdisciplinary opportunities for students to engage in emerging approaches in architecture, engineering, science and the social sciences.

CCNY’s response to a rapidly urbanizing global community consists of courses on climate response, resilient design, water resource management and energy, with engineering, science and architectural degree programs at both the undergraduate and graduate level that address the sustainability challenges of the 21st century.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.​

 

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Contact Susan Konig

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

212 650 8437


How substance use affects adherence to PrEP among gay and bisexual men

Tableau of drugs- pills, coke, marijuana, and alcohol.Research has shown that drug and alcohol use interferes with anti-retroviral medication adherence among gay and bisexual men (GBM) living with HIV. There is limited parallel examination of whether the same holds true for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) adherence among HIV-negative GBM.

In a study published this month in the journal AIDS and Behavior, CUNY SPH Professor Christian Grov and colleagues interviewed 104 PrEP-using GBM, half of whom engaged in club drug use (ketamine, ecstasy, GHB, cocaine, or methamphetamine). Participants completed day-by-day retrospective interviews as well as prospective diaries to record their substance using and medication adherence–generating 9532 days of data. Participants reported their day-by-day PrEP, club drug, marijuana, and heavy alcohol use (5 + drinks in one sitting).

“In our study, we found that adherence was overall high, with the average person only missing between 1 and 2 doses over a given 30-day period,” said Grov, the study’s lead author.

The researchers found that, on average, club drug users were no more likely to miss a dose of PrEP than non-club drug users. However, club drug use (at the event level) increased the odds of missing a dose on the same day by 55 percent and the next day (e.g., a “carryover effect”) by 60 percent. “This suggests that although club drug users appeared to have similar aggregate levels of adherence, their missed doses were specifically timed around instances of club drug use.

The study did not identify an event-level effect of marijuana use or heavy drinking on PrEP adherence.

“We did not hypothesize that marijuana would impact adherence, but parallel literature on alcohol suggests it has impacted adherence among HIV-positive populations,” said Grov. “Current guidelines specify that someone should take their PrEP every day in order to maximize its protection against HIV. Alternate dosing strategies—whereby PrEP is taken less frequently and timed around instances in which sex occurs—is currently being investigated. Should time-driven PrEP become approved for use, our next question becomes, ‘Who would be the most appropriate candidates for that?’”

Because this study found that instances of club drug use were associated with instances of non-adherence, the authors concluded that club drug users could have greater protective effects from daily oral or long-acting injectable PrEP compared to a time (event)driven PrEP.

Grov, C., Rendina, H.J., John, S.A. et al. AIDS Behav (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2309-9


Re-thinking Alzheimer’s disease therapeutic targets using gene-based tests

Two connected puzzle pieces with the words Alzheimer's and genetics, symbolizing the link between genes and disease.Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating condition with no known cure. Existing drugs only alleviate symptoms. Given repeated and costly drug failures, CUNY SPH Professor Mary Schooling and colleagues assessed systematically whether approved and investigational AD drugs are targeting products of genes strongly associated with AD and whether these genes are targeted by existing drugs for other indications which could be re-purposed.

Schooling and her team identified genes strongly associated with late-onset AD from the loci of genetic variants associated with AD at genome-wide-significance and from a gene-based test applied to the most extensively genotyped late-onset AD case (n = 17,008)-control (n = 37,154) study, the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project. They used three gene-to-drug cross-references, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Drugbank and Drug Repurposing Hub, to identify genetically validated targets of AD drugs and any existing drugs or nutraceuticals targeting products of the genes strongly associated with late-onset AD.

A total of 67 autosomal genes were identified as strongly associated with late-onset AD. Existing approved or investigational AD drugs did not target products of any of these 67 genes. Drugs for other indications targeted 11 of these genes, including immunosuppressive disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs targeting PTK2B gene products.

The researchers found that approved and investigational AD drugs are not targeting products of genes strongly associated with late-onset AD. However, other drugs targeting products of these genes exist and could perhaps be re-purposing to combat late-onset AD after further scrutiny.

“This study shows the value of systematically searching bioinformatics resources to discover new leads concerning the prevention or treatment of complex diseases,” Schooling says.

Kwok, MK, Lin Lin, S, Schooling, MC. Re-thinking Alzheimer’s disease therapeutic targets using gene-based tests. EBioMedicine, Volume 0 , Issue 0.


Program for New Yorkers living with HIV needs work, researchers say

young man sitting on subway stairs with head in handsThe New York City HIV Care Coordination Program (CCP), funded through the federal Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, combines multiple evidence-based strategies to support persons living with HIV (PLWH) who are newly diagnosed with HIV or have a recent history of poor HIV care outcomes.

In an NIH-funded study recently published in the journal PLOS ONE, CUNY SPH Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology Denis Nash and colleagues assessed the comparative effectiveness of the CCP by merging programmatic data on CCP clients with population-based surveillance data on all known New York City PLWH.

The CCP and non-CCP groups were matched on propensity for CCP enrollment within four baseline treatment status groups (newly diagnosed or previously diagnosed and either consistently unsuppressed, inconsistently suppressed or consistently suppressed). The researchers compared CCP to non-CCP proportions with viral load suppression at 12-month follow-up.

The study found that the CCP intervention had a small positive short-term effect on viral load suppression among newly diagnosed PLWH and those who were consistently virally unsuppressed in the year prior to the start of follow-up, suggesting the program has been effective at helping with initial hurdles to anti-retroviral treatment access and adherence. However, the absence of an effect among previously diagnosed persons with any HIV viral suppression in the year prior to enrollment suggests that the CCP has not surpassed ‘usual care’ as a support for maintaining medication adherence. The team concluded that efforts to refine CCP service delivery in NYC could include more focused enrollment among newly diagnosed and consistently unsuppressed PLWH. The researchers recommend that future studies assess longer-term outcomes, including sustained viral suppression, in this population and others with known barriers to HIV care and treatment.

“NYC Care Coordination clients have other major challenges in their life besides HIV,” Nash says. “More than 22 percent of them had unstable housing, 30 percent had low mental health functioning, and 15 percent reported recent hard drug use. Fifty percent had at least one of these barriers at the time of program enrollment. That the CCP has some benefits over usual care is encouraging. However, the modest effects we observed remind us that there is no silver bullet for such a vulnerable group, and that we need to continue to improve the program to try and make it more effective.”

The CUNY team, in partnership with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), just received a second NIH grant to evaluate the impact of a revised and updated CCP model, as compared to the original CCP model and as compared to contemporaneous ‘usual care’ in NYC. The new project will also study the implementation of recent CCP model revisions and the potential for further program refinements, from the perspectives of clients and CCP service providers.

This work was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health [grant number R01 MH101028 to Dr. Denis Nash of the CUNY Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health and Dr. Mary Irvine of NYC DOHMH].

Nash D, Robertson MM, Penrose K, Chamberlin S, Robbins RS, Braunstein SL, Myers JE, Abraham B, Kulkarni S, Waldron L, Levin B, Irvine MK. Short-term effectiveness of HIV care coordination among persons with recent HIV diagnosis or history of poor HIV outcomes. PLOS ONE, September 24, 2018 


Baruch College Participates in Global Conference Showcasing Undergraduate Research

Approximately 345 students from 10 universities in eight countries presented their work via video-conferencing technology

For the fifth consecutive year, Baruch College participated in the International Conference of Undergraduate Research (ICUR). Held this year on September 25 and 26, the conference brought together approximately 345 students from 10 universities in eight countries spanning five continents.

Thirteen Baruch College undergraduates presented and discussed their research in joint sessions alongside peers from around the globe in real-time through video-conferencing technology. The students received coaching in writing research abstracts and presentation skills.

The Baruch contingent represented students from the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, the Zicklin School of Business, and the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs. Their presentations focused on a wide range of topics: genetics of developmental hormones in fruit flies; history of doctors in Japanese Internment Camps in World War II; free radicals, mitochondria, and cell function; fixing water pollution using New York Harbor oysters; language rights for Khoisan people in South Africa; India’s tensions with China over its One Belt One Road trade policy; cute kawaii fashion in Japan; utensil design for patients with hand tremors; how gender affects experience of film characters; and social desirability bias and ethics.

“The ICUR is designed to showcase the best in undergraduate research from across the globe and to provide a supportive environment for talented young scholars, many of whom are conducting and presenting research for the first time,” says Katherine Pence, PhD, Baruch College’s ICUR coordinator and associate professor in the Department of History at the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. “The conference combines global outreach with innovative technology and original research for a one-of-a-kind showcase of student achievement. It is a rewarding experience for them that can help prepare them for graduate school and professional careers.”

As one of this year’s participants, Psychology and Biological Sciences double major Veronica Stocker (’18), commented afterward, “I really enjoyed the event…There was a question and answer period at the end that was quite engaging and stimulated a lot of interesting discussion. It was also fascinating to hear the work being done by other students around the world and it was overall a wonderful experience…[It] has given me valuable insight into the world of research and has inspired me to imagine myself continuing in research as an ultimate career goal.”

Global Conference

In addition to Baruch College—which was the only U.S. college participating—ICUR 2018 featured Monash University (Australia), Monash University (South Africa), Monash University (Malaysia), Nanyang Technological University (Singapore), University of Brawijaya (Indonesia), Kyushu University (Japan), University of Warwick (U.K.), University of Sussex (U.K.), and University of Leeds (U.K.).

This year Baruch also hosted a student from one of the participating universities—Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University—who is studying abroad in the U.S. and presented from Baruch College campus.

Led and organized by a Warwick and Monash University Alliance, the ICUR challenges undergraduate students to “rethink their work in an international context.” The conference requires presenters to consider the perspective of students from different backgrounds. In addition, presenters need to examine global and regional trends within their research field and learn to speak to different audiences outside their fields and in various countries.

Since ICUR’s establishment in 2013, more than 1,500 students from 15 institutions have presented.

Baruch’s participation in this year’s conference was made possible by the support of the Office of the Provost.

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Baruch College’s Early Learning Center Secures Funding from the U.S. Department of Education

The $570,768 four-year grant will enhance child care and education services to student-parents

Baruch College Early Learning Center

Baruch College’s Early Learning Center received a four-year grant for $570,768 from the U.S. Department of Education that will support its mission of providing child care and education services to student-parents who attend the institution.

By securing the Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program (CCAMPIS) grant, the Baruch College Early Learning Center (BCELC) will be able to provide a range of family support services and programming to enhance the lives of student-parents and their children, as well as offer child care fee subsidy assistance to Pell eligible student-parents.

“This is the first time submitting an RFP for the CCAMPIS grant, so it was very exciting to learn that our proposal was accepted for funding,” said Lorraine Mondesir, Director of the BCELC. “Our center continues to provide high-quality, low-cost child care to our student parents.”

Commitment to Student-Parents

In addition, this funding will allow the BCELC to conduct outreach efforts to promote the center to increase enrollment of low-income student-parents; create a parent resource room and lending library that would include books, games and puzzles which helps connect school to home; and partner with on-campus programs and off-campus organizations to establish a parent wellness program.

The goals of these program enhancements are to reinforce the BCELC’s commitment to support needs of student-parents, support and build upon children’s development and aid in the graduation and retention rates of primarily low-income student parents by improving the well-being of the family and community.

About the Baruch College Early Learning Center

The BCELC provides child care services so student-parents can pursue their college degree. The BCELC program—for children two-and-a-half to five-years old—presents an interdisciplinary, project-approach to curriculum and is designed to stimulate children’s interest and sustain curiosity; to encourage children to explore their environment as they engage in exploring their world, to construct an understanding of their own experiences; and to offer opportunities for in-depth exploration and research.

Children at BCELC participate in individual and group activities such as woodworking, cooking, storytelling, music, art, and working with blocks. There is also daily outdoor play and walks around the neighborhood.

The BCELC is licensed by the New York City Department of Health and is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

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CUNY Colleges Receive Record $6M in Federal Grants for Early Childhood Learning Centers

Early Childhood CentersCity University of New York colleges secured nearly $6 million in federal grant funds this year that will benefit schools’ Early Childhood Centers (ECCs) and the student-parents who rely on their services.

At Bronx Community College, where more than half of all students work while attending classes and 55% have a child under the age of 5, the grant funds will enable the ECC to stay open until 10 p.m., meaning it will care for some 40 children per academic year whose parents take classes at night and currently must arrange for child care off campus.

“Early Childhood Centers provide services that are indispensable to thousands of CUNY student-parents who would otherwise find it far more difficult to continue pursuing their educational goals,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “This additional funding enables more New Yorkers to stay in college and build a better future for themselves and their young families.”

Bronx Community College’s ECC provides music, yoga and other activities that children don’t always get at child care centers off campus, along with counseling and other resources for parents. “Before I knew about the Early Childhood Center, I had to travel to drop my daughter off at daycare, come to school and then go back. To know there’s a center available to me right here on campus makes it all so much easier,” said Natalie Evans, who leaves her 3-year-old Charlee at BCC’s center on weekdays while she pursues an associate degree in Public Health. “I tell people all the time that this is more than just a child care center,” Evans added. “It’s like a really big, informative, supportive family.”

The U.S. Department of Education awards the grants through its Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program to support on-campus child care services primarily serving the needs of low-income students. CUNY colleges have been awarded funds since the grant program began in 1999, but the $5,976,180 secured this year marks a high point in both the amount of funding obtained for the child care centers and the number of CUNY schools to benefit.

