School/Class News





Out in Two Cohort Has High GPAs and Higher Aspirations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On October 11, a ceremony and reception at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) celebrated the Fall 2018 Out in Two inductees, a cohort of 25 students selected from a pool of 113 applicants, according to Richard Naughton, who coordinates the program with fellow Senior Academic Advisor Jonathan Matamoros.

Among other strengths—including their community service and resilience—the scholars hold exceptional Grade Point Averages, or GPAs.

“We are very proud of this semester’s cohort. The students possess very impressive academic records. Nine of the 25 cohort members have a 4.0 GPA, and all but one of the new scholars has a GPA higher than 3.5; the lowest GPA is 3.48,” said Naughton.

BMCC Interim President Karrin E. Wilks delivered welcome remarks to the new cohort of scholars, who gathered along with their friends, family, classmates and members of the BMCC community in Richard Harris Terrace at the college’s main campus.

“We know that you have already been successful, that you have distinguished yourselves as students and citizens,” Wilks said. “Your commitment is inspiring to us. The world needs more smart, dedicated, tenacious leaders to make a difference not only in your careers and communities, but to make the world a better place for all of us.”

Acting Provost Erwin Wong told the Out in Two scholars, “We have nothing but the highest expectation that you will make us proud. We are confident we will see you doing many great things in your time at BMCC and beyond.”

Doris Holz, Vice President of Development and Chief Operating Officer of the BMCC Foundation congratulated the inductees, “on behalf of myself and the entire BMCC Foundation Board,” she said. “There is a lot of talent and hard work in this group of scholars. You are an inspiration to us all.”

Donors and dedicated staff ensure success of Out in Two scholars

Out in Two, a program unique to BMCC, provides support to help high-achieving students graduate within two years and transfer to a senior college. Out in Two scholars are closely mentored by BMCC faculty and staff. They solve academic challenges together, share resources and build networks that extend into their professional careers.

The Out in Two cohorts have doubled in size in the last few years, and that growth has been supported by donations from the BMCC Foundation, the Derfner Foundation, the Meringoff Family Foundation and the Southpole Foundation.

“We are grateful for the ongoing, generous donations of leading foundations who understand the value of supporting a cohort or small group program,” says Vice President Holz. “Out in Two, a close-knit learning community at BMCC, has proven to build student retention and success. The Out in Two scholars have earned an overall two-year graduate rate of 91 percent, and transfer to prestigious institutions including Cornell University, New York University, Vassar, Smith College and many others.”

The ceremony’s alumni speaker, Bhawna Seth (’17, Communication Studies), served as Out in Two Club President and has been accepted to Baruch College, CUNY. Today, she works as a College Assistant at BMCC for the Panther Partners program in the Office of Student Affairs.

Seth shared her experience in Out in Two. Having grown up in India, in a family of “many girls,” she said, “many things in our lives were determined by our gender.” At BMCC, she found mentors who “supported my freedom to experiment, and to take risks without being judged. Each of us has his or her own unique way to contribute.”

Out in Two scholar and liberal arts major Wendy Ihama said she appreciates the program’s one-on-one advising, and trips such as one planned for next week to the United Nations in midtown Manhattan.

“I want to study international relations once I graduate from BMCC, and eventually work as a foreign service officer,” she said. “The Out in Two program helps us complete our degrees but also helps us plan for the future and transfer to a bachelor’s degree program.”

Simon Dybowksi, an Out in Two scholar and video arts and technology major said what he likes about the program “is our community of students who are focused on their careers and doing well in their studies.”

In the past few years, he said, he has been creating content for videos, and wants to produce documentaries that focuses on issues related to children, who he works with through community service projects.

The Fall 2018 Out in Two scholarship recipients include Yetunde Adesunloro, Ingrid Becker, Barbara Bessa, Fernando Campos, Chiara Cutelli, Claudia Daporta, Richard Dias, Mamadou Doumbia, Szymon (Simon) Dybowski, Simcha Goldwurm, Wendy Ihama, Patrick Izidro De Souza, Regina Jackson, Monette Jacobs, Jean Lacap, Angie Maldonado Rodriguez, Moyosore Omolayo, Miriam Palma, Nino Pateishvili, Kevin Romeus, Lylia Saurel, Kate Sukhnandan, Gabriela Vassallo, Tingting Wu and Rei Yoshida.


BMCC Partnership With NYU Opens Doors for Ambitious Students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through a partnership between two New York University (NYU) programs—the Pipeline Opportunity for Inter-Collegiate STEM Education (POISE) and the Gallatin Undergraduate Initiative for Discovery in Education GUIDE—two select groups of Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students will gain access to academic resources, mentors and scholarships at NYU. They will also have the opportunity to either attend or observe a class at NYU, while they complete their associate degree at BMCC.

Through the BMCC Office of Student Affairs and Office of Academic Affairs, students are selected for the programs based on their academic excellence and unique contributions to the BMCC community.   POISE connects BMCC students focused on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) with theAcademic Achievement Program (AAP) within NYU’s College of Arts and Science (CAS). This links them to bachelor’s degree programs where they can continue their education in STEM, as well as in psychology and related majors.

GUIDE brings BMCC students into the NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study, where faculty and advisors help them prepare for Gallatin’s rigorous Bachelor of Arts degree program. GUIDE is tailored for students interested in developing their own program of study in the area of social justice, which includes a focus on social movements, law and governance, urban democracy, economics, identity, political literature and art, as well as environmental studies.

Each pipeline program welcomes BMCC students to become part of the NYU campus community. In addition to meeting with mentors, the POISE and GUIDE students receive an NYU ID and are able to join NYU student groups and utilize resources such as the NYU library. Once they graduate from BMCC and are accepted into NYU, they are eligible to apply for generous scholarships.

POISE scholars pursue STEM opportunities at NYU

The POISE scholars are Precious Adeyemi-Ogunleye, Joanne Callaghan, Erick Cochea, Amy Jimenez, Sohna Aisha Joof, Manoel Kadja , Radha Longo, Emmanuel Ologundudu, Jeydy Perezand Fadel Yerima.

BMCC science major Fadel Yerima says that, “NYU has a great neuroscience program. It could open doors I can’t even imagine now and it has tons of resources. Ultimately, I want to attend medical school, to focus on neurology and become a neurosurgeon.”

Science major Jeydy Perez says that interacting with the NYU academic community will challenge her, academically. “I recently completed an internship at a hospital in Dominican Republic,” she says, “and I was shocked at their lack of resources. I talked to a little boy who was there for an appendix that needed to be extracted, and that got me focused on the pediatric side of medicine.”

Sohna Aisha Joof, a science for health professions major at BMCC, intends to work toward a career as a trauma surgeon. Joanne Callaghan, a BMCC science major, is interested in a career in pharmacology, and wants to transfer into the biochemistry program at NYU, while science major Precious Adeyemi-Ogunleye is interested in NYU’s dental school.

GUIDE students embrace the rigor of NYU

The GUIDE scholars include D’Ilyna Adams, Dara Hyacinthe, Owen Kellaway, Jayshawn Lee and Shaina Vallejos. Each one takes a class at NYU, while completing their associate degree at BMCC.

Business Administration major Shaina Vallejos says that she looks forward to integrating her interests into a major she could create through NYU’s Gallatin School of Individual Study. She appreciates the level of discourse she has encountered in her class at NYU: “Instead of ‘Reading, Understanding and Accepting’, our class discussions at NYU seem to focus on, ‘Reading, Understanding and Questioning’.”

“I appreciate the new level of challenge,” said Writing and Literature major Jay Shaunless, and gerontology major Owen Kellaway says, “The GUIDE program is really rigorous, and it has that social justice lens that I share and that is central to my work.”

“We are super excited you are here.”

Michael Hutmaker, BMCC Dean of Student Affairs, told the gathering of POISE and GUIDE scholars, “Your ability, your intellect and your drive are on the same level as any student at NYU.” While it might be challenging to transfer to a senior college like NYU, he said, “You will already be part of the community. Try to get over there to the NYU campus once a week. Meet with an advisor, make sure they know who you are. If they are aware of your strengths and goals, they can be of more assistance when you apply to NYU.”

Erwin Wong, BMCC Acting Provost, told the group, “As POISE and GUIDE students, you’ll be assessed by the faculty and staff at NYU. It’s also important that you assess them; that you pay close attention to whether NYU is a good fit for you and your goals. Whatever happens, the level of engagement you have at NYU will be valuable experience whether you eventually transfer to NYU or some other university that has a program that speaks to you.”

Helene Bach, BMCC Director of Research, advised the students, “While you’re at NYU, take the opportunity to talk to your professors. Look them up. See what they’re publishing, what their research is about. Make an appointment and talk to them about their projects, and try to get a sense of where you might fit into a project like that, someday.”

“That’s an important skill, in business or academia—networking,” Wong added. “Bottom line, NYU poses challenges but you can meet those challenges. You are all here because you belong here. You have each other, you have us, and you have your mentors and networks on the NYU campus. You are not alone and we are super excited that you are here.”


Brooklyn Seoul: A Cultural Exchange

Brooklyn College’s new academic partnership with Dongguk University in South Korea gives students from both institutions the opportunity to expand their worldview and strengthen their cultural competency.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

Brooklyn College senior Raven Wilson dressed in a traditional Korean 한복 (hanbok).

“I have friends everywhere now,” says Raven Wilson—Brooklyn College (BC) senior, Korean popular music (K-pop) aficionado, and teaching/program assistant in the Media Production and Cultural Studies in South Korea Program. One of the first students to participate in the inaugural BC-Dongguk South Korea Exchange Program, Wilson, who double majors in communication and theater, is now the exchange program’s student ambassador.

“This program is great for students because you’re not being thrown into a situation where there’s no one there for you,” Wilson says. “This particular program doesn’t send students abroad solo; you’re always traveling with a group, so you always have a base that has your back.”

The exchange kicked off in the fall 2017 semester. Wilson, whose tuition cost was reimbursed through the Roy L. Furman ’60 Fellows Program, stayed at an off-campus dormitory near Seoul Station (the equivalent of New York City’s Penn Station). As a New Yorker, she had no problem navigating South Korea’s mass-transit system to get to school each day. It helped that the system made all announcements in Korean, English, Japanese, and Mandarin.

“The value of cultural competency cannot be overestimated,” says Gail Bier, senior director of International Education and Global Engagement at Brooklyn College. “For students to be able to say to a potential employer that they spent time studying in another country demonstrates that they are proficient in working with people very different from themselves, in environments very different from ones they are accustomed to, that they are able to communicate across challenges and are open to expanding their worldview. This gives them the edge needed to stand out among other candidates.”

While at Dongguk, Wilson took some courses that were taught fully in English and others that were taught at a 60/40 percent split (60 English, 40 in Korean), including communication theory, introduction to Korean film, Korean language, and film production. Wilson said that of those, the film production class was the toughest, as she and her classmates were required to make a short film every week for the first six weeks. Afterward, they were placed into groups and instructed to make a feature-length film out of their disparate short pieces in a way that interlocked to create a single narrative. Additionally, the students were each assigned to make their own experimental film project that contained no dialogue, but told the story through images.

“That was the most intense class of all the courses I took at Dongguk,” says Wilson, who earned A’s in every class, despite the Korean grading system that limits the number of students who can receive an A grade in each course.

JiHoon Song, a Dongguk University junior who is majoring in business management, was among the students who spent a semester at Brooklyn College. He says he chose to study at the college because of its reputation for providing a rigorous education and its location in one of the most dynamic cities in the world.

“New York has different kinds of food from all over the world, and I could enjoy the best quality of many things such as musicals, museums, concerts, and other arts. I chose Brooklyn College for this semester because the professors are passionate and the courses are extremely useful.”

Song took six courses: AerobicsPrinciples of MarketingGlobal Business EnvironmentIntroduction to Mass MediaIntercultural Communication, and Introduction to Communication.

“I loved the campus,” he says. “It was so quiet and has many places to sit and contemplate or study. I could lie on the grass. I liked the college’s gym as well. I worked out four times a week. I became healthier because of it. Another great place was the Brooklyn College Library. I will recommend other Dongguk students participate in the exchange program because Brooklyn College has awesome professors and wonderful students.”

Wilson, who befriended Song and keeps in touch with him via KakaoTalk, a South Korea texting app, will be graduating with the Class of 2019 in the spring. She plans to pursue a career in entertainment management and artist representation.

 

Interested in taking your education around the globe? The Tow Undergraduate/Graduate International Research Stipend enables undergraduate and graduate students to conduct research in settings outside the United States during the winter intersession. It is designed to expand students’ academic experiences and to enrich their lives, and that of the college, by providing access to educational opportunities abroad. The online application is available on the Brooklyn College Scholarships and Awards homepage. The deadline is October 31, 2018.

Brooklyn College is able to provide its students with the kind of global engagement opportunities they need to expand their learning and stand out in the marketplace thanks to the generosity of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To learn about the various ways to contribute to student success, please visit the foundation website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora, 212.662.9939


Event: Separating Facts from Fake News: Environmental FOIA in the Trump Era

 

Saturday, November 3rd

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

CUNY School of Law
2 Court Square, Long Island City, NY 11101

When Sarah Lamdan wrote the book Environmental Information: Research, Access, and Environmental Decisionmaking in 2016, she did not know that access to environmental information was about to change dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. By early 2017, hundreds of scientists and information specialists were rushing to preserve troves of government climate change data in Data Rescue events across the nation. Cries of “fake news” blurred the lines between scientific truths and fiction in the new, uncertain political climate.

As data disappeared from EPA webpages, a shroud of secrecy hid federal environmental policy from the public. Congress and the EPA proposed plans to eliminate scientific data from environmental decisionmaking. The EPA itself began to shrink, with 1,600 workers leaving the agency in the first 18 months of Trump’s presidency.

Environmental advocates, government transparency organizations, and members of the public turned to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to wrest undisclosed environmental information from a federal government set on intensive environmental deregulation. FOIA requests and litigation have skyrocketed in the Trump era as people try to capture glimpses of what our environmental agencies are up to.

CUNY Law Professor Sarah Lamdan has teamed up with Dale Willman, from CUNY’s Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism, and Rebecca Bratspies, director of CUNY Law’s Center for Urban and Environmental Reform, to plan a day-long event at CUNY School of Law dedicated to discussing environmental FOIA issues. Separating Facts from Fake News: Environmental FOIA in the Trump Era will bring together environmental lawyers, journalists, advocates, and scholars.

Join us for a day of conversation and strategy sessions with environmental lawyers and journalists working to expose and fight environmental deregulation. Develop your FOIA skills with attorneys and journalists who use FOIA in environmental litigation and reporting.

For more information about the event, and to RSVP, click here.


CCNY study breaks Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) distance limit

Schematic of the long-range energy transfer between donor and acceptor molecules enhanced by the metamaterial. Image Credit: Visakh Menon

Using engineered nanocomposite structures called metamaterials, a City College of New York-led research team reports the ability to measure a significant increase in the energy transfer between molecules. Reported in the journal ACS Photonics, this breakthrough breaks the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) distance limit of ~10-20 nanometers, and leads to the possibility of measuring larger molecular assemblies.

And since FRET is a staple technique in many biological and biophysical fields, this new development could benefit pharmaceuticals, for instance.

“Energy transfer between molecules plays a central role in phenomena such as photosynthesis and is also used as a spectroscopic ruler for identifying structural changes of molecules,” said Vinod Menon, professor of physics in City College’s Division of Science. “However, the process of energy transfer is usually limited in the distance over which it occurs, typically reaching 10 to 20 nm.”

But in the study reported by Menon’s ACS Photonics group, the authors demonstrate significant increase in the energy transfer distance (> 15x) – reaching ~ 160 nm. This is accomplished by using a metamaterial that undergoes a topological transition.

The present work sets the stage for the use of spectroscopic rulers for studying a wide array of larger molecular systems which has not been previously possible using standard FRET technique.

The Menon group comprised CCNY physics majors Rahul Deshmukh and Tal Galfsky (both graduate students) and Emaad Khwaja (undergraduate). Collaborators included the theory groups of Girish Agarwal (Texas A&M University) and   Svend-Age Biehs (Carl von Ossietzky University, Germany). The work at CCNY was supported by the National Science Foundation’s Division of Materials Research and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Baruch College Professor Scott Newbert Receives Abraham J. Briloff Prize for Ethics

Scott L. Newbert, PhD, the Lawrence N. Field Chair in Entrepreneurship and academic director of the Lawrence N. Field Center programs at the Zicklin School of Business received the Abraham J. Briloff Prize for Ethics at the 2018 Baruch College Faculty Convocation.

Dr. Newbert was among a distinguished number of faculty whose professional achievements were recognized through Presidential Excellence Awards, Guggenheim Fellowships, and other honors.

Dr. Newbert received the​ Briloff Prize in recognition of his article “Achieving Social and Economic Equality by Unifying Business and Ethics: Adam Smith as the Cause of and Cure for the Separation Thesis,” published in the Journal of Management Studies in 2018.

In his article, Dr. Newbert argues that the widespread misconception that 18th century economist and philosopher Adam Smith​ advocated a purely self-interested form of capitalism has resulted in the vast social and economic inequalities we have experienced since Smith’s time. In response, Dr. Newbert argues that Smith’s writings actually suggest that broad-based social and economic prosperity​can only result by striking an appropriate balance between self-interest and concern for others.​

“The Briloff Prize is a testament to the importance Baruch College places on understanding how ethics both informs and is informed by one’s professional life,” said Newbert. “I am honored to have had my research recognized by the committee this year and am grateful for the generosity of Charles R. Dreifus who has made this prize possible, and for Abraham J. Briloff, who was the inspiration for it.”

The Abraham J. Briloff Prizes in Ethics are intended to stimulate scholarship in the field of ethics, with an emphasis on ethics in professional life. The prizes are funded by a gift from alumnus Charles R. Dreifus, (’66, MBA ’73) in honor of Abraham J. Briloff, Emmanuel Saxe Distinguished Professor of Accountancy Emeritus. The prizes are awarded annually to a faculty member who has written an important topical article, essay or book on ethics and to a student or students who have written an outstanding research paper or essay, also as it relates to current events.

 


Latina Ad trailblazer Daisy Expósito-Ulla in Hispanic Heritage Month talk at CCNY

Daisy Expósito-Ulla, communications guru and CEO of d expósito & Partners, will speak at CCNY on Oct. 25.

Communications guru Daisy Expósito-Ulla joins the American Advertising Federation (AAF) chapter at The City College of New York for a conversation on Oct. 25 about her dynamic, high-profile career at the cross sections of marketing and social equity. The event, 12:30 – 2 p.m. in Shepard Hall room 250, is part of City College’s Lunch with Leaders Ad/PR Lecture Series and commemorates Hispanic Heritage Month.

Expósito’s talk is free and open to the public. Click here to register and receive complimentary admission.

Expósito’s marketing agency, d expósito & Partners, prides itself on producing work that takes progressive social equity and nationwide demographic changes into account while developing strategies and campaigns that are among the most outstanding of the last decade.

A “New American Agency” for a new America, the d expósito team considers itself “cultural warriors” looking to pioneer a future that builds on significant contributions from the influential Hispanic population in the years to come.

d expósito & Partners have earned numerous awards since their founding in 2005, including: Three ¡Bravo! PR top awards for AARP 2018 for the film Every step of the Way; The 2018 Media Event of the Year Award; and The 2018 Public Affairs Campaign of the Year Award. Earlier this year, Ms. Expósito was inducted into the AAF Advertising Hall of Fame.

For more information, please contact Jayson Alexander Swain, CCNY AAF treasurer/Public Affairs at jayson@jaysonalexanderswain.com or (646) 675.5976.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for World University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


City Tech Humanities Professor Publishes Book Chronicling Career of Communication Studies Pioneer David Campbell

Professor Julian Costa

Julian Costa, adjunct lecturer of Humanities at the New York City College of Technology (City Tech), recently published a book titled David Campbell: Story of a Career.

The book is a biography that traces the teaching career of the late David Campbell, who taught communication in Ohio and Pennsylvania from 1964 until 2000. In telling the story of Campbell’s career, the book also provides insight into the evolution of communication studies as an academic subject.

“In the 1960s, a student pursuing a degree in communication largely focused on performance skills,” said Costa. “Public speaking, acting, and the physiology behind how we speak were the cornerstones of the curriculum. Today, these are separate curricula.”

Costa added, “Mass communication was only just beginning to catch the attention of academia.  It was during the ‘60s and ‘70s where coursework in media production became a popular area of study.” What intrigued Costa to write this book was Campbell’s professional record as a teacher and public servant. “In his thirty five years of teaching, David Campbell developed new majors and courses, he chaired his department through the integration of personal computing into the communication curriculum, developed scholarships, and so much more,” said Costa. “What I respect about his career the most, however, was that he gave his students real-world learning experiences. He was a proponent of experiential education, internships, and working with clients.” Campbell’s teaching specialty was television production, and in this role, he and his students produced a variety of cablecasting, including live telethons and weekly talk shows for various clients.

As a supplement to the book, Costa has created an accompanying website that includes a number of restored telecasts from Campbell and his classes, viewable as YouTube videos. This can be accessed at www.professorcampbell.com.

At City Tech, Costa teaches public speaking for the Humanities Department. In addition to teaching, he serves as executive producer of “CCM: All Access,” a weekly television show produced at the County College of Morris in New Jersey.

For more information about the book, please contact Professor Costa at jcosta@citytech.cuny.edu.


Editorial: protecting public health research from inappropriate corporate influence

In an editorial in the November 2018 issue of the American Journal of Public Health, CUNY SPH Distinguished Professor Nicholas Freudenberg emphasizes the importance of protecting public health research from inappropriate corporate influence. Corporate sponsorship of new bodies of faux science on climate change, tobacco, unhealthy food and pharmaceuticals, Freudenberg warns, put the credibility of independent public health researchers at risk.

“Mixing the apples of independent science designed to inform policy with the oranges of science designed to advance corporate interests leaves policymakers with a fruit salad that may be a faulty guide to public health practice”, Freudenberg writes.

Read more:

 

 


Distinguished Professor Denis Nash appointed to governor’s Hepatitis C Elimination Task Force

Distinguished Professor Denis Nash

Denis Nash

More than 100,000 New Yorkers are living with hepatitis C, and most are unaware that they have it. The virus is spread by blood to blood contact, with the most common risk factor being injection drug use. Over the past decade, there has been a distinct peak in cases emerging among younger people aged 20 to 40, fueled in part by the growing opioid epidemic. 

In March, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced New York State’s commitment to eliminate hepatitis C by increasing access to testing, treatment and education to connect vulnerable New Yorkers with available services. On Thursday, Cuomo announced the members selected to join the Task Force that will advise the state on its Hepatitis C Elimination Plan.  

Among the appointees is Denis Nash, Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at CUNY SPH and Executive Director of the CUNY Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH).  

Nash will co-Chair the Surveillance, Data, and Metrics Workgroup of the new Hepatitis C Elimination Task Force. He previously served on another task force convened by Governor Cuomo, which was charged with developing a blueprint for New York’s groundbreaking ‘Ending the HIV Epidemic’ Initiative. Out of this came the Ending the Epidemic Dashboard, developed and maintained by CUNY ISPH, which compiles and disseminates metrics that monitor the initiative’s progress.  

“Our Governor has again taken a bold step to address one of our most pressing population health issues that is also a very solvable implementation science challenge,” Nash says. “We can and will achieve hepatitis C virus elimination in New York!” 

“The members selected for this task force are some of the finest in their fields, and their invaluable experience will provide us with the information we need to develop an attainable elimination plan,” Governor Cuomo said in a press release. “This strategic plan will not only improve the quality of life for those living with Hepatitis C, but also ensure that New Yorkers have the support and resources they need to prevent this disease.”  

Learn more 


Workplace wellness program helps employees make healthy choices

man in a suit eats a salad at a deskObesity is an ongoing public health concern in the United States and although obesity has both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors, evidence shows that adopting a healthy lifestyle can play a significant role in its prevention or reduction.

In several studies, increased consumption of vegetables and fruits, as well as intake of whole grains, are positively associated with reducing obesity. But the US national median intake of vegetables and fruits in adults and adolescents is lower than the amount recommended by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Since employees spend most of their day at the workplace, the work environment is a suitable setting to promote healthy lifestyles. Dr. Ghada Soliman, Associate Professor of Nutrition at CUNY SPH and colleagues evaluated the effectiveness of a workplace wellness program on employees’ eating behaviors towards health-oriented dietary change, such as increasing intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and dairy, as well as decreasing intakes of saturated fat and sugar-sweetened beverages. The findings were published in the Journal Public Health Nutrition.

The retrospective cohort study analyzed data from 12,636 adults who participated in a wellness program for three consecutive years during years 2004 to 2013 and who completed web-based health risk questionnaire. The wellness program included annual health screening, laboratory data, health risk questionnaires, as well as online and onsite personalized nutrition education and counseling. The research team found that the wellness program had a positive impact on increasing the number of participants who selected healthier food choices. The data also indicate that increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy and the healthy eating pattern were correlated with improved health outcome indicators such as BMI and triglycerides in the third-year follow-up of the program.

“This study provides a model for a successful wellness program in the workplace that could be personalized to fit individual needs,” Soliman says. “It presents an evidence for the impact of wellness programs on the health and wellbeing of participants and as such may help inform and shape future wellness policies in the workplace.”

Soliman, GA., Kim, J., Lee, J., High, R., Hortman, S., Kim, Y., Wehbi, N., and Canedy, J. Wellness programme at the workplace promotes dietary change and improves health indicators in a longitudinal retrospective study. Public Health Nutrition, 2018: October 1: 1-9. doi: 10.1017/S1368980018002380. 


CCNY’s eight Clinton Fellows tackle education at Clinton Global Initiative

Seven of CCNY’s eight Chicago-bound Clinton Fellows [from left]: Jessica Jorge, Raneem Elsayed, Swathi Mettela, Danny Tsoi, Nancy Larcher, Mahmoud Khedr and Khandker Ahamed.

This year’s Clinton Global Initiative University meeting at the University of Chicago, Oct. 19-21, attracts more than 1,000 innovative student leaders from around the world for a conference themed “Turning Ideas into Action.” The participants include eight of The City College of New York’s best and brightest – all but one from the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership — invited to attend after earning Clinton Fellowships in the spring.

CCNY’s eight Clinton Fellows — three of them from the Class of 2018 — and their majors are:

  • Khandker Ahamed, CUNY BADivision of Humanities and the Arts;
  • Raneem Elsayed,  history/international studies;
  • Jessica Jorge, psychology/international studies, Class of 2018;
  • Mahmoud Khedr, CUNY BA;
  • Nancy Larcher, history/political science, Class of 2018;
  • Swathi Mettela, anthropology;
  • Faria Tasnim, international studies/sociology, Class of 2018; and
  • Danny Tsoi, economics.