New four-year awards were given to six CUNY schools, bringing to nine the number of University colleges that receive program funds. Newly awarded colleges include Brooklyn College, Baruch College, Bronx Community College, LaGuardia Community College, Kingsborough Community College and Lehman College. Medgar Evers College, New York City College of Technology and Borough of Manhattan Community College received four-year awards in 2017. Among other benefits, the funds will help add services, subsidize child enrollments and extend their hours of operation, benefiting adult learners who take evening classes.

LaGuardia Community College, for example, will increase the number of children who can be enrolled in its ECC by 20%, from 219 to at least 263, and the center will be able to offer emotional and mental health support services for parents. “I could not imagine dropping off my son somewhere, and then coming to LaGuardia,” said LaGuardia student Tracy Mingo, a 35-year-old single mom. “Here, it’s a one-stop shop. Knowing my son is nearby gives me so much comfort.”

At Kingsborough Community College, the new grant will enable more than 90% of student-parents who utilize the Child Development Center to pay as little as $1 per week for child care while they attend classes. KBCC also plans to bring academic advising, financial aid and career counseling directly into the Child Development Center, making it easier for student-parents to access those supports and, ultimately, to stay in school.

“All the services available on campus will be available right here,” said Heather Brown, director of the Child Development Center, which cares for upwards of 60 children per semester and operates some 80.5 hours per week. “For a lot of parents, this will be a game changer.”

There are 16 Early Childhood Centers that serve 17 CUNY campuses, providing daytime, evening and weekend child care and Pre-K for All, as well as mental health support services for parents and subsidies for parents who qualify. The centers are available to all CUNY students, and serve about 1,600 children annually. Experienced and certified educators conduct the programs, and all University child care programs are licensed and evaluated by New York City Department of Health.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

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City Tech Chair Of Electrical Engineering Explores Space Technologies In Book’s Second Edition

We may not realize the extent to which our everyday lives are governed by satellites and other innovative space technologies, but City Tech chair of Electrical Engineering, Dr. Mohammad Razani, would like to change that. In the recently published second edition of his book Commercial Space Technologies and Applications: Communication, Remote Sensing, GPS, and Meteorological Satellites, Razani explores space technologies and their various applications.

Focusing on man-made satellites, this new edition not only discusses the space technologies that benefit our daily lives, it also explores the ways in which these technologies have improved over the years, as well as their impact on our generation and generations to come. Moreover, it includes extensive study questions and exercises after each chapter for those interested in testing their knowledge or wishing to use it as a textbook in their institutions.

Razani notes, “Outer space is a challenging environment that provides enormous opportunities and benefits to mankind and should be used wisely and for peaceful purposes only.”

Dr. Razani has extensive experience in various fields of technologies spanning from satellite communications to microwave remote sensing and information technology. He received his B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E. degrees from Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, and his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. At City Tech, Razani is a full professor and chair of the Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering Technology Department.

For more information and to purchase Dr. Razani’s book, visit www.crcpress.com.


CCNY’s CUNY School of Medicine launches HIV prevention ad campaign

Victoria Frye and Jeremy Fagan in front of PEPTALK ad

Victoria Frye (right) and Jeremy Fagan (left) in front of PEPTALK ad on 132nd street and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

Researchers from the CUNY School of Medicine at The City College of New York are making strides in HIV prevention with the launch of their bus shelter ad campaign “PEPTALK” in Upper Manhattan and the Bronx. The campaign focuses on increasing awareness and access to Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP), a medication that prevents HIV infection if taken within 72-hours of exposure to the virus and consistently for 28 days.

The campaign is part of a two-year NIH-funded research study, which was awarded to Dr. Victoria Frye, principal investigator and associate medical professor at the CUNY School of Medicine at CCNY. The R21 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is designed to develop and evaluate a campaign to increase access to and uptake of PEP among people living in high HIV prevalence areas and minority communities. The campaign is a collaboration between the CUNY School of Medicine and The Oval Center of Montefiore Medical Center.

“This kind of ad campaign is needed; one thing that is pretty consistent is that most community residents, even younger people – students in my classes, don’t know about PEP,” said Frye. “PEP is effective and has been used for decades by medical professionals to prevent infections after needle sticks. Now, it is one more tool we can use to prevent HIV.”

The ads are designed to drive demand for PEP, evaluating both the effectiveness of the campaign and a brief behavioral intervention to increase clinical care engagement among PEP patients, gay men of color in particular. They were designed after a significant formative research phase was conducted with in-depth interviews and focus groups led by Jeremy Fagan, project director of PEPTALK, and Barry Zingman, co-principal investigator at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and medical director of the AIDS Center at Montefiore.

On Friday, October 19 at 11 a.m., Frye and her colleagues will gather at 132nd street and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard to engage with the community about PEP and unveil the new bus shelter ad campaign.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Out in Two Cohort Has High GPAs and Higher Aspirations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On October 11, a ceremony and reception at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) celebrated the Fall 2018 Out in Two inductees, a cohort of 25 students selected from a pool of 113 applicants, according to Richard Naughton, who coordinates the program with fellow Senior Academic Advisor Jonathan Matamoros.

Among other strengths—including their community service and resilience—the scholars hold exceptional Grade Point Averages, or GPAs.

“We are very proud of this semester’s cohort. The students possess very impressive academic records. Nine of the 25 cohort members have a 4.0 GPA, and all but one of the new scholars has a GPA higher than 3.5; the lowest GPA is 3.48,” said Naughton.

BMCC Interim President Karrin E. Wilks delivered welcome remarks to the new cohort of scholars, who gathered along with their friends, family, classmates and members of the BMCC community in Richard Harris Terrace at the college’s main campus.

“We know that you have already been successful, that you have distinguished yourselves as students and citizens,” Wilks said. “Your commitment is inspiring to us. The world needs more smart, dedicated, tenacious leaders to make a difference not only in your careers and communities, but to make the world a better place for all of us.”

Acting Provost Erwin Wong told the Out in Two scholars, “We have nothing but the highest expectation that you will make us proud. We are confident we will see you doing many great things in your time at BMCC and beyond.”

Doris Holz, Vice President of Development and Chief Operating Officer of the BMCC Foundation congratulated the inductees, “on behalf of myself and the entire BMCC Foundation Board,” she said. “There is a lot of talent and hard work in this group of scholars. You are an inspiration to us all.”

Donors and dedicated staff ensure success of Out in Two scholars

Out in Two, a program unique to BMCC, provides support to help high-achieving students graduate within two years and transfer to a senior college. Out in Two scholars are closely mentored by BMCC faculty and staff. They solve academic challenges together, share resources and build networks that extend into their professional careers.

The Out in Two cohorts have doubled in size in the last few years, and that growth has been supported by donations from the BMCC Foundation, the Derfner Foundation, the Meringoff Family Foundation and the Southpole Foundation.

“We are grateful for the ongoing, generous donations of leading foundations who understand the value of supporting a cohort or small group program,” says Vice President Holz. “Out in Two, a close-knit learning community at BMCC, has proven to build student retention and success. The Out in Two scholars have earned an overall two-year graduate rate of 91 percent, and transfer to prestigious institutions including Cornell University, New York University, Vassar, Smith College and many others.”

The ceremony’s alumni speaker, Bhawna Seth (’17, Communication Studies), served as Out in Two Club President and has been accepted to Baruch College, CUNY. Today, she works as a College Assistant at BMCC for the Panther Partners program in the Office of Student Affairs.

Seth shared her experience in Out in Two. Having grown up in India, in a family of “many girls,” she said, “many things in our lives were determined by our gender.” At BMCC, she found mentors who “supported my freedom to experiment, and to take risks without being judged. Each of us has his or her own unique way to contribute.”

Out in Two scholar and liberal arts major Wendy Ihama said she appreciates the program’s one-on-one advising, and trips such as one planned for next week to the United Nations in midtown Manhattan.

“I want to study international relations once I graduate from BMCC, and eventually work as a foreign service officer,” she said. “The Out in Two program helps us complete our degrees but also helps us plan for the future and transfer to a bachelor’s degree program.”

Simon Dybowksi, an Out in Two scholar and video arts and technology major said what he likes about the program “is our community of students who are focused on their careers and doing well in their studies.”

In the past few years, he said, he has been creating content for videos, and wants to produce documentaries that focuses on issues related to children, who he works with through community service projects.

The Fall 2018 Out in Two scholarship recipients include Yetunde Adesunloro, Ingrid Becker, Barbara Bessa, Fernando Campos, Chiara Cutelli, Claudia Daporta, Richard Dias, Mamadou Doumbia, Szymon (Simon) Dybowski, Simcha Goldwurm, Wendy Ihama, Patrick Izidro De Souza, Regina Jackson, Monette Jacobs, Jean Lacap, Angie Maldonado Rodriguez, Moyosore Omolayo, Miriam Palma, Nino Pateishvili, Kevin Romeus, Lylia Saurel, Kate Sukhnandan, Gabriela Vassallo, Tingting Wu and Rei Yoshida.


BMCC Partnership With NYU Opens Doors for Ambitious Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through a partnership between two New York University (NYU) programs—the Pipeline Opportunity for Inter-Collegiate STEM Education (POISE) and the Gallatin Undergraduate Initiative for Discovery in Education GUIDE—two select groups of Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students will gain access to academic resources, mentors and scholarships at NYU. They will also have the opportunity to either attend or observe a class at NYU, while they complete their associate degree at BMCC.

Through the BMCC Office of Student Affairs and Office of Academic Affairs, students are selected for the programs based on their academic excellence and unique contributions to the BMCC community.   POISE connects BMCC students focused on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) with theAcademic Achievement Program (AAP) within NYU’s College of Arts and Science (CAS). This links them to bachelor’s degree programs where they can continue their education in STEM, as well as in psychology and related majors.

GUIDE brings BMCC students into the NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study, where faculty and advisors help them prepare for Gallatin’s rigorous Bachelor of Arts degree program. GUIDE is tailored for students interested in developing their own program of study in the area of social justice, which includes a focus on social movements, law and governance, urban democracy, economics, identity, political literature and art, as well as environmental studies.

Each pipeline program welcomes BMCC students to become part of the NYU campus community. In addition to meeting with mentors, the POISE and GUIDE students receive an NYU ID and are able to join NYU student groups and utilize resources such as the NYU library. Once they graduate from BMCC and are accepted into NYU, they are eligible to apply for generous scholarships.

POISE scholars pursue STEM opportunities at NYU

The POISE scholars are Precious Adeyemi-Ogunleye, Joanne Callaghan, Erick Cochea, Amy Jimenez, Sohna Aisha Joof, Manoel Kadja , Radha Longo, Emmanuel Ologundudu, Jeydy Perezand Fadel Yerima.

BMCC science major Fadel Yerima says that, “NYU has a great neuroscience program. It could open doors I can’t even imagine now and it has tons of resources. Ultimately, I want to attend medical school, to focus on neurology and become a neurosurgeon.”

Science major Jeydy Perez says that interacting with the NYU academic community will challenge her, academically. “I recently completed an internship at a hospital in Dominican Republic,” she says, “and I was shocked at their lack of resources. I talked to a little boy who was there for an appendix that needed to be extracted, and that got me focused on the pediatric side of medicine.”

Sohna Aisha Joof, a science for health professions major at BMCC, intends to work toward a career as a trauma surgeon. Joanne Callaghan, a BMCC science major, is interested in a career in pharmacology, and wants to transfer into the biochemistry program at NYU, while science major Precious Adeyemi-Ogunleye is interested in NYU’s dental school.

GUIDE students embrace the rigor of NYU

The GUIDE scholars include D’Ilyna Adams, Dara Hyacinthe, Owen Kellaway, Jayshawn Lee and Shaina Vallejos. Each one takes a class at NYU, while completing their associate degree at BMCC.

Business Administration major Shaina Vallejos says that she looks forward to integrating her interests into a major she could create through NYU’s Gallatin School of Individual Study. She appreciates the level of discourse she has encountered in her class at NYU: “Instead of ‘Reading, Understanding and Accepting’, our class discussions at NYU seem to focus on, ‘Reading, Understanding and Questioning’.”

“I appreciate the new level of challenge,” said Writing and Literature major Jay Shaunless, and gerontology major Owen Kellaway says, “The GUIDE program is really rigorous, and it has that social justice lens that I share and that is central to my work.”

“We are super excited you are here.”

Michael Hutmaker, BMCC Dean of Student Affairs, told the gathering of POISE and GUIDE scholars, “Your ability, your intellect and your drive are on the same level as any student at NYU.” While it might be challenging to transfer to a senior college like NYU, he said, “You will already be part of the community. Try to get over there to the NYU campus once a week. Meet with an advisor, make sure they know who you are. If they are aware of your strengths and goals, they can be of more assistance when you apply to NYU.”

Erwin Wong, BMCC Acting Provost, told the group, “As POISE and GUIDE students, you’ll be assessed by the faculty and staff at NYU. It’s also important that you assess them; that you pay close attention to whether NYU is a good fit for you and your goals. Whatever happens, the level of engagement you have at NYU will be valuable experience whether you eventually transfer to NYU or some other university that has a program that speaks to you.”

Helene Bach, BMCC Director of Research, advised the students, “While you’re at NYU, take the opportunity to talk to your professors. Look them up. See what they’re publishing, what their research is about. Make an appointment and talk to them about their projects, and try to get a sense of where you might fit into a project like that, someday.”

“That’s an important skill, in business or academia—networking,” Wong added. “Bottom line, NYU poses challenges but you can meet those challenges. You are all here because you belong here. You have each other, you have us, and you have your mentors and networks on the NYU campus. You are not alone and we are super excited that you are here.”


Brooklyn Seoul: A Cultural Exchange

Brooklyn College’s new academic partnership with Dongguk University in South Korea gives students from both institutions the opportunity to expand their worldview and strengthen their cultural competency.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

Brooklyn College senior Raven Wilson dressed in a traditional Korean 한복 (hanbok).

“I have friends everywhere now,” says Raven Wilson—Brooklyn College (BC) senior, Korean popular music (K-pop) aficionado, and teaching/program assistant in the Media Production and Cultural Studies in South Korea Program. One of the first students to participate in the inaugural BC-Dongguk South Korea Exchange Program, Wilson, who double majors in communication and theater, is now the exchange program’s student ambassador.

“This program is great for students because you’re not being thrown into a situation where there’s no one there for you,” Wilson says. “This particular program doesn’t send students abroad solo; you’re always traveling with a group, so you always have a base that has your back.”

The exchange kicked off in the fall 2017 semester. Wilson, whose tuition cost was reimbursed through the Roy L. Furman ’60 Fellows Program, stayed at an off-campus dormitory near Seoul Station (the equivalent of New York City’s Penn Station). As a New Yorker, she had no problem navigating South Korea’s mass-transit system to get to school each day. It helped that the system made all announcements in Korean, English, Japanese, and Mandarin.

“The value of cultural competency cannot be overestimated,” says Gail Bier, senior director of International Education and Global Engagement at Brooklyn College. “For students to be able to say to a potential employer that they spent time studying in another country demonstrates that they are proficient in working with people very different from themselves, in environments very different from ones they are accustomed to, that they are able to communicate across challenges and are open to expanding their worldview. This gives them the edge needed to stand out among other candidates.”

While at Dongguk, Wilson took some courses that were taught fully in English and others that were taught at a 60/40 percent split (60 English, 40 in Korean), including communication theory, introduction to Korean film, Korean language, and film production. Wilson said that of those, the film production class was the toughest, as she and her classmates were required to make a short film every week for the first six weeks. Afterward, they were placed into groups and instructed to make a feature-length film out of their disparate short pieces in a way that interlocked to create a single narrative. Additionally, the students were each assigned to make their own experimental film project that contained no dialogue, but told the story through images.

“That was the most intense class of all the courses I took at Dongguk,” says Wilson, who earned A’s in every class, despite the Korean grading system that limits the number of students who can receive an A grade in each course.

JiHoon Song, a Dongguk University junior who is majoring in business management, was among the students who spent a semester at Brooklyn College. He says he chose to study at the college because of its reputation for providing a rigorous education and its location in one of the most dynamic cities in the world.

“New York has different kinds of food from all over the world, and I could enjoy the best quality of many things such as musicals, museums, concerts, and other arts. I chose Brooklyn College for this semester because the professors are passionate and the courses are extremely useful.”

Song took six courses: AerobicsPrinciples of MarketingGlobal Business EnvironmentIntroduction to Mass MediaIntercultural Communication, and Introduction to Communication.

“I loved the campus,” he says. “It was so quiet and has many places to sit and contemplate or study. I could lie on the grass. I liked the college’s gym as well. I worked out four times a week. I became healthier because of it. Another great place was the Brooklyn College Library. I will recommend other Dongguk students participate in the exchange program because Brooklyn College has awesome professors and wonderful students.”

Wilson, who befriended Song and keeps in touch with him via KakaoTalk, a South Korea texting app, will be graduating with the Class of 2019 in the spring. She plans to pursue a career in entertainment management and artist representation.

 

Interested in taking your education around the globe? The Tow Undergraduate/Graduate International Research Stipend enables undergraduate and graduate students to conduct research in settings outside the United States during the winter intersession. It is designed to expand students’ academic experiences and to enrich their lives, and that of the college, by providing access to educational opportunities abroad. The online application is available on the Brooklyn College Scholarships and Awards homepage. The deadline is October 31, 2018.

Brooklyn College is able to provide its students with the kind of global engagement opportunities they need to expand their learning and stand out in the marketplace thanks to the generosity of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To learn about the various ways to contribute to student success, please visit the foundation website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora, 212.662.9939


Event: Separating Facts from Fake News: Environmental FOIA in the Trump Era

 

Saturday, November 3rd

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

CUNY School of Law
2 Court Square, Long Island City, NY 11101

When Sarah Lamdan wrote the book Environmental Information: Research, Access, and Environmental Decisionmaking in 2016, she did not know that access to environmental information was about to change dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. By early 2017, hundreds of scientists and information specialists were rushing to preserve troves of government climate change data in Data Rescue events across the nation. Cries of “fake news” blurred the lines between scientific truths and fiction in the new, uncertain political climate.

As data disappeared from EPA webpages, a shroud of secrecy hid federal environmental policy from the public. Congress and the EPA proposed plans to eliminate scientific data from environmental decisionmaking. The EPA itself began to shrink, with 1,600 workers leaving the agency in the first 18 months of Trump’s presidency.

Environmental advocates, government transparency organizations, and members of the public turned to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to wrest undisclosed environmental information from a federal government set on intensive environmental deregulation. FOIA requests and litigation have skyrocketed in the Trump era as people try to capture glimpses of what our environmental agencies are up to.

CUNY Law Professor Sarah Lamdan has teamed up with Dale Willman, from CUNY’s Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism, and Rebecca Bratspies, director of CUNY Law’s Center for Urban and Environmental Reform, to plan a day-long event at CUNY School of Law dedicated to discussing environmental FOIA issues. Separating Facts from Fake News: Environmental FOIA in the Trump Era will bring together environmental lawyers, journalists, advocates, and scholars.

Join us for a day of conversation and strategy sessions with environmental lawyers and journalists working to expose and fight environmental deregulation. Develop your FOIA skills with attorneys and journalists who use FOIA in environmental litigation and reporting.

For more information about the event, and to RSVP, click here.


CCNY study breaks Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) distance limit

Schematic of the long-range energy transfer between donor and acceptor molecules enhanced by the metamaterial. Image Credit: Visakh Menon

Using engineered nanocomposite structures called metamaterials, a City College of New York-led research team reports the ability to measure a significant increase in the energy transfer between molecules. Reported in the journal ACS Photonics, this breakthrough breaks the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) distance limit of ~10-20 nanometers, and leads to the possibility of measuring larger molecular assemblies.

And since FRET is a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields, this new development could benefit pharmaceuticals, for instance.

“Energy transfer between molecules plays a central role in phenomena such as photosynthesis and is also used as a spectroscopic ruler for identifying structural changes of molecules,” said Vinod Menon, professor of physics in City College’s Division of Science. “However, the process of energy transfer is usually limited in the distance over which it occurs, typically reaching 10 to 20 nm.”

But in the study reported by Menon’s ACS Photonics group, the authors demonstrate significant increase in the energy transfer distance (> 15x) – reaching ~ 160 nm. This is accomplished by using a metamaterial that undergoes a topological transition.

The present work sets the stage for the use of spectroscopic rulers for studying a wide array of larger molecular systems which has not been previously possible using standard FRET technique.

The Menon group comprised CCNY physics majors Rahul Deshmukh and Tal Galfsky (both graduate students) and Emaad Khwaja (undergraduate). Collaborators included the theory groups of Girish Agarwal (Texas A&M University) and   Svend-Age Biehs (Carl von Ossietzky University, Germany). The work at CCNY was supported by the National Science Foundation’s Division of Materials Research and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Baruch College Professor Scott Newbert Receives Abraham J. Briloff Prize for Ethics

Scott L. Newbert, PhD, the Lawrence N. Field Chair in Entrepreneurship and academic director of the Lawrence N. Field Center programs at the Zicklin School of Business received the Abraham J. Briloff Prize for Ethics at the 2018 Baruch College Faculty Convocation.

Dr. Newbert was among a distinguished number of faculty whose professional achievements were recognized through Presidential Excellence Awards, Guggenheim Fellowships, and other honors.

Dr. Newbert received the​ Briloff Prize in recognition of his article “Achieving Social and Economic Equality by Unifying Business and Ethics: Adam Smith as the Cause of and Cure for the Separation Thesis,” published in the Journal of Management Studies in 2018.

In his article, Dr. Newbert argues that the widespread misconception that 18th century economist and philosopher Adam Smith​ advocated a purely self-interested form of capitalism has resulted in the vast social and economic inequalities we have experienced since Smith’s time. In response, Dr. Newbert argues that Smith’s writings actually suggest that broad-based social and economic prosperity​can only result by striking an appropriate balance between self-interest and concern for others.​

“The Briloff Prize is a testament to the importance Baruch College places on understanding how ethics both informs and is informed by one’s professional life,” said Newbert. “I am honored to have had my research recognized by the committee this year and am grateful for the generosity of Charles R. Dreifus who has made this prize possible, and for Abraham J. Briloff, who was the inspiration for it.”

The Abraham J. Briloff Prizes in Ethics are intended to stimulate scholarship in the field of ethics, with an emphasis on ethics in professional life. The prizes are funded by a gift from alumnus Charles R. Dreifus, (’66, MBA ’73) in honor of Abraham J. Briloff, Emmanuel Saxe Distinguished Professor of Accountancy Emeritus. The prizes are awarded annually to a faculty member who has written an important topical article, essay or book on ethics and to a student or students who have written an outstanding research paper or essay, also as it relates to current events.

 


Latina Ad trailblazer Daisy Expósito-Ulla in Hispanic Heritage Month talk at CCNY

Daisy Expósito-Ulla, communications guru and CEO of d expósito & Partners, will speak at CCNY on Oct. 25.

Communications guru Daisy Expósito-Ulla joins the American Advertising Federation (AAF) chapter at The City College of New York for a conversation on Oct. 25 about her dynamic, high-profile career at the cross sections of marketing and social equity. The event, 12:30 – 2 p.m. in Shepard Hall room 250, is part of City College’s Lunch with Leaders Ad/PR Lecture Series and commemorates Hispanic Heritage Month.

Expósito’s talk is free and open to the public. Click here to register and receive complimentary admission.

Expósito’s marketing agency, d expósito & Partners, prides itself on producing work that takes progressive social equity and nationwide demographic changes into account while developing strategies and campaigns that are among the most outstanding of the last decade.

A “New American Agency” for a new America, the d expósito team considers itself “cultural warriors” looking to pioneer a future that builds on significant contributions from the influential Hispanic population in the years to come.

d expósito & Partners have earned numerous awards since their founding in 2005, including: Three ¡Bravo! PR top awards for AARP 2018 for the film Every step of the Way; The 2018 Media Event of the Year Award; and The 2018 Public Affairs Campaign of the Year Award. Earlier this year, Ms. Expósito was inducted into the AAF Advertising Hall of Fame.

For more information, please contact Jayson Alexander Swain, CCNY AAF treasurer/Public Affairs at jayson@jaysonalexanderswain.com or (646) 675.5976.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
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City Tech Humanities Professor Publishes Book Chronicling Career of Communication Studies Pioneer David Campbell

Professor Julian Costa

Julian Costa, adjunct lecturer of Humanities at the New York City College of Technology (City Tech), recently published a book titled David Campbell: Story of a Career.

The book is a biography that traces the teaching career of the late David Campbell, who taught communication in Ohio and Pennsylvania from 1964 until 2000. In telling the story of Campbell’s career, the book also provides insight into the evolution of communication studies as an academic subject.

“In the 1960s, a student pursuing a degree in communication largely focused on performance skills,” said Costa. “Public speaking, acting, and the physiology behind how we speak were the cornerstones of the curriculum. Today, these are separate curricula.”

Costa added, “Mass communication was only just beginning to catch the attention of academia.  It was during the ‘60s and ‘70s where coursework in media production became a popular area of study.” What intrigued Costa to write this book was Campbell’s professional record as a teacher and public servant. “In his thirty five years of teaching, David Campbell developed new majors and courses, he chaired his department through the integration of personal computing into the communication curriculum, developed scholarships, and so much more,” said Costa. “What I respect about his career the most, however, was that he gave his students real-world learning experiences. He was a proponent of experiential education, internships, and working with clients.” Campbell’s teaching specialty was television production, and in this role, he and his students produced a variety of cablecasting, including live telethons and weekly talk shows for various clients.

As a supplement to the book, Costa has created an accompanying website that includes a number of restored telecasts from Campbell and his classes, viewable as YouTube videos. This can be accessed at www.professorcampbell.com.

At City Tech, Costa teaches public speaking for the Humanities Department. In addition to teaching, he serves as executive producer of “CCM: All Access,” a weekly television show produced at the County College of Morris in New Jersey.

For more information about the book, please contact Professor Costa at jcosta@citytech.cuny.edu.


Editorial: protecting public health research from inappropriate corporate influence

In an editorial in the November 2018 issue of the American Journal of Public Health, CUNY SPH Distinguished Professor Nicholas Freudenberg emphasizes the importance of protecting public health research from inappropriate corporate influence. Corporate sponsorship of new bodies of faux science on climate change, tobacco, unhealthy food and pharmaceuticals, Freudenberg warns, put the credibility of independent public health researchers at risk.

“Mixing the apples of independent science designed to inform policy with the oranges of science designed to advance corporate interests leaves policymakers with a fruit salad that may be a faulty guide to public health practice”, Freudenberg writes.