Of any of the five focus areas they are required to commit to at the Clinton event, the CCNY delegation will tackle education. Environment and climate change, peace and human rights, poverty alleviation, and public health are the other topics.

Ahamed, Tsoi and Khedr will talk about their Zahn Innovation Center award-winning mental health education curriculum for high school students developed by their student start-up FloraMind. It is designed to promote self-care and break the stigma around mental health. It won the $25,000 Zahn Social Impact Prize.

Elsayed will discuss how she teaches design thinking to high school students. The goal is for them to pass the concept on to elementary students.

Jorge will introduce “Uxakah Learn,” an afterschool program for girls to empower them to speak about social justice issues in their communities.

And Larcher, Mettela and Tasnim will share research on their oral history program at CCNY to explore the lives of students at the diverse campus.

More than $750,000 in funding will be available to select CGI U 2018 students to help them turn their ideas into action.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


REIMAGINING PRISON WITH THE VERA INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE

Reimagining Prison with The Vera Institute of Justice

On October 10th the Vera Institute of Justice held their Reimagining Prison conference at John Jay College. The event was the culmination of their Reimagining Prison Project and the release of their Reimagining Prison Report, which makes the case for a human-dignity centered approach to incarceration.

The event was also held at the Cheshire Correctional Institution in Cheshire Connecticut, where members of the innovative T.R.U.E. Unit could be digitally telecast to the entire conference. Developed by Scott Semple, Connecticut’s Department of Correction Commissioner, with strong support from Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy, and the Vera Institute of Justice, the vision for the unit is: Truthfulness, Respectfulness, Understanding, and Elevating.

“It’s my hope that when we all put our minds together, we can envision a system that lives up to the ideals in which our country was founded on,” said President Mason. She then moderated a discussion panel with Nicholas Turner, President of the Vera Institute of Justice; Malloy; and Stanley Richards, Executive Vice President of The Fortune Society.

(left to right) Karol V. Mason, Nicholas Turner, Dannel P. Malloy, and Stanley Richards 

I’ve recognized through working in the criminal justice system, how it treats people of poverty and color, and how opportunities afforded to white people and people with money are not afforded to people of color.” — Dannel P. Malloy, Governor of Connecticut

 

Why Reimagine Prisons?
Turner answered that question by thinking back to a trip his team took to Germany in June of 2015. “The idea of going to a country where the incarceration rate is a tenth of what it is in this country felt important to see. That helped us think about what we should be doing. That is what really spurred us to think about reimagining prisons,” said Turner. Governor Malloy, a partner in the project, also mentioned the Germany trip as an eye-opening experience regarding criminal justice practices. “It was interesting to see how differently they view the prison system, and how they look at it as an opportunity. We tend to view it as a punishment vehicle and that we should exact the highest punishment possible,” said Malloy. “If we could change that, then we would have less crime, lower rates of recidivism, and we could really turn lives around.”

“We need to get to the fundamental questioning of what the system is built on, one of white supremacy and racial oppression, and the dehumanization of people.” —Nicholas Turner, President of the Vera Institute of Justice

 

All three panel members also touched on our country’s history of discrimination and unequal criminal justice practices as a fundamental reason why, as a society, we have to rethink our prisons. “I’ve recognized through working in the criminal justice system, how it treats people of poverty and color, and how opportunities afforded to white people and people with money are not afforded to people of color,” said Malloy. “I also came to understand that we had too many people in prisons for the wrong reasons. We have to stop sending children to prison, because when you send a child to prison, you are likely to have him for the rest of his life entering and reentering prison.” Turner explained that to move forward, we have to confront our country’s history of racism. “We need to get to the fundamental questioning of what the system is built on, one of white supremacy and racial oppression, and the dehumanization of people,” said Turner.

“At Fortune, we know that the crime is what people did, not who they are.” —Stanley Richards, Executive Vice President of The Fortune Society

 

This concept of giving people in prisons a sense of dignity, so that they could embrace their own humanity, hit home for Richards. “As a former incarcerated man of color, I spent most of my life cycling in and out of prison. I did not see the beauty within myself,” said Richards. “It wasn’t until I went to school that I realized that I was not all the things all my teachers told me. I wasn’t the dumbest guy in the class. I wasn’t worth nothing. I realized that I wasn’t all of that.” His non-profit organization, The Fortune Society, provides hope and guidance for formerly incarcerated individuals, with over 50% of the staff being formerly incarcerated. “At Fortune, we know that the crime is what people did, not who they are. We let people know when they walk through the doors, they are not the worst thing that they have ever done,” said Richards.

 

How are we moving forward?
Having human dignity be the centerpiece for the Reimagining Prisons Project has propelled the work forward, and it’s having a positive effect. “Our prison population has gone from 18,000, down to 13,000. Right now we are the only state close to getting half of our prison population,” said Malloy. “We’ve had gigantic change in public safety. In 2016, we had the largest decline in violent crime of any state in the nation, and in that period of time we did that by a third.” Richards agreed and said that he’s seen the difference in New York City himself. “When I was on Rikers Island, there were 22,000 people incarcerated in New York City. Today we are at 8,200,” said Richards. “Safety is up, crime is down, incarceration is down, and we now have the possibility to close Rikers and have a much smaller footprint.”

Jermaine Young, T.R.U.E. Mentor

Jermaine Young, T.R.U.E. Mentor

“A lot of times, brothers commit crimes because they were victimized themselves.” —Jermaine Young, T.R.U.E. Mentor

 

Jermaine Young, a T.R.U.E. Mentor, said that what affected him, and the other members of the T.R.U.E. Unit the most, was a sense of humanity. “It’s not all about teaching young brothers ‘don’t do this, and don’t do that.’ It’s about getting to the human dignity issue,” said Young. “A lot of times, brothers commit crimes because they were victimized themselves.”

Christopher Belcher, T.R.U.E. Mentee

Christopher Belcher, T.R.U.E. Mentee

Christopher Belcher, a T.R.U.E. Mentee, said that growing up he just wanted to be a part of something positive, and that being caught up in the criminal justice system was something he never thought he’d experience. “It’s easy to be a part of something negative, just walk outside,” said Belcher. Now, being in the T.R.U.E. Unit, he’s often moved to tears by officers and mentors regularly showing him compassion and support. One of the officers coaches his basketball team. “He’s wearing a different hat as our coach, and I get to see him as something else, someone supporting me.” After he leaves the Cheshire Correctional Institution, Belcher hopes to become a strong advocate for prison reform.

The positive benefits are not only felt by the T.R.U.E. Unit mentors and mentees, but also the prison staff themselves. Scott Erfe, the Warden at the Cheshire Correctional Institution, explained that the T.R.U.E. Unit provided much-needed inspiration for his staff members. “We don’t get to see the positive outcomes, because if someone leaves and does something positive, we don’t see them,” said Erfe. “We only see the negativity if they come back to prison. Through the T.R.U.E. Unit, staff members can see the positivity and growth, and they want to get up and come to work.”

After visiting Connecticut prisons 23 times, and fully understanding how dehumanizing prisons were to both the individuals incarcerated and the staff members employed at them, Malloy feels even more compelled to reimagine the criminal justice system. “I encourage people to visit prisons to fully understand how much wasted time and wasted space is involved. Change like the T.R.U.E. Unit at Cheshire has a positive effect on the entire population at the prison,” said Malloy. “When correction guards come to me and say being in the T.R.U.E. Unit is the finest experience they’ve ever had in their 30-plus-year careers, that sends a message to everybody else. There is another way to do these things.”

Click here to read the full Vera Institute of Justice Reimagining Prison Report.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, October 15, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

This week NEST+m is honored to host a site visit on Tuesday October 16th from the New York City Department of Education’s First Deputy Chancellor, Chief Academic Officer, Deputy Chief Academic Officer, Nine Executive Superintendents and other honored guests.

While these honored guests will be onsite for a day of professional learning among themselves, their day of learning will also feature classroom visits across NEST+m’s K-12 learning community.

For our students, teachers and faculty, this is a regular instructional day but certainly one to be proud of!

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Monday, October 15, 8:30am – Whole Child Committee meeting
  • Tuesday, October 16, 4:10pm – SLT Meeting in the Library
  • Wednesday October 17 – 10th grade students will engage in a grade-wide bonding trip to Central Park and the nearby Museums.
  • Wednesday, October 17 – Middle Grades PTA-sponsored Lice Check by Lice Angels
  • Thursday, October 18, 8:30am – PTA Meeting in the Cafeteria
  • Thursday, October 18 – Lower Grades PTA-sponsored Lice Check by Lice Angels
  • Thursday, October 18, 3:00-5:00pm – Rescheduled Hispanic Heritage Celebration in the Courtyard
  • Friday October 19th, 8:30am – K-2 Family Friday (more info forthcoming)


City Tech Offers First Accredited BFA Degree In Communication Design At CUNY

The new Pearl Facility

The Communication Design department at New York City College of Technology (City Tech) has become the first within the CUNY system to offer a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree in Communication Design accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

This new design program at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge integrates fundamental theory and concepts with applied technology, helping students keep pace with an ever-changing industry.

Offering five concentrations – Advertising, Graphic Design, Web Design, Illustration and Motion Graphics – as well as providing a professional agency-like environment and assignments mirroring real-world client projects, the program ensures that all of its graduates are ready to enter the creative workforce.

Professor Josh Kapusinski highlights the value of the program’s new curriculum: “Our motion media courses give students a complete skill set, and being the first four-year accredited design program within CUNY immediately sets us apart.”

The program will be housed in the newly renovated Pearl Facility, a 12,200 sq. ft. space devoted to developing concepts, including labs for creating them and presentation spaces for showcasing finished work. The department’s Pearl Facility will be officially unveiled at a ribbon cutting ceremony on October 18, 2018, during which it will welcome its alumni and the industry professionals who employ them.

One such alumnus, Distinguished Professor and world-renowned graphic designer and typographer Tony Di Spigna, has donated his 50-year archive to the department’s Grace Gallery in what will become its first permanent collection. Professor Di Spigna, who was a student in the program from 1962 to 1964, recalls the heritage of the department he graduated from and looks forward to what it will accomplish in the future: “The two-year program has done wonders for students and their professional careers. Now that it’s a four-year B.F.A. program, imagine how much more it will do.”

As City Tech’s Communication Design department continues to level the playing field between public and private design school options in New York City, its new B.F.A. degree in Communication Design reinforces City Tech’s reputation as an incubator for creative talent.

For more information about the Communication Design B.F.A. program, please contact Sharmaine Bernard in the Communication Design department at SBernard@citytech,cuny.edu or 718-260-5175; or Emerald Williams at EWilliams@citytech.cuny.edu to schedule an appointment with department chair Douglas Davis.


U.S. Dept. of Ed GAANN grant expands CCNY chemical engineering PhD program

CCNY chemical engineer and GAANN grant recipient David Rumschitzki will train seven PhD students over the next three years.

Bolstering the expertise in a U.S. Department of Education identified area of national need and three of its sub-areas, City College of New York chemical engineer David Rumschitzki is the recipient of more than $1 million to train seven PhDs in the field over three years.  The funding comprises a $900K Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) grant from the U.S. Department of Education and $150K in supplementary support from CUNY.

The GAANN award sets up an integrated research and pedagogical program headed by Rumschitzki in City College’s Grove School of Engineering.  Running through Sept. 30, 2021, the program will train future PhD chemical engineers in the three sub-focus areas: materials, energy production/storage, and interfacial science/engineering.

The grant pays for six students per year for three years with CUNY supporting one additional student per year for three years. The support includes $34,000 per student per year in stipends, in addition to tuition, health insurance and some money for supplies. Focus will be on recruiting female students and students from underrepresented groups, although the only hard eligibility criterion is that the students be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Harlem-based City College is designated a Hispanic Serving Institution of Higher Education by the U.S. Dept. of Education.

“Earning this GAANN award as we celebrate our centennial is affirmation that the Grove School can compete with the best schools in the country — It’s a vote of confidence by both reviewers and the U.S. Dept. of Education that we have a first rate PhD program in chemical engineering,” said Rumschitzki.

He noted the strong support of CUNY interim Vice-Chancellor Dan McCloskey, CCNY president Vince Boudreau, interim provost Tony Liss, Grove School dean Gilda Barabino and chair of chemical engineering Ilona Kretzschmar.  He also stressed that it was only possible to bring this application together so quickly because of the close cooperation of his chemical engineering faculty colleague Charles Maldarelli in preparing the winning GAANN proposal and getting the program started.

“Everyone has pitched in enthusiastically to make this a success,” said Rumschitzki.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


BMCC Report Reveals High Traffic and Wide Use of Battery Park City Parks

The parks located in Battery Park City are a vital part of the fabric that makes lower Manhattan dynamic and diverse. Approximately 690,000 people visit the 36 acres of parks and public spaces in Battery Park City (BPC) each year according to findings from an extensive research project led by a team of Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) professors and students.

BMCC Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice Professors Michelle Ronda and Robin Isserles and a team of current and former BMCC students were contracted by Battery Park City Authority (BPCA) in 2017 to conduct the first ever  BPCA Parks User Count & Study 2017-2018.

The 130-page report is designed to help BPCA meet the challenges of maintaining the high level of satisfaction that park visitors currently enjoy.

In a BPCA press release, B.J. Jones, President and Chief Executive Officer, said the report’s findings will help inform future decisions about the park’s maintenance, horticulture and programing. The report will also help BPCA focus efforts in addressing matters like resiliency, safety and making its spaces more engaging and welcoming to everyone.

The study offered students and faculty unique learning experiences that included science research methodology and analytical skills.

“We are very proud of BMCC professors Michelle Ronda and Robin Isserles who engaged students in this important study to analyze the use of Battery Park City’s parks and public spaces, with the aim of continually improving New York City’s urban landscape,” says Karrin E. Wilks, BMCC Interim President. “This study served as a unique research opportunity for our faculty and students, and established our partnership with Battery Park City to strengthen our local community.”

Key Findings

  • The average length of residency for those surveyed is eight years; the average length of time having worked in BPC is six-and-one-half years; and the average time that people have been coming to BPC parks is six years; About 47% of visitors come from the New York City Metro area, 31% of visitors come from out-of-state, and 22% are within walking distance of BPC.
  • Most visitors to BPC parks (residents and non-residents alike) come in a group (six out of 10) and about three in 10 people come with a dog; about 11% of people come to BPC parks on bikes; About 25% of visitors to BPC parks were there for the first-time.
  • When asked what brought them to BPC parks on the day of the survey, about three in 10 people report that they came to BPC parks to sightsee, 19% said that they came to walk, and 10% report that they came to walk dogs.

“Although parks are often places for solitary exercise or contemplation, these public spaces in BPC are also clearly important places for people to socialize, and many people have made visiting these places into a daily habit,” said Ronda.

BMCC visitor counts and the survey of park visitors, confirm BPC parks are highly successful. Nonetheless, a series of focus groups showed some BPC residents and non-residents have concerns such as insufficient restrooms, crowded pathways and bicycles that ride too fast or do not follow existing two-path rules.

One of the more interesting findings from the focus groups was the sense of ownership some residents expressed about the parks and a desire to safeguard these public spaces, and their uses. As one participant said, “Unlike Central Park, this is a residential community. We want to protect this.”

Focus group participants also expressed pride in their neighborhood being recognized and widely enjoyed which could translate into higher property values.

Suggestions from focus groups

Among the suggestions that focus group participants offered to BPCA were more signage in languages other than English, outdoor exercise machines and stations, emergency phones by the river, more tennis courts, piers for kayaking and better bicycle management. The groups also suggested more activities such as dance events and outdoor activities for older residents.

The BMCC team said any limitations of a social science research project are also opportunities for future research. The focus groups offered varied suggestions, such as recruiting more people in order to compile a more accurate census.

“There is more that could be explored in BPC in terms of health and public spaces, beyond the relationship of workers to this public space. Urban parks serve as an ‘oasis’ for so many workers, but also those people who do not have regular access to more natural environments. Research indicates such access may reap health and mental health benefits,” said Ronda.

Applying scientific data to park management

The study took place from July 2017 to May 2018. During that time, Ronda and Isserles hired and trained 43 research assistants. Of those, five were BPCA summer interns, nine were students in Isserles’ BMCC sociology capstone course and the remaining 29 were CUNY students, many who are currently or formerly enrolled at BMCC. Criminal Justice Professor Illir Disha served as a consultant on the report, helping sort and compile the collected data.

Ronda and Isserles presented the team’s findings at a BPCA open community meeting on October 3. The professors will present the report again to the Manhattan Community Board 1 meeting on November 7.

William Kornblum, professor emeritus, sociology, Graduate Center of the City University of New York who served as a consultant on the project, said a vast number of those surveyed in the study expressed love and admiration for the BPC parks.

“For planners and park managers, however, what makes a park system like that of Battery Park City successful hinges on additional questions to be addressed through data gathered about park visitors, and the “BPCA Parks User Count & Study” was designed with just that in mind,” said Kornblum.

“This study answers many of our questions with scientific clarity and neutrality thanks to the expertise of BMCC professors and students,” said Abby Ehrlich, BPCA Director of Community Partnerships and Engagement.

Ronda said the benefits from the partnership between BMCC and BPCA go beyond the study.

“Faculty, administrators and students have expanded our professional networks, and found new opportunities for employment, internships, and the possibility of future educational and research projects,” said Ronda.


Award-winning Playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Baruch College’s Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence, Participating in Staged Reading on Oct. 16

Jacobs Jenkins teaching introductory course about playwriting during fall semester

Renowned playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, the fall 2018 Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College, is unveiling new work at a staged reading on Oct. 16 at Baruch Performing Arts Center’s Rosalyn and Irwin Engleman Recital Hall.

This event, which is open to the public, begins with a reception at 4:45 p.m., followed by the reading at 5:30 p.m.

Celebrating the 20th year of this program, Jacobs-Jenkins is the 40th Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences.

As a Writer-in-Residence, Jacobs-Jenkins is teaching “Playwriting: An Introduction” during the fall semester. In this introductory workshop, students will read and write a number of one-act plays in an attempt to grasp the basics of dramatic writing. In addition to questions of craft and storytelling, the course will focus on the playwright’s process, the formation of healthy creative habits, and the sharpening of critical skills through reading and responding to the work of both classmates and colleagues in the larger professional field.

The course will culminate in staged in-class readings of student plays. Students will be responsible for casting and directing these readings.

‘Leave With Something to Think About’

Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ plays include Everybody, Neighbors, An Octoroon, Appropriate, and Gloria. He is a Residency Five playwright-in-residence at the Signature Theatre and the recipient of a 2016 MacArthur fellowship, the Windham-Campbell Prize for Drama, and the inaugural Tennessee Williams Award. Jacobs-Jenkins won the 2014 Obie Award for Best New American Play.

“I would say all my work is fed by question and a need to understand why the world is what it is,” Jacobs-Jenkins explained. “I want people to leave the theatre looking at life differently. They should leave with bravery to actually try to connect and try to understand to see each other in each other.”

Jacobs-Jenkins is a graduate of the Lila Acheson Wallace American Playwrights Program at the Juilliard School and holds an MA in Performance Studies from NYU. He is an associate director of the Playwriting MFA program of Hunter College, CUNY.

About the Harman Writer-in-Residence Program at Baruch College

Founded in the fall of 1998 by Professor Roslyn Bernstein, the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence Program brings distinguished writers to the Baruch College campus every semester. Whether they are poets, playwrights, novelists, journalists, essayists or critics, the Harman Writers-in-Residence enrich the Baruch environment, creating a lively literary salon for students and faculty. Endowed by alumnus Dr. Sidney Harman (’39), the Harman Program relies on an intense workshop design, where visiting writers teach small classes and hold individual conferences. In addition, the Harman Program sponsors student creative writing competitions, literary internships, individual guest readings, and a week-long residency.

# # #


Baruch College’s Psychology Internship Training Program Receives Full Accreditation from the American Psychology Association

The American Psychological Association (APA) has granted accreditation to Baruch College’s Counseling Center Doctoral Psychology Internship Program. This designation makes Baruch College one of only two colleges in New York City that currently offer an APA-accredited counseling center internship program.

This accreditation is the highest recommendation a clinical psychology training program can receive. As part of their experience, interns work and collaborate with staff psychologists, social workers, psychiatry residents and other mental health professionals. Trainees in the Baruch College’s Doctoral Psychology Internship Program participate in direct services such as individual therapy, group therapy, crisis assessment, and psychological testing. In addition, interns’ training includes two weekly seminars, monthly case conferences, group and individual supervision, and opportunities to participate in outreach activities across the campus.

“This APA-accreditation is a testimony to all the hard work our staff dedicates to this program,” says Teresa Hurst, PhD, Acting Director and Director of Training for the Baruch College Counseling Center. “We believe in the importance of teaching interns more than a set of skills. Rather, we are committed to teaching them how to learn, be reflective about their work, and assess the ways their experiences fit with what they have learned.”

Learning to Work in a Diverse World

The Doctoral Psychology Internship Program at Baruch trains students to work in a diverse world. The program’s model stresses sensitivity to various populations and specifically focuses interns on becoming aware of their own assumptions about human behavior, values, and biases. Interns are actively trained to understand the point of view of each client without negative judgments and to practice appropriate, relevant, and sensitive intervention strategies and skills in working with culturally diverse clients.

Similar to critical practice, critical thinking, conceptualization, problem-solving, and research are also part of the program, which offers two full-time positions every year. Graduates are expected to be able to function as competent and ethical psychologists and to provide scholarship-based psychological services to individuals, groups, and organizations.

The Counseling Center’s Doctoral Psychology Internship Program is funded through Student Activity Fees, which are managed by the Baruch College Association.

# # #

 


Marxe School of Public and International Affairs Alumni Awarded New York State Excelsior Service Fellowships

Robert Beiderman, headshot, smiling in a red and blue plaid shirt

Robert Beiderman

Adaobi Oguagha, headshot, smiling, in a black and blue patterened blouse with necklace

Adaobi Oguagha

Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs announced that two of its Master in Public Administration (MPA) graduates from the class of 2018 have been selected to participate in the competitive Excelsior Service Fellowship Program.

The program, launched by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo in 2013, brings “highly talented recent graduates of law, graduate and professional schools into state government service. Excelsior Fellows bring diverse backgrounds and new perspectives to a host of policy and operational positions in New York State government.”

The fellowship begins in September and runs two years within the New York State’s Executive Chamber, a government agency, or authority.

“Marxe alumni have been involved in the program since its establishment; they continue to exemplify what it means to be an Excelsior Fellow,” David Birdsell, Dean of Baruch’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs said. “These fellowships were designed to attract people of great talent to leadership roles in government and that is exactly what we strive for at Marxe.”

According to Dean Birdsell, the Excelsior Fellows work full-time alongside senior members of the administration and play a policy-influencing role in New York State with the opportunity to work on the most pressing issues of the day.

To date, more than 25 graduates of the Marxe School’s MPA program have been accepted into the program since its launch five years ago and have worked at such top-tier state agencies as Empire State Development, The Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corporation (PATH), the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA), and the state’s Executive Chamber.

Meet the 2018 Excelsior Service Fellows

Robert Beiderman, NYS Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), Communities and Local Government division

“As a former actor, this fellowship is the perfect bridge that will allow me to continue learning while beginning a career in public service. I really like how NYSERDA pursues clean energy from a practical and financial standpoint, and I look forward to getting a better idea of how they interact with other state and local agencies to promote clean energy.

My goal right now is to soak up as much information as possible, and I’m confident that Baruch’s professors, most of whom have worked in public service for many years, have prepared me to excel in this new challenge.”

Adaobi Oguagha, NYS Executive Chamber Governor’s Education Team and Women LEAD

”Upon acceptance into the Excelsior Service Fellowship, the Excelsior committee approached me regarding a new program called Women LEAD. It would work in conjunction with the Excelsior Service Fellowship and include mentorship from a high-level female state official along with a Certificate in Women and Public Policy from the University at Albany.

I have a tremendous passion for public service, specifically in the area of education, and I’m looking forward to advancing and implementing many of the initiatives that the Governor has begun. For example, the expansion of early education in high-need school districts and tackling the issue of food insecurity among college students by creating food pantries on SUNY and CUNY campuses. I hope my work during this fellowship allows me to impact and serve the students of New York State.”

Competitive Selection Process

The selection process involved faculty and administrator nominations, an application in which the students had to articulate their interests and qualifications via a statement of purpose, and an interview during which a committee assessed their interests, qualifications, drive, and potential for success via a variety of traditional, behavioral, and scenario-based questions.  The process is highly competitive and approximately 60 fellows are chosen each year.

In addition to Baruch College, participating schools include Albany Law School, Cornell Law School, the New York University’s School of Law and its Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, among others.

For more information about the MPA program at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, go here.

 # # #

 


CCNY goes healthy for World Food Day event on Oct. 16 with author of “The Plan”

World Food Day Panel

CCNY Goes Healthy panelists Lyn Genet Recitas, Tren’ness Woods-Black and Nabeel Alamgir.

The City College of New York celebrates “CCNY Goes Healthy” on World Food Day opening a dialogue about healthy lifestyle changes and combating low food security issues on campus and within the Harlem community. The inaugural event welcomes three culinary and nutritional experts to engage in a food talk with President Vince Boudreau as moderator.

World Food Day takes place on October 16 and is a day that strives to bring awareness to low food security issues that affect areas all over the world and strives to achieve a more sustainable future.

Panelists include:

  • Lyn Genet Recitas, nutritionist and bestselling author of “The Plan”
  • Tren’ness Woods-Black, vice president of Communications for Sylvia’s Restaurant and founder of TWB
  • Nabeel Alamgir, chief marketing officer of Bareburger

The event is proudly sponsored by the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global LeadershipThe Office of the President, the FAO and Whole Foods Market. It will fall under this year’s Healthy CUNY initiative to jump-start Giving Tuesday. The Colin Powell School / NYPIRG Food Pantry will be accepting donations in the form of non-perishable food items.

The panel will take place from 12-2 p.m. in the NAC ballroom with light refreshments to enjoy. Please click here to RSVP.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CCNY goes healthy for World Food Day event on Oct. 16 with author of “The Plan”

World Food Day Panel

CCNY Goes Healthy panelists Lyn Genet Recitas, Tren’ness Woods-Black and Nabeel Alamgir.