Read more:

 

 


Distinguished Professor Denis Nash appointed to governor’s Hepatitis C Elimination Task Force

Distinguished Professor Denis Nash

Denis Nash

More than 100,000 New Yorkers are living with hepatitis C, and most are unaware that they have it. The virus is spread by blood to blood contact, with the most common risk factor being injection drug use. Over the past decade, there has been a distinct peak in cases emerging among younger people aged 20 to 40, fueled in part by the growing opioid epidemic. 

In March, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced New York State’s commitment to eliminate hepatitis C by increasing access to testing, treatment and education to connect vulnerable New Yorkers with available services. On Thursday, Cuomo announced the members selected to join the Task Force that will advise the state on its Hepatitis C Elimination Plan.  

Among the appointees is Denis Nash, Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at CUNY SPH and Executive Director of the CUNY Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH).  

Nash will co-Chair the Surveillance, Data, and Metrics Workgroup of the new Hepatitis C Elimination Task Force. He previously served on another task force convened by Governor Cuomo, which was charged with developing a blueprint for New York’s groundbreaking ‘Ending the HIV Epidemic’ Initiative. Out of this came the Ending the Epidemic Dashboard, developed and maintained by CUNY ISPH, which compiles and disseminates metrics that monitor the initiative’s progress.  

“Our Governor has again taken a bold step to address one of our most pressing population health issues that is also a very solvable implementation science challenge,” Nash says. “We can and will achieve hepatitis C virus elimination in New York!” 

“The members selected for this task force are some of the finest in their fields, and their invaluable experience will provide us with the information we need to develop an attainable elimination plan,” Governor Cuomo said in a press release. “This strategic plan will not only improve the quality of life for those living with Hepatitis C, but also ensure that New Yorkers have the support and resources they need to prevent this disease.”  

Learn more 


Workplace wellness program helps employees make healthy choices

man in a suit eats a salad at a deskObesity is an ongoing public health concern in the United States and although obesity has both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors, evidence shows that adopting a healthy lifestyle can play a significant role in its prevention or reduction.

In several studies, increased consumption of vegetables and fruits, as well as intake of whole grains, are positively associated with reducing obesity. But the US national median intake of vegetables and fruits in adults and adolescents is lower than the amount recommended by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Since employees spend most of their day at the workplace, the work environment is a suitable setting to promote healthy lifestyles. Dr. Ghada Soliman, Associate Professor of Nutrition at CUNY SPH and colleagues evaluated the effectiveness of a workplace wellness program on employees’ eating behaviors towards health-oriented dietary change, such as increasing intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and dairy, as well as decreasing intakes of saturated fat and sugar-sweetened beverages. The findings were published in the Journal Public Health Nutrition.

The retrospective cohort study analyzed data from 12,636 adults who participated in a wellness program for three consecutive years during years 2004 to 2013 and who completed web-based health risk questionnaire. The wellness program included annual health screening, laboratory data, health risk questionnaires, as well as online and onsite personalized nutrition education and counseling. The research team found that the wellness program had a positive impact on increasing the number of participants who selected healthier food choices. The data also indicate that increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy and the healthy eating pattern were correlated with improved health outcome indicators such as BMI and triglycerides in the third-year follow-up of the program.

“This study provides a model for a successful wellness program in the workplace that could be personalized to fit individual needs,” Soliman says. “It presents an evidence for the impact of wellness programs on the health and wellbeing of participants and as such may help inform and shape future wellness policies in the workplace.”

Soliman, GA., Kim, J., Lee, J., High, R., Hortman, S., Kim, Y., Wehbi, N., and Canedy, J. Wellness programme at the workplace promotes dietary change and improves health indicators in a longitudinal retrospective study. Public Health Nutrition, 2018: October 1: 1-9. doi: 10.1017/S1368980018002380. 


CCNY’s eight Clinton Fellows tackle education at Clinton Global Initiative

Seven of CCNY’s eight Chicago-bound Clinton Fellows [from left]: Jessica Jorge, Raneem Elsayed, Swathi Mettela, Danny Tsoi, Nancy Larcher, Mahmoud Khedr and Khandker Ahamed.

This year’s Clinton Global Initiative University meeting at the University of Chicago, Oct. 19-21, attracts more than 1,000 innovative student leaders from around the world for a conference themed “Turning Ideas into Action.” The participants include eight of The City College of New York’s best and brightest – all but one from the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership — invited to attend after earning Clinton Fellowships in the spring.

CCNY’s eight Clinton Fellows — three of them from the Class of 2018 — and their majors are:

  • Khandker Ahamed, CUNY BADivision of Humanities and the Arts;
  • Raneem Elsayed,  history/international studies;
  • Jessica Jorge, psychology/international studies, Class of 2018;
  • Mahmoud Khedr, CUNY BA;
  • Nancy Larcher, history/political science, Class of 2018;
  • Swathi Mettela, anthropology;
  • Faria Tasnim, international studies/sociology, Class of 2018; and
  • Danny Tsoi, economics.

Of any of the five focus areas they are required to commit to at the Clinton event, the CCNY delegation will tackle education. Environment and climate change, peace and human rights, poverty alleviation, and public health are the other topics.

Ahamed, Tsoi and Khedr will talk about their Zahn Innovation Center award-winning mental health education curriculum for high school students developed by their student start-up FloraMind. It is designed to promote self-care and break the stigma around mental health. It won the $25,000 Zahn Social Impact Prize.

Elsayed will discuss how she teaches design thinking to high school students. The goal is for them to pass the concept on to elementary students.

Jorge will introduce “Uxakah Learn,” an afterschool program for girls to empower them to speak about social justice issues in their communities.

And Larcher, Mettela and Tasnim will share research on their oral history program at CCNY to explore the lives of students at the diverse campus.

More than $750,000 in funding will be available to select CGI U 2018 students to help them turn their ideas into action.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
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REIMAGINING PRISON WITH THE VERA INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE

Reimagining Prison with The Vera Institute of Justice

On October 10th the Vera Institute of Justice held their Reimagining Prison conference at John Jay College. The event was the culmination of their Reimagining Prison Project and the release of their Reimagining Prison Report, which makes the case for a human-dignity centered approach to incarceration.

The event was also held at the Cheshire Correctional Institution in Cheshire Connecticut, where members of the innovative T.R.U.E. Unit could be digitally telecast to the entire conference. Developed by Scott Semple, Connecticut’s Department of Correction Commissioner, with strong support from Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy, and the Vera Institute of Justice, the vision for the unit is: Truthfulness, Respectfulness, Understanding, and Elevating.

“It’s my hope that when we all put our minds together, we can envision a system that lives up to the ideals in which our country was founded on,” said President Mason. She then moderated a discussion panel with Nicholas Turner, President of the Vera Institute of Justice; Malloy; and Stanley Richards, Executive Vice President of The Fortune Society.

(left to right) Karol V. Mason, Nicholas Turner, Dannel P. Malloy, and Stanley Richards 

I’ve recognized through working in the criminal justice system, how it treats people of poverty and color, and how opportunities afforded to white people and people with money are not afforded to people of color.” — Dannel P. Malloy, Governor of Connecticut

 

Why Reimagine Prisons?
Turner answered that question by thinking back to a trip his team took to Germany in June of 2015. “The idea of going to a country where the incarceration rate is a tenth of what it is in this country felt important to see. That helped us think about what we should be doing. That is what really spurred us to think about reimagining prisons,” said Turner. Governor Malloy, a partner in the project, also mentioned the Germany trip as an eye-opening experience regarding criminal justice practices. “It was interesting to see how differently they view the prison system, and how they look at it as an opportunity. We tend to view it as a punishment vehicle and that we should exact the highest punishment possible,” said Malloy. “If we could change that, then we would have less crime, lower rates of recidivism, and we could really turn lives around.”

“We need to get to the fundamental questioning of what the system is built on, one of white supremacy and racial oppression, and the dehumanization of people.” —Nicholas Turner, President of the Vera Institute of Justice

 

All three panel members also touched on our country’s history of discrimination and unequal criminal justice practices as a fundamental reason why, as a society, we have to rethink our prisons. “I’ve recognized through working in the criminal justice system, how it treats people of poverty and color, and how opportunities afforded to white people and people with money are not afforded to people of color,” said Malloy. “I also came to understand that we had too many people in prisons for the wrong reasons. We have to stop sending children to prison, because when you send a child to prison, you are likely to have him for the rest of his life entering and reentering prison.” Turner explained that to move forward, we have to confront our country’s history of racism. “We need to get to the fundamental questioning of what the system is built on, one of white supremacy and racial oppression, and the dehumanization of people,” said Turner.

“At Fortune, we know that the crime is what people did, not who they are.” —Stanley Richards, Executive Vice President of The Fortune Society

 

This concept of giving people in prisons a sense of dignity, so that they could embrace their own humanity, hit home for Richards. “As a former incarcerated man of color, I spent most of my life cycling in and out of prison. I did not see the beauty within myself,” said Richards. “It wasn’t until I went to school that I realized that I was not all the things all my teachers told me. I wasn’t the dumbest guy in the class. I wasn’t worth nothing. I realized that I wasn’t all of that.” His non-profit organization, The Fortune Society, provides hope and guidance for formerly incarcerated individuals, with over 50% of the staff being formerly incarcerated. “At Fortune, we know that the crime is what people did, not who they are. We let people know when they walk through the doors, they are not the worst thing that they have ever done,” said Richards.

 

How are we moving forward?
Having human dignity be the centerpiece for the Reimagining Prisons Project has propelled the work forward, and it’s having a positive effect. “Our prison population has gone from 18,000, down to 13,000. Right now we are the only state close to getting half of our prison population,” said Malloy. “We’ve had gigantic change in public safety. In 2016, we had the largest decline in violent crime of any state in the nation, and in that period of time we did that by a third.” Richards agreed and said that he’s seen the difference in New York City himself. “When I was on Rikers Island, there were 22,000 people incarcerated in New York City. Today we are at 8,200,” said Richards. “Safety is up, crime is down, incarceration is down, and we now have the possibility to close Rikers and have a much smaller footprint.”

Jermaine Young, T.R.U.E. Mentor

Jermaine Young, T.R.U.E. Mentor

“A lot of times, brothers commit crimes because they were victimized themselves.” —Jermaine Young, T.R.U.E. Mentor

 

Jermaine Young, a T.R.U.E. Mentor, said that what affected him, and the other members of the T.R.U.E. Unit the most, was a sense of humanity. “It’s not all about teaching young brothers ‘don’t do this, and don’t do that.’ It’s about getting to the human dignity issue,” said Young. “A lot of times, brothers commit crimes because they were victimized themselves.”

Christopher Belcher, T.R.U.E. Mentee

Christopher Belcher, T.R.U.E. Mentee

Christopher Belcher, a T.R.U.E. Mentee, said that growing up he just wanted to be a part of something positive, and that being caught up in the criminal justice system was something he never thought he’d experience. “It’s easy to be a part of something negative, just walk outside,” said Belcher. Now, being in the T.R.U.E. Unit, he’s often moved to tears by officers and mentors regularly showing him compassion and support. One of the officers coaches his basketball team. “He’s wearing a different hat as our coach, and I get to see him as something else, someone supporting me.” After he leaves the Cheshire Correctional Institution, Belcher hopes to become a strong advocate for prison reform.

The positive benefits are not only felt by the T.R.U.E. Unit mentors and mentees, but also the prison staff themselves. Scott Erfe, the Warden at the Cheshire Correctional Institution, explained that the T.R.U.E. Unit provided much-needed inspiration for his staff members. “We don’t get to see the positive outcomes, because if someone leaves and does something positive, we don’t see them,” said Erfe. “We only see the negativity if they come back to prison. Through the T.R.U.E. Unit, staff members can see the positivity and growth, and they want to get up and come to work.”

After visiting Connecticut prisons 23 times, and fully understanding how dehumanizing prisons were to both the individuals incarcerated and the staff members employed at them, Malloy feels even more compelled to reimagine the criminal justice system. “I encourage people to visit prisons to fully understand how much wasted time and wasted space is involved. Change like the T.R.U.E. Unit at Cheshire has a positive effect on the entire population at the prison,” said Malloy. “When correction guards come to me and say being in the T.R.U.E. Unit is the finest experience they’ve ever had in their 30-plus-year careers, that sends a message to everybody else. There is another way to do these things.”

Click here to read the full Vera Institute of Justice Reimagining Prison Report.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, October 15, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

This week NEST+m is honored to host a site visit on Tuesday October 16th from the New York City Department of Education’s First Deputy Chancellor, Chief Academic Officer, Deputy Chief Academic Officer, Nine Executive Superintendents and other honored guests.

While these honored guests will be onsite for a day of professional learning among themselves, their day of learning will also feature classroom visits across NEST+m’s K-12 learning community.

For our students, teachers and faculty, this is a regular instructional day but certainly one to be proud of!

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Monday, October 15, 8:30am – Whole Child Committee meeting
  • Tuesday, October 16, 4:10pm – SLT Meeting in the Library
  • Wednesday October 17 – 10th grade students will engage in a grade-wide bonding trip to Central Park and the nearby Museums.
  • Wednesday, October 17 – Middle Grades PTA-sponsored Lice Check by Lice Angels
  • Thursday, October 18, 8:30am – PTA Meeting in the Cafeteria
  • Thursday, October 18 – Lower Grades PTA-sponsored Lice Check by Lice Angels
  • Thursday, October 18, 3:00-5:00pm – Rescheduled Hispanic Heritage Celebration in the Courtyard
  • Friday October 19th, 8:30am – K-2 Family Friday (more info forthcoming)


City Tech Offers First Accredited BFA Degree In Communication Design At CUNY

The new Pearl Facility

The Communication Design department at New York City College of Technology (City Tech) has become the first within the CUNY system to offer a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree in Communication Design accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

This new design program at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge integrates fundamental theory and concepts with applied technology, helping students keep pace with an ever-changing industry.

Offering five concentrations – Advertising, Graphic Design, Web Design, Illustration and Motion Graphics – as well as providing a professional agency-like environment and assignments mirroring real-world client projects, the program ensures that all of its graduates are ready to enter the creative workforce.

Professor Josh Kapusinski highlights the value of the program’s new curriculum: “Our motion media courses give students a complete skill set, and being the first four-year accredited design program within CUNY immediately sets us apart.”

The program will be housed in the newly renovated Pearl Facility, a 12,200 sq. ft. space devoted to developing concepts, including labs for creating them and presentation spaces for showcasing finished work. The department’s Pearl Facility will be officially unveiled at a ribbon cutting ceremony on October 18, 2018, during which it will welcome its alumni and the industry professionals who employ them.

One such alumnus, Distinguished Professor and world-renowned graphic designer and typographer Tony Di Spigna, has donated his 50-year archive to the department’s Grace Gallery in what will become its first permanent collection. Professor Di Spigna, who was a student in the program from 1962 to 1964, recalls the heritage of the department he graduated from and looks forward to what it will accomplish in the future: “The two-year program has done wonders for students and their professional careers. Now that it’s a four-year B.F.A. program, imagine how much more it will do.”

As City Tech’s Communication Design department continues to level the playing field between public and private design school options in New York City, its new B.F.A. degree in Communication Design reinforces City Tech’s reputation as an incubator for creative talent.

For more information about the Communication Design B.F.A. program, please contact Sharmaine Bernard in the Communication Design department at SBernard@citytech,cuny.edu or 718-260-5175; or Emerald Williams at EWilliams@citytech.cuny.edu to schedule an appointment with department chair Douglas Davis.


U.S. Dept. of Ed GAANN grant expands CCNY chemical engineering PhD program

CCNY chemical engineer and GAANN grant recipient David Rumschitzki will train seven PhD students over the next three years.

Bolstering the expertise in a U.S. Department of Education identified area of national need and three of its sub-areas, City College of New York chemical engineer David Rumschitzki is the recipient of more than $1 million to train seven PhDs in the field over three years.  The funding comprises a $900K Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) grant from the U.S. Department of Education and $150K in supplementary support from CUNY.

The GAANN award sets up an integrated research and pedagogical program headed by Rumschitzki in City College’s Grove School of Engineering.  Running through Sept. 30, 2021, the program will train future PhD chemical engineers in the three sub-focus areas: materials, energy production/storage, and interfacial science/engineering.

The grant pays for six students per year for three years with CUNY supporting one additional student per year for three years. The support includes $34,000 per student per year in stipends, in addition to tuition, health insurance and some money for supplies. Focus will be on recruiting female students and students from underrepresented groups, although the only hard eligibility criterion is that the students be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Harlem-based City College is designated a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education by the U.S. Dept. of Education.

“Earning this GAANN award as we celebrate our centennial is affirmation that the Grove School can compete with the best schools in the country — It’s a vote of confidence by both reviewers and the U.S. Dept. of Education that we have a first rate PhD program in chemical engineering,” said Rumschitzki.

He noted the strong support of CUNY interim Vice-Chancellor Dan McCloskey, CCNY president Vince Boudreau, interim provost Tony Liss, Grove School dean Gilda Barabino and chair of chemical engineering Ilona Kretzschmar.  He also stressed that it was only possible to bring this application together so quickly because of the close cooperation of his chemical engineering faculty colleague Charles Maldarelli in preparing the winning GAANN proposal and getting the program started.

“Everyone has pitched in enthusiastically to make this a success,” said Rumschitzki.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


BMCC Report Reveals High Traffic and Wide Use of Battery Park City Parks

The parks located in Battery Park City are a vital part of the fabric that makes lower Manhattan dynamic and diverse. Approximately 690,000 people visit the 36 acres of parks and public spaces in Battery Park City (BPC) each year according to findings from an extensive research project led by a team of Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) professors and students.

BMCC Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice Professors Michelle Ronda and Robin Isserles and a team of current and former BMCC students were contracted by Battery Park City Authority (BPCA) in 2017 to conduct the first ever  BPCA Parks User Count & Study 2017-2018.

The 130-page report is designed to help BPCA meet the challenges of maintaining the high level of satisfaction that park visitors currently enjoy.

In a BPCA press release, B.J. Jones, President and Chief Executive Officer, said the report’s findings will help inform future decisions about the park’s maintenance, horticulture and programing. The report will also help BPCA focus efforts in addressing matters like resiliency, safety and making its spaces more engaging and welcoming to everyone.

The study offered students and faculty unique learning experiences that included science research methodology and analytical skills.

“We are very proud of BMCC professors Michelle Ronda and Robin Isserles who engaged students in this important study to analyze the use of Battery Park City’s parks and public spaces, with the aim of continually improving New York City’s urban landscape,” says Karrin E. Wilks, BMCC Interim President. “This study served as a unique research opportunity for our faculty and students, and established our partnership with Battery Park City to strengthen our local community.”

Key Findings

  • The average length of residency for those surveyed is eight years; the average length of time having worked in BPC is six-and-one-half years; and the average time that people have been coming to BPC parks is six years; About 47% of visitors come from the New York City Metro area, 31% of visitors come from out-of-state, and 22% are within walking distance of BPC.
  • Most visitors to BPC parks (residents and non-residents alike) come in a group (six out of 10) and about three in 10 people come with a dog; about 11% of people come to BPC parks on bikes; About 25% of visitors to BPC parks were there for the first-time.
  • When asked what brought them to BPC parks on the day of the survey, about three in 10 people report that they came to BPC parks to sightsee, 19% said that they came to walk, and 10% report that they came to walk dogs.

“Although parks are often places for solitary exercise or contemplation, these public spaces in BPC are also clearly important places for people to socialize, and many people have made visiting these places into a daily habit,” said Ronda.

BMCC visitor counts and the survey of park visitors, confirm BPC parks are highly successful. Nonetheless, a series of focus groups showed some BPC residents and non-residents have concerns such as insufficient restrooms, crowded pathways and bicycles that ride too fast or do not follow existing two-path rules.

One of the more interesting findings from the focus groups was the sense of ownership some residents expressed about the parks and a desire to safeguard these public spaces, and their uses. As one participant said, “Unlike Central Park, this is a residential community. We want to protect this.”

Focus group participants also expressed pride in their neighborhood being recognized and widely enjoyed which could translate into higher property values.

Suggestions from focus groups

Among the suggestions that focus group participants offered to BPCA were more signage in languages other than English, outdoor exercise machines and stations, emergency phones by the river, more tennis courts, piers for kayaking and better bicycle management. The groups also suggested more activities such as dance events and outdoor activities for older residents.

The BMCC team said any limitations of a social science research project are also opportunities for future research. The focus groups offered varied suggestions, such as recruiting more people in order to compile a more accurate census.

“There is more that could be explored in BPC in terms of health and public spaces, beyond the relationship of workers to this public space. Urban parks serve as an ‘oasis’ for so many workers, but also those people who do not have regular access to more natural environments. Research indicates such access may reap health and mental health benefits,” said Ronda.

Applying scientific data to park management

The study took place from July 2017 to May 2018. During that time, Ronda and Isserles hired and trained 43 research assistants. Of those, five were BPCA summer interns, nine were students in Isserles’ BMCC sociology capstone course and the remaining 29 were CUNY students, many who are currently or formerly enrolled at BMCC. Criminal Justice Professor Illir Disha served as a consultant on the report, helping sort and compile the collected data.

Ronda and Isserles presented the team’s findings at a BPCA open community meeting on October 3. The professors will present the report again to the Manhattan Community Board 1 meeting on November 7.

William Kornblum, professor emeritus, sociology, Graduate Center of the City University of New York who served as a consultant on the project, said a vast number of those surveyed in the study expressed love and admiration for the BPC parks.

“For planners and park managers, however, what makes a park system like that of Battery Park City successful hinges on additional questions to be addressed through data gathered about park visitors, and the “BPCA Parks User Count & Study” was designed with just that in mind,” said Kornblum.

“This study answers many of our questions with scientific clarity and neutrality thanks to the expertise of BMCC professors and students,” said Abby Ehrlich, BPCA Director of Community Partnerships and Engagement.

Ronda said the benefits from the partnership between BMCC and BPCA go beyond the study.

“Faculty, administrators and students have expanded our professional networks, and found new opportunities for employment, internships, and the possibility of future educational and research projects,” said Ronda.


Award-winning Playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Baruch College’s Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence, Participating in Staged Reading on Oct. 16

Jacobs Jenkins teaching introductory course about playwriting during fall semester

Renowned playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, the fall 2018 Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College, is unveiling new work at a staged reading on Oct. 16 at Baruch Performing Arts Center’s Rosalyn and Irwin Engleman Recital Hall.

This event, which is open to the public, begins with a reception at 4:45 p.m., followed by the reading at 5:30 p.m.

Celebrating the 20th year of this program, Jacobs-Jenkins is the 40th Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences.

As a Writer-in-Residence, Jacobs-Jenkins is teaching “Playwriting: An Introduction” during the fall semester. In this introductory workshop, students will read and write a number of one-act plays in an attempt to grasp the basics of dramatic writing. In addition to questions of craft and storytelling, the course will focus on the playwright’s process, the formation of healthy creative habits, and the sharpening of critical skills through reading and responding to the work of both classmates and colleagues in the larger professional field.

The course will culminate in staged in-class readings of student plays. Students will be responsible for casting and directing these readings.

‘Leave With Something to Think About’

Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ plays include Everybody, Neighbors, An Octoroon, Appropriate, and Gloria. He is a Residency Five playwright-in-residence at the Signature Theatre and the recipient of a 2016 MacArthur fellowship, the Windham-Campbell Prize for Drama, and the inaugural Tennessee Williams Award. Jacobs-Jenkins won the 2014 Obie Award for Best New American Play.

“I would say all my work is fed by question and a need to understand why the world is what it is,” Jacobs-Jenkins explained. “I want people to leave the theatre looking at life differently. They should leave with bravery to actually try to connect and try to understand to see each other in each other.”

Jacobs-Jenkins is a graduate of the Lila Acheson Wallace American Playwrights Program at the Juilliard School and holds an MA in Performance Studies from NYU. He is an associate director of the Playwriting MFA program of Hunter College, CUNY.

About the Harman Writer-in-Residence Program at Baruch College

Founded in the fall of 1998 by Professor Roslyn Bernstein, the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program brings distinguished writers to the Baruch College campus every semester. Whether they are poets, playwrights, novelists, journalists, essayists or critics, the Harman Writers-in-Residence enrich the Baruch environment, creating a lively literary salon for students and faculty. Endowed by alumnus Dr. Sidney Harman (’39), the Harman Program relies on an intense workshop design, where visiting writers teach small classes and hold individual conferences. In addition, the Harman Program sponsors student creative writing competitions, literary internships, individual guest readings, and a week-long residency.

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Baruch College’s Psychology Internship Training Program Receives Full Accreditation from the American Psychology Association

The American Psychological Association (APA) has granted accreditation to Baruch College’s Counseling Center Doctoral Psychology Internship Program. This designation makes Baruch College one of only two colleges in New York City that currently offer an APA-accredited counseling center internship program.

This accreditation is the highest recommendation a clinical psychology training program can receive. As part of their experience, interns work and collaborate with staff psychologists, social workers, psychiatry residents and other mental health professionals. Trainees in the Baruch College’s Doctoral Psychology Internship Program participate in direct services such as individual therapy, group therapy, crisis assessment, and psychological testing. In addition, interns’ training includes two weekly seminars, monthly case conferences, group and individual supervision, and opportunities to participate in outreach activities across the campus.

“This APA-accreditation is a testimony to all the hard work our staff dedicates to this program,” says Teresa Hurst, PhD, Acting Director and Director of Training for the Baruch College Counseling Center. “We believe in the importance of teaching interns more than a set of skills. Rather, we are committed to teaching them how to learn, be reflective about their work, and assess the ways their experiences fit with what they have learned.”

Learning to Work in a Diverse World

The Doctoral Psychology Internship Program at Baruch trains students to work in a diverse world. The program’s model stresses sensitivity to various populations and specifically focuses interns on becoming aware of their own assumptions about human behavior, values, and biases. Interns are actively trained to understand the point of view of each client without negative judgments and to practice appropriate, relevant, and sensitive intervention strategies and skills in working with culturally diverse clients.

Similar to critical practice, critical thinking, conceptualization, problem-solving, and research are also part of the program, which offers two full-time positions every year. Graduates are expected to be able to function as competent and ethical psychologists and to provide scholarship-based psychological services to individuals, groups, and organizations.

The Counseling Center’s Doctoral Psychology Internship Program is funded through Student Activity Fees, which are managed by the Baruch College Association.

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Marxe School of Public and International Affairs Alumni Awarded New York State Excelsior Service Fellowships

Robert Beiderman, headshot, smiling in a red and blue plaid shirt

Robert Beiderman

Adaobi Oguagha, headshot, smiling, in a black and blue patterened blouse with necklace

Adaobi Oguagha

Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs announced that two of its Master in Public Administration (MPA) graduates from the class of 2018 have been selected to participate in the competitive Excelsior Service Fellowship Program.