The City College of New York celebrates “CCNY Goes Healthy” on World Food Day opening a dialogue about healthy lifestyle changes and combating low food security issues on campus and within the Harlem community. The inaugural event welcomes three culinary and nutritional experts to engage in a food talk with President Vince Boudreau as moderator.

World Food Day takes place on October 16 and is a day that strives to bring awareness to low food security issues that affect areas all over the world and strives to achieve a more sustainable future.

Panelists include:

  • Lyn Genet Recitas, nutritionist and bestselling author of “The Plan”
  • Tren’ness Woods-Black, vice president of Communications for Sylvia’s Restaurant and founder of TWB
  • Nabeel Alamgir, chief marketing officer of Bareburger

The event is proudly sponsored by the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global LeadershipThe Office of the President, the FAO and Whole Foods Market. It will fall under this year’s Healthy CUNY initiative to jump-start Giving Tuesday. The Colin Powell School / NYPIRG Food Pantry will be accepting donations in the form of non-perishable food items.

The panel will take place from 12-2 p.m. in the NAC ballroom with light refreshments to enjoy. Please click here to RSVP.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. CCNY embraces its role at the forefront of social change. It is ranked #1 by the Harvard-based Opportunity Insights out of 369 selective public colleges in the United States on the overall mobility indexThis measure reflects both access and outcomes, representing the likelihood that a student at CCNY can move up two or more income quintiles. In addition, the Center for world University Rankings places CCNY in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Empire State Development Announces New Film Production Training Program at Bronx Community College

October 9, 2018 — An unprecedented partnership between New York State’s economic development agency Empire State Development (ESD), Bronx Community College (BCC) and Local 52 of The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) was unveiled on Tuesday, October 2 — The BCC Film and Television Production Crafts Training Program. When it is launched in the Winter of 2019, the 14-week course will train up to 100 students annually for work in various trades in New York’s robust big and small screen entertainment industry.

The effort is being supported by a $375,000 grant from ESD and a $125,000 grant from the Office of Continuing Education and Workforce Development of The City University of New York (CUNY), thanks to a generous contribution from JPMorgan Chase. The program will teach students technical skills, such as basic carpentry, electric, tool usage and shop safety, as well as “life skills” like problem solving, teamwork and communication. Students who complete the program will receive a Bronx Community College/CUNY Continuing Education credential recognized by Local 52.

An additional goal of the program is to assist Local 52 in the diversification of its workforce — a point made by BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe.

“With our well-established associate degree program in Media and Digital Film Production, Bronx Community College is uniquely positioned to recruit and train students of color, including women, for rewarding careers in film and television production,” said President Isekenegbe. “Thanks to our partnership with IATSE Local 52 and New York State, we will be able to offer customized technical training in high-demand crafts to students from the Bronx and beyond.”

After completing their training at BCC, graduates will be referred to Local 52 for employment. Trainees that gain enough practical work experience, improve their skills and meet the requirements will be eligible for union membership, opening the door to lifelong vocations.

For further information, contact Dean Kenneth Adams at kenneth.adams@bcc.cuny.edu or 718-289-1607.


Bronx Community College Receives Nearly $100,000 from the U.S. Education Department

The Grant Will Fund Technology Upgrades For Cybersecurity Computer Lab

OCTOBER 9, 2018 – The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Bronx Community College (BCC) $98,170 over two years to upgrade the technology in its Cybersecurity Computer Lab.

BCC’s Cybersecurity and Networking Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree program — the first to be offered at a City University of New York community college — launched this fall with its first 25 students. This unique course of study enables students to earn information technology industry credentials while pursuing a 60-credit degree, helping to prepare students for further study and careers in the fast-growing cybersecurity field.

“This federal funding will enable BCC to upgrade our Cybersecurity Computer Lab with state-of-the-art equipment,” said BCC President Thomas Isekenegbe. “This ensures that what students learn on campus will align with industry standards, particularly as it relates to creating a virtual work environment and troubleshooting real-life network security threats.”

The funding will enable BCC faculty to enhance four advanced cybersecurity courses with new equipment and software. As part of the grant, BCC also will receive technical assistance from the National CyberWatch Center at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland.

The Cybersecurity Computer Lab is located in Meister Hall, BCC’s home for the sciences.

For further information, contact Dr. Syed “Rashid” Zaidi at syed.zaidi@bcc.cuny.edu or call 718-289-3043.


BCC TO OFFER EVENING CHILD CARE FOR STUDENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN

The Program for Two to Five-Year-Olds
Made Possible by $1.4 Million in Federal Funding

OCTOBER 4, 2018 – Beginning next year, Bronx Community College (BCC) will introduce on-campus child care for students attending evening classes, thanks to a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Education.

BCC’s accredited Early Childhood Center currently offers child care and preschool programs to 100 children, ages 2-5, while their parents attend classes during the day. The federal Child Care Access Mean Parents in School program (CCAMPIS) will enable 160 preschoolers whose mothers and fathers take classes in the evening to enjoy that same professional child care after hours.

The U.S. Department of Education awarded BCC nearly $1.4 million in CCAMPIS funding over the next four years. Once launched, on-campus child care hours will extend until 10 p.m. each spring and fall semester.

“More than half of all BCC students work while attending classes, and 55% have children under the age of five,” observes BCC president Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “Their ability to access high-quality child care gives them peace of mind and the support they need to pursue their studies.”

BCC’s Department of Institutional Research has found that student parents who use the College’s on-campus Early Childhood Center are twice as likely to stay in school and graduate than other students.

“BCC is at the forefront of providing safe, innovative and progressive learning experiences for children,” says Jitinder “Judy” Walia, Executive Director of the BCC Early Childhood Center. “Evening child care will provide convenience to working and nontraditional students, flexibility in scheduling required classes and more options for carrying the full course load needed for graduation.”

For further information, contact Ms. Walia at jitinder.walia@bcc.cuny.edu or call the Early Childhood Center at 718-289-5461.


CUNY School of Professional Studies Holds First Disability and Employment Event

New York, NY – October 10. 2018 –  In recognition of National Disability Empowerment Awareness Month, the CUNY School of Professional Studies’ Abilities and Resources Committee held its inaugural event titled Disability and Employment in the 21st Century on Thursday, October 4 at 6:00 pm.

Throughout the evening, aspects of self-advocacy and professionalism within the disability community were discussed by an esteemed panel comprising Dr. Christopher Rosa, interim vice chancellor for student affairs at CUNY; Daniel Chan, assistant director for the Office of AccessABILITY at Hunter College; Preston Burger, CUNY LEADS advisor at Bronx Community College; Charmaine Townsell, coordinator for student activities at CUNY; Jes Osrow, co-founder of The Rise Journey; and Allie Cashel, author, co-founder, and president of Suffering the Silence.

“There are so many obstacles to meaningful employment for people with disabilities, from issues of accessibility to discrimination, and this conversation is critical to the well-being of thousands of New Yorkers,” says John Mogulescu, CUNY School of Professional Studies Dean.

The mission of the CUNY School of Professional Studies’ Abilities and Resources Committee is to serve as the connection among students who require diverse accommodations and learning platforms. This effort is spearheaded by:

  • Leonard Blades
  • Gabrielle Carrion, MA in Disability Studies student
  • Christopher Fleming, LEADS advisor and MS in Disability Services in Higher Education student
  • Sarah Krusemark, BA in Psychology alumna
  • Christopher Leydon, student services coordinator
  • Wilma Rodriguez, BA in Disability Studies student
  • Selma Sulejman, MA in Disability Studies student

“As the Abilities and Resources Committee strives to enhance unity and a stronger understanding of diverse disabilities, we have the utmost desire to shed light on National Disability Employment Awareness Month,” says Leonard Blades, an MS in Disability Services in Higher Education student at CUNY SPS and one of the founding members of the Abilities and Resources Committee.  “Our intent with this event is to spearhead the conversation, to offer fruitful wisdom, and raise awareness in regards to disability and employment.”

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 5% in the Nation in U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2018 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs. Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


For Ahra Sung, A Daughter Of Korean Immigrants, It’s Been A Journey Of Determination And Success, Overcoming Disability, Earning A York B.S., Beginning A Master’s

Diagnosed with autism when she was a toddler, Ahra Sung has far exceeded doctors’ dour projections for her achievement in the classroom. She earned a Bachelor of Science at York College in the spring, but didn’t stop there. This fall, Sung began work on a master’s in York’s Pharmaceutical Science and Business program, the lone program of its kind in The City University of New York.

That kind of academic success might have seemed anything but certain for Sung, the daughter of Korean immigrants, who grew up in Flushing, Queens.  But guided by her motto, “don’t let your disability define your ability,” Sung has long refused to be held back. She says she placed out of special education classes in kindergarten and was taking advanced courses by the time she was in high school at The Queens School of Inquiry. To get where she is today, she took full advantage of York’s robust system of supports for students with special needs.

During her freshman year in 2014, Sung registered with York’s Center for Students with Disabilities and sought help through TRIO York Enrichment Services, a federally funded program that provides academic assistance and enrichment services through workshops, counseling, academic coaching and adaptive technology.

She participated in a photo exhibit, “See Me,” which featured students and college employees who were striving to conquer developmental or physical challenges. The exhibit, conceived by York’s Counseling Office, was on display in the campus library for more than a month.

“When I first came to York, I was struggling a lot socially and with where to go for help,” says Sung, who isn’t shy about discussing the benefits of York’s support system. “Now I know where to go, and the TRIO office helped me with my graduate school application, as well. I check with them to let them know how I’m doing.”

To be sure, her journey has been anything but easy. Sung readily admits there were times she felt like giving up. Sometimes, the York College student support staff helped her keep pushing; she also learned to rely on self-styled solutions. Sung is easily distracted, and it is not uncommon for her attention to wane; in response, she has learned to hold onto small, soft plush toys that she says help her stay “in the moment.”

“Once Ahra is focused on a subject, she can think it through to its end,” says Daniel Robie, a York College assistant professor of chemistry. “I try to give her topics that are so interesting that she focuses on them immediately.”

Sung thrived under Robie’s mentorship, completing a research project about crystal formations in Rochelle salt. She presented her findings at the Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium, sponsored by the American Chemical Society’s New York Section and held at York College in May.

The project turned out so well that Robie’s colleague, professor Deb Chakravarti, who serves as director of York College’s U.S. Food and Drug Administration Partnership program, got Sung placed in an internship at FDA’s Northeast Food and Feed Laboratory (NFFL) located on York’s Jamaica, Queens, campus.

“You have to build people up to succeed, and my colleagues were very supportive [of her],” Chakravarti said. He spoke with Kent Herman, deputy director of the NFFL, who agreed to give Sung an opportunity over the summer. During the experience, Sung got a feel for state-of-the-art analytical techniques like inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, used for the detection of trace metals such as arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury and lead in feed samples and other commodities.

Robie is optimistic about Sung’s prospects moving forward. “I have high expectations for Ahra in the M.S. program,” Robie says. “I have encouraged her to devote a lot of time to her work, since well-spent study time is the key to success.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 


Destry Sulkes and Margaret Crotty appointed to Foundation Board of Directors

new board members Sulkes and Crotty

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Foundation is pleased to announce two new appointees toits inaugural Board of Directors: Destry Sulkes, Chief Data Officer at WPP Health and Wellness, and Margaret Crotty, Executive Director and CEO at Partnership with Children.

Destry holds a MD/MBA from Tufts University School of Medicine with research in Ophthalmology. Prior to joining WPP, Destry built long-term value in a series of start-ups serving life science companies that invest in innovative uses of data, analytics and communications to improve healthcare quality. He helped Zeiss launch the Optical coherence tomography (OCT) device with global education efforts and led two medical education groups through rapid growth and acquisition. Earlier, he led strategy efforts for WebMD/Medscape, authored a report on life science company data needs and cofounded a healthcare analytics company, Prognosi.  Previously, he served as a Director and President of the nonprofit Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions. Dr. Sulkes also serves on the Advisory Board for the Big Data Certificate Program at Rutgers University.

Margaret has served in executive leadership roles in both the not-for-profit and private sectors in the areas of education and public health. Prior to joining Partnership with Children, she launched and ran Save the Children’s $2 billion initiative to reduce child mortality in the developing world. Previously, she was the President and CEO of AFS-USA Intercultural Programs, formerly the American Field Service, which has provided intercultural exchanges for over 300,000 high school students since 1947. In the private sector, Margaret spent seven years at the global corporation EF Education, the world’s largest privately-held education company, living in Shanghai, Hong Kong and Paris, first as a member of the founding management team of EF’s online language education business, and later as President of EF’s higher education business. She holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and an MPH from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

We are also thrilled to announce that Interim Board Chair Lyndon Haviland has accepted the role of permanent Board Chair and board member Michael Meng has accepted the role of Treasurer. Both will serve two-year terms in their respective leadership positions.

View the full board of directors here!


LaGuardia Lifts Poor Students to Lives of Opportunity—Findings from Stanford University Researchers

How to Select a College?

Start by looking at a college’s record of lifting students from poverty to opportunity

From Poverty to Opportunity

Borough, neighborhood, subway accessibility, cost, academic programs, student life, and graduation rates are some of the key factors New Yorkers consider when choosing a college.

Stanford University’s Center on Poverty and Inequality has developed a new method of assessing colleges—looking at how well a college helped students whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent of income levels reach the top 20 percent for individual earnings—named the College Mobility Report Cards.

The analysis showed that LaGuardia Community College/CUNY (“LaGuardia”) is among the top one percent among the 604 two-year colleges nationwide with the greatest success in lifting the poorest students into jobs where they earn good wages and create better lives for themselves and their families.

“Stanford University’s College Mobility Report Cards should be the starting point for considering where to go to college, especially for those from poor families,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “With our track record of boosting students from living in unstable housing and struggling to put food on the table, to being able to rent an apartment and not worrying about where their next meal will come from, New Yorkers, should put LaGuardia Community College at the top of their college list.”

Rony Estevez, age 25, is an example of LaGuardia’s potential to boost student-mobility. Born in the US to parents from the Dominican Republic, he grew up in public housing in Brooklyn. After high school, Rony studied for a year at a college upstate, before moving back to be closer to family and enrolling at LaGuardia.

Needing a job to help pay for living expenses, First Big Break, LaGuardia’s Honors Internship Program, helped him secure a paid internship in accounting, his major. Rony thrived in the internship, at Creative Business Inc., where its president and founder, Jeanne Hardy, asked Rony to stay on full-time. Rony recently celebrated his third anniversary at the company, where he’s now a full-time staff accountant earning $55,000/yr. He and his fiancé, Stacey Baez, RN, recently bought a house together, and are looking forward to their wedding early next year. And Rony is on his way to earning his bachelor’s in accounting at Brooklyn College.

“Rony’s story is an example of what we’ve long seen among our students—our graduates not only improve their lives, but lift up their entire family for generations to come,” said President Mellow.

LaGuardia, a member of The City University of New York (CUNY), is the only CUNY two-year college in Queens to make the nationwide top five list for student mobility. LaGuardia is ranked No. 5, and Borough of Manhattan Community College is No. 3.

Nine of CUNY’s four-year colleges were among the top 15 spots on the nationwide senior college list: Baruch College, No. 1; City College, No. 2; Lehman College, No. 3; John Jay, No. 5; City Tech, No. 7; Brooklyn College, No. 8; Hunter College, No. 10; Queens College, No. 11; and York College, No. 15.

“Many of our majors have transfer agreements with CUNY four-year colleges—streamlining the process for a LaGuardia graduate to transfer to Baruch or another CUNY four-year—another reason why LaGuardia should be a top choice for New Yorkers, especially Queens residents,” said President Mellow.

For more, click here to read a recent Chronicle of Higher Education article about college mobility report cards.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

####


What do Urban College Students Really Think about Health Insurance?

students with Healthy CUNY shirts speaking to other studentsHealth insurance is important for everyone, and college students are no exception. At CUNY, nearly ten percent of its more than 270,000 students have no insurance at all, even though many qualify for free or low-cost options. This places them at risk for both health and financial catastrophe.

As part of the University’s Healthy CUNY Initiative, which promotes student health as a pathway to academic success, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Professor Chris Palmedo, doctoral candidate Katrina Mateo, and recent MPH graduates Eleni Murphy and Jennifer Gallo conducted a qualitative study to identify pathways and obstacles to increasing student health insurance at the university. The findings were published in the Journal of American College Health.

Palmedo conducted student focus groups at four-year and community colleges, and interviews with the key individuals involved in recruiting and enrolling students into health insurance plans.

“It turns out that communications alone can go a long way to increase student access to health insurance,” Palmedo said. “Many CUNY students are eligible for Medicaid, but they don’t even know it. Colleges are trusted communications sources, and can do a lot to take advantage of this important role when it comes to advancing student health.”

Other communications opportunities identified from the research: Colleges can make on-campus health resources more accessible to students. These include campus-run health offices and social service partner agencies such as Single Stop, which operate on several CUNY campuses throughout the city. During some of the focus groups, Palmedo says, students were informing each other about these resources. Faculty, student clubs, and the online enrollment process are other channels for improving information about student health and health insurance, according to the research.

“Universities already make great investments in their students,” Palmedo said. “Our study identified opportunities for an even greater return on these investments over the long term.”

Palmedo PC, Murphy EK, Mateo KF, & Jennifer Gallo J. “What do urban college students really think about health insurance? A qualitative study.” Journal of American College Health. 26 Sep 2018


What do Urban College Students Really Think about Health Insurance?

studentsHealth insurance is important for everyone, and college students are no exception. At CUNY, nearly ten percent of its more than 270,000 students have no insurance at all, even though many qualify for free or low-cost options. This places them at risk for both health and financial catastrophe.

As part of the University’s Healthy CUNY Initiative, which promotes student health as a pathway to academic success, CUNY SPH Professor Chris Palmedo, doctoral candidate Katrina Mateo, and recent MPH graduates Eleni Murphy and Jennifer Gallo conducted a qualitative study to identify pathways and obstacles to increasing student health insurance at the university. The findings were published in the Journal of American College Health.

Palmedo conducted student focus groups at four-year and community colleges, and interviews with the key individuals involved in recruiting and enrolling students into health insurance plans.

“It turns out that communications alone can go a long way to increase student access to health insurance,” Palmedo said. “Many CUNY students are eligible for Medicaid, but they don’t even know it. Colleges are trusted communications sources, and can do a lot to take advantage of this important role when it comes to advancing student health.”

Other communications opportunities identified from the research: Colleges can make on-campus health resources more accessible to students. These include campus-run health offices and social service partner agencies such as Single Stop, which operate on several CUNY campuses throughout the city. During some of the focus groups, Palmedo says, students were informing each other about these resources. Faculty, student clubs, and the online enrollment process are other channels for improving information about student health and health insurance, according to the research.

“Universities already make great investments in their students,” Palmedo said. “Our study identified opportunities for an even greater return on these investments over the long term.”

Palmedo PC, Murphy EK, Mateo KF, & Jennifer Gallo J. “What do urban college students really think about health insurance? A qualitative study.” Journal of American College Health. 26 Sep 2018


The effects of dementia on family wealth may contribute to economic disparities between black-Americans and non-Black Americans

elderly man looking pensive while elderly woman looks onDementia is a costly health condition, with the majority of the economic burden falling upon the families of those suffering with the disease. Black Americans, who are at greater risk of developing dementia than white Americans, hold on average less than one-eighth of he wealth of white Americans, and thus may be disproportionally affected by the financial burden.

CUNY SPH alumnus Jennifer Kaufman led a study into whether dementia exacerbates this wealth disparity by examining dementia’s effect on wealth trajectories of black versus non-black Americans over an eight-year period preceding death. The results were published in the journal Ageing & Society.

The findings indicate that black Americans with dementia may experience a precipitous drain in assets. Their median wealth declined 97 per cent (from $38,205 to $1,200), compared with 42 per cent (from $141,500 to $82,000) among non-black Americans with dementia. Among black Americans without dementia, median wealth declined less than 15 per cent.

Home-ownership reduces the probability of wealth exhaustion, but dementia is also a predictor of home loss, which appears to play a significant role in wealth exhaustion, especially among black Americans.

The research suggests that the effects of dementia on family wealth may hinder efforts to level the economic playing field for Americans. At least half of black Americans have insufficient wealth to withstand dementia’s financial effects. For black Americans especially, all wealth may be exhausted over the course of dementia, leaving nothing for the next generation.

“Because of the importance of home equity in the accumulation of wealth, this circumstance may be, in part, a legacy of housing discrimination once enshrined in US policies and not yet eradicated in practice,” Kaufman says. “If dementia hinders a family’s efforts to improve its socio-economic status, and lower status is associated with a higher risk of dementia, not only wealth disparities but dementia itself may be part of a vicious cycle.”

Kaufman JE, Gallo WT, Fahs MC (2018). The contribution of dementia to the disparity in family wealth between black and non-black Americans. Ageing & Society 1–22. https://doi.org/10.1017/ S0144686X18000934


The effects of dementia on family wealth may contribute to economic disparities between black-Americans and non-Black Americans

Elderly man looking pensive while elderly woman looks on

Dementia is a costly health condition, with the majority of the economic burden falling upon the families of those suffering with the disease. Black Americans, who are at greater risk of developing dementia than white Americans, hold on average less than one-eighth of he wealth of white Americans, and thus may be disproportionally affected by the financial burden.

CUNY SPH alumnus Jennifer Kaufman led a study into whether dementia exacerbates this wealth disparity by examining dementia’s effect on wealth trajectories of black versus non-black Americans over an eight-year period preceding death. The results were published in the journal Ageing & Society.

The findings indicate that black Americans with dementia may experience a precipitous drain in assets. Their median wealth declined 97 per cent (from $38,205 to $1,200), compared with 42 per cent (from $141,500 to $82,000) among non-black Americans with dementia. Among black Americans without dementia, median wealth declined less than 15 per cent.

Home-ownership reduces the probability of wealth exhaustion, but dementia is also a predictor of home loss, which appears to play a significant role in wealth exhaustion, especially among black Americans.

The research suggests that the effects of dementia on family wealth may hinder efforts to level the economic playing field for Americans. At least half of black Americans have insufficient wealth to withstand dementia’s financial effects. For black Americans especially, all wealth may be exhausted over the course of dementia, leaving nothing for the next generation.

“Because of the importance of home equity in the accumulation of wealth, this circumstance may be, in part, a legacy of housing discrimination once enshrined in US policies and not yet eradicated in practice,” Kaufman says. “If dementia hinders a family’s efforts to improve its socio-economic status, and lower status is associated with a higher risk of dementia, not only wealth disparities but dementia itself may be part of a vicious cycle.”

Kaufman JE, Gallo WT, Fahs MC (2018). The contribution of dementia to the disparity in family wealth between black and non-black Americans. Ageing & Society 1–22. https://doi.org/10.1017/ S0144686X18000934


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, October 8, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

I am hoping you’ve had a wonderful extended weekend.

In our week ahead:

  • Wednesday October 10th – 11th grade students will take the PSAT
  • Wednesday October 10th – 9th grade students will engage in a grade-wide bonding trip to  Caumsett State Park
  • Wednesday October 10th – College Office Financial Aid Presentation, 5pm to 7pm
  • Thursday October 11th – 3pm to 5pm, Hispanic Heritage Celebration in the Courtyard

Special Announcement:
This week, after consultation with NEST+m’s School Safety Team, PTA co-presidents and teacher leaders, we will be making a slight shift to enhance our campus safety. Starting this week, between 8:30am and 2:20pm, entrance into our main-courtyard will take place through the Parking Lot gate. This move will ensure that all persons arriving at NEST+m during those hours will enter the central courtyard through one set of doors where they can be greeted by School Safety.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

Student Opportunities

Baruch STEP Academy – **Deadline extended to Wednesday, October 10, 2018**
The Baruch STEP Academy is accepting applications for the Fall 2018 Programs (middle and high school). The programs run for 10 Saturdays from October 6th – December 15th, starting at 9am. The high school program ends at 2pm, while the middle school program ends at 12pm.

The application for the Academy Fall 2018 Program can be accessed only online:

New Students: https://tinyurl.com/Fall-2018-NSA

The middle school program runs from 9am – 12pm:

  • Pre-Algebra & General Science Review

High school students participate in three periods throughout the day:

Math (1st Period 9:00am-10:30am)

  • Geometry Review
  • Algebra 2/Trigonometry Review
  • SAT Math Prep

Science (2nd Period 10:30am-12pm)

  • Living Environment Review
  • Chemistry Review
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Workshop (3rd Period 12:45pm-2pm)
  • Career Exploration
  • Financial Literacy
  • Analytical Writing

Questions? Please email BaruchSTEP@gmail.com


CUNY Freshman Enrollment Increases 4.0 Percent To Record 39,938 Students

Freshmen enrollment at The City University of New York rose 4.0 percent this fall to 39,938 students, a record for the University and a continuation of a five-year upward trend.

Since 2014, the number of freshmen enrolling at CUNY’s 18 senior and community colleges has increased by nearly 7 percent.

“The growth of our freshman classes is a testament to our successful efforts to evolve, expand and continuously improve educational offerings on campuses across CUNY,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Students are increasingly drawn to the quality and affordability of a CUNY education. Our mission to give them a pathway to social mobility has never been more vital.”

According to University officials, financial incentives by state and city government in recent years have also contributed to the upsurge. The state’s Excelsior Scholarship program, which supplements state and federal aid to make college free for more students, has been one factor. Another is the city’s move to waive CUNY application fees for public school students from low-income families.

Nearly all of CUNY’s campuses saw increases in their first-time freshmen enrollment this fall over last year. All told, the number of freshmen at the 11 senior colleges went from 20,158 to 21,214, a 5.3 percent increase. Among the seven community colleges, freshmen enrollment rose from 18,260 to 18,724.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 24 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###


Queens College Marks Anniversary of Hurricane Maria with Month-Long Exhibition of Art By School-Age Survivors of Storm on Puerto Rico

— Project is Funded by a Nonprofit that Perpetuates the Legacy of a Short-Lived Activist;
Show Opens October 9 With Reception —

Queens, New York, October 5, 2018—Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College will host an exhibition of 80 original works that students from Puerto Rico produced in response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria. The exhibition, Acciones Que Levantan a Puerto Rico (Actions That Lift Puerto Rico) ACCIONES, is sponsored by the CHICAS by Alejandra Foundation (CHICAS Foundation), a leading Puerto Rico-based social movement and nonprofit organization named for a girl who opposed bullying and social injustice before succumbing to an aneurysm at the age of nine. The show commemorates the one-year anniversary of the storm, which made landfall in Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017. The works will be on view in the Art Center on the sixth floor of the college’s Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library from October 9 through November 9, 2018. A reception on Tuesday, October 9, at 5:30 pm, will formally open the exhibition to the public; to attend, RSVP to qcartcenter@qc.cuny.edu.