The program, launched by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo in 2013, brings “highly talented recent graduates of law, graduate and professional schools into state government service. Excelsior Fellows bring diverse backgrounds and new perspectives to a host of policy and operational positions in New York State government.”

The fellowship begins in September and runs two years within the New York State’s Executive Chamber, a government agency, or authority.

“Marxe alumni have been involved in the program since its establishment; they continue to exemplify what it means to be an Excelsior Fellow,” David Birdsell, Dean of Baruch’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs said. “These fellowships were designed to attract people of great talent to leadership roles in government and that is exactly what we strive for at Marxe.”

According to Dean Birdsell, the Excelsior Fellows work full-time alongside senior members of the administration and play a policy-influencing role in New York State with the opportunity to work on the most pressing issues of the day.

To date, more than 25 graduates of the Marxe School’s MPA program have been accepted into the program since its launch five years ago and have worked at such top-tier state agencies as Empire State Development, The Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation (PATH), the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA), and the state’s Executive Chamber.

Meet the 2018 Excelsior Service Fellows

Robert Beiderman, NYS Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), Communities and Local Government division

“As a former actor, this fellowship is the perfect bridge that will allow me to continue learning while beginning a career in public service. I really like how NYSERDA pursues clean energy from a practical and financial standpoint, and I look forward to getting a better idea of how they interact with other state and local agencies to promote clean energy.

My goal right now is to soak up as much information as possible, and I’m confident that Baruch’s professors, most of whom have worked in public service for many years, have prepared me to excel in this new challenge.”

Adaobi Oguagha, NYS Executive Chamber Governor’s Education Team and Women LEAD

”Upon acceptance into the Excelsior Service Fellowship, the Excelsior committee approached me regarding a new program called Women LEAD. It would work in conjunction with the Excelsior Service Fellowship and include mentorship from a high-level female state official along with a Certificate in Women and Public Policy from the University at Albany.

I have a tremendous passion for public service, specifically in the area of education, and I’m looking forward to advancing and implementing many of the initiatives that the Governor has begun. For example, the expansion of early education in high-need school districts and tackling the issue of food insecurity among college students by creating food pantries on SUNY and CUNY campuses. I hope my work during this fellowship allows me to impact and serve the students of New York State.”

Competitive Selection Process

The selection process involved faculty and administrator nominations, an application in which the students had to articulate their interests and qualifications via a statement of purpose, and an interview during which a committee assessed their interests, qualifications, drive, and potential for success via a variety of traditional, behavioral, and scenario-based questions.  The process is highly competitive and approximately 60 fellows are chosen each year.

In addition to Baruch College, participating schools include Albany Law School, Cornell Law School, the New York University’s School of Law and its Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, among others.

For more information about the MPA program at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, go here.

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CCNY goes healthy for World Food Day event on Oct. 16 with author of “The Plan”

World Food Day Panel

CCNY Goes Healthy panelists Lyn Genet Recitas, Tren’ness Woods-Black and Nabeel Alamgir.

The City College of New York celebrates “CCNY Goes Healthy” on World Food Day opening a dialogue about healthy lifestyle changes and combating low food security issues on campus and within the Harlem community. The inaugural event welcomes three culinary and nutritional experts to engage in a food talk with President Vince Boudreau as moderator.

World Food Day takes place on October 16 and is a day that strives to bring awareness to low food security issues that affect areas all over the world and strives to achieve a more sustainable future.

Panelists include:

  • Lyn Genet Recitas, nutritionist and bestselling author of “The Plan”
  • Tren’ness Woods-Black, vice president of Communications for Sylvia’s Restaurant and founder of TWB
  • Nabeel Alamgir, chief marketing officer of Bareburger

The event is proudly sponsored by the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global LeadershipThe Office of the President, the FAO and Whole Foods Market. It will fall under this year’s Healthy CUNY initiative to jump-start Giving Tuesday. The Colin Powell School / NYPIRG Food Pantry will be accepting donations in the form of non-perishable food items.

The panel will take place from 12-2 p.m. in the NAC ballroom with light refreshments to enjoy. Please click here to RSVP.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CCNY goes healthy for World Food Day event on Oct. 16 with author of “The Plan”

World Food Day Panel

CCNY Goes Healthy panelists Lyn Genet Recitas, Tren’ness Woods-Black and Nabeel Alamgir.

The City College of New York celebrates “CCNY Goes Healthy” on World Food Day opening a dialogue about healthy lifestyle changes and combating low food security issues on campus and within the Harlem community. The inaugural event welcomes three culinary and nutritional experts to engage in a food talk with President Vince Boudreau as moderator.

World Food Day takes place on October 16 and is a day that strives to bring awareness to low food security issues that affect areas all over the world and strives to achieve a more sustainable future.

Panelists include:

  • Lyn Genet Recitas, nutritionist and bestselling author of “The Plan”
  • Tren’ness Woods-Black, vice president of Communications for Sylvia’s Restaurant and founder of TWB
  • Nabeel Alamgir, chief marketing officer of Bareburger

The event is proudly sponsored by the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global LeadershipThe Office of the President, the FAO and Whole Foods Market. It will fall under this year’s Healthy CUNY initiative to jump-start Giving Tuesday. The Colin Powell School / NYPIRG Food Pantry will be accepting donations in the form of non-perishable food items.

The panel will take place from 12-2 p.m. in the NAC ballroom with light refreshments to enjoy. Please click here to RSVP.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Empire State Development Announces New Film Production Training Program at Bronx Community College

October 9, 2018 — An unprecedented partnership between New York State’s economic development agency Empire State Development (ESD), Bronx Community College (BCC) and Local 52 of The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) was unveiled on Tuesday, October 2 — The BCC Film and Television Production Crafts Training Program. When it is launched in the Winter of 2019, the 14-week course will train up to 100 students annually for work in various trades in New York’s robust big and small screen entertainment industry.

The effort is being supported by a $375,000 grant from ESD and a $125,000 grant from the Office of Continuing Education and Workforce Development of The City University of New York (CUNY), thanks to a generous contribution from JPMorgan Chase. The program will teach students technical skills, such as basic carpentry, electric, tool usage and shop safety, as well as “life skills” like problem solving, teamwork and communication. Students who complete the program will receive a Bronx Community College/CUNY Continuing Education credential recognized by Local 52.

An additional goal of the program is to assist Local 52 in the diversification of its workforce — a point made by BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe.

“With our well-established associate degree program in Media and Digital Film Production, Bronx Community College is uniquely positioned to recruit and train students of color, including women, for rewarding careers in film and television production,” said President Isekenegbe. “Thanks to our partnership with IATSE Local 52 and New York State, we will be able to offer customized technical training in high-demand crafts to students from the Bronx and beyond.”

After completing their training at BCC, graduates will be referred to Local 52 for employment. Trainees that gain enough practical work experience, improve their skills and meet the requirements will be eligible for union membership, opening the door to lifelong vocations.

For further information, contact Dean Kenneth Adams at kenneth.adams@bcc.cuny.edu or 718-289-1607.


Bronx Community College Receives Nearly $100,000 from the U.S. Education Department

The Grant Will Fund Technology Upgrades For Cybersecurity Computer Lab

OCTOBER 9, 2018 – The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Bronx Community College (BCC) $98,170 over two years to upgrade the technology in its Cybersecurity Computer Lab.

BCC’s Cybersecurity and Networking Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree program — the first to be offered at a City University of New York community college — launched this fall with its first 25 students. This unique course of study enables students to earn information technology industry credentials while pursuing a 60-credit degree, helping to prepare students for further study and careers in the fast-growing cybersecurity field.

“This federal funding will enable BCC to upgrade our Cybersecurity Computer Lab with state-of-the-art equipment,” said BCC President Thomas Isekenegbe. “This ensures that what students learn on campus will align with industry standards, particularly as it relates to creating a virtual work environment and troubleshooting real-life network security threats.”

The funding will enable BCC faculty to enhance four advanced cybersecurity courses with new equipment and software. As part of the grant, BCC also will receive technical assistance from the National CyberWatch Center at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland.

The Cybersecurity Computer Lab is located in Meister Hall, BCC’s home for the sciences.

For further information, contact Dr. Syed “Rashid” Zaidi at syed.zaidi@bcc.cuny.edu or call 718-289-3043.


BCC TO OFFER EVENING CHILD CARE FOR STUDENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN

The Program for Two to Five-Year-Olds
Made Possible by $1.4 Million in Federal Funding

OCTOBER 4, 2018 – Beginning next year, Bronx Community College (BCC) will introduce on-campus child care for students attending evening classes, thanks to a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Education.

BCC’s accredited Early Childhood Center currently offers child care and preschool programs to 100 children, ages 2-5, while their parents attend classes during the day. The federal Child Care Access Mean Parents in School program (CCAMPIS) will enable 160 preschoolers whose mothers and fathers take classes in the evening to enjoy that same professional child care after hours.

The U.S. Department of Education awarded BCC nearly $1.4 million in CCAMPIS funding over the next four years. Once launched, on-campus child care hours will extend until 10 p.m. each spring and fall semester.

“More than half of all BCC students work while attending classes, and 55% have children under the age of five,” observes BCC president Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “Their ability to access high-quality child care gives them peace of mind and the support they need to pursue their studies.”

BCC’s Department of Institutional Research has found that student parents who use the College’s on-campus Early Childhood Center are twice as likely to stay in school and graduate than other students.

“BCC is at the forefront of providing safe, innovative and progressive learning experiences for children,” says Jitinder “Judy” Walia, Executive Director of the BCC Early Childhood Center. “Evening child care will provide convenience to working and nontraditional students, flexibility in scheduling required classes and more options for carrying the full course load needed for graduation.”

For further information, contact Ms. Walia at jitinder.walia@bcc.cuny.edu or call the Early Childhood Center at 718-289-5461.


CUNY School of Professional Studies Holds First Disability and Employment Event

New York, NY – October 10. 2018 –  In recognition of National Disability Empowerment Awareness Month, the CUNY School of Professional Studies’ Abilities and Resources Committee held its inaugural event titled Disability and Employment in the 21st Century on Thursday, October 4 at 6:00 pm.

Throughout the evening, aspects of self-advocacy and professionalism within the disability community were discussed by an esteemed panel comprising Dr. Christopher Rosa, interim vice chancellor for student affairs at CUNY; Daniel Chan, assistant director for the Office of AccessABILITY at Hunter College; Preston Burger, CUNY LEADS advisor at Bronx Community College; Charmaine Townsell, coordinator for student activities at CUNY; Jes Osrow, co-founder of The Rise Journey; and Allie Cashel, author, co-founder, and president of Suffering the Silence.

“There are so many obstacles to meaningful employment for people with disabilities, from issues of accessibility to discrimination, and this conversation is critical to the well-being of thousands of New Yorkers,” says John Mogulescu, CUNY School of Professional Studies Dean.

The mission of the CUNY School of Professional Studies’ Abilities and Resources Committee is to serve as the connection among students who require diverse accommodations and learning platforms. This effort is spearheaded by:

  • Leonard Blades
  • Gabrielle Carrion, MA in Disability Studies student
  • Christopher Fleming, LEADS advisor and MS in Disability Services in Higher Education student
  • Sarah Krusemark, BA in Psychology alumna
  • Christopher Leydon, student services coordinator
  • Wilma Rodriguez, BA in Disability Studies student
  • Selma Sulejman, MA in Disability Studies student

“As the Abilities and Resources Committee strives to enhance unity and a stronger understanding of diverse disabilities, we have the utmost desire to shed light on National Disability Employment Awareness Month,” says Leonard Blades, an MS in Disability Services in Higher Education student at CUNY SPS and one of the founding members of the Abilities and Resources Committee.  “Our intent with this event is to spearhead the conversation, to offer fruitful wisdom, and raise awareness in regards to disability and employment.”

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 5% in the Nation in U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2018 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs. Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


For Ahra Sung, A Daughter Of Korean Immigrants, It’s Been A Journey Of Determination And Success, Overcoming Disability, Earning A York B.S., Beginning A Master’s

Diagnosed with autism when she was a toddler, Ahra Sung has far exceeded doctors’ dour projections for her achievement in the classroom. She earned a Bachelor of Science at York College in the spring, but didn’t stop there. This fall, Sung began work on a master’s in York’s Pharmaceutical Science and Business program, the lone program of its kind in The City University of New York.

That kind of academic success might have seemed anything but certain for Sung, the daughter of Korean immigrants, who grew up in Flushing, Queens.  But guided by her motto, “don’t let your disability define your ability,” Sung has long refused to be held back. She says she placed out of special education classes in kindergarten and was taking advanced courses by the time she was in high school at The Queens School of Inquiry. To get where she is today, she took full advantage of York’s robust system of supports for students with special needs.

During her freshman year in 2014, Sung registered with York’s Center for Students with Disabilities and sought help through TRIO York Enrichment Services, a federally funded program that provides academic assistance and enrichment services through workshops, counseling, academic coaching and adaptive technology.

She participated in a photo exhibit, “See Me,” which featured students and college employees who were striving to conquer developmental or physical challenges. The exhibit, conceived by York’s Counseling Office, was on display in the campus library for more than a month.

“When I first came to York, I was struggling a lot socially and with where to go for help,” says Sung, who isn’t shy about discussing the benefits of York’s support system. “Now I know where to go, and the TRIO office helped me with my graduate school application, as well. I check with them to let them know how I’m doing.”