Featuring pieces created by Puerto Rican students from public and private schools, ACCIONES is the only hurricane-themed student art exhibit of its kind. “The collection communicates a profound sense of hope for the future and serves as a poignant reminder of the long road ahead to help Puerto Rico fully recover from the storm’s devastation. ACCIONES also reveals the values that best represent the people of Puerto Rico, such as service, family, empathy, solidarity, hospitality, culture, love of nature and resiliency,” said Frances I. Ryan, executive director of the CHICAS Foundation.

“Students and staff from Queens College participated in Governor Cuomo’s NY Stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Initiative by helping to clean, restore, and reconstruct homes on the island in the aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “By hosting this exhibition, we want to continue to honor Puerto Ricans’ courageous struggle and the positive message of recovery that the young people of the island are sending out into the world.”

The CHICAS Foundation envisioned the hurricane-themed art initiative as an important communication forum for Puerto Rican students, allowing them to express their emotions about life-changing experiences and to use art to begin the healing process. Teachers played a major role in the competition by encouraging students to communicate their feelings as they returned to school following the storm. Despite dire conditions—much of the island is still without electricity, water, telecommunication or road access—630 original works were submitted to the ACCIONES contest. A panel of artists, art teachers and community leaders selected 80 of the paintings for display. 

“The values expressed throughout the exhibit are consistent with those of our founder’s legacy,” adds Ryan. “The late Alejandra Sofía Leizán Ryan was a young activist and plastics artist who dedicated her life and talent to fighting bullying and social injustice.”

ACCIONES was recently recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for its humanitarian contribution through the arts to help create awareness about the impact of Hurricane Maria on the island and the people of Puerto Rico.

About Kupferberg Center for the Arts at Queens College
The Selma and Max Kupferberg Center for the Visual and Performing Arts (KCA) is an administrative umbrella for ten Queens College arts units—including the QC Art Center—that offer public cultural programming throughout the year. KCA’s mission is to provide high-quality, accessible and affordable cultural attractions to the Queens College community and the borough’s 2.2 million residents. The largest multi-disciplinary arts entity in the borough, Kupferberg Center for the Arts features world-class artists and performances at its main-stage campus venues, and showcases the talents of emerging and regional artists in off-site, neighborhood settings. A leader in the cultural renaissance of Queens, KCA connects residents of the most ethnically diverse region of the nation to their unique cultural heritages, showcasing these arts to a broader audience and validating the contributions each makes to the distinct nature of our campus and community.

About Alejandra Sofía Leizán Ryan and the CHICAS Foundation
CHICAS by Alejandra is the legacy of young artist and activist, Alejandra Sofía Leizán Ryan. Prior to her sudden death of an aneurism at the age of nine (Sept. 17, 2015), Alejandra devoted her life and artistic talent to fighting “bullying” and all forms of discrimination. The sadness and sense of hopelessness that “bullying” caused two of her cousins inspired Alejandra to dedicate her paintings to celebrate diversity. Her legacy of values and message of social justice continues through the works of the CHICAS by Alejandra Foundation.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Grove School receives NSF grant to ensure Internet safety from cyber attacks

CCNY engineering and computer science professors at Kyutech Institute in Japan

CCNY professors (right side) visiting Kyutech Institute in japan for pre-award meeting. From left: Abbe Mowshowitz, Tarek Saadawi, Myung Lee and Akira Kawaguchi.

Researchers from The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering are working to safeguard the Internet from cyber attacks and are receiving a boost that could lead to more trustworthy networks.

The boost comes in the form of a grant from the National Science Foundation to explore advanced resilient Internet architectures. The $450,000 grant is in partnership with the Kuytech Institute in Japan and additional support from the Japanese Science Foundation.

It will be used to address research challenges associated with enabling trustworthy networks supporting the Internet of Things (IoT), which encompasses everything connected to the Internet, and cyber-physical systems (CPS), which is a mechanism that is controlled or monitored by computer-based algorithms.  The IoT and CPS are becoming prevalent in everyday life, enabling a wide array of related emerging services and applications in cities and communities, including health, transportation, energy, utilities and other areas.

“The future Internet architecture must be able to deal with massive number of devices: computers, home appliances, autonomous connected vehicles,” said principal investigator Tarek Saadawi, electrical engineering professor at the Grove School. “It is estimated that 20 billion devices will be connected to the Internet by 2020, and they must be able to sustain and be resilient to all kind of failures due to cyber attacks, traffic surges, node failure and others.”

There are six researchers from Kuytech Institute in Japan and Saadawi along with three co-principal investigators from CCNY. Co-principal investigators include:

Akira Kawaguchi, professor and chair of computer science;

Myung Jong Lee, electrical engineering professor; and

Abbe Mowshowitz, computer science professor.

The grant runs for three years and will cultivate a wider scholar exchange program between Kyutech and CCNY building on a cooperation that already exists between the two institutions. Saadawi adds that they plan on connecting the two campuses, through the Internet2, a dedicated global research network, aiming to have a virtual private network connection so that there is direct communication bandwidth between each of the research laboratories.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


“The Manhattan Nobody Knows” and other CCNY titles

In a sequel to his award-winning “The New York Nobody Knows,” noted Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership sociologist William B. Helmreich returns with “The Manhattan Nobody Knows: An Urban Walking Guide” (Princeton University Press, November 2018). The book is one of the latest titles from City College of New York faculty.

While crafting his first New York tome required him to walk every block of the Big Apple (6,000 miles in all), Helmreich retraced 721 of those miles in Manhattan to pen this walking guide of one of the world’s greatest cities.

The result is a book by the Distinguished Professor of Sociology in the Colin Powell School that captures the unique magic and excitement of the island. It highlights hundreds of facts, places, and points of interest unavailable in other guides.

Other new exciting titles from CCNY faculty include:

In addition, “Eigenstaller’s Market,” a short story by Matthew G. Nagler, professor of economics and business in the Colin Powell School, appears in “Economic Inquiry,” a rarity for the highly regarded journal.

“To my knowledge, this is the first time that Economic Inquiry has chosen to publish a work of short fiction,” remarked Nagler.

He weaves the tale of an American economics professor who travels to Switzerland to interview an aging experimental economist who, during a dark period in the 20th century, conducted a study that is shrouded in secrecy, but which he suspects was an unspeakable abomination. On his journey, the younger economist is forced to question his own ethical principles, his capacity for compassion, and his personal commitment to the ideals of scientific endeavor.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Homecoming 2018 Features Full Slate of Activities for Alumni; Current Students and Their Families Will Participate for the First Time

— Brunch, Raffles, and Reception Among the Events Taking Place on October 13
and 14; Climate Change Lecture and Outdoor Food Festival Open to the Public

WHAT:
Queens College’s Homecoming Festival will welcome returning alumni, with a full lineup of activities designed for renewing old acquaintances and making new ones. Current students and their families will participate for the first time.

Click here for a complete event schedule. Select events are open to the public; registration is encouraged.         

WHEN:
Sunday, October 14, 2018, 11 am–5 pm
Saturday, October 13: Special Anniversary Reception for the classes of 1943, 1948, 1958, and 1968, 5–7 pm

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Click here for directions to the college, and here for a campus map.

BACKGROUND: Queens College’s Homecoming Festival offers something for everyone on Sunday, October 14. QC Athletics and Greek Life/House Plans will kick off a day of exciting activities by holding their respective reunion brunches at 11 am. Campus tours will be offered from noon to 1:30 pm; memorabilia and oral histories will be collected in Rosenthal Library from 1 to 3 pm.

Stephen Pekar ’86, a professor in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, will speak about the Zealandia expedition in Powdermaker Hall. “Love Is in the Air” will give alumni who met spouses at Queens College a chance to purchase a commemorative inscribed love lock, which will be a part of a permanent display at the college. Both events begin at 1 pm.

Gourmets will find much to savor in “A Taste of QC on the Quad,” which will feature a DJ, food trucks, raffles, a cash bar beginning at 12 noon, and a beer- and wine-tasting event at 2:30 pm.

Homecoming will culminate in the Reunion Reception at 3:30 pm, honoring the
classes of 1978, 1988, 1993, 1998, 2008, and 2013.

“We’re tremendously proud of our alumni and their many contributions to our city, state, and nation,” says President Felix V. Matos Rodriguez. “Homecoming gives these men and women a reason to come back to campus, meet friends and classmates, and see what’s happening at their alma mater today.”

To learn more about Reunion activities and register for selected events, contact Alumni Relations at (718) 997-3930 or click here.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and also ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Learn more at www.qc.cuny.edu

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY Campuses Offer An Array Of Programs, Performances And Forums To Celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month

Celebrating Hispanic HeritageCampuses across CUNY are presenting an array of activities, performances and programs to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, a 30-day period that runs through Oct. 15 and was enacted into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to celebrate the stories and achievements of American citizens who trace their lineage to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.

“The CUNY community is proud to pay tribute to the histories and cultures of Hispanics and Latinos across the City and throughout the country”, said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “CUNY is stronger because of their contributions to our great University.”

Events include “Thriving on the Margins: A Workshop on Identity,” Oct. 10 at Medgar Evers College; an authors’ panel, “Writing Historical Fiction to Reach/Teach New Audiences,” Oct. 11 at Hunter College Center for Puerto Rican Studies; the Distinguished Latino Leaders Awards, Oct. 11 at Hostos Community College; and “¡Estamos Aqui! Queer Latinx Pride,” Oct. 11 at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Here is more information about these and other activities scheduled on CUNY campuses during Hispanic Heritage Month:

10/3

Medgar Evers College: University of Puerto Rico Student Film Festival, Mary Pinkett Theater,

S-122, 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

10/4

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Graduating con ganas: A discussion on a Man’s View on the Value of Education Today, NB L.74.02, 1:40 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Hostos Community College: The 10th biennial BomPlenazo, a celebration of Afro-Puerto Rican Music and Dance (through 10/7), Main Theater/Pregones Theater/Rincon Criollo, 9 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

10/5

City College of New York: Tipico Night Ocho, live band and DJ, Marshak Gym, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

10/10

Hostos Community College: Hispanic/Latino or Latinx: Latina Activism: Sisters and Daughters – Past & Present. Faculty Dining Room, C Building/East Academic Complex, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: The Needs and Changes of Afro-Latinx Students at JJC, a Hispanic Serving Institution, NB 9.64, 1:40 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Medgar Evers College: Thriving on the Margins: An interactive workshop on Identity with guest lecturer Miguel Rodriguez, Welcome Center, 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

10/11

Hostos Community College: Distinguished Latino Leaders Awards; honorees include: Hon. Luis M. Diaz, Bronx County Clerk; Hon. Linda Maricela Machuca, cónsul general of Ecuador; Hon. Maria Isabel Nieto Jaramillo, cónsul general of Columbia; A Atrium, Allied Health Building, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Hunter College: Writing Historical Fiction to Reach/Teach New Audiences: Authors panel featuring Virginia Sanchez-Korrol and Eleanor Parker Sapia, moderated by Vanessa Pérez-Rosario, Center for Puerto Rican Studies, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: “¡Estamos Aqui! Queer Latinx Pride,” Hound Square, 1:40 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Lehman College: Journalism in the Age of Disaster – Puerto Rico: La Tormenta, The Truth and Making Sense, One Year After Hurricane Maria, journalism panel discussion moderated by The New York Times’ David Gonzalez, featuring commentary by student participants of CUNY Service Corps Puerto Rico Project, Music Building Recital Hall (Room 306), 12:45 p.m.

10/15

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Imagining Hispanic Serving Colleges and Universities as Integrated Institutions for Ethnoracial Justice, Nicholas Vargas, assistant professor, Center for Latin American Studies and Department of Sociology, Criminology & Law, University of Florida, 15 NB, L.61, 1:40 p.m.

Medgar Evers College: ICL Initiative: Beyond Cultural Competence in Health and Social Services, AB-1, Cafeteria, 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

###


SMART ON CRIME CONFERENCE COMES TO JOHN JAY

Smart On Crime Conference Comes to John Jay

On September 25th and 26th, John Jay held the second annual Smart on Crime Innovations Conference, bringing together some of the nation’s top criminal justice authorities and respected leaders. Co-hosted by John Jay College, the Center for American Progress, and the Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation, a wide range of experts shared their experiences, their data, and their goals for the future. “It doesn’t matter if you’re a democrat or a republican, a conservative or a liberal, from the city, the suburbs or a rural community—we’re all here for the same reason,” said President Karol V. Mason. “We’re here to rethink our criminal justice system, making it more equitable and fair, regardless of race, gender, or socioeconomic status.”

“We want to get people together to make a commitment to shrinking the criminal justice system, and to showcase innovations in this space that are working and changing communities, while making sure that we do it in a safe, smart and equitable way,” said Ed Chung, Vice President, Criminal Justice Reform, Center for American Progress. Speakers covered topics ranging from race and disparities to the rehabilitation and education of former inmates. The conference offered data-driven views and solutions to criminal justice reform.

 Click here to see the entire conference, and enjoy these moments captured from the event. 

 

President Karol Mason, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

President Karol Mason, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Ed Chung, Center for American Progress

Ed Chung, Center for American Progress

(left to right) Ed Chung, Center for American Progress, Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama, President Karol Mason, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Michael Tubbs, Mayor of Stockton (CA)

(left to right) Ed Chung, Center for American Progress, Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama, President Karol Mason, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Michael Tubbs, Mayor of Stockton (CA)

Devon Simmons, Prisoner Reentry Institute, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Devon Simmons, Prisoner Reentry Institute, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Bill Keller, The Marshall Project and Mark Holden, Koch Industries, Inc.

Bill Keller, The Marshall Project and Mark Holden, Koch Industries, Inc.

Casper Stewart, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation and Mary Fallin, Governor of Oklahoma

Casper Stewart, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation and Mary Fallin, Governor of Oklahoma

(left to right) Jeremy Travis, The Laura and John Arnold Foundation, Erica Ford, LIFE Camp, Inc., Mai Fernandez, National Center for Victims of Crime, and Danielle Sered, Common Justice.

(left to right) Jeremy Travis, The Laura and John Arnold Foundation, Erica Ford, LIFE Camp, Inc., Mai Fernandez, National Center for Victims of Crime, and Danielle Sered, Common Justice.

Khalil Cumberbatch, The Fortune Society

Khalil Cumberbatch, The Fortune Society

(left to right) Devon Simmons, Prisoner Reentry Institute, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Vivian Nixon, College and Community Fellowship, Daryl Atkinson, Forward Justice, and Ed Chung, Center for American Progress

(left to right) Devon Simmons, Prisoner Reentry Institute, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Vivian Nixon, College and Community Fellowship, Daryl Atkinson, Forward Justice, and Ed Chung, Center for American Progress

(left to right) Adam Gelb, Council on Criminal Justice, Hannah Sassaman, Media Mobilizing Project, Barry Friedman, NYU Policing Project, David Kennedy, National Network for Safe Communities, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and Jo-Ann Wallace, National Legal Aid & Defender Association

(left to right) Adam Gelb, Council on Criminal Justice, Hannah Sassaman, Media Mobilizing Project, Barry Friedman, NYU Policing Project, David Kennedy, National Network for Safe Communities, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and Jo-Ann Wallace, National Legal Aid & Defender Association

David Kennedy, National Network for Safe Communities, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

David Kennedy, National Network for Safe Communities, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Anthony Annucci, Acting Commissioner, NY Dept. of Corrections and Community Supervision

Anthony Annucci, Acting Commissioner, NY Dept. of Corrections and Community Supervision

(left to right) Randy Petersen, Texas Public Policy/Right on Crime, Eric Gonzalez, District Attorney for Kings County (NY), Barry Scheck, Innocence Project, Ron Davis, 21st Century Policing Solutions, Iris Baez, Anthony Baez Community and Parents Against Police Brutality Foundation, and Shari Silberstein, Equal Justice USA

(left to right) Randy Petersen, Texas Public Policy/Right on Crime, Eric Gonzalez, District Attorney for Kings County (NY), Barry Scheck, Innocence Project, Ron Davis, 21st Century Policing Solutions, Iris Baez, Anthony Baez Community and Parents Against Police Brutality Foundation, and Shari Silberstein, Equal Justice USA

José Cisneros, Treasurer for the City and County of San Francisco (CA)

José Cisneros, Treasurer for the City and County of San Francisco (CA)

Adam Gelb, Council on Criminal Justice

Adam Gelb, Council on Criminal Justice

(left to right) Jake Horowitz, The Pew Charitable Trusts, Ana Bermudez, Commissioner, New York (NY) Dept. of Probation, DeAnna Hoskins, JustLeadershipUSA, Ebony Ruhland, University of Cincinnati and Amy Solomon, The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

(left to right) Jake Horowitz, The Pew Charitable Trusts, Ana Bermudez, Commissioner, New York (NY) Dept. of Probation, DeAnna Hoskins, JustLeadershipUSA, Ebony Ruhland, University of Cincinnati and Amy Solomon, The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Steven Pacheco, CONNECTr/John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Steven Pacheco, CONNECTr/John Jay College of Criminal Justice

(left to right) Kimberly Foxx, State's Attorney for Cook County (IL), Candice Jones, Public Welfare Foundation, Jason Hernandez, Open Society Foundation, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa (OK) and Ashley Allison, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

(left to right) Kimberly Foxx, State’s Attorney for Cook County (IL), Candice Jones, Public Welfare Foundation, Jason Hernandez, Open Society Foundation, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa (OK), Jeffrey Robinson, ACLU and Ashley Allison, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

(left to right) Rudy Valdez, Director,

(left to right) Rudy Valdez, Director, “The Sentence” Documentary, Vivian Nixon, College and Community Fellowship, and Zoe Towns, FWD.us

Jake Horowitz, The Pew Charitable Trusts, and Amy Solomon, The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Jake Horowitz, The Pew Charitable Trusts, and Amy Solomon, The Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Jeff Asher, FiveThirtyEight.com Contributor

Jeff Asher, FiveThirtyEight.com Contributor


CUNY SPH welcomes visiting scholars from Madrid

Luisa Borrell and visiting scholars

From left to right: Bertha Angelica Bonilla, Angel Asunsolo del Barco, Luisa N. Borrell

The Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics welcomes two visiting scholars to CUNY SPH this semester.

Bertha Angelica Bonilla is a third-year doctoral student with Department of Epidemiology at the University of Alcala in Madrid. She is in the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics as a Visiting Scholar through December 2018. Angelica will work on her dissertation research during her time at CUNY SPH. Her dissertation examines differences in diabetes type 2 between the immigrant and native adult population residing in Madrid. Professor Luisa N. Borrell is a member of Angelica’s dissertation committee and will supervise her work during her time at CUNY SPH. Drs. Manuel Franco and Maria Isabel Del Cura serve as co-chairs of the committee. They are both affiliated with the Social and Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Group at the University of Alcala in Madrid.

Angel Asunsolo del Barco, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor and the current Deputy Director of the Department of Surgery, Medical and Social Sciences at the University of Alcala in Madrid. His scholarly pursuit with the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics at CUNY SPH is part of an agreement with the University of Alcala. His interests include the use of epidemiological methods in translational clinical research and, as part of real-world practice, the use of electronic health records and administrative data to facilitate the investigation and understanding of the health of populations. His most current research is focused in chronic diseases and ongoing projects include studying the effect of 1) chronic venous insufficiency on pregnancy outcomes and 2) different outcomes (especially mental health) on the use of healthcare resources.

 


Robert Alfano wins Inventor of the Year and SPIE Gold Medal

 

CCNY experimental physicist Robert Alfano

Robert R. Alfano’s decades-long contribution to the field of ultrafast laser science and photonics is legendary with more than 120 patents and 700 publications. In further recognition of his pioneering research, the Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering at The City College of New York is the recipient of two more major honors: ENYIPLA’s 2018 Inventor of Year award and SPIE’s 2019 Gold Medal.

The Inventor of the Year accolade from the Eastern New York Intellectual Property Law Association is for his patent that defines the application of supercontinuum light for medical and biological applications.   His discovery of supercontinuum is one of Alfano’s crowning achievements.

ENYIPLA cites that Alfano has been a prolific inventor “over many years as evidenced by his many patents which document his collaboration with others and his advances in the state of the art.”

He will receive the Inventor of the Year award, which includes a plaque and   New York State Senate Proclamation, this fall.

Alfano will receive the 2019 SPIE Gold Medal next August. SPIE is the international society for optics and photonics.

The Gold Medal is the highest honor presented annually by SPIE in recognition of outstanding engineering or scientific accomplishments in optics, electro-optics, or photographic technologies or applications.

“The SPIE Awards Committee has made this recommendation in recognition of your outstanding seminal achievements and contributions to advancement of knowledge on fundamental properties of materials and their interaction with light in areas of biology, condensed matter, semiconductors, tunable lasers, and biomedical optics,” SPIE writes to Alfano.

About Robert Alfano
His career has been defined by his pioneering work in the application of light and photonics technologies to the study of biological, biomedical and condensed matter systems. In addition to his discovery of the supercontinuum, Alfano’s other research achievements include development of new Chromium  doped tunable NIR lasers, the advance of laser spectroscopic and optical imaging techniques for condensed matter and biomedical optics and photonics, and the study of ultrafast optical pulse propagation and imaging in scattering media.

His other accolades include the Optical Society of America’s Charles Hard Townes Award (2008) and Michael S. Feld Biophotonics honor (2016); the SPIE Britton Chance award for Biomedical Optics (2012); and the American Physical Society’s Arthur L Schawlow Prize in Laser Science (2013). Click here to read more.

About The City College of New York 
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


LaGuardia Community College Appoints Mark C. Healy, former CEO of AST Financial Group, as Vice President of Continuing Education

From cargo truck driver to CEO and now LaGuardia vice president—LaGuardia graduate Healy credits the College with putting him on his career path


Healy’s vision for Continuing Education is to address the educational aspirations of the professionals moving into Long Island City, to strengthen & grow existing continuing education programs, & to leverage the New York State Opportunity Zone Program to support new businesses moving into Western Queens

September 26, 2018

LaGuardia Graduate Mark C. Healy, former CEO of AST Financial, appointed Vice President of Continuing Education
After a nationwide search, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY (“LaGuardia”) has named business leader Mark C. Healy (LaGuardia Class of 1983) as vice president of Continuing Education, which serves 30,000 New Yorkers seeking high-quality, affordable, and short-term pathways to advancing their careers, education and businesses.

Healy brings more than 35 years of experience in business and financial services, including serving as president and CEO of AST Financial Group. He has held senior positions at National Financial Services/ Fidelity Investments, and TD Securities. Most recently, he was the owner and president of BGBY Investments, LLC, a wealth management practice.

“Throughout his career, Mark has shown an astounding ability to lead and manage large and growing teams of people. He combines this extensive experience with a deep and enduring commitment to LaGuardia and our mission,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow.

Healy graduated from LaGuardia in 1983 with an associate degree in accounting.

“I credit LaGuardia with much of my professional success,” said Healy. “It’s where I learned how to merge my street smarts with my acquired accounting expertise, and where I met faculty who helped me establish a career on Wall Street—mentorship that was vital as I didn’t have professional role models in my personal life.”

Healy and his four siblings grew up with limited means in Jamaica, Queens. Their mother struggled to make ends meet after Healy’s father died suddenly when he was 10 years old. After high school, he took a job driving cargo trucks at Kennedy Airport. However, after a year he decided that he needed to go to college, and enrolled at LaGuardia because of its affordable tuition and opportunities for paid internships. After graduating from LaGuardia, he earned his bachelor’s in public accounting from LIU Post (as it is currently named), and then started his highly successful career in finance.

When Healy speaks with students, he shares the family hardships that led him to LaGuardia: “I want students to know that I understand what they’re going through, and encourage them to stay in college and graduate so they can have a better future. I’m thrilled to be in this new role supporting our adult-learners on their journeys to improving their lives and careers.”

LaGuardia’s Continuing Education Division serves adults who need to finish high school, immigrants wanting to improve their English language skillsprofessionals seeking new skills, and entrepreneurs working to grow their businesses. Robust certificate and professional development offerings include healthcare education and training, the largest English language-learning program in New York City, and career skills training.

Innovative partnerships with New York employers and governmental agencies help shape and support these programs—helping underemployed and unemployed New Yorkers find pathways to steady work, and supporting small businesses. As example, a partnership with Weill Cornell Medicine, supported by NYC’s Department of Small Business Services, trains New Yorkers for medical billing jobs at Weill Cornell and other health care institutions. In addition, the College’s Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program has helped hundreds of New York entrepreneurs create jobs, secure loans, and negotiate new contracts.

“My goals are to both sustain our vital education and training programs, while addressing the educational aspirations of the professionals moving to Western Queens,” said Healy. “Another key goal is supporting efforts to draw businesses to our community, through the Opportunity Zone community development program—increasing opportunities for jobs and internships for our students.” (Click here for a map reflecting the census tracks in Queens that have been designated part of the New York State Opportunity Zone Program.)

Since 2013, Healy has been a member of the LaGuardia Community College Foundation, including as board chair (2016-2018)—spearheading efforts to provide financial support for students. Each year, the Foundation gives out nearly $2 million in scholarships and emergency financial support to the College’s primarily low-income and new-immigrant students. In 2015, Healy established a scholarship fund to help students pay their tuition and other college expenses.

For his dedication to LaGuardia, the College Foundation honored Healy with the 2014 Innovative Leadership Award. To watch a video of his acceptance of the award, click here.

Healy takes the reins from Jane E. Schulman, who stepped down last month as vice president of continuing education.

To learn more about LaGuardia’s Continuing Education division, click here.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

####


Dr. Nireata Seals Appointed as Vice President of Student Affairs

LaGuardia Community College Appoints Nireata D. Seals, Ed.D. as Vice President of Student Affairs

Nireata Seals
After a nationwide search, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY (“LaGuardia”) has appointed Nireata D. Seals, Ed.D. as vice president of Student Affairs.

In her role, Dr. Seals directs the essential student services for the nearly 20,000 students pursuing their associate’s degrees at LaGuardia, including registration, enrollment, financial aid, disability services, transfer, and career planning and placement.

As well, she oversees LaGuardia’s robust services designed to help the college’s primarily low-income student population stay on track and graduate. These include an on-campus food pantry, health services, and subsidized daycare (for student-parents). Each year, hundreds of LaGuardia students—in both our associate’s degree programs and continuing education programs—access these services.

“Dr. Seals is a transformational leader who has a deep understanding of the demands on our busy students, and what they need to stay on track to graduation,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow.

For the past 25 years, Dr. Seals has led a distinguished career in student services, beginning with directing campus activities at the College of New Rochelle and as resident hall manager at New York University. Next, she held positions at Queensborough Community College and Hunter College. She joined LaGuardia in 2015 as assistant dean for enrollment services, and was appointed associate dean for student access and achievement in 2016.

“Nireata has an amazing ability to see the student experience from the macro level,” said LaGuardia Community College Provost Paul Arcario, Ed.D. “She wants our students to have positive experiences here, and fosters a culture where student-facing staff go above and beyond.”

“My job is to help students remove barriers to their success,” said Dr. Seals. “They’re juggling work, family, and classes—and often spend several hours commuting between their daily responsibilities. When students are on-campus, they need to access what they need as easily as possible—accordingly, we’re adding more evening hours to campus services to better serve working students. Anything to help our students get to their next step in their journey.”

Under her leadership, the U.S. Department of Education awarded to LaGuardia a four-year $1.5 million grant to support student-parents. The grant, from the federal Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program, will enable LaGuardia to increase the number of children served by LaGuardia’s on-campus subsidized daycare, the Early Childhood Learning Center (ECLC), from 219 to upwards of 263 children. As well, the ECLC is establishing a program to address the emotional and mental health of parents, and providing subsidies for the lowest income student-parents.

For students like single mom Tracy Mingo, age 35, being able to send her child to universal pre-k at LaGuardia’s ECLC was an enormous boon: “I could not imagine dropping off my son somewhere, and then coming to LaGuardia. Here it’s a one-stop shop. Knowing my son is nearby gives me so much comfort.”

Dr. Seals earned her doctorate of education in executive leadership from Saint John Fisher College in Rochester, NY; her masters in student personnel administration from New York University; and her bachelors in behavioral science/social work from Concordia University (formally Christ College Irvine) in Irvine, Calif.

Dr. Seal succeeds Michael A. Baston, J.D., Ed.D., who was appointed president of Rockland Community College in July 2017.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

####


LaGuardia Selected as Training Prep Site for Cyber Boot Camp in City’s Bold New Cybersecurity Initiative

LaGuardia Community College (“LaGuardia”) is joining Cyber NYC, an initiative led by the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) to make the City a center for combatting cyber threats.

In a press announcement issued today, NYCEDC describes Cyber NYC as a plan to “transform New York City into a global leader of cybersecurity innovation and talent to combat one of the world’s greatest threats.”

Cyber NYC is expected to help spawn 10,000 good-paying jobs in the coming decade, providing an inlet to many New Yorkers from non-traditional backgrounds, particularly those from low-income families or who are otherwise disadvantaged.

LaGuardia is the only community college specifically named as a program partner in Cyber NYC; additional higher education partners include Columbia University, NYU, Cornell Tech, and the CUNY system (of which LaGuardia is a part). LaGuardia has one of the largest tech training programs in the New York metropolitan region.

“Cyber NYC is an important investment by the City of New York as it provides a route into the well-paying, in-demand field of cybersecurity for all New Yorkers —enabling them to make better lives for themselves and their families,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “With our experience training the next generation of tech professionals—more than 3,500 New Yorkers come through our technology programs each year—our bridge programs prepare students for high-intensity careers in the ever-changing world of work. As every industry continues to plan for a defense against cyber-attack, I am proud that students trained at LaGuardia will play a role in safeguarding data, privacy, and digital assets in New York City, and beyond.”

Having been selected to help facilitate the Cyber Boot Camp, LaGuardia will collaborate with software development school Fullstack Academy, which will lead an intensive boot camp in industry-specific cybersecurity competencies.

Adults with minimal familiarity with cybersecurity will be placed in a six-week preparatory course at LaGuardia, where participants will learn the basics of industry software and terminology, before continuing onto the Fullstack boot camp.

The Cyber Boot Camp will place over 1,000 students in jobs that have an average starting salary of $65,000 over the first three years of the program.

Those interested in applying for the Cyber Boot Camp, should visit www.LaGuardia.edu/CyberNYC, or click here to learn more about the cyber boot camp at Fullstack Academy.

To read NYCEDC’s full press announcement about Cyber NYC, click here.

To read a press announcement about the major role that The City University of New York (CUNY) will play in Cyber NYC, click here.

• • • •

About NYCEDC
New York City Economic Development Corporation is the City’s primary vehicle for promoting economic growth in each of the five boroughs. NYCEDC’s mission is to stimulate growth through expansion and redevelopment programs that encourage investment, generate prosperity and strengthen the City’s competitive position. NYCEDC serves as an advocate to the business community by building relationships with companies that allow them to take advantage of New York City’s many opportunities. To learn more about NYCEDC projects and initiatives, follow its Facebook or Twitter feeds, or visit its blog.

About Fullstack Academy
Fullstack Academy is an award-winning, immersive coding school based in New York City. Backed by Y Combinator, co-founders David Yang and Nimit Maru leveraged their experience at Yahoo, Gilt Groupe, and Bloomspot (acquired by JP Morgan Chase in 2011) to create an elite program centered on fullstack JavaScript and emerging technologies. Fullstack Academy graduates enjoy excellent outcomes, with alumni working at startups as well as technology leaders, including Google, Amazon and Facebook. In 2016, Fullstack Academy launched Grace Hopper Program, the first all-women coding bootcamp in New York City, and the first in the country to offer a deferred tuition model. In 2018, Fullstack partnered with New York City to launch Fullstack Cyber Academy, an elite cybersecurity bootcamp. Visit https://www.fullstackacademy.com/ to learn more.

About LaGuardia Community College
LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

####


CUNY Among Prime Partners of Cyber NYC, Initiative Pairing Colleges With Industry to Create Major Hub of Learning, Innovation in Emerging Field

The City University of New York will play a major role in the implementation of Cyber NYC, a $30 million initiative announced today by the New York City Economic Development Corp. (NYCEDC) to transform New York into a worldwide hub for cybersecurity innovation.

CUNY, part of a consortium of academic institutions that also includes Columbia, NYU and Cornell Tech, will take the lead in designing a multifaceted applied cybersecurity learning initiative, pairing academic and industry leaders and exposing students to a vital and rapidly emerging field that will count an estimated 3.5 million unfilled jobs by 2021.

The effort will include the development of industry-informed curricula and new instructional vehicles for their delivery; a Tech-in-Residence program that will pair students with top leaders from the tech sector, providing the tools to apply academic lessons to real-life industry needs; a citywide forum that brings academic and industry leaders together for a two-way conversation and the creation of a regional cybersecurity conference; and the development of a graduate program in Cybersecurity Studies at the Grove School of Engineering/City College of New York.

“The benefits of our participation in this crucial citywide effort will be felt on campuses across the University,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The applied cybersecurity learning initiative will bring industry professionals into classrooms to give our students a real-life perspective. It will foster needed discourse, and engage our academic peers in vital discussion. Cyber NYC enables CUNY to expand offerings for adult learners and add learning opportunities, including a master’s degree program, equipping our diverse student population to work in this burgeoning field.”

The first component of CUNY’s involvement will focus on the development of specialized educational units called stackable credentials. The courses, to be developed in partnership with NYU Tandon School of Engineering, will be self-standing modules that can provide continuing education for professionals and, potentially, be combined to form credit-bearing credentials toward a certification or degree. The courses’ scaled delivery, across multiple universities via global learning platform edX, will enable industry professionals in finance, health care, retail and media to keep abreast of rapidly changing cybersecurity hazards and practices.

Adding to a grant obtained last year from the New York City Department of Small Business Services, CUNY will enlist cybersecurity professionals to serve as adjuncts in an expanded Tech-in-Residence program, Tech-In-Residence Cyber Corps, bringing an array of courses that stress job-skills acquisition and deliver educational lessons within a real-life context. The program’s reach will be University-wide, but adjuncts will initially be deployed to campuses that provide cybersecurity courses including John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City College, New York City College of Technology, Queensborough Community College and Hunter College.

LaGuardia Community College will partner with software development school Fullstack Academy to lead an intensive cybersecurity boot camp. LaGuardia and its faculty will host a six-week preparatory course for adults who have limited exposure to information technology (IT), teaching the basics of industry software and terminology in preparation for the boot camp. The boot camps will arm New Yorkers with industry-targeted skills, and will aim to place more than 1,000 students in jobs over the first three years. Cyber NYC is expected to help spawn 10,000 good-paying jobs in the coming decade, providing an inlet to many New Yorkers from non-traditional backgrounds, particularly those from low-income families or who are otherwise disadvantaged.

The NYCEDC funds will seed the development of a new graduate studies program in cybersecurity, to be housed at the CCNY Grove School of Engineering. The master’s degree program will be launched as a fifth-year extension of the school’s existing B.S. in Computer Science and later grown into a stand-alone yearlong program, building on GE’s record of providing industry-informed graduate studies such as its Masters in Translational Medicine program. Facebook, already an engaged GE collaborator, has agreed to assist in the development of this valuable addition.

Finally, CUNY will create a citywide Cybersecurity Discipline Council, a new vehicle through which to address pressing issues and needs. The forum, which is expected to culminate in a full-scale, regional cybersecurity conference, will be another needed bridge provided by Cyber NYC to connect the academic and private sectors.

Other key objectives to be pursued in the NYCEDC cybersecurity initiative involve the creation of a cybersecurity-focused innovation center, Hub.NYC, in SoHo to aid tech startups, an aim that will be coordinated by the Israeli firm, Jerusalem Venture Partners (JVP); a Global Cyber Center for industry collaborators, to be opened in Chelsea and coordinated by Israeli firm SOSA; and a technology transfer component, to be overseen by Columbia University, which will harness emerging technologies in the pursuit of cybersecurity measures and, by connecting the creators with experienced entrepreneurs, help shepherd the resulting properties to the private sector.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

###


Management’s ‘overt lack of concern’ for employee health and safety puts non-union casino hotel workers at risk

tired hotel housekeeping workerNon-union Las Vegas casino resort workers face increased health and safety risks due in large part to management’s lack of concern for and vigilance surrounding employee work conditions.

To understand the health- and safety-related experiences of non-union casino hotel employees, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Diana Romero, doctoral alumnus Kathleen Flandrick, doctoral candidate Pamela Vossenas, and Jason Kordosky, a representative from the Local 226 Culinary Workers Union, collaborated in a focus-group study of non-union workers employed in one of eight non-union casino resorts in Las Vegas, Nevada. The findings were published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.

Focus group participants largely attributed the health and safety risks to several key themes including activities negatively affecting health and safety, barriers to health and safety,  injury and pain occurrences, coping mechanisms, job vulnerability, management policies and enforcement, within a larger context of management’s “overt lack of concern” for employee health. Workers reported that this indifference creates a negative environment whereby employer-controlled factors jeopardize employees’ health and safety.

“This study paints a comprehensive yet sobering picture of the ‘on-the-ground’ realities of the occupational health and safety challenges confronted by non-union hospitality workers in Las Vegas,” Romero says. “All paths seemed to lead to management’s disregard for workers’ health and safety.”

Fortunately, Romero says, the findings informed development of a Dynamic Theoretical Framework of Employee Health and Safety Risk that provides guidance for steps going forward to both reduce unhealthy exposures and encourage management’s engagement that can also serve their goals in increasing worker productivity.

Romero D, Flandrick K, Kordosky J, Vossenas P. On-the-ground health and safety experiences of non-union casino hotel workers: A focus-group study stratified by four occupational groups. Am J Ind Med. 2018;1–10. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22896


Testing substance use self-screening at university health centers

man holding tablet computerAlcohol and drug use is a major health issue among college students. Rates of substance use among young adults, including college students, exceed those of the general adult population and may lead to short- and long-term health consequences.

In spite of this, most university student health centers have not implemented alcohol or drug screening as standard practice. In order to assess the feasibility and acceptability of substance use screenings, and to measure the prevalence and severity of drug and alcohol use among university health center patients, CUNY SPH Assistant Professor Sean Haley and researchers from New York University tested a self-administered screening approach in student health center clinics at one private and one public university in New York City. The researchers adapted previously validated computer self-administered screening tools for completion on iPads in the waiting area, prior to the medical visit. The findings were published in the Journal of American College Health.

The findings highlight the prevalence of substance use among the population. The study found that 31.5 percent of all participants reported using tobacco in the past year, and over two-thirds (67.1 percent) reported unhealthy alcohol use. Thirty-nine percent of the participants reported using illicit drugs and nine percent reported non-medical prescription drug use.

Across the total sample, 43.8 percent (n= 220) of participants elected to share their substance use screening results with their primary care provider. In bivariate analyses, participants from the public university and those with moderate-high risk use of tobacco, alcohol, or illicit drugs were less likely to share their results with their doctor. Self-screening was well-accepted by the students utilizing the health centers, but the individuals who are most in need of services to address alcohol and drug use were the least likely to share screening results with their medical provider.

“The detection of substance use among college students offers an opportunity to intervene before behaviors become deeply entrenched,” says Haley. “Screening before the medical appointment is certainly feasible, however more work is needed to understand and reduce students’ reticence to disclose their use to their medical provider.”

McNeely J, Haley SJ, Smith AJ, Leonard NR, Cleland CM, Ferdschneider M, Calderoni M, Sleiter L, Ciotoli C & Adam A. Computer self-administered screening for substance use in university student health centers, Journal of American College Health, DOI: 10.10


Testing substance use self-screening at university health centers

man holding tablet computer

Alcohol and drug use is a major health issue among college students. Rates of substance use among young adults, including college students, exceed those of the general adult population and may lead to short- and long-term health consequences.

In spite of this, most university student health centers have not implemented alcohol or drug screening as standard practice. In order to assess the feasibility and acceptability of substance use screenings, and to measure the prevalence and severity of drug and alcohol use among university health center patients, Sean Haley, assistant professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, and researchers from New York University tested a self-administered screening approach in student health center clinics at one private and one public university in New York City. The researchers adapted previously validated computer self-administered screening tools for completion on iPads in the waiting area, prior to the medical visit. The findings were published in the Journal of American College Health.

The study found that 31.5 percent of all participants reported using tobacco in the past year, and over two-thirds (67.1 percent) reported unhealthy alcohol use. Thirty-nine percent of the participants reported using illicit drugs and nine percent reported non-medical prescription drug use.

Across the total sample, 43.8 percent (n= 220) of participants elected to share their substance use screening results with their primary care provider. In bivariate analyses, participants from the public university and those with moderate-high risk use of tobacco, alcohol, or illicit drugs were less likely to share their results with their doctor.

The researchers found that anonymous screening for substance use in university health centers is feasible and well accepted by the students utilizing the health centers, and that there is a high prevalence of unhealthy tobacco, alcohol, and drug use in this population. However, individuals who are most in need of services to address alcohol and drug use were the least likely to share screening results with their medical provider.

The findings highlight the prevalence of substance use among the population and emphasize the importance of screening in college health care settings.

“The detection of substance use among college students offers an opportunity to intervene before behaviors become deeply entrenched,” says Haley. “Screening before the medical appointment is certainly feasible, however more work is needed to understand and reduce students’ reticence to disclose their use to their medical provider.”

McNeely J, Haley SJ, Smith AJ, Leonard NR, Cleland CM, Ferdschneider M, Calderoni M, Sleiter L, Ciotoli C & Adam A. Computer self-administered screening for substance use in university student health centers, Journal of American College Health, DOI: 10.10


Management’s ‘overt lack of concern’ for employee health and safety puts non-union casino hotel workers at risk

tired hotel workerNon-union Las Vegas casino resort workers face increased health and safety risks due in large part to management’s lack of concern for and vigilance surrounding employee work conditions.

To understand the health- and safety-related experiences of non-union casino hotel employees, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Associate Professor Diana Romero, doctoral alumnus Kathleen Flandrick, doctoral candidate Pamela Vossenas, and Jason Kordosky, a representative from the Local 226 Culinary Workers Union, collaborated in a focus-group study of non-union workers employed in one of eight non-union casino resorts in Las Vegas, Nevada. The findings were published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.

Focus group participants largely attributed the health and safety risks to several key themes including activities negatively affecting health and safety, barriers to health and safety,  injury and pain occurrences, coping mechanisms, job vulnerability, management policies and enforcement, within a larger context of management’s “overt lack of concern” for employee health. Workers reported that this indifference creates a negative environment whereby employer-controlled factors jeopardize employees’ health and safety.

“This study paints a comprehensive yet sobering picture of the ‘on-the-ground’ realities of the occupational health and safety challenges confronted by non-union hospitality workers in Las Vegas,” Romero says. “All paths seemed to lead to management’s disregard for workers’ health and safety.”

Fortunately, Romero says, the findings informed development of a Dynamic Theoretical Framework of Employee Health and Safety Risk that provides guidance for steps going forward to both reduce unhealthy exposures and encourage management’s engagement that can also serve their goals in increasing worker productivity.

Romero D, Flandrick K, Kordosky J, Vossenas P. On-the-ground health and safety experiences of non-union casino hotel workers: A focus-group study stratified by four occupational groups. Am J Ind Med. 2018;1–10. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22896


The Wondrous World of Karen Berger

Karen Berger ’79, a trailblazer in the comic book industry who has worked on some of the best-known and edgiest books in the history of the genre, embarks on her latest adventure, the Berger Books imprint under the publisher, Dark Horse.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

Known as ‘the mother of weird comics,’ Karen Berger ’79 steered a generation of readers into dark and shimmering spaces with books that flourished under her Vertigo Comics imprint, including The Sandman; V for Vendetta; Swamp Thing; Y: The Last Man; and Preacher, among others. Illustration by Paul Gagner ’09 M.F.A.

Brooklyn Beginnings

The first time Karen Berger ’79 walked into a comic book shop was during her freshman year at Brooklyn College. She was accompanying her friend John Marc “J.M.” DeMatteis ’76. DeMatteis had recently started writing for DC Comics (DC).

“He dragged me to this old store on Flatbush Avenue,” Berger recalls. “He had sold his first story to Paul Levitz, who was editor of House of Mystery and Weird War Tales, and wanted to show me his work.”

The shop was called My Friend’s Bookstore. “It was the strangest place,” Berger says. “It was dusty. The book Marc worked on was kept at the back of the store in a crate, and he had to go back there and dig it out to show me. I thought the whole thing was just so bizarre, you know?” she says. “But I kind of liked his story.”

No one could have imagined then that Berger, who had barely a passing interest in the pulp adventures of superheroes, would go on to become one of the most transformative figures in the comic industry—a figure whose impact is felt to this day as founder of her own company, Berger Books.

Berger’s Brooklyn roots are quite deep. Born and raised in the borough, as were her parents and grandparents, she grew up mostly in the Flatlands section. She comes from a family of Brooklyn College alumni. Berger’s father, Harold Berger, graduated in 1944 with a degree in biology. Her mother, Rita Brandt-Berger, earned a degree in home economics in 1948. And her eldest brother, Bruce Berger, graduated in 1974 with a degree in psychology.

<p>Berger's father, Harold, died in 1960, when Berger was just two years old. His photo and personal data appeared on the back of his Brooklyn College transcript. (Brooklyn College archives)</p>

Berger’s father, Harold, died in 1960, when Berger was just two years old. His photo and personal data appeared on the back of his Brooklyn College transcript. (Brooklyn College archives)

Berger herself received a bachelor’s degree in English literature, with concentrations in art history and journalism. “I was really into modern art at the time and thought that, with my background, I might get a job at a museum or a magazine, though there were very few magazines that focused on art, and those industries were very tough to break into,” she says.

Broadening her job search, Berger looked for positions throughout the publishing industry and found that most were limited to proofreading—not something she was interested in as a career. As it happened, her friend Marc had started publishing more stories with DC. He mentioned to Berger that his editor was looking for an editorial assistant who was not a comic book reader and who, therefore, would not be distracted from work responsibilities by reading them all day long. Berger promptly applied, and she began working for the publisher in 1979.

She’s a Wonder

DC gave Berger room to grow. To further her budding interest in the field, Levitz provided her with opportunities to work as an assistant editor on books such as Batman and Detective Comics. She honed her skills and creative talent while working in proximity to some of the most legendary names in geekdom, including former DC publisher Julius “Julie” Schwartz; Superman artist Curt Swan; Shazam artist Kurt Schaffenberger; Hawkman artist Murphy Anderson; Joe Kubert, artist and founder of the Kubert School; and Robert Kanigher, writer of Wonder Woman, among many others.

Many people have noted with surprise Berger’s ability to thrive in a male-dominated industry. She understands why some might feel that way—particularly during a sociopolitical moment when women across the globe are speaking up about domestic and workplace assault, harassment, and violence via the #MeToo movement. However, Berger says that no obstacles or limitations, institutional or otherwise, were ever imposed upon her because of her gender. For this, she credits Jenette Kahn, who became DC’s publisher in 1976.

“It was almost as though the tone was already set,” Berger says. “Here was a smart, creative, ethical, fearless, risk-taking, brave, amazing, warm, friendly person running the company. It was a very open place. I never felt that, as a woman, I couldn’t get ahead there. I was editing House of Mystery six months after I walked in the door. And I was promoted to editorial coordinator in something like a year and a half. Yes, it’s true, there were not that many women compared with the number of men working at the company, but my direct male bosses, Paul and Dick Giordano were extremely encouraging, supportive and huge advocates for my career growth.”

What made Berger’s tenure at DC so unique was her approach to the franchises. She did not view the heroes and their foils through the lens of a fan, but searched for what distinguished them from standard cartoonish tropes. She drew on the specific elements that helped the characters transcend the funny pages and inhabit a space in the broader American cultural zeitgeist. For example, Berger’s stewardship of Amethyst, Princess of Gemworld embraced its fantasy elements; in The Legion of Super-Heroes, she steered the focus toward science fiction; for Swamp Thing, she encouraged an emphasis on the horror and romantic aesthetics; and with Wonder Woman, she shepherded the interplay of mythology and politics. Berger, was the editor during writer/artist George Pérez’s seven-year run, which is credited with reinvigorating Wonder Woman with the feminist perspective her creator—a psychiatrist and the inventor of the lie detector, William Marston Moulton—intended her to have. And Berger’s influence on all of these creations has been lasting. Film director Patty Jenkins states that it was Pérez’s version of Wonder Woman that inspired her approach in the 2017 blockbuster film.

Berger’s visionary guidance would provide the basis of an imprint that transformed the industry and broke the boundaries for what comic books could be.

Experiencing Vertigo

“It all happened very organically,” Berger says about the founding of Vertigo Comics, an imprint of DC that took a decidedly mature and experimental approach to comic books. “I was working with British writer Alan Moore on Swamp Thing, and Alan, as we all know, changed the face of comics,” says Berger. “Jenette Kahn had told me that there were a lot of talented people living in England, and she said, ‘Why don’t you become our ambassador as we begin to work with more artists and writers there?'”

Berger started to curate and cultivate the talent pool in England, becoming acquainted with artists like Brian Bolland and Dave Gibbons. At the time, DC was experiencing a kind of renaissance and revamping staple brands like Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman for a modern audience. Aside from Wonder Woman, Berger was interested in getting more-obscure characters on the DC roster. She began searching for creators, some of whom were at the earliest stages in their careers, whose work she enjoyed or in whom she saw great potential. Coupled with several of the books she was already editing (SandmanSwamp ThingShade, the Changing Man), these edgy, literary-minded, in-your-face political monthlies (which were then known colloquially as “the Berger Books”) caused quite a stir in the industry.

As this was happening, Berger was on maternity leave and received a call from DC’s then vice president and executive editor, Dick Giordano. He invited her to attend, when she returned, a meeting with Levitz, Kahn, and himself to talk about the possibility of Berger expanding her work at DC. Because of the buzz around her titles and their success in the market, they wondered whether she would be interested in helming her own line of books.

“In a heartbeat, I said yes.”

Founded in 1993, and based on Berger’s own business/publishing plan, Vertigo Comics is now among the imprints that have won the most awards in the history of the industry, with many of its titles perennial best-sellers. Some of its best-known books include SandmanDeath: The High Cost of Living (the first title officially launched under Vertigo); V for VendettaHellblazerPreacher; and Y: The Last Man. Of those titles, two have been adapted for film and two for television. Berger’s model was to launch two new series every month—one that was a “weird” take on a pre-existing DC property, and the other that was an original, creator-owned property (in which the writers and artists retain the legal ownership rights of the material). The latter was particularly groundbreaking in an industry whose terms were previously “work-for-hire,” meaning that all work created by the writers and artists belonged to the publisher in perpetuity.

Berger’s influence on the way the comic book industry works, how it creates stories, who it permits to tell stories, and what those stories look and feel like cannot be overstated. She thinks the title “pioneer” is a generous one and feels lucky to have been encouraged along every step of her career. She credits the writers and artists she worked with, and the synchronicity between them, for bringing about the trailblazing material that shaped a generation of readers. When Berger decided to leave Vertigo in 2012, news of her departure reverberated throughout the industry. The New York Times published a feature story on her career, deeming her “comics’ mother of the weird stuff.”

Berger looks back on her years at Vertigo with high regard for her colleagues. “Jenette, Paul, and Dick are/were great people, great mentors, great believers in creative freedom, new ideas, shaking things up, taking chances and risks. It was wonderful to be able to have that support—especially at a large company that was owned by a corporation, Warner Bros. The company now is quite different: different management, much more of a corporate atmosphere, which was one of the reasons why I wound up leaving.”

Triumph of the Imagination

You can’t keep a “wonder woman” like Berger down. In 2018, after a five-year hiatus from mainstream comics that saw her working in television development and doing some independent and freelance editorial consulting, Berger launched the first comic book imprint to be headed by a woman and whose name contained hers: Berger Books. When selecting titles for Berger Books, which is published through Dark Horse Comics, Berger employs the same processes, wisdom, and eye for talent that she used to make Vertigo such a success.

What led Berger to return to comics? A book titled Surgeon X, published by Image Comics, which she decided to edit. Her work on the project was unlike any of her previous experiences: together with documentary filmmaker turned comic book writer Sara Kenney, she consulted with a board of medical professionals to ensure that Surgeon X‘s representation of the field was as accurate as possible. Berger also worked with Kenney and multiple artists in creating an app as a companion piece for the book.

This contemporary approach to storytelling made Berger realize that she “really missed comics” and that she wanted something to focus on full time, so she began the work of making Berger Books a reality.