To be sure, her journey has been anything but easy. Sung readily admits there were times she felt like giving up. Sometimes, the York College student support staff helped her keep pushing; she also learned to rely on self-styled solutions. Sung is easily distracted, and it is not uncommon for her attention to wane; in response, she has learned to hold onto small, soft plush toys that she says help her stay “in the moment.”

“Once Ahra is focused on a subject, she can think it through to its end,” says Daniel Robie, a York College assistant professor of chemistry. “I try to give her topics that are so interesting that she focuses on them immediately.”

Sung thrived under Robie’s mentorship, completing a research project about crystal formations in Rochelle salt. She presented her findings at the Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium, sponsored by the American Chemical Society’s New York Section and held at York College in May.

The project turned out so well that Robie’s colleague, professor Deb Chakravarti, who serves as director of York College’s U.S. Food and Drug Administration Partnership program, got Sung placed in an internship at FDA’s Northeast Food and Feed Laboratory (NFFL) located on York’s Jamaica, Queens, campus.

“You have to build people up to succeed, and my colleagues were very supportive [of her],” Chakravarti said. He spoke with Kent Herman, deputy director of the NFFL, who agreed to give Sung an opportunity over the summer. During the experience, Sung got a feel for state-of-the-art analytical techniques like inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, used for the detection of trace metals such as arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury and lead in feed samples and other commodities.

Robie is optimistic about Sung’s prospects moving forward. “I have high expectations for Ahra in the M.S. program,” Robie says. “I have encouraged her to devote a lot of time to her work, since well-spent study time is the key to success.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Destry Sulkes and Margaret Crotty appointed to Foundation Board of Directors

new board members Sulkes and Crotty

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Foundation is pleased to announce two new appointees toits inaugural Board of Directors: Destry Sulkes, Chief Data Officer at WPP Health and Wellness, and Margaret Crotty, Executive Director and CEO at Partnership with Children.

Destry holds a MD/MBA from Tufts University School of Medicine with research in Ophthalmology. Prior to joining WPP, Destry built long-term value in a series of start-ups serving life science companies that invest in innovative uses of data, analytics and communications to improve healthcare quality. He helped Zeiss launch the Optical coherence tomography (OCT) device with global education efforts and led two medical education groups through rapid growth and acquisition. Earlier, he led strategy efforts for WebMD/Medscape, authored a report on life science company data needs and cofounded a healthcare analytics company, Prognosi.  Previously, he served as a Director and President of the nonprofit Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions. Dr. Sulkes also serves on the Advisory Board for the Big Data Certificate Program at Rutgers University.

Margaret has served in executive leadership roles in both the not-for-profit and private sectors in the areas of education and public health. Prior to joining Partnership with Children, she launched and ran Save the Children’s $2 billion initiative to reduce child mortality in the developing world. Previously, she was the President and CEO of AFS-USA Intercultural Programs, formerly the American Field Service, which has provided intercultural exchanges for over 300,000 high school students since 1947. In the private sector, Margaret spent seven years at the global corporation EF Education, the world’s largest privately-held education company, living in Shanghai, Hong Kong and Paris, first as a member of the founding management team of EF’s online language education business, and later as President of EF’s higher education business. She holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and an MPH from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

We are also thrilled to announce that Interim Board Chair Lyndon Haviland has accepted the role of permanent Board Chair and board member Michael Meng has accepted the role of Treasurer. Both will serve two-year terms in their respective leadership positions.

View the full board of directors here!


LaGuardia Lifts Poor Students to Lives of Opportunity—Findings from Stanford University Researchers

How to Select a College?

Start by looking at a college’s record of lifting students from poverty to opportunity

From Poverty to Opportunity

Borough, neighborhood, subway accessibility, cost, academic programs, student life, and graduation rates are some of the key factors New Yorkers consider when choosing a college.

Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality has developed a new method of assessing colleges—looking at how well a college helped students whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent of income levels reach the top 20 percent for individual earnings—named the College Mobility Report Cards.

The analysis showed that LaGuardia Community College/CUNY (“LaGuardia”) is among the top one percent among the 604 two-year colleges nationwide with the greatest success in lifting the poorest students into jobs where they earn good wages and create better lives for themselves and their families.

“Stanford University’s College Mobility Report Cards should be the starting point for considering where to go to college, especially for those from poor families,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “With our track record of boosting students from living in unstable housing and struggling to put food on the table, to being able to rent an apartment and not worrying about where their next meal will come from, New Yorkers, should put LaGuardia Community College at the top of their college list.”

Rony Estevez, age 25, is an example of LaGuardia’s potential to boost student-mobility. Born in the US to parents from the Dominican Republic, he grew up in public housing in Brooklyn. After high school, Rony studied for a year at a college upstate, before moving back to be closer to family and enrolling at LaGuardia.

Needing a job to help pay for living expenses, First Big Break, LaGuardia’s Honors Internship Program, helped him secure a paid internship in accounting, his major. Rony thrived in the internship, at Creative Business Inc., where its president and founder, Jeanne Hardy, asked Rony to stay on full-time. Rony recently celebrated his third anniversary at the company, where he’s now a full-time staff accountant earning $55,000/yr. He and his fiancé, Stacey Baez, RN, recently bought a house together, and are looking forward to their wedding early next year. And Rony is on his way to earning his bachelor’s in accounting at Brooklyn College.

“Rony’s story is an example of what we’ve long seen among our students—our graduates not only improve their lives, but lift up their entire family for generations to come,” said President Mellow.

LaGuardia, a member of The City University of New York (CUNY), is the only CUNY two-year college in Queens to make the nationwide top five list for student mobility. LaGuardia is ranked No. 5, and Borough of Manhattan Community College is No. 3.

Nine of CUNY’s four-year colleges were among the top 15 spots on the nationwide senior college list: Baruch College, No. 1; City College, No. 2; Lehman College, No. 3; John Jay, No. 5; City Tech, No. 7; Brooklyn College, No. 8; Hunter College, No. 10; Queens College, No. 11; and York College, No. 15.

“Many of our majors have transfer agreements with CUNY four-year colleges—streamlining the process for a LaGuardia graduate to transfer to Baruch or another CUNY four-year—another reason why LaGuardia should be a top choice for New Yorkers, especially Queens residents,” said President Mellow.

For more, click here to read a recent Chronicle of Higher Education article about college mobility report cards.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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What do Urban College Students Really Think about Health Insurance?

students with Healthy CUNY shirts speaking to other studentsHealth insurance is important for everyone, and college students are no exception. At CUNY, nearly ten percent of its more than 270,000 students have no insurance at all, even though many qualify for free or low-cost options. This places them at risk for both health and financial catastrophe.

As part of the University’s Healthy CUNY Initiative, which promotes student health as a pathway to academic success, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Professor Chris Palmedo, doctoral candidate Katrina Mateo, and recent MPH graduates Eleni Murphy and Jennifer Gallo conducted a qualitative study to identify pathways and obstacles to increasing student health insurance at the university. The findings were published in the Journal of American College Health.

Palmedo conducted student focus groups at four-year and community colleges, and interviews with the key individuals involved in recruiting and enrolling students into health insurance plans.

“It turns out that communications alone can go a long way to increase student access to health insurance,” Palmedo said. “Many CUNY students are eligible for Medicaid, but they don’t even know it. Colleges are trusted communications sources, and can do a lot to take advantage of this important role when it comes to advancing student health.”

Other communications opportunities identified from the research: Colleges can make on-campus health resources more accessible to students. These include campus-run health offices and social service partner agencies such as Single Stop, which operate on several CUNY campuses throughout the city. During some of the focus groups, Palmedo says, students were informing each other about these resources. Faculty, student clubs, and the online enrollment process are other channels for improving information about student health and health insurance, according to the research.

“Universities already make great investments in their students,” Palmedo said. “Our study identified opportunities for an even greater return on these investments over the long term.”

Palmedo PC, Murphy EK, Mateo KF, & Jennifer Gallo J. “What do urban college students really think about health insurance? A qualitative study.” Journal of American College Health. 26 Sep 2018


What do Urban College Students Really Think about Health Insurance?

studentsHealth insurance is important for everyone, and college students are no exception. At CUNY, nearly ten percent of its more than 270,000 students have no insurance at all, even though many qualify for free or low-cost options. This places them at risk for both health and financial catastrophe.

As part of the University’s Healthy CUNY Initiative, which promotes student health as a pathway to academic success, CUNY SPH Professor Chris Palmedo, doctoral candidate Katrina Mateo, and recent MPH graduates Eleni Murphy and Jennifer Gallo conducted a qualitative study to identify pathways and obstacles to increasing student health insurance at the university. The findings were published in the Journal of American College Health.

Palmedo conducted student focus groups at four-year and community colleges, and interviews with the key individuals involved in recruiting and enrolling students into health insurance plans.

“It turns out that communications alone can go a long way to increase student access to health insurance,” Palmedo said. “Many CUNY students are eligible for Medicaid, but they don’t even know it. Colleges are trusted communications sources, and can do a lot to take advantage of this important role when it comes to advancing student health.”

Other communications opportunities identified from the research: Colleges can make on-campus health resources more accessible to students. These include campus-run health offices and social service partner agencies such as Single Stop, which operate on several CUNY campuses throughout the city. During some of the focus groups, Palmedo says, students were informing each other about these resources. Faculty, student clubs, and the online enrollment process are other channels for improving information about student health and health insurance, according to the research.

“Universities already make great investments in their students,” Palmedo said. “Our study identified opportunities for an even greater return on these investments over the long term.”

Palmedo PC, Murphy EK, Mateo KF, & Jennifer Gallo J. “What do urban college students really think about health insurance? A qualitative study.” Journal of American College Health. 26 Sep 2018


The effects of dementia on family wealth may contribute to economic disparities between black-Americans and non-Black Americans

elderly man looking pensive while elderly woman looks onDementia is a costly health condition, with the majority of the economic burden falling upon the families of those suffering with the disease. Black Americans, who are at greater risk of developing dementia than white Americans, hold on average less than one-eighth of he wealth of white Americans, and thus may be disproportionally affected by the financial burden.

CUNY SPH alumnus Jennifer Kaufman led a study into whether dementia exacerbates this wealth disparity by examining dementia’s effect on wealth trajectories of black versus non-black Americans over an eight-year period preceding death. The results were published in the journal Ageing & Society.

The findings indicate that black Americans with dementia may experience a precipitous drain in assets. Their median wealth declined 97 per cent (from $38,205 to $1,200), compared with 42 per cent (from $141,500 to $82,000) among non-black Americans with dementia. Among black Americans without dementia, median wealth declined less than 15 per cent.

Home-ownership reduces the probability of wealth exhaustion, but dementia is also a predictor of home loss, which appears to play a significant role in wealth exhaustion, especially among black Americans.

The research suggests that the effects of dementia on family wealth may hinder efforts to level the economic playing field for Americans. At least half of black Americans have insufficient wealth to withstand dementia’s financial effects. For black Americans especially, all wealth may be exhausted over the course of dementia, leaving nothing for the next generation.

“Because of the importance of home equity in the accumulation of wealth, this circumstance may be, in part, a legacy of housing discrimination once enshrined in US policies and not yet eradicated in practice,” Kaufman says. “If dementia hinders a family’s efforts to improve its socio-economic status, and lower status is associated with a higher risk of dementia, not only wealth disparities but dementia itself may be part of a vicious cycle.”

Kaufman JE, Gallo WT, Fahs MC (2018). The contribution of dementia to the disparity in family wealth between black and non-black Americans. Ageing & Society 1–22. https://doi.org/10.1017/ S0144686X18000934


The effects of dementia on family wealth may contribute to economic disparities between black-Americans and non-Black Americans

Elderly man looking pensive while elderly woman looks on

Dementia is a costly health condition, with the majority of the economic burden falling upon the families of those suffering with the disease. Black Americans, who are at greater risk of developing dementia than white Americans, hold on average less than one-eighth of he wealth of white Americans, and thus may be disproportionally affected by the financial burden.

CUNY SPH alumnus Jennifer Kaufman led a study into whether dementia exacerbates this wealth disparity by examining dementia’s effect on wealth trajectories of black versus non-black Americans over an eight-year period preceding death. The results were published in the journal Ageing & Society.

The findings indicate that black Americans with dementia may experience a precipitous drain in assets. Their median wealth declined 97 per cent (from $38,205 to $1,200), compared with 42 per cent (from $141,500 to $82,000) among non-black Americans with dementia. Among black Americans without dementia, median wealth declined less than 15 per cent.

Home-ownership reduces the probability of wealth exhaustion, but dementia is also a predictor of home loss, which appears to play a significant role in wealth exhaustion, especially among black Americans.

The research suggests that the effects of dementia on family wealth may hinder efforts to level the economic playing field for Americans. At least half of black Americans have insufficient wealth to withstand dementia’s financial effects. For black Americans especially, all wealth may be exhausted over the course of dementia, leaving nothing for the next generation.

“Because of the importance of home equity in the accumulation of wealth, this circumstance may be, in part, a legacy of housing discrimination once enshrined in US policies and not yet eradicated in practice,” Kaufman says. “If dementia hinders a family’s efforts to improve its socio-economic status, and lower status is associated with a higher risk of dementia, not only wealth disparities but dementia itself may be part of a vicious cycle.”

Kaufman JE, Gallo WT, Fahs MC (2018). The contribution of dementia to the disparity in family wealth between black and non-black Americans. Ageing & Society 1–22. https://doi.org/10.1017/ S0144686X18000934


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, October 8, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

I am hoping you’ve had a wonderful extended weekend.

In our week ahead:

  • Wednesday October 10th – 11th grade students will take the PSAT
  • Wednesday October 10th – 9th grade students will engage in a grade-wide bonding trip to  Caumsett State Park
  • Wednesday October 10th – College Office Financial Aid Presentation, 5pm to 7pm
  • Thursday October 11th – 3pm to 5pm, Hispanic Heritage Celebration in the Courtyard

Special Announcement:
This week, after consultation with NEST+m’s School Safety Team, PTA co-presidents and teacher leaders, we will be making a slight shift to enhance our campus safety. Starting this week, between 8:30am and 2:20pm, entrance into our main-courtyard will take place through the Parking Lot gate. This move will ensure that all persons arriving at NEST+m during those hours will enter the central courtyard through one set of doors where they can be greeted by School Safety.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

Student Opportunities

Baruch STEP Academy – **Deadline extended to Wednesday, October 10, 2018**
The Baruch STEP Academy is accepting applications for the Fall 2018 Programs (middle and high school). The programs run for 10 Saturdays from October 6th – December 15th, starting at 9am. The high school program ends at 2pm, while the middle school program ends at 12pm.

The application for the Academy Fall 2018 Program can be accessed only online:

New Students: https://tinyurl.com/Fall-2018-NSA

The middle school program runs from 9am – 12pm:

  • Pre-Algebra & General Science Review

High school students participate in three periods throughout the day:

Math (1st Period 9:00am-10:30am)

  • Geometry Review
  • Algebra 2/Trigonometry Review
  • SAT Math Prep

Science (2nd Period 10:30am-12pm)

  • Living Environment Review
  • Chemistry Review
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Workshop (3rd Period 12:45pm-2pm)
  • Career Exploration
  • Financial Literacy
  • Analytical Writing

Questions? Please email BaruchSTEP@gmail.com


CUNY Freshman Enrollment Increases 4.0 Percent To Record 39,938 Students

Freshmen enrollment at The City University of New York rose 4.0 percent this fall to 39,938 students, a record for the University and a continuation of a five-year upward trend.

Since 2014, the number of freshmen enrolling at CUNY’s 18 senior and community colleges has increased by nearly 7 percent.

“The growth of our freshman classes is a testament to our successful efforts to evolve, expand and continuously improve educational offerings on campuses across CUNY,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Students are increasingly drawn to the quality and affordability of a CUNY education. Our mission to give them a pathway to social mobility has never been more vital.”

According to University officials, financial incentives by state and city government in recent years have also contributed to the upsurge. The state’s Excelsior Scholarship program, which supplements state and federal aid to make college free for more students, has been one factor. Another is the city’s move to waive CUNY application fees for public school students from low-income families.

Nearly all of CUNY’s campuses saw increases in their first-time freshmen enrollment this fall over last year. All told, the number of freshmen at the 11 senior colleges went from 20,158 to 21,214, a 5.3 percent increase. Among the seven community colleges, freshmen enrollment rose from 18,260 to 18,724.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Queens College Marks Anniversary of Hurricane Maria with Month-Long Exhibition of Art By School-Age Survivors of Storm on Puerto Rico

— Project is Funded by a Nonprofit that Perpetuates the Legacy of a Short-Lived Activist;
Show Opens October 9 With Reception —

Queens, New York, October 5, 2018—Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College will host an exhibition of 80 original works that students from Puerto Rico produced in response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria. The exhibition, Acciones Que Levantan a Puerto Rico (Actions That Lift Puerto Rico) ACCIONES, is sponsored by the CHICAS by Alejandra Foundation (CHICAS Foundation), a leading Puerto Rico-based social movement and nonprofit organization named for a girl who opposed bullying and social injustice before succumbing to an aneurysm at the age of nine. The show commemorates the one-year anniversary of the storm, which made landfall in Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017. The works will be on view in the Art Center on the sixth floor of the college’s Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library from October 9 through November 9, 2018. A reception on Tuesday, October 9, at 5:30 pm, will formally open the exhibition to the public; to attend, RSVP to qcartcenter@qc.cuny.edu.

Featuring pieces created by Puerto Rican students from public and private schools, ACCIONES is the only hurricane-themed student art exhibit of its kind. “The collection communicates a profound sense of hope for the future and serves as a poignant reminder of the long road ahead to help Puerto Rico fully recover from the storm’s devastation. ACCIONES also reveals the values that best represent the people of Puerto Rico, such as service, family, empathy, solidarity, hospitality, culture, love of nature and resiliency,” said Frances I. Ryan, executive director of the CHICAS Foundation.

“Students and staff from Queens College participated in Governor Cuomo’s NY Stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Initiative by helping to clean, restore, and reconstruct homes on the island in the aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “By hosting this exhibition, we want to continue to honor Puerto Ricans’ courageous struggle and the positive message of recovery that the young people of the island are sending out into the world.”

The CHICAS Foundation envisioned the hurricane-themed art initiative as an important communication forum for Puerto Rican students, allowing them to express their emotions about life-changing experiences and to use art to begin the healing process. Teachers played a major role in the competition by encouraging students to communicate their feelings as they returned to school following the storm. Despite dire conditions—much of the island is still without electricity, water, telecommunication or road access—630 original works were submitted to the ACCIONES contest. A panel of artists, art teachers and community leaders selected 80 of the paintings for display. 

“The values expressed throughout the exhibit are consistent with those of our founder’s legacy,” adds Ryan. “The late Alejandra Sofía Leizán Ryan was a young activist and plastics artist who dedicated her life and talent to fighting bullying and social injustice.”

ACCIONES was recently recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for its humanitarian contribution through the arts to help create awareness about the impact of Hurricane Maria on the island and the people of Puerto Rico.

About Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College
The Selma and Max Kupferberg Center for the Visual and Performing Arts (KCA) is an administrative umbrella for ten Queens College arts units—including the QC Art Center—that offer public cultural programming throughout the year. KCA’s mission is to provide high-quality, accessible and affordable cultural attractions to the Queens College community and the borough’s 2.2 million residents. The largest multi-disciplinary arts entity in the borough, Kupferberg Center for the Arts features world-class artists and performances at its main-stage campus venues, and showcases the talents of emerging and regional artists in off-site, neighborhood settings. A leader in the cultural renaissance of Queens, KCA connects residents of the most ethnically diverse region of the nation to their unique cultural heritages, showcasing these arts to a broader audience and validating the contributions each makes to the distinct nature of our campus and community.

About Alejandra Sofía Leizán Ryan and the CHICAS Foundation
CHICAS by Alejandra is the legacy of young artist and activist, Alejandra Sofía Leizán Ryan. Prior to her sudden death of an aneurism at the age of nine (Sept. 17, 2015), Alejandra devoted her life and artistic talent to fighting “bullying” and all forms of discrimination. The sadness and sense of hopelessness that “bullying” caused two of her cousins inspired Alejandra to dedicate her paintings to celebrate diversity. Her legacy of values and message of social justice continues through the works of the CHICAS by Alejandra Foundation.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Grove School receives NSF grant to ensure Internet safety from cyber attacks

CCNY engineering and computer science professors at Kyutech Institute in Japan

CCNY professors (right side) visiting Kyutech Institute in japan for pre-award meeting. From left: Abbe Mowshowitz, Tarek Saadawi, Myung Lee and Akira Kawaguchi.

Researchers from The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering are working to safeguard the Internet from cyber attacks and are receiving a boost that could lead to more trustworthy networks.

The boost comes in the form of a grant from the National Science Foundation to explore advanced resilient Internet architectures. The $450,000 grant is in partnership with the Kuytech Institute in Japan and additional support from the Japanese Science Foundation.

It will be used to address research challenges associated with enabling trustworthy networks supporting the Internet of Things (IoT), which encompasses everything connected to the Internet, and cyber-physical systems (CPS), which is a mechanism that is controlled or monitored by computer-based algorithms.  The IoT and CPS are becoming prevalent in everyday life, enabling a wide array of related emerging services and applications in cities and communities, including health, transportation, energy, utilities and other areas.

“The future Internet architecture must be able to deal with massive number of devices: computers, home appliances, autonomous connected vehicles,” said principal investigator Tarek Saadawi, electrical engineering professor at the Grove School. “It is estimated that 20 billion devices will be connected to the Internet by 2020, and they must be able to sustain and be resilient to all kind of failures due to cyber attacks, traffic surges, node failure and others.”

There are six researchers from Kuytech Institute in Japan and Saadawi along with three co-principal investigators from CCNY. Co-principal investigators include:

Akira Kawaguchi, professor and chair of computer science;

Myung Jong Lee, electrical engineering professor; and

Abbe Mowshowitz, computer science professor.

The grant runs for three years and will cultivate a wider scholar exchange program between Kyutech and CCNY building on a cooperation that already exists between the two institutions. Saadawi adds that they plan on connecting the two campuses, through the Internet2, a dedicated global research network, aiming to have a virtual private network connection so that there is direct communication bandwidth between each of the research laboratories.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


“The Manhattan Nobody Knows” and other CCNY titles

In a sequel to his award-winning “The New York Nobody Knows,” noted Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership sociologist William B. Helmreich returns with “The Manhattan Nobody Knows: An Urban Walking Guide” (Princeton University Press, November 2018). The book is one of the latest titles from City College of New York faculty.

While crafting his first New York tome required him to walk every block of the Big Apple (6,000 miles in all), Helmreich retraced 721 of those miles in Manhattan to pen this walking guide of one of the world’s greatest cities.

The result is a book by the Distinguished Professor of Sociology in the Colin Powell School that captures the unique magic and excitement of the island. It highlights hundreds of facts, places, and points of interest unavailable in other guides.

Other new exciting titles from CCNY faculty include:

In addition, “Eigenstaller’s Market,” a short story by Matthew G. Nagler, professor of economics and business in the Colin Powell School, appears in “Economic Inquiry,” a rarity for the highly regarded journal.

“To my knowledge, this is the first time that Economic Inquiry has chosen to publish a work of short fiction,” remarked Nagler.

He weaves the tale of an American economics professor who travels to Switzerland to interview an aging experimental economist who, during a dark period in the 20th century, conducted a study that is shrouded in secrecy, but which he suspects was an unspeakable abomination. On his journey, the younger economist is forced to question his own ethical principles, his capacity for compassion, and his personal commitment to the ideals of scientific endeavor.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Homecoming 2018 Features Full Slate of Activities for Alumni; Current Students and Their Families Will Participate for the First Time

— Brunch, Raffles, and Reception Among the Events Taking Place on October 13
and 14; Climate Change Lecture and Outdoor Food Festival Open to the Public

WHAT:
Queens College’s Homecoming Festival will welcome returning alumni, with a full lineup of activities designed for renewing old acquaintances and making new ones. Current students and their families will participate for the first time.

Click here for a complete event schedule. Select events are open to the public; registration is encouraged.         

WHEN:
Sunday, October 14, 2018, 11 am–5 pm
Saturday, October 13: Special Anniversary Reception for the classes of 1943, 1948, 1958, and 1968, 5–7 pm

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Click here for directions to the college, and here for a campus map.

BACKGROUND: Queens College’s Homecoming Festival offers something for everyone on Sunday, October 14. QC Athletics and Greek Life/House Plans will kick off a day of exciting activities by holding their respective reunion brunches at 11 am. Campus tours will be offered from noon to 1:30 pm; memorabilia and oral histories will be collected in Rosenthal Library from 1 to 3 pm.

Stephen Pekar ’86, a professor in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, will speak about the Zealandia expedition in Powdermaker Hall. “Love Is in the Air” will give alumni who met spouses at Queens College a chance to purchase a commemorative inscribed love lock, which will be a part of a permanent display at the college. Both events begin at 1 pm.

Gourmets will find much to savor in “A Taste of QC on the Quad,” which will feature a DJ, food trucks, raffles, a cash bar beginning at 12 noon, and a beer- and wine-tasting event at 2:30 pm.

Homecoming will culminate in the Reunion Reception at 3:30 pm, honoring the
classes of 1978, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2008, and 2013.

“We’re tremendously proud of our alumni and their many contributions to our city, state, and nation,” says President Felix V. Matos Rodriguez. “Homecoming gives these men and women a reason to come back to campus, meet friends and classmates, and see what’s happening at their alma mater today.”

To learn more about Reunion activities and register for selected events, contact Alumni Relations at (718) 997-3930 or click here.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and also ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Learn more at www.qc.cuny.edu

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY Campuses Offer An Array Of Programs, Performances And Forums To Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month

Celebrating Hispanic HeritageCampuses across CUNY are presenting an array of activities, performances and programs to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, a 30-day period that runs through Oct. 15 and was enacted into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to celebrate the stories and achievements of American citizens who trace their lineage to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.

“The CUNY community is proud to pay tribute to the histories and cultures of Hispanics and Latinos across the City and throughout the country”, said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “CUNY is stronger because of their contributions to our great University.”

Events include “Thriving on the Margins: A Workshop on Identity,” Oct. 10 at Medgar Evers College; an authors’ panel, “Writing Historical Fiction to Reach/Teach New Audiences,” Oct. 11 at Hunter College Center for Puerto Rican Studies; the Distinguished Latino Leaders Awards, Oct. 11 at Hostos Community College; and “¡Estamos Aqui! Queer Latinx Pride,” Oct. 11