“Dark Horse is very progressive and totally creator-supportive company. They publish great-quality material with very high production values. At the end of the day it’s all about the book. It’s all about how you collect a story into a graphic novel and keep it on the shelf in stores. I have a lot of respect for publisher Mike Richardson and the company he built. I called him up, and he pretty much said, ‘Sure, Karen. I’d love to work with you.'”

Working from her home in Maplewood, New Jersey, Berger began to build the imprint from the ground up, with the assistance of her husband, Richard Bruning, a graphic designer, cartoonist, editor, and writer who designed the logos for Watchmen and Dark Knight Returns for DC. Berger Books launched in January 2018 with five titles: Hungry Ghosts (the last published work of celebrity chef, author, and travel documentarian Anthony Bourdain, who died earlier this year), IncognegroMata HariThe Originals, and The Seeds. Recently, the imprint has expanded its lineup to include The AlcoholicInvisible KingdomLaGuardiaOlivia Twist, and She Could Fly. Berger intends to keep the line relatively small so that she can personally guide each title. The reception has been, in classic Berger fashion, incredible.

“I’ve always edited comics that I wanted to read myself,” she says. “That may sound kind of simple or maybe even glib, but it’s not meant to. I understand we want to make money and that, as publisher and editor, you have to keep that in mind, too. But I hope that putting the quality of the content first will help us reach readers.”

Ahead of this year’s New York Comic Con, Karen Berger will be participating in a book signing and panel discussion of Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts, along with co-writer Joel Rose, and artists Paul Pope, Vanesa Del Rey, and José Villarrubia, at the TriBeca Barnes & Noble on Thursday, October 4, 2018 at 6 p.m. For more information about Berger Books, visit the Dark Horse website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, October 1, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Congratulations to NEST+m’s students, teachers and families.

According to Niche.com, publisher of this September 26th article, NYC’s Best Public Elementary Schools: See 2019 Rankings,  “The highest-ranking city school was New Explorations Into Science, Technology & Math on the Lower East Side, a K-12 school for “gifted and talented” students that landed at No. 21 in the metropolitan area.”

As a K-12 school community, each of us creates NEST+m each day. Families: Your partnership is essential to our success.

Thank you for joining us during last week’s Curriculum Night and PTA Back to School Celebration.

As we enter this first week of October, please note that our Fall Tours for prospective Middle Grades and Upper Grades students and families begin this week. For more information about NEST+m’s admissions process for prospective families (who are not presently part of the NEST+m community), please direct prospective families to the admissions tab at NESTmk12.net

Upper Grades and Middle Grades students who would like to assist during Tours should speak with their guidance counselor this week.

This week NEST+m’s 12th grade students will explore the beautiful Hudson River Valley as they participate in a grade-wide bonding trip to the Storm King Arts Center. Our 6th and 7th grade students will participate in a fabulous Fall Field Day at East River Park.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Monday, October 1 – Senior Photo Day
  • Wednesday, October 3, 8:30am – 9:30am – High School Articulation Meeting for 8th Grade Parents in Auditorium MORE INFO
  • Friday, October 5 – Middle Grades Field Day
  • Monday, October 8 – Columbus Day, school is closed

LaGuardia Graduate Mark C. Healy, former CEO of AST Financial, appointed Vice President of Continuing Education

From cargo truck driver to CEO and now LaGuardia vice president—LaGuardia graduate Healy credits the College with putting him on his career path


Healy’s vision for Continuing Education is to address the educational aspirations of the professionals moving into Long Island City, to strengthen & grow existing continuing education programs, & to leverage the New York State Opportunity Zone Program to support new businesses moving into Western Queens

September 26, 2018

LaGuardia Graduate Mark C. Healy, former CEO of AST Financial, appointed Vice President of Continuing Education
After a nationwide search, LaGuardia Community College/CUNY (“LaGuardia”) has named business leader Mark C. Healy (LaGuardia Class of 1983) as vice president of Continuing Education, which serves 30,000 New Yorkers seeking high-quality, affordable, and short-term pathways to advancing their careers, education and businesses.

Healy brings more than 35 years of experience in business and financial services, including serving as president and CEO of AST Financial Group. He has held senior positions at National Financial Services/ Fidelity Investments, and TD Securities. Most recently, he was the owner and president of BGBY Investments, LLC, a wealth management practice.

“Throughout his career, Mark has shown an astounding ability to lead and manage large and growing teams of people. He combines this extensive experience with a deep and enduring commitment to LaGuardia and our mission,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow.

Healy graduated from LaGuardia in 1983 with an associate degree in accounting.

“I credit LaGuardia with much of my professional success,” said Healy. “It’s where I learned how to merge my street smarts with my acquired accounting expertise, and where I met faculty who helped me establish a career on Wall Street—mentorship that was vital as I didn’t have professional role models in my personal life.”

Healy and his four siblings grew up with limited means in Jamaica, Queens. Their mother struggled to make ends meet after Healy’s father died suddenly when he was 10 years old. After high school, he took a job driving cargo trucks at Kennedy Airport. However, after a year he decided that he needed to go to college, and enrolled at LaGuardia because of its affordable tuition and opportunities for paid internships. After graduating from LaGuardia, he earned his bachelor’s in public accounting from LIU Post (as it is currently named), and then started his highly successful career in finance.

When Healy speaks with students, he shares the family hardships that led him to LaGuardia: “I want students to know that I understand what they’re going through, and encourage them to stay in college and graduate so they can have a better future. I’m thrilled to be in this new role supporting our adult-learners on their journeys to improving their lives and careers.”

LaGuardia’s Continuing Education Division serves adults who need to finish high school, immigrants wanting to improve their English language skillsprofessionals seeking new skills, and entrepreneurs working to grow their businesses. Robust certificate and professional development offerings include healthcare education and training, the largest English language-learning program in New York City, and career skills training.

Innovative partnerships with New York employers and governmental agencies help shape and support these programs—helping underemployed and unemployed New Yorkers find pathways to steady work, and supporting small businesses. As example, a partnership with Weill Cornell Medicine, supported by NYC’s Department of Small Business Services, trains New Yorkers for medical billing jobs at Weill Cornell and other health care institutions. In addition, the College’s Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program has helped hundreds of New York entrepreneurs create jobs, secure loans, and negotiate new contracts.

“My goals are to both sustain our vital education and training programs, while addressing the educational aspirations of the professionals moving to Western Queens,” said Healy. “Another key goal is supporting efforts to draw businesses to our community, through the Opportunity Zone community development program—increasing opportunities for jobs and internships for our students.” (Click here for a map reflecting the census tracks in Queens that have been designated part of the New York State Opportunity Zone Program.)

Since 2013, Healy has been a member of the LaGuardia Community College Foundation, including as board chair (2016-2018)—spearheading efforts to provide financial support for students. Each year, the Foundation gives out nearly $2 million in scholarships and emergency financial support to the College’s primarily low-income and new-immigrant students. In 2015, Healy established a scholarship fund to help students pay their tuition and other college expenses.

For his dedication to LaGuardia, the College Foundation honored Healy with the 2014 Innovative Leadership Award. To watch a video of his acceptance of the award, click here.

Healy takes the reins from Jane E. Schulman, who stepped down last month as vice president of continuing education.

To learn more about LaGuardia’s Continuing Education division, click here.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

####


Career Fair Opens Doors for Hundreds of Student Job Seekers

“The vibe was very welcoming.” That’s how Criminal Justice major Savion Cleophat described the Fall 2018 Career Fair presented by the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNYCenter for Career Development at 199 Chambers Street on September 26.

“I see a lot of motivation from the students to seek jobs, as well as to explore resources at BMCC,” said Stavroula Koinis, a career advisor in the Center for Career Development who headed up an information table at the event. “Our students are taking advantage of meeting as many employers as possible. They have a huge investment in their future careers, and are always seeking ways to move forward with their goals, asking, ‘What’s next’?”

The event was attended by close to 800 students and more than 100 employers. One of those employers, Katie Anderson, a store manager with LOFT in Times Square, said her company first participated in the BMCC career fair last spring.

“We’ve been impressed by our experience with BMCC students. It’s important to meet people face-to-face, when you’re considering a pool of candidates,” Anderson said. “BMCC is more of a commuter college, so students live in all five boroughs and they’re able to work in locations throughout the city. We meet a lot of business marketing students here at BMCC, and we find that whatever their major, when they work in retail—whether working with the internal or external store team—they develop skills they can take to a number of business environments.”

Communities of careers build meaning into job search

“We tried to target a wide variety of industries included in the BMCC Career Communities, so that they relate to students’ majors,” said Katherine Bedoya, an employee relations coordinator in the Center for Career Development. “At BMCC, every academic major is linked to high-demand industries and workforce sectors grouped into what we call ‘Career Communities’. Keeping that in mind as we helped students prepare for the Career Fair helped us make it more meaningful for them.”

BMCC also has a new Career Fair app, Bedoya said. “It’s free. You search for ‘BMCC Career Fair’ in your app store online. It shows all the employers for the fair, and lists the jobs they’re looking to fill, along with requirements for the job.”

The app even shows a floor plan for the career fair, she said, “so the students can be efficient with their time and make a game plan before they get there.”

Employers at the Fall 2018 Career Fair ranged from Sephora, the cosmetics chain; to Madame Tussauds, the famous wax museum; to the New York Police Department, Allied Physicians Group, Banana Republic, Sunglass Hut, Frito Lay Inc., and many others.

Duane Hodgeson, a Multimedia Design major, walked thoughtfully up and down the wide aisles in the BMCC gym, flanked by colorful employer tables.

“I’m interested in finding a part-time job in graphic design while I finish my degree,” he said. “I’ve been talking to different employers and even if I’m not interested in working in their industry, it’s good practice for me. You can never get too much practice in talking to people.”

Tracey Smith, a nursing major who volunteered at the fair, was on hand to answer questions from fellow students at the event.

“Sometimes we have a hard time finding a job and we need this kind of support,” she said. “You get a lot of help and prep from the Career Center staff before you actually go to the fair, so we feel ready when we get here. This is an excellent platform to explore the wide range of opportunities that are out there.”

Students consider employment on and off campus

While the BMCC career fairs are a bridge for jobs off campus, the Center for Career Development also guides students toward employment opportunities on campus.

These include working as a College Assistant in a research lab or office, working through a federal work-study program, or working at BMCC through programs including CUNY Educate, Develop, Graduate and Empower (EDGE), the Counseling Assistantship Program (CAP), CUNY Service Corps and others.

Students prepare for these opportunities at the Center for Career Development by taking part in mock interviews, resume writing workshops and goal-setting sessions. They can attend gatherings such as LinkedIn Hour, held every Tuesday from 3 to 4 p.m. at 199 Chambers Street, Room S-342, to learn tips on maximizing their use of this social network for professionals.

They can also take surveys to explore their interests and attend counseling sessions to focus on marketing themselves.

Career Express, an online platform provided through the Center for Career Development, provides an extensive job bank for students, as well as access to professional development workshops and other services.

There are also employment resources for alumni.

The next BMCC career fair will be held in Spring 2019. For more information, stop by the Center for Career Development at 199 Chambers Street, Room S-342, or call (212) 220-8170.

 


Prof. Julie Goldscheid on Kavanaugh Hearings for PBS NewsHour

September 26, 2018 – Professor Julie Goldscheid appeared on PBS NewsHour’s evening broadcast on Wednesday with an analysis of the upcoming Senate Judiciary Committee hearings for SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Today Prof. Goldscheid, along with more than 250 other law professors with experience teaching, researching, and writing about issues of gender violence and representing gender violence survivors in court, including a number of other CUNY Law faculty, wrote a letter to the committee outlining their concerns.

 

Prof. Julie Goldscheid has decades of experience teaching, researching, and writing about issues of gender violence and advocating for gender violence survivors’ legal rights.

This week she spearheaded a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee calling for a full investigation of the events underlying allegations against SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh. More than 250 law professors with expertise in gender violence critiqued the process set out by the Judiciary Committee.  The letter raised concerns about the Committee’s refusal to hear from all witnesses and statements pre-judging the outcome of the proceedings.  It urged the Committee to remember that the hearing is “neither a criminal trial nor a civil proceeding. The focus should be on the nominee’s intellect, demeanor, judicial temperament and moral conduct.”


Ultimately, the letter urges, Senators should “be concerned with the nominee’s judgment, insight, and capacity for reflection on the impact of a person’s behavior on others.”

 

 

For the full interview, head to PBS NewsHour to see the clip.

Read the letter to Judiciary Committee Kavanaugh confirmation hearings


Kade Wise ’11 Builds a Television “Empire”

The popular alumnus discusses how he went from majoring in marketing to landing roles on some of the highest-rated shows on television.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

Kade Wise ’11 uses his degree in marketing to help him navigate the business of acting in Hollywood.

HomelandLucifer. And now, Empire. Those are the hit television shows that Kade Wise ’11 has starred in—and he has only just begun.

In his Empire role, his biggest to date, Wise stars as “Preacher Azal,” a politically conscious, Muslim rapper who works as a tattoo artist. He’s approached by Jussie Smollett’s character, Jamal Lyon, to become a member of an anonymous collective of musicians, free of the economic and political constraints of the music industry. Azal is, at first, apprehensive, but Jamal eventually wins him over. This gives Wise the chance to show off his real-life musical acumen.

“I love working on the show. Most of my scenes are with Jussie. He’s such a great dude.”

Wise revealed that he had initially auditioned for a different role, but the showrunners were so impressed by Wise’s performance that they offered him the role of Azal, which seems tailor-made for him.

“I feel like I’m playing a parallel-universe version of myself,” Wise says of his role as Azal. “I’m honoring that character’s mission.”

The top-rated series just concluded its fourth season and has been renewed for a fifth, which premieres on Sept. 26.

Born in Algiers, Algeria, Wise came to the United States with his family when he was five years old. He grew up in the Gravesend section of Brooklyn and is the first person in his family to graduate from college. Before enrolling in Brooklyn College, he wondered why he needed a degree. “I’m an artist. Why do I need college?” was his way of thinking.

“I started rapping when I was 11 years old. I didn’t know anyone in the business. Here I am, an Algerian immigrant, no one holding my hand or telling me what to do. But something inside me said, ‘Market yourself!'”

At age 12, he cold-called several record companies and left voicemail messages for staff members in which he demonstrated his eagerness to work for them, and his skill, by rapping. That scored him an interview at Roc-A-Fella Records, the label once owned by Grammy Award-winning rapper Jay-Z and his partner, rap mogul Damon Dash;  he got to meet them both. While nothing came of this initial meeting, he scored an internship at the company two years later as a member of the “street team,” performing such tasks as putting together promotional packages and running errands. He was eventually promoted to interning in the A&R department before finally moving on.

In addition to acting and rapping, Wise is also an artist, poet, and singer—all talents he discovered during childhood. He also has directing, producing, and editing credits under his belt. But before making a full leap into his artistic ventures, Wise’s practical side took hold, and he realized that in the slim chance that his dreams did not materialize, he needed a backup plan. He decided to attend Brooklyn College because of its standing as a top institution of higher learning and its proximity to his home and family in the borough.

View this post on Instagram

My old stomping grounds!

A post shared by Kade Wise (@itskadewise) on

“And I felt proud about attending a college with the word ‘Brooklyn’ in it,” he says.

A Dean’s List honoree, Wise studied abroad in Spain to learn Spanish, which he said was a mind-broadening experience that sparked his desire to travel the world. His next destination was a little closer to home.

“I went to Los Angeles for the first time, and that’s when I knew I would pursue acting professionally.”

Encouraging Wise to make the venture was Michael Sarrao ’02, career education and training specialist in the Magner Career Center. Sarrao met him during a class visit he made to an entrepreneurial course Wise was taking at the time.

“I discovered that he was an aspiring rapper, songwriter, and actor,” says Sarrao. “He already had the energy, determination, and optimism necessary for success in the entertainment industry.” So much so, that Sarrao offered Wise a starring role in a short film he was working on to promote a Kickstarter campaign for his graphic novel, Unmasked. “When I was casting for the roles, I immediately thought of Kade and wrote a character specifically for him.  I wanted to help him gain more acting credentials on his resume. He did a great job, and I truly believe the webisode helped us surpass our Kickstarter goal as we raised more than $14,000.”

Knowing that the multitalented Wise was determined to pursue his dream, Sarrao used the college’s connections to help him prepare for it. Sarrao says, “The last thing I would’ve wanted was for him to look back years later and regret not exploring that creative side, and wondering ‘what if?'”

Through the Magner Center, Wise received help with his resume, attended workshops, and was paired with several alumni through the center’s mentoring program. Sarrao put him in touch with alumni—Sue Nadell ’83, a film and television producer who received her bachelor of arts degree in television and radio from the college—who resided in the Los Angeles area or who worked in the entertainment industry, helping Wise to build a network of support before making the leap.

Wise received a bachelor of business administration with a concentration in marketing from what is now the college’s Murray Koppelman School of Business and worked in the corporate sector for about nine months before he realized that he could not take half measures toward his acting career. He left his job and moved to Los Angeles to focus on acting full time.

His first big break came when he was offered a role on the Emmy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning Showtime series, Homeland.

“It was such a great experience. Homeland is a gritty show and gives you the opportunity to showcase a darker acting style.”

He says that sometimes he wishes he had pursued a degree in the arts, particularly given the reputation of Brooklyn College’s Conservatory of MusicDepartment of Art, and Department of Theater, noting: “I think it took me this long to breakthrough because of the unconventional route I chose to take.  But I’m okay with all of that because had I chosen differently, I wouldn’t be the person I am now, in the space I’m in now, as well-rounded as I am now.”

One of the many benefits of his education at the college was that it afforded him the opportunity to participate in the Liebowitz Entrepreneur Program founded by Brooklyn College alumnus and Adjunct Professor Ted Liebowitz ’79. The program trains students how to start and run their own businesses. In 2014, Wise returned to the college to participate in the Magner Center’s Entrepreneur in the Arts event, where he discussed living in Los Angeles and pursuing his acting career.  His visit afforded him the opportunity to mentor students in the same way he was mentored, giving them advice about what he learned and how they could persevere in the industry.

“I’m a businessperson at heart,” Wise says. “And the skills I learned in my major continue to serve me in my current industry because many of the behind-the-scenes situations require a business mind.”

To hone his acting talent, Wise did eventually study with the Barrow Group, a popular off-Broadway theater company in New York City, as well as Playhouse West and Scott Sedita Acting Studios in Los Angeles—the latter of which he said was particularly transformative.

“Sedita offered a film/television technique master class that really helped me get to where I needed to get to in terms of being conscious and getting rid of habits and quirks that I didn’t even know I had.”

He also appeared on FOX’s Lucifer, which he said was the first time he had ever traveled internationally to work on an acting project. Lucifer was also the first time he had been exposed to and started to become accustomed to the access, attention, and perks associated with the industry. But then, Wise says, he received a wake-up call.

“I didn’t work for a year after that. Talk about the universe saying, ‘Have a seat, young man. Be humble!'”

Heeding the universe’s advice and taking the time to look inward to develop his spirituality, and outward to perfect his skill, he was rewarded with his greatest professional job so far: the recurring role on Empire.

And this is not where Wise’s aspirations end. His goal is to be the kind of actor whose art and achievements are recognized globally. He would also like to focus more fully on his musical talents.

“There are so many things I want to do with my life,” he says. “Perhaps one day I’ll work in the nonprofit/philanthropy sector, or maybe in politics. I’m an idealist, but I realize that idealism works gradually and with a great deal of effort. Little by little, I’d like to be the change I’d like to see in the world.”

Next up for Wise: He will be appearing alongside Ryan Phillipe and Omar Epps in the third season of the USA Network television series, Shooter.

To learn more about Kade Wise and keep up to date on his projects, visit his FacebookIMDbInstagram, and Twitter pages.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


BIC at CCNY kicks off its fifth anniversary with @BIC Lecture, Sept. 27

bic_future_in_five_lecture

@BIC The Future In Five Lecture with (from left) Michael Roth, Gail Heimann, Matt Neale, Suzanne Powers and Nada Stirratt.

BIC, the forward-thinking, culture-shifting Branding + Integrated Communications graduate program, is celebrating its fifth anniversary at The City College of New York.

The innovative two-year Master of Professional Studies was the brainchild of Nancy Tag, an award winning educator and influential ad professional. As BIC’s director, Tag crafted the curriculum, enlisted professionals to teach, and assembled an illustrious board of industry leaders to advise. The silo smashing program has been a raging success, with grads going on to work at companies like Y&R, Apple, BBDO, Droga5, Cohn & Wolfe, Ogilvy, VaynerMedia, TBWA, SS+K, 360i, BerlinRosen, DDB, and NYTimes T-Brand Studio among others.

“As the only master’s degree program that teaches branding and communications in an integrated way, BIC’s producing talent that blows my mind,” Tag stated. “In just five years, we’ve won two gold One Show pencils, a PR Council Innovation Award, and had 14 students awarded The LAGRANT Foundation Scholarship.”

BIC kicks off its fifth anniversary celebrations with “The Future In Five”, a free @BIC Lecture on September 27th at City College. IPG Chairman and CEO Michael Roth ’67 will lead the discussion on what’s next and will be joined by Gail Heimann, president of Weber Shandwick, Matt Neale, chief executive officer of Golin, Suzanne Powers, gloabal cheif security officer of McCann Worldgroup, and Nada Stirratt, vice president of Global Marketing Solutions North America for Facebook.

BIC board member, David Sable, global chief executive officer of Y&R, is a fan. “As BIC at City College reaches its 5th anniversary, its graduates are changing the industry with new perspectives, greater diversity and exceptionally high-level multi-disciplinary training,” said Sable. “Y&R has hired more than 75 CCNY students over the years, and we are committed to the continued development and growth of the BIC program.”

About The City College of New York 

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


The Future of Housing in NYC: Alumni Convening

Leading the charge and from the trenches, alums are challenging how we think about housing.

 

 

On Wednesday, September 26, 46 alums and many students and faculty convened at CUNY Law for an intense and powerful dialogue about the challenges and opportunities created by the new right to counsel for attorneys practicing in the difficult and challenging area of housing law in New York City in 2018. The event brought together the voices of attorneys and educators, with the goals of informing alums about the state of current housing education provided by CUNY Law and seeking their counsel on how the Law School can better support alums and graduate attorneys prepared to hit the ground running.

Over an Italian dinner, alums reconnected, reminisced, and shared their experiences doing the difficult but rewarding work of housing law. As Professor John Whitlow explained, CUNY Law and its alums are “keeping this city the type of place where people can come and escape various nightmares to live their dreams,” but even with the passage of the 2017 Right to Counsel law for tenants facing eviction, much work needs to be done. Housing attorneys carry tremendous caseloads and practice in courthouses overwhelmed by the needs of their clients. Office space is scarce or nonexistent, and the stress of fighting for people to keep their homes is exhausting. Poor people and vulnerable people are always the ones most at risk, and New York City is experiencing a rising crisis in affordable housing availability.

But the news is not all bad. As Dean Mary Lu Bilek explained, “CUNY Law is always reflecting on what we are doing, and asking ourselves: how can we do it better?” On Wednesday night, alums chimed in with smart, concrete, real-world advice on how to do just that. Suggestions including interweaving housing law throughout the curriculum more thoroughly, the creation of a housing clinic, and recognizing the interdisciplinary nature of housing law, which intersects with immigration, criminal defense, and mental health, and disproportionately impacts communities of color.

Thank you for coming back to CUNY Law, alums! We hear you, and we’re here for you. The conversation is not over – it’s just beginning.

Here’s what we already provide for CUNY Law students interested in learning about housing law:

Housing Related Curricular and Programming Offerings 2018-19_001

We also offer a Housing Justice Practicum, which trains third-year students in the legal frameworks and skills related to the preservation of affordable housing and explores the context of the current housing crisis. The course is comprised of a weekly seminar and an externship with a housing legal services provider, which together facilitate the acquisition of concrete skills, knowledge, experience, and connections in a vital and rapidly growing area of public interest law.


EXECUTIVE MASTER’S PROGRAM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE INAUGURAL GRADUATION

Executive Master’s Program in Criminal Justice Inaugural Graduation
President Karol V. Mason

President Karol V. Mason

 

 

On September 17th, the College held the inaugural graduation of the NYPD/John Jay Executive Leadership Master’s Degree Program in Criminal Justice. This program, a partnership with John Jay and the New York City

Police Department, was created to educate officers to meet the current and future challenges of policing in their communities.

“Given the importance of policing in American society, it’s imperative that we take the best policing has to offer—the men and women in front of me tonight—and continue to build and improve the leadership of the NYPD,” said President Karol V. Mason during the graduation ceremony.

Benjamin Tucker

Benjamin B. Tucker, First Deputy Police Commissioner

Benjamin B. Tucker, First Deputy Police Commissioner, first addressed the graduates. “As we listen to you talk about your dreams and tell your stories, we know that this program was well conceived. We have a vison for where we’re going. You having this education means that you are the future of this agency.” he said. Then Tucker addressed the many family members—children, parents, husbands, and wives—sitting in the room. “I went to school at night for 11 years, and my wife has still not forgiven me. So I know your sacrifice. Thank you for supporting them and hanging in there.”

James O`Neill

James P. O`Neill, Police Commissioner

Before presenting certificates and challenge coins, James P. O’Neill, Police Commissioner, commended the graduates. “I know what it is to go to school at night. I know what it is to go to school at midnight. And you all have full-time jobs, so you don’t have a lot of extra time,” said O’Neill. “To make the decision to do this was not easy. To make this commitment to yourself and to this city means you know what it means to be a cop in 2018. It’s an extremely complex job.”

Christel Lytwyn, the Police Liaison Director, called out each of the graduate’s names as Professor Peter Moskos, who was instrumental in seeing this first cohort successfully graduate, presented certificates with the Police Commissioner, First Deputy Commissioner, and President Mason.

“I’m happy to celebrate with everyone tonight, and I look forward to seeing a long line of future leaders from this program,” said President Mason, a sentiment shared by all.

Deputy Chief Judith Harrison

Class Spokesperson and Deputy Chief Judith Harrison

Peter Moskos

Professor Peter Moskos 

Christel Lytwyn

Christel Lytwyn, the Police Liaison Director

The first cohort of the NYPD/John Jay Executive Leadership Master’s Degree Program in Criminal Justice

The first cohort of the NYPD/John Jay Executive Leadership Master’s Degree Program in Criminal Justice


JOHN JAY COLLEGE RANKS AMONG TOP PUBLIC COLLEGES AGAIN IN 2018

John Jay College Ranks Among Top Public Colleges Again in 2018

John Jay College is ranked among the top public schools in the country by several publications in 2018, reaffirming our position as a leader in providing access to quality education at an affordable price, and in propelling low-income students into the middle class.

In this year’s U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges rankings, John Jay College was among the Top 50 Public Schools in the North, coming in at #46. John Jay also featured in the Ethnic Diversity listing with a Diversity “index” of 0.70 (with 1.0 as highest) and Hispanics at 44%. US News altered their ranking criteria this year to include indicators to measure success in promoting social mobility – an area where John Jay and CUNY are recognized as national leaders.

The Chronicle of Higher Education’s rankings of Colleges with the Highest Student-Mobility Rates placed John Jay College at the #5 spot. Eight of the top 11 were CUNY colleges, showing CUNY’s dominance as an engine of social mobility. The Chronicle’s list was based on “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility,” the highly respected study led by Stanford University economics professor Raj Chetty.

Money Magazine’s list of Best Colleges for Your Money 2018 included John Jay College in the top quarter of the more than 700 schools ranked in the nation. Along with using measures of educational quality, affordability and alumni success, Money magazine also factored in the social mobility rate developed by Professor Chetty. The College was also included in the middle of over 300 colleges in the Forbes list of America’s Best Value Colleges.

BestColleges.com placed John Jay College among the Top 10 Best Online Colleges in New York for 2018. The website partners with HigherEducation.com to provide college information and their rankings are intended to “inform and guide prospective students toward institutions that provide a quality education and a meaningful learning experience at an affordable cost.”

College Consensus included John Jay among the “100 Most Affordable Colleges and Universities for 2018” at #34. The online publication bills itself as a new college review aggregator that combines results from key college rankings and student reviews.

Earlier this year, CollegeChoice.Net ranked John Jay College #1 in best undergraduate degree in criminal justice in the country. Out of 35 public and private institutions, John Jay emerged as the leader in criminology education, making it one of the “absolute best” places for students to pursue a Criminal Justice Bachelor of Science degree.

In a different list compiled by CollegeChoice.Net, John Jay was also recognized for its undergraduate Forensic Science program with a #28 ranking. Academic reputation, retention rates, affordability, and early salaries of graduates were factored into both rankings.

Previously, John Jay was ranked one of the most diverse schools in the Northeast by the Wall Street Journal. The College is a federally designated Minority-Serving Institution (MSI) as well as a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI). With a student body that represents more than 130 nationalities, the campus is an inclusive place to study justice issues through an intersectional lens.

John Jay was also ranked as #12 on College Choice’s Best Colleges for Veterans  national list, where it was lauded for a curriculum “that focuses specifically on the interests and needs of student veterans and military students.” In recognition of its programming, services, and career opportunities to prepare its student veterans for life after the military, the College is also a Best for Vets higher education institution, and was designated a “Military Friendly” institution.

 

About John Jay College of Criminal Justice: 
An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York is a Hispanic Serving Institution and Minority Serving Institution offering a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu and follow us on Twitter @JohnJayCollege.


JOHN JAY REMEMBERS ALUMNI MEMBERS LOST ON 9/11

John Jay Remembers Alumni Members Lost On 9/11

On Wednesday, September 12th, the John Jay community gathered together to pay tribute to our fallen heroes who lost their lives on September 11th, 2001. Sixty-seven John Jay alumni members were killed that day, and unfortunately, more have later succumbed to illnesses directly related to their efforts on the site.

“Today, we honor their memories. We salute their bravery. We support their loved ones. And, we remind ourselves to continue their work,” said President Karol V. Mason. “For many young students gathered with us today, the tragic events on September 11th may not be a part of your collective memory. But, as a part of the John Jay community, know that the courage and conviction that ran through those alumni members on September 11th runs through you too. You’re carrying their legacy in everything you do.”

Following President Mason’s remarks, Sanjana Nair, Lecturer in the English Department, recited a poem she wrote especially for the occasion. As faculty, staff, and students read the names of our lost alumni members, students placed a candle around the memorial.

Once the site was encircled in candles, James Leonard, M.S. ’13, Chief of the Department, FDNY; Peter Beshar, J.D., John Jay College Foundation Trustee, Executive Vice President & General Counsel Marsh & McLennan Companies; and Benjamin Tucker, B.S. ’77, J.D., First Deputy Commissioner, NYPD, each spoke about the long-term impact the event had on their agencies and businesses. To acknowledge the lives recently lost from the toxic debris, they lit special candles of remembrance. The event concluded with students placing origami cranes around the memorial, symbolizing a wish of peace, hope, and healing.

Officers commence the event as Professor Gregory Sheppard sings the National Anthem

Officers commence the event as Professor Gregory Sheppard sings the National Anthem

President Mason delivers heartfelt remarks

President Mason delivers heartfelt remarks

Sanjana Nair recites her poem

Sanjana Nair recites her poem

Students line up to place their candles

Students line up to place their candles

(left to right) Peter Beshar, Benjamin Tucker, Karol Mason, and James Leonard

(left to right) Peter Beshar, Benjamin Tucker, Karol Mason, and James Leonard

Candles of remembrance and origami cranes of hope

Candles of remembrance and origami cranes of hope

 

For more stories on September 11th commemorations at John Jay, please visit these links:

 


RICHARD ROTHSTEIN’S BOOK TALK: THE COLOR OF LAW

Richard Rothstein’s Book Talk: The Color of Law

Many people believe that residential segregation in America is caused by “de facto segregation” (a separation of groups occurring from natural conditions or preferences), instead of resulting from “de jure” segregation (segregation by law). But, in Professor Richard Rothstein’s new book The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, he offers up solid evidence proving that this belief is a myth. “Without government requirements, rules and regulations, we would not have been able to create the segregated landscape that we have today,” said Rothstein. On September 6th, during his Office for the Advancement of Research (OAR) Book Talk, Rothstein made sure that the audience at John Jay College knew both the history and facts behind how our federal, state, and local governments explicitly segregated our country.

What led to residential segregation
Dating the start of residential segregation to the 1930s, Rothstein explained how it began with the public housing program created under the 1937 Housing Act. “Under the New Deal and during The Depression, segregated housing projects were built for working class families,” Rothstein said. “They made separate projects for whites, and separate projects for blacks. This went on through WWII.” These housing programs greatly impacted—and are still impacting—the demographics of many neighborhoods in our country, yet education about residential segregation has always been severely lacking. In most textbooks, “there’s only one paragraph about discrimination, with one sentence saying, ‘In the north, African Americans found themselves forced into segregation,’” said Rothstein. “The textbooks make it seem like one day African Americans looked out their window and found themselves segregated. And that’s not true.”

Further describing the public housing programs role in residential segregation, Rothstein noted that in 1949, the government offered white families the opportunity to leave the housing projects, an opportunity black families were left out of, as explicitly stated in the contracts. “The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), subsidized the movement of white families out of the projects and into single family homes in suburbs such as Levittown, PA” said Rothstein. “No homes were sold to African Americans, and there were clauses prohibiting the resale to black families.” Rothstein said that projects like Levittown, funded with government money, were created all across America, developing suburban neighborhoods African Americans were unequivocally blocked from joining. Over time, this not only meant a loss of jobs in the cities because industries moved near those developments, it also meant a loss of generational wealth from being a home owner. And, in most cases, the federally sponsored mortgages cost less then the rent African Americans were already paying.

“The most economically disadvantaged children in this country come to school in poor health because of their neighborhood. When you take children like that and concentrate them into specific schools, it’s difficult to overcome these disadvantages and achieve higher levels.”—Richard Rothstein

 

What residential segregation has caused
With an understanding that the public housing programs were the primary cause of residential segregation, Rothstein explained that there are several consequences from the programs, the first being the wealth gap. “African American income is 60% of whites. This happened because African Americans were prohibited from buying homes and couldn’t gain equity over the next generations,” said Rothstein. Aside from the wealth gap, Rothstein attributed the 1930s public housing program to minorities not having access to quality public health, violence in over-crowded areas, and to the achievement gap. “The most economically disadvantaged children in this country come to school in poor health because of their neighborhood. When you take children like that, and concentrate them into specific schools, it’s difficult to overcome these disadvantages and achieve higher levels,” said Rothstein. “Low-income children need to sit next to middle-class children in order to have a productive learning environment.” Rothstein also added that the concentration of segregated schools plays a role in the increased violence in these neighborhoods. “Violence between police and young men is caused because the most disadvantaged young men are concentrated into single neighborhoods, with no access to good jobs or transportation to get to these jobs,” he said. “They are left without hope and the ability to participate in schools that aren’t segregated.”

Richard Rothstein

Richard Rothstein

“Violence between police and young men is caused because the most disadvantaged young men are concentrated into single neighborhoods, with no access to good jobs or transportation to get to these jobs.”—Richard Rothstein

 

How to deconstruct residential segregation 
Emphasizing the need for people to understand history and reconstruct their perceptions, Rothstein participated in a Q&A with the audience. When asked what we can do to deconstruct residential segregation, he made several suggestions, starting with abolishing zoning laws. “Suburbs around the country have zoning laws to maintain their exclusivity both racially and economically,” said Rothstein. “If we abolish these zoning laws, members of disadvantaged communities would be able to construct townhouses and single family homes there.” Rothstein also suggested amending the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Program and the Housing Choice Voucher Program (Section 8). “Both of these programs are built in already existing low-income communities, reinforcing the segregation,” he said. “The programs should use the tax credit and vouchers in high-opportunity communities and give low-income families a chance to thrive.”

To see Rothstein’s complete Book Talk, click here.


Genetic Determinants of Telomere Length in African American Youth

Red broken X chromosomeTelomeres are DNA-protein structures that play a vital role in maintaining DNA stability and integrity. Telomere length (TL) is an important biomarker of aging and overall health, but TL has been mostly studied in adult populations of European or Asian ancestry.

CUNY SPH Professor Luisa N. Borrell was one of the senior authors of the first genome-wide association study of TL among African American youth, published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The study notes that the lack of research on factors affecting TL in pediatric and non-European populations creates a knowledge gap in the scientific understanding of gene-environment interactions regulating telomeres. Epidemiologic studies reporting associations between TL and disease risk are potentially biased by the disease itself or exposures relating to treatment. Genetic proxies for TL have recently been employed to overcome these and other potential biases, such as social and environmental exposures. A problematic assumption when using genetic proxies for TL is that they are generalizable across age and racial/ethnic groups.

Borrell and colleagues measured TL from whole blood samples of 492 healthy African American youth (children and adolescents between 8 and 20 years old) and were unable to replicate eitherthe 34 reported genetic associations found in adults or the six genetic associations found in European children. The study also identified novel genetic associations with TL that have not been identified in previous studies in pediatric or adult populations. The findings suggest that genetic markers of TL are not generalizable across all populations.

“Our results underscore the importance of examining genetic associations with TL in diverse pediatric populations such as African Americans and call attention to include Hispanic pediatric population, an admixture population when it comes to ancestry, in TL studies,” says Borrell.

In order to fully understand the impacts of age and population effects on the genetic regulation of TL, further telomere research is needed in pediatric populations from diverse ancestral backgrounds, Borrell says.


Genetic Determinants of Telomere Length in African American Youth

Red broken X chromosome among blue chromosomes on blue background.

Telomeres are DNA-protein structures that play a vital role in maintaining DNA stability and integrity. Telomere length (TL) is an important biomarker of aging and overall health, but TL has been mostly studied in adult populations of European or Asian ancestry.

CUNY SPH Professor Luisa N. Borrell was one of the senior authors of the first genome-wide association study of TL among African American youth, published in the journal Scientific Reports.

The study notes that the lack of research on factors affecting TL in pediatric and non-European populations creates a knowledge gap in the scientific understanding of gene-environment interactions regulating telomeres. Epidemiologic studies reporting associations between TL and disease risk are potentially biased by the disease itself or exposures relating to treatment. Genetic proxies for TL have recently been employed to overcome these and other potential biases, such as social and environmental exposures. A problematic assumption when using genetic proxies for TL is that they are generalizable across age and racial/ethnic groups.

Borrell and colleagues measured TL from whole blood samples of 492 healthy African American youth (children and adolescents between 8 and 20 years old) and were unable to replicate eitherthe 34 reported genetic associations found in adults or the six genetic associations found in European children. The study also identified novel genetic associations with TL that have not been identified in previous studies in pediatric or adult populations. The findings suggest that genetic markers of TL are not generalizable across all populations.

“Our results underscore the importance of examining genetic associations with TL in diverse pediatric populations such as African Americans and call attention to include Hispanic pediatric population, an admixture population when it comes to ancestry, in TL studies,” says Borrell.

In order to fully understand the impacts of age and population effects on the genetic regulation of TL, further telomere research is needed in pediatric populations from diverse ancestral backgrounds, Borrell says.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, September 24, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

We look forward to welcoming all NEST+m Families to Curriculum Night, this Wednesday, September 26th4:45pm to 7:45pm.

As previously announced, here is our Curriculum Night Schedule:

A Formal Welcome:
Each year the NEST+m community has the opportunity to welcome new teachers and faculty. We also have the opportunity to celebrate the ways in which returning teachers & faculty take on new areas of responsibility.

  • Mr. Nerva Jean-Pierre. Mr. Jean Pierre, who is known as “JP” is on a one year assignment as an Assistant Principal. His area of responsibility is school climate, culture and safety. He will be working closely with NEST+m’s Deans of Student Culture.
  • Deans of Student Culture: Ms. Jackie O’Connor, Ms. Ellen Sands, Ms. Michelle Roper.
  • IEP Coordinator: Ms. Dao Lei
  • Transitions Coordinator: Ms. Carrie Bray
  • School Psychologist: Ms. Julie Castro
  • Director of College Counseling: Ms. Nancy Alba (Maternity leave replacement for Ms. Natalia Kisina)
  • New-to-NEST+m K-5 Teachers:
    • Ms. Cassi Park (1st Grade),
    • Mr. George Gottschalk, Physical Education (Leave Replacement for Ms. Theresa Anderson)
    • Ms. Alysha Walker (Grades K-2 Science)
    • Ms. Diane Tenaglia (Grades 3-5 Science)
    • Ms. Felicia Patzke (5th Grade ELA & Humanities)
    • Ms. Taryn Moskowitz (4th Grade
    • Ms. Courtney Caulfield (4th Grade)
    • Mr. Ozzie Avinaut (3rd Grade)
  • New-to-NEST+m Grades 6-12 Teachers:
    • Ms. Selina Zhang, 6th Grade Science
    • Ms. Suna Shin, 7th Grade ELA
    • Mr. Stephen Kos, Integrated Co-teaching
    • Mr. Mike Muntner, Integrated Co-teaching
    • Ms. Jordana Kottler, Integrated Co-teaching
    • Mr. Hao Ma, Integrated Co-teaching
    • Mr. Van Nguyen, Integrated Co-teaching
    • Ms. Rachel Guadron, Spanish
    • Ms. Lena Krumgalz, AP Biology, Bioengineering
    • Mr. Andrew Wells, AP Biology, Living Environment
    • Mr. Jeremy Watson, Physical Education

Learning From and With Each Other

  • Kudos to our K-5 Teacher Team and Assistant Principal Barbara Rossi for attending last year’s DOE Showcase School series. The attached article provides a shout-out to Barbara and NEST+m’s K-5 teacher team for the ways in which NEST+m’s professional practices were enhanced by embracing intervisitation as a deliberate professional learning strategy: “Strategies for Implementing Practices from Showcase Schools” was published in June 2018
  • Congratulations to Meera Zucker who has received a 2018 Math for America  MƒA Master Teacher Fellowship
  • Thank you to new-to-NEST+m Teachers Mike Munter and Stephen Kos for participating in Urban Advantage, a collaboration between the NYC DOE and NY Cultural institutions for the purpose of developing Grades 6-8 students’ Science & Engineering skills.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Tuesday, September 25, 2018 – Author William Kamkwamba visits NEST+m
    – Period 2 (9:15am – 9:58am) – Grades 9/10
    – Period 3 (10:02am – 10:45am) – Grades 6-8
    – Period 5 (11:36am – 12:19pm) – Grades 11-12
  • Wednesday September 26, 2018 – Curriculum Night. This event is for parents and will run from 4:45 – 7:45pm. No After3, SONYC programs or UG afternoon activities will be in session.
  • Friday, September 28, 2018 – NEST+m Spiritwear Day
  • Saturday, September 29, 2018 – Parents PTA Back to School Bash

Announcements

BRING IT!: DOE and the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability have partnered to distribute a reusable S’Well water bottle to every single public high school student (grades 9-12). This donation is part of the City’s new BRING IT campaign which challenges students to help build a cleaner, healthier city, starting with one new habit: bringing a reusable bottle everywhere they go. NEST+m 9-12 grade students can pick up their bottles in the Lobby during their lunch periods on Monday and Tuesday.

The NEST+m Ethos: Core-values within NEST+m’s K-12 school community. DOWNLOAD POSTER.

Student Safety


Queens College Climate Change Exhibition to Feature 45-Foot Inflatable Replica of High-Tech Research Vessel, September 24 – 28

— Event to Feature Presentations by Distinguished Guest Speakers and QC Climate Change Experts; Schedule Includes Film Screenings and Demonstration on Emergency Preparedness; Coincides With Climate Change NYC –​

Queens, NY, September 19, 2018 − Queens College will host the large-scale interactive exhibition Exploring Earth’s Secrets this fall, from Monday, September 24 – Friday, September 28, 2018. It will offer visitors the opportunity for a hands-on learning experience about climate change and groundbreaking research, some of which is being done by Queens College professors. The exhibition is free and open to the public. It will take place outdoors on the Campus Quad and feature a 45-foot inflatable replica of the high-tech research vessel Joint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth Sampling (JOIDES) Resolution, which will house interactive informational kiosks (watch  the video.) The exhibition coincides with “Climate Week NYC,” and a series of speakers and events is scheduled for Monday through Thursday.

With the most earth and environmental science majors of any CUNY college and professors at the forefront of climate change research, Queens College is the only school in the university to host the exhibition. Its goal is to introduce young people to current trends in climate change research by focusing on three key elements: a study of past periods of intense warm weather to better understand and predict what our future climate could look like; understanding past earthquake and tsunami activity so that we can better predict future disasters; and oceanic exploration, including submerged continents, as a way to identify food and other resources.

“Our faculty are deeply involved with vital research on climate change and they include our students in all phases of exploration and analyses.   Through their participation in international expeditions, students gain invaluable experience both retrieving and examining samples. We are proud of the impressive caliber of our faculty and the mentoring they provide for the next generation of scientists concerned with the future of our planet,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

The research vessel the JOIDES Resolution has served as a base for a team of traveling international researchers who are studying the world’s oceans, among them Rockaway native Stephen Pekar and Cecilia McHugh, both Queens College professors in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. “The JOIDES Resolution is part of the International Ocean Discovery Program, which is perhaps the most successful international science program the world has ever seen. It has helped write the book on climatic and oceanic changes for the past 100 million years—since the time of the dinosaurs,” says Pekar. “The ship has also provided an understanding of sea-level changes since at least 50 million years ago when the earth was much warmer than today,” adds McHugh. The exhibition will be open to the public and may be of special interest to secondary and postsecondary students, teachers and parents involved in related studies and projects.

Click here ​to watch Professors Pekar and McHugh discuss their research.

The exhibition is made possible with the generous support of Con Edison.

Exhibition Highlights:

Opening Ceremony
Monday, September 24, 12:15 pm, the Quad
Distinguished guest speakers, raffles, opportunities to meet scientists

Effects of Climate Change
Tuesday, September 25, 5 pm, Rosenthal Library, Room 230
Lectures by two professors at the Queens College School of Earth and Environmental Science
“How Sea Level and Climate Modify the Margins of Continents,” Cecilia McHugh
“The Last Time It Got This Hot on Earth: A Climate Scientist Looks Back and Then Forward to a Sustainable Future,” Stephen Pekar

6:30 pm, Rosenthal Library, Room 230
Film screening: Chasing Ice, Emmy award-winning documentary about melting glaciers

Impact of Natural Disasters on Children
Wednesday, September 26, 2:30 pm, Rosenthal Library, Room 230
Lecture by Queens College Psychology Professor Yoko Nomura on “Children of Superstorm Sandy: The Epigenetic and Developmental Impact of Natural Disaster”

Natural Disasters & Recovery
Wednesday, September 26, 2 pm, Rosenthal Library, Room 230
Presentation by Aralis Hillsman, New York City Emergency Management office on disaster preparation; an emergency “go pack” will be raffled off.

Sustainability & Solutions
Thursday, September 27, 2 pm, Rosenthal Library, Room 230
Presentation by Queens College Earth and Environmental Science faculty member George Hendrey, CUNY Distinguished Professor of Environmental Science

6:30 pm, Rosenthal Library, Room 230
Film screening: Time to Choose, Academy Award-winning documentary about worldwide climate change and innovative efforts to address it.

QC Retirees Day
Friday, September 28, 10 am, Campus Quad
QC retirees tour and raffle​​

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Sternberg lecture discusses student success and new American university

Sternberg Family Lecture speakers Lacey H Leegwater and William F. L. Moses.

The fifth annual Sternberg Family Lecture in Public Scholarship at The City College of New York on Tuesday, September 25, presents a discussion by two experts entitled “Student Success and the New American University: Shifting Needs, Changing Strategies.” The lecture is in conversation with President Vince Boudreau and hosted by the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership.

The speakers are:

  • William F. L. Moses, managing director for The Kresge Foundation’s Education Program, which supports postsecondary access and success for low-income, first-generation and underrepresented students;
  • Lacey H Leegwater, M.Ed., senior advisor at the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP). In this role, she oversees new project development and contributes to the strategic positioning and future directions of IHEP’s research and operational efforts.

The lecture is free and open to the public, and it starts at 4:30 p.m. in Shepard Hall, Room 350. Please click hereto RSVP.

About The City College of New York 

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Curriculum Night, September 26, 2018

Dear NEST+m families,

We would like to welcome you to school for our Curriculum Night on Wednesday, September 26!

  • Please CLICK HERE to see information for families in Grades 6-12
  • Please CLICK HERE to see information for families in Grades K-5

Please note, this event is for parents only. After3 and SONYC classes will NOT be in session on September 26th. Upper Grade afternoon activities will not be in session.

We look forward to seeing you there!


On-demand room-temperature single photon array: a quantum communication breakthrough by CCNY physicists

Schematic of single photon emitter array using anatomically thin materials placed on nanopillars. Image by Rezlind Bushati

Physicists at The City College of New York have used atomically thin two-dimensional materials to realize an array of quantum emitters operating at room temperature that can be integrated into next generation quantum communication systems.

Researchers from the groups of City College Professors Carlos Meriles and Vinod Menon developed for the first time an array of on-demand single photon emitters that operate at room temperature.

Using an atomically thin material, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), placed on nanopillars, the researchers demonstrated single photon emission at the pillar locations. In simplest terms, the breakthrough allows one to know where the single photon emitters are located. Single photon emitters are essential building blocks for next generation quantum communication and computing protocols as they can be used as a quantum bit (qubit). The secure communication comes about because of the quantum property of the single photon making eavesdropping impossible. The current breakthrough has solved a long-standing and practical hurdle of realizing deterministic single photon emitters at room temperature. Previously, very low temperatures were necessary or the photons were hard to extract using other materials such as diamond, noted Menon. And, if single photon emission did occur at room temperature, it happened at random locations.

The work was carried out by graduate student Nicholas Proscia, post-doctoral researchers, Zav Shotan and Harishankar Jayakumar, and undergraduate students Michael Dollar and Charles Cohen, in collaboration with theory groups from the Australian National University (Marcus Doherty and Prithvi Reddy) and the Center for Physical Science and Technology, Lithuania (Audrius Alkauskas).

This work was supported by funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation through CREST IDEALS center, the EFRI 2-DARE program, the Australian Research Council and the Research Council of Lithuania. The paper appears in the September 20 issue of Optica.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


Protected: In the Balance: Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:


BMCC Community Pays It Forward by Donating Blood

At Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), a high value is placed on volunteering. Students tutor their classmates, pitch in at local soup kitchens and help out at tax filing centers for low-income New Yorkers.

Another way BMCC students give back, is by donating blood. On September 13, they joined professors and staff in Richard Harris Terrace at BMCC’s main campus for a blood drive co-sponsored by the BMCC Health Services and the New York Blood Center.

Sharie R. Hansen, a BMCC professor of health education, has been donating blood for more than 25 years and is a regular at the BMCC blood drives. In fact, her contribution to the city’s blood bank has made her a gold card-carrying member of the New York Blood Center’s Gallon Club.

“I think donating blood is a number one priority. It’s a precious gift to people in need,” says Hansen. “When we donate blood, we save lives.”

Hansen, who earned an associate degree in early childhood education at BMCC and went on to earn an Ed.D. in Health and Behavioral Studies at Teacher’s College, returned to BMCC as a professor and coordinated the college’s first blood drive in 2008.

“Giving blood sets a good humanitarian example,” she says. “As professors, we have to be role models. If we are teaching our students to be better citizens in the world, we should teach them to give the gift of life by giving blood.”

More than 200 participants help build blood supply

In June 2018, the New York Blood Center reported that New York City had reached only half its target supply of blood—but the BMCC community has done what it can to offset that shortage.

“We collected 128 pints within six hours,” says Penelope Jordan, Director of Health Services at BMCC. “More than 200 people participated in the event, even more than last year.”

According to Jordan, BMCC has increased its number of blood drives from two a year, to two in the fall, two in the spring and three in the summer. The September blood drive at BMCC was linked to the commemoration of 9/11. “The timing seemed to bring more folks out to participate,” says Jordan. “It served as an opportunity for people to pause and reflect and give for others.”

Students who help facilitate the blood drives and disperse information are eligible for co-curricular credit, and individuals who donate blood receive free mini-medical exams, which include readings on blood pressure and body temperature.

“They also measure your hematocrit level, showing the percentage of red blood cells and iron stores, which can indicate whether you’re anemic, and they test for HIV and other communicable diseases,” says Jordan.

Diminished blood reserves in New York City could be related to factors such as people being away in the summer, Jordan says. “Also, we live in a city of over eight million people. With the density of pedestrian and vehicle traffic, we have more traumatic events such as car accidents and crush injuries. Gun shot wounds are also a factor. On Labor Day, a hospital emergency room in the city might see two or three severe trauma patients needing blood.”

BMCC community contributes to bone marrow registry 

Blood drives not only enable transfusions in emergency situations, they benefit individuals who are living with blood-borne illnesses such as HIV, hepatitis B and C, sickle cell anemia, leukemia and lymphoma.

“Blood is the gasoline that keeps our engines going,” says Jordan. “Your bone marrow is also essential for good health.”

This year, the non-profit organization DKMS—which has registered over eight million potential bone marrow donors worldwide—was part of the BMCC blood donation event.

Diana Braithwaite, donor recruitment coordinator for DKMS, was on hand to talk to students, faculty and staff.

“They showed a three-minute video and did cheek swabs on people who were interested in being included in the bone marrow registry,” says Jordan. “If you have a blood cancer such as leukemia; if you have sickle cell anemia or a multiple myeloma, a bone marrow transplant may be the thing that saves your life when you find a DNA match.”

She stresses that not everybody is a candidate for bone marrow or blood donation, “but these events raise awareness and dispel myths such as, it’s super painful, or people are using you as a guinea pig. I believe in the BMCC community’s ability to be an example of giving, and our students’ ability to pay it forward.”

The next blood donation drive at BMCC will be in November. For more information, contact Penelope Jordan, (212) 220-8257, pjordan@bmcc.cuny.edu.


ALUMNI CONVENING: Emerging Intersections in Elder Law

On September 6, 2018, the Office of Alumni Engagement, along with the Elder Law Clinic, held this year’s first Alumni Convening on an emergent issue in New York City.  Stay tuned for more Alumni Convenings in the coming months.

 

The Hon. Bryanne Hamill ’90, speaks at the rededication of the Jean E. Sherwin seminar room

 

The Edler Law Clinic, despite having several names over the years (Wills from 1989-90 and the Law Office Clinic from 1990-98), has always attracted advocates with outstanding competencies: professional responsibility, clinical judgement, legal reasoning, theoretical perspective, communication, and management of effort. And on September 6, 2018, we celebrated an alum who embodied these attributes in ways that were “truly awesome,” and “inspiring,” in the words of the late Professor Rhonda Copelon. Jean E. Sherwin, a graduate of the 1990 class, is the namesake of a rededicated seminar room at the law school. With more than 60 alumni and supporters in attendance, Jean’s classmate and dear friend, the Hon. Bryanne Hamill ’90, and her sister, Vicki Wyman, spoke of her passion to practice law in service to the needs of others; as a social worker and psychotherapist, Jean had witnessed firsthand the failures of our social service systems and how social barriers contributed to the needs of individuals seeking treatment. She came to CUNY Law to make a difference for those who needed access to better and more equitable systems of care.

The evening was a celebration of Jean as well as an entire network of alumni working to protect the rights of especially vulnerable populations, focusing on promoting autonomy, empowerment, and dignity for the aging, for those fearing deportation, and for immigrants looking to secure guardianship and custody rights of their children.  This year, the clinic is focused on several key intersections of the law:

  • Race, poverty & social justice
  • Aging, disability, guardianship & decision-making autonomy
  • Immigration, families & guardianship of children
  • Technology, privacy, liberty & the law.

A panel discussion of these areas was led by clinic director and professor Joe Rosenberg ’86, along with two adjunct professors, Julia Hernandez ’12 and Liz Valentin ’01, as well as twelve students, some of whom are members of our part-time evening program rounded out the evening. In fact, this detail is a key area of innovation for the law school; the clinic now meets in the evenings and is part of a progressive shift in experiential learning and its accessibility. Mariana Negron-Quinones, a fourth-year evening student and teaching assistant, spoke about her work with the Planning with Parent Project, which provides know-your-rights trainings for parents, advocates, and legal clinics to advise them how to best assure that families and loved ones are protected from the current immigration policies and their aggressive enforcement.  Both Degna P. Levister, Assistant Dean of Admissions and Enrollment Management, and the Hon. Kristin Booth Glen, University Professor and Dean Emerita, who have also co-taught with Joe, joined the panel.

The assembled group discussed new measures to protect older adults, people with significant disabilities, and families who need assistance with estate planning and lifetime needs. A large part of the conversation focused on how to help immigrant families obtain guardianship to protect their loved ones, and also defended those who should not have their autonomy taken away via an improperly decided guardianship. Through its Article 81 Guardianship Pro Se Project, the Elder Law Clinic provides detailed, step-by-step guides to guardianship proceedings and conducts regular know-your-rights workshops to educate the broader community. In response to the current presidential administration’s disregard for immigrants, the Elder Law Clinic has recently shifted towards preparing families vulnerable to deportation with lifetime and estate planning, including the care and guardianship of minor children.

A huge thanks to everyone who joined us for the evening, especially those moved to celebrate the life and passion of Jean E. Sherwin.


Hunter Professor Awarded $245,000 State Grant for Breast Cancer Education to Help Korean Immigrant Women

Jin Young Seo, a professor at Hunter College School of Nursing, has been awarded a $245,000 grant from New York State to develop a breast cancer risk-reduction education program that focuses on Korean immigrant women – for whom the disease is the leading cause of death.

The grant was among $3 million in awards announced by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo for nine research and education projects across New York State that will delve into breast cancer causes, prevention, detection, screening, treatment and new educational strategies.

“This is important work that will help save lives,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “We are pleased that the state appreciates the nature of health disparities and recognizes the need to educate women in the Korean immigrant community about breast cancer. The grant award represents yet another example of CUNY’s dedicated faculty engaged in research in the public interest with direct benefit to our communities.”

“I am honored to receive this grant as a junior faculty,” said Seo, a Korean immigrant, researcher, registered nurse and nurse practitioner who has been an assistant professor for four years. “I am also very excited to start this project to help the Korean immigrant community.”

For 10 years, Seo said, she has researched Asian immigrant women’s health services utilization, health disparities, health care barriers, behaviors regarding prenatal care and cancer screening, and health education.

The project, to be conducted in collaboration with Korean Community Services of Metropolitan New York Inc., will develop a “culturally tailored” educational intervention – the Korean Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program, which will set four goals for participating women: healthy weight, physically active lifestyle, healthy diet with limited alcohol consumption, and breast cancer screening and adherence. It will include “a group-based lifestyle intervention incorporating traditional Korean health beliefs,” tailored for risk reduction, with eight weeks of group education sessions led by a trained lifestyle coach and 16 weeks of follow-up sessions involving smartphone applications and calls and texts from coaches, according to the project description.

Low screening rates, health-related beliefs, lack of awareness of breast cancer screening and lack of a primary care physician are all likely causes of an increase in Korean-American breast cancer rates, according to the abstract, which stated, “We expect that our innovative educational intervention will increase KA women’s breast cancer knowledge, support their maintenance of a healthier life style, increase breast cancer screening rates and reduce the estimated risk of developing breast cancer.”

Seo, who is actively involved in local Korean community organizations and has led several studies working with Korean immigrant women, is principal investigator on the multidisciplinary research team, which includes as co-principal investigator Hunter School of Nursing professor So-Hyun Park, a registered nurse and oncology nurse practitioner who has researched cancer survivorship and interventions focused on nutrition and exercise behaviors. The team also includes community health workers, researchers and clinicians in nursing, medicine and public health.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 

 

 

 


Super Fair Provides Options on Services and Academics

Linking support services to student success is an integral component of the national pathways movement, which streamlines community-college graduation requirements into prescribed course sequences.

In fact, according to a 2017 Community College Research Center (CCRC) report, “Colleges will not see substantial improvements in student outcomes unless they redesign programs and support services across the institution soplete programs of study that will prepare them for further education and career advancement.”

At Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), a Welcome Back Super Fair hosted on September 12 by New Student Programs, Student Affairs and Academic Affairs reflected the college’s Pathways Initiative, in that it presented information tables on services—tutoring, the library, IT support and many others—alongside tables showcasing more than 45 associate degree programs.

In addition, signage throughout the fair promoted the College’s new Career Clusters, a Pathways component that links fields of employment with various academic majors—and supports a mission to help students stay on track for careers that yield family-sustaining wages.

BMCC Super Fair 2018

At the table on BMCC’s health education associate degree program, a focus on Gerontology is shown via flyers to lead to careers in community and government agencies, social services, academia, corporate product development and more.

Health education staff member Margaret Eisenberg was stationed at that table. “I’m here to welcome students to BMCC, to promote the Health Education department and let students know about the BMCC Health and Wellness Club,” she said.

Shane Carty, a freshman who is considering a health major and wants to eventually enter the BMCC nursing program, found it useful to speak with Eisenberg and iron out some confusion she had with her course requirements. “I have a better sense of direction about what classes I should take,” she said.

BMCC Super Fair 2018

At another table, William Hall, an IT assistant in the Department of Information Resources and Technology, said he was there to advise students on how to activate their BMCC account and email, as well as use Wi-Fi, Blackboard, CUNYfirst and other platforms.

“These platforms enable students to get in touch with their professors, retrieve their assignments, check their grades and view their tuition balance,” he said. “These are things that are absolutely essential to having a smoother semester and doing well in class.”

Philtrice Mixson, a college assistant in the mathematics lab, was on hand to share information about the tutoring service. “I think once the students talk in person to someone about the service, they feel more comfortable using it,” she said. Staff were also on hand to share information on the BMCC ESL lab, reading lab and other services.

Sianna Leavy, Office Manager for the BMCC Athletics Department, was at the fair to provide information on BMCC team schedules and hours of operation for the Fitness Center.

“Students, faculty and staff might not realize they can play badminton, take a Zumba class, swim in the BMCC pool and do other fitness activities,” she said. “When people hear ‘Athletics Department’, they don’t realize we have a great gym and fitness center that the community can use. Exercise can give you more energy, help you focus and really enhance your college experience.”

Mark Mueller, a learning specialist in the Office of Accessibility, observed that, “It’s one thing to know that there are accessibility services available on a campus—but when you have a chance to meet and talk with an accessibility representative in an informal setting like this fair, you might be more likely to find that office on campus and walk in for the support you need.”

Students participating in the Super Fair, collected stickers documenting their conversations at the various tables and were eligible to enter a raffle for a monthly MetroCard.


BMCC Math Professor Receives $1.5 Million NSF Grant to Create Developmental Math Test

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Mathematics Professor Claire Wladis has received a $1.5 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant—the largest ever received by a BMCC faculty researcher—to develop a test that measures how well college students understand fundamental algebra concepts.

This will be the first test of algebraic conceptual understanding for college students developed and validated in the postsecondary context, according to Wladis, who is the principal investigator of the five-year research project.

Kathleen Offenholley, professor of mathematics at BMCC and Jay Verkullien, professor of educational psychology at the CUNY Graduate Center will serve as the co-principal investigators. BMCC Mathematics Professors Dale Dawes, Elisabeth Jaffe and Audrey Nasar will participate in the research and development of the test.

Elementary algebra and other developmental math courses have long been identified as barriers to student degree progress and completion. As few as one fifth of the students placed in developmental math courses successfully complete a credit-bearing math course in college, according to data from the Community College Research Center at Columbia University.

At BMCC, almost 80 percent of first-time freshmen require developmental math, according to the college’s 2015 Enrollment, Retention and Completion Report.

Wladis and her team will create and validate an item pool of roughly 200 items that test conceptual understanding in algebra. She says algebraic concepts are critical because without them, students are simply calculating things without actually understanding them.

“That lack of understanding leads to misuse of calculations and mistakes, not just in algebra class, but also for students who go on to take other math classes like statistics and calculus,” said Wladis.

The current CUNY algebra entrance and exit exams test how well students can perform certain algebraic calculations—but the tests do not tell educators whystudents get certain problems wrong.

“The test that we are developing should provide us with insight into what students are thinking—helping us to pinpoint specific misconceptions, or to identify specific ways of thinking that students are employing when approaching algebra problems,” said Wladis.

The research team plans to recruit developmental math instructors at BMCC as well as other CUNY colleges to give their students sample questions during class and then provide feedback to the research team. She expects that approximately 5,500 BMCC students will take the test at some point and another 2,500 students from other colleges will also participate.

“Our hope is that the resulting test will allow instructors to better pinpoint student misconceptions in algebra so they can address them during teaching, and it will allow researchers to figure out which methods best help students to learn critical algebra concepts,” said Wladis.


Bronx Community College Awarded $5 Million Grant from National Science Foundation

Bronx Community College will receive one of the largest grants ever awarded to a community college by the National Science Foundation—$5 million to fund scholarships for traditionally underrepresented students in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

The NSF “S-STEM” grant will fund a collaboration between Bronx Community and Lehman College to help support scholarships for 575 talented, low-income CUNY students. The program, which begins October 1, will provide students with paid research opportunities, internships and faculty mentoring as they earn associate’s degrees at BCC. Students in the program can transfer to Lehman and continue their scholarships and work with new mentors, earn bachelor’s degrees and prepare for STEM careers. The S-STEM scholarships will supplement the students’ existing Pell Grants.

“This National Science Foundation grant is yet another example of how our gifted faculty and dedicated staff work consistently to find new and innovative opportunities that benefit CUNY students,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “I’m particularly proud that this grant will fund the studies of students from diverse backgrounds who aspire to careers in the STEM fields.”

“This NSF S-STEM grant will help BCC as it builds a community of excellence,” said Bronx Community College President Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “The grant will leverage proven resources – on both campuses – to provide academically talented, low-income students with academic, financial, advisement, mentoring, career and enrichment supports intended to help them to secure a degree, further their education and enter the STEM workforce.”

“This NSF S-STEM grant will reduce financial barriers and create greater access to STEM fields for talented women and minority students,” said Vicki Flaris, a professor at Bronx Community College’s chemistry department, who will oversee the program along with other faculty mentors.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 


Bronx Community College Awarded $5 Million Grant from National Science Foundation

Bronx Community College will receive one of the largest grants ever awarded to a community college by the National Science Foundation—$5 million to fund scholarships for traditionally underrepresented students in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

The NSF “S-STEM” grant will fund a collaboration between Bronx Community and Lehman College to help support scholarships for 575 talented, low-income CUNY students. The program, which begins October 1, will provide students with paid research opportunities, internships and faculty mentoring as they earn associate’s degrees at BCC. Students in the program can transfer to Lehman and continue their scholarships and work with new mentors, earn bachelor’s degrees and prepare for STEM careers. The S-STEM scholarships will supplement the students’ existing Pell Grants.

“This National Science Foundation grant is yet another example of how our gifted faculty and dedicated staff work consistently to find new and innovative opportunities that benefit CUNY students,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “I’m particularly proud that this grant will fund the studies of students from diverse backgrounds who aspire to careers in the STEM fields.”

“This NSF S-STEM grant will help BCC as it builds a community of excellence,” said Bronx Community College President Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “The grant will leverage proven resources – on both campuses – to provide academically talented, low-income students with academic, financial, advisement, mentoring, career and enrichment supports intended to help them to secure a degree, further their education and enter the STEM workforce.”

“This NSF S-STEM grant will reduce financial barriers and create greater access to STEM fields for talented women and minority students,” said Vicki Flaris, a professor at Bronx Community College’s chemistry department, who will oversee the program along with other faculty mentors.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 


CUNY SPH researchers critique new guidelines regarding neurocysticercosis

tapeworm under a microscope

The Infectious Disease Society of America/American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene recently developed new guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis (NC), caused by infection with Taenia solium, a tapeworm found in pork. But CUNY SPH researchers say some of the recommendations are based on poor or limited evidence.

Dr. Elizabeth Kelvin, Associate Professor at CUNY SPH, and DPH candidate Matthew Romo coauthored a paper weighing the strengths and weakness of the proposed guidelines. The report was published in the Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.

NC occurs when humans are infected with the larval stage of the tapeworm in the brain, where a cyst forms around the parasite and causes a variety of neurologic symptoms, including seizures. The disease is associated with poor sanitation and is highly endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Asia while, the researchers note, the diagnostic criteria in question were developed specifically for the US and Canada.

“Developing guidelines specifically for two countries that see only a small fraction of all NC cases seems like a large missed opportunity,” the researchers wrote.

The guidelines strongly recommend combination treatment with two anthelminthic (antiparasitic) drugs for patients with two or more active cysts on the basis of one clinical trial that was stopped early. Stopping a trial early is controversial because large random fluctuations of the estimated treatment effect can occur, particularly early on in the progress of a trial. Furthermore, trials that are stopped early because a benefit has been detected tend to overestimate the true impact of the intervention, especially when the number of outcome events is not large, as was the case in this study. They recommend surgical removal of cysts in the fourth ventricle of the brain and long-term treatment with anthelminthic drugs and steroids for NC occurring in the fluid-filled space around the brain, despite their own admission that there is little evidence to support these recommendations.

The CUNY researchers suggest that clinicians approach some of the recommendations in the new guidelines with caution and call for the establishment of gold-standard guidelines that can be used and adapted for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with NC worldwide.

“The lack of research on neurocysticercosis has forced clinicians to make diagnosis and treatment decisions without adequate empirical evidence to support them,” Kelvin says. “We hope our review will encourage more research into the areas where evidence is lacking.”

Carpio A, Fleury A, Kelvin EA, Romo ML, Abraham R & Tellez-Zenteno J (2018): New guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis: a difficult proposal for patients in endemic countries, Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, DOI: 10.1080/147

 

 


CUNY SPH researchers critique new guidelines regarding neurocysticercosis

tapeworm under a microscope

The Infectious Disease Society of America/American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene recently developed new guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis (NC), caused by infection with Taenia solium, a tapeworm found in pork. But CUNY SPH researchers say some of the recommendations are based on poor or limited evidence.

Dr. Elizabeth Kelvin, Associate Professor at CUNY SPH, and DPH candidate Matthew Romo coauthored a paper weighing the strengths and weakness of the proposed guidelines. The report was published in the Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.

NC occurs when humans are infected with the larval stage of the tapeworm in the brain, where a cyst forms around the parasite and causes a variety of neurologic symptoms, including seizures. The disease is associated with poor sanitation and is highly endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Asia while, the researchers note, the diagnostic criteria in question were developed specifically for the US and Canada.

“Developing guidelines specifically for two countries that see only a small fraction of all NC cases seems like a large missed opportunity,” the researchers wrote.

The guidelines strongly recommend combination treatment with two anthelminthic (antiparasitic) drugs for patients with two or more active cysts on the basis of one clinical trial that was stopped early. Stopping a trial early is controversial because large random fluctuations of the estimated treatment effect can occur, particularly early on in the progress of a trial. Furthermore, trials that are stopped early because a benefit has been detected tend to overestimate the true impact of the intervention, especially when the number of outcome events is not large, as was the case in this study. They recommend surgical removal of cysts in the fourth ventricle of the brain and long-term treatment with anthelminthic drugs and steroids for NC occurring in the fluid-filled space around the brain, despite their own admission that there is little evidence to support these recommendations.

The CUNY researchers suggest that clinicians approach some of the recommendations in the new guidelines with caution and call for the establishment of gold-standard guidelines that can be used and adapted for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with NC worldwide.

“The lack of research on neurocysticercosis has forced clinicians to make diagnosis and treatment decisions without adequate empirical evidence to support them,” Kelvin says. “We hope our review will encourage more research into the areas where evidence is lacking.”

Carpio A, Fleury A, Kelvin EA, Romo ML, Abraham R & Tellez-Zenteno J (2018): New guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis: a difficult proposal for patients in endemic countries, Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, DOI: 10.1080/147

 

 


CUNY SPH researchers critique new guidelines regarding neurocysticercosis

tapeworm under a microscopeThe Infectious Disease Society of America/American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene recently developed new guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis (NC), caused by infection with Taenia solium, a tapeworm found in pork. But CUNY SPH researchers say some of the recommendations are based on poor or limited evidence.

Dr. Elizabeth Kelvin, Associate Professor at CUNY SPH, and DPH candidate Matthew Romo coauthored a paper weighing the strengths and weakness of the proposed guidelines. The report was published in the Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.

NC occurs when humans are infected with the larval stage of the tapeworm in the brain, where a cyst forms around the parasite and causes a variety of neurologic symptoms, including seizures. The disease is associated with poor sanitation and is highly endemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Asia while, the researchers note, the diagnostic criteria in question were developed specifically for the US and Canada.

“Developing guidelines specifically for two countries that see only a small fraction of all NC cases seems like a large missed opportunity,” the researchers wrote.

The guidelines strongly recommend combination treatment with two anthelminthic (antiparasitic) drugs for patients with two or more active cysts on the basis of one clinical trial that was stopped early. Stopping a trial early is controversial because large random fluctuations of the estimated treatment effect can occur, particularly early on in the progress of a trial. Furthermore, trials that are stopped early because a benefit has been detected tend to overestimate the true impact of the intervention, especially when the number of outcome events is not large, as was the case in this study. They recommend surgical removal of cysts in the fourth ventricle of the brain and long-term treatment with anthelminthic drugs and steroids for NC occurring in the fluid-filled space around the brain, despite their own admission that there is little evidence to support these recommendations.

The CUNY researchers suggest that clinicians approach some of the recommendations in the new guidelines with caution and call for the establishment of gold-standard guidelines that can be used and adapted for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with NC worldwide.

“The lack of research on neurocysticercosis has forced clinicians to make diagnosis and treatment decisions without adequate empirical evidence to support them,” Kelvin says. “We hope our review will encourage more research into the areas where evidence is lacking.”

Carpio A, Fleury A, Kelvin EA, Romo ML, Abraham R & Tellez-Zenteno J (2018): New guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis: a difficult proposal for patients in endemic countries, Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, DOI: 10.1080/147


A geospatial approach to identifying causes of childhood diarrhea in West Africa

african child holding stomachDiarrhea is a leading cause of malnutrition in young children and is globally the second leading cause of death among post-neonatal children under five. A quarter of all global cases occur in Africa, with particularly high burden countries in West Africa. This disparity led Drs. Gillian Dunn, of Hawaii Pacific University, and Glen Johnson, of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH), to identify where specific geo-spatial clusters of childhood diarrhea exist in West Africa, and to identify household and climatic factors that are associated with such clusters.

This research, which grew out of Dr. Dunn’s dissertation as a DPH student at CUNY SPH, was recently published in the journal Spatial and Spatiotemporal Epidemiology.

Using data from the USAID Demographic and Health Surveys, the authors applied a spatial scan statistic algorithm to identify locations with statistically elevated risk, relative to the rest of the region; and further to identify household and climatic factors that are associated with such clusters.

The results support existing evidence on the importance of factors such as household wealth to child health, but also introduce new evidence on the role of factors such as urbanicity and rainfall in West Africa. Furthermore, after controlling for household and climatic factors, 23 statistically significant clusters of elevated risk (up to seven times the risk of the surrounding area) were detected.

Dr. Dunn, who has personally visited many of these high-risk areas in Western Africa, says special attention should be paid to these areas in order to protect child health.

Dunn, G and Johnson GD. 2018. The Geo-Spatial Distribution of Childhood Diarrheal Disease in West Africa, 2008-2013: A Covariate-Adjusted Cluster Analysis. Spatial and Spatiotemporal Epidemiology, 26:127-141.


A geospatial approach to identifying causes of childhood diarrhea in West Africa

african child holding stomachDiarrhea is a leading cause of malnutrition in young children and is globally the second leading cause of death among post-neonatal children under five. A quarter of all global cases occur in Africa, with particularly high burden countries in West Africa. This disparity led Drs. Gillian Dunn, of Hawaii Pacific University, and Glen Johnson, of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH), to identify where specific geo-spatial clusters of childhood diarrhea exist in West Africa, and to identify household and climatic factors that are associated with such clusters.

This research, which grew out of Dr. Dunn’s dissertation as a DPH student at CUNY SPH, was recently published in the journal Spatial and Spatiotemporal Epidemiology.

Using data from the USAID Demographic and Health Surveys, the authors applied a spatial scan statistic algorithm to identify locations with statistically elevated risk, relative to the rest of the region; and further to identify household and climatic factors that are associated with such clusters.

The results support existing evidence on the importance of factors such as household wealth to child health, but also introduce new evidence on the role of factors such as urbanicity and rainfall in West Africa. Furthermore, after controlling for household and climatic factors, 23 statistically significant clusters of elevated risk (up to seven times the risk of the surrounding area) were detected.

Dr. Dunn, who has personally visited many of these high-risk areas in Western Africa, says special attention should be paid to these areas in order to protect child health.

Dunn, G and Johnson GD. 2018. The Geo-Spatial Distribution of Childhood Diarrheal Disease in West Africa, 2008-2013: A Covariate-Adjusted Cluster Analysis. Spatial and Spatiotemporal Epidemiology, 26:127-141.


A geospatial approach to identifying causes of childhood diarrhea in West Africa

african child holding stomachDiarrhea is a leading cause of malnutrition in young children and is globally the second leading cause of death among post-neonatal children under five. A quarter of all global cases occur in Africa, with particularly high burden countries in West Africa. This disparity led Drs. Gillian Dunn, of Hawaii Pacific University, and Glen Johnson of CUNY SPH, to identify where specific geo-spatial clusters of childhood diarrhea exist in West Africa, and to identify household and climatic factors that are associated with such clusters.

This research, which grew out of Dr. Dunn’s dissertation as a DPH student at CUNY SPH, was recently published in the journal Spatial and Spatiotemporal Epidemiology.

Using data from the USAID Demographic and Health Surveys, the authors applied a spatial scan statistic algorithm to identify locations with statistically elevated risk, relative to the rest of the region; and further to identify household and climatic factors that are associated with such clusters.

The results support existing evidence on the importance of factors such as household wealth to child health, but also introduce new evidence on the role of factors such as urbanicity and rainfall in West Africa. Furthermore, after controlling for household and climatic factors, 23 statistically significant clusters of elevated risk (up to seven times the risk of the surrounding area) were detected.

Dr. Dunn, who has personally visited many of these high-risk areas in Western Africa, says special attention should be paid to these areas in order to protect child health.

Dunn, G and Johnson GD. 2018. The Geo-Spatial Distribution of Childhood Diarrheal Disease in West Africa, 2008-2013: A Covariate-Adjusted Cluster Analysis. Spatial and Spatiotemporal Epidemiology, 26:127-141.


There’s A New Proposed Crimes Against Humanity Treaty

There’s A New Proposed Crimes Against Humanity Treaty:

But Where Are Women’s and LGBTI Rights?

 

CUNY Law’s Human Rights and Gender Justice Clinic announces a new initiative and launches a Crimes Against Humanity Toolkit focused on promoting international gender justice.

 

Where We Stand: Progress on safeguards for gender justice

New YorkA new international treaty focusing on crimes against humanity such as massacres, torture, and rape is in the works.  However, the draft treaty adopts an opaque definition of gender, that would give some governments an excuse to ignore persecution committed against women and LGBTI people. Today, activists are launching a campaign calling on the international community to recognize and address crimes against humanity committed on the basis of an inclusive interpretation of gender, expanded to include sexual orientation and gender identity.

In Iraq, accused ISIS fighters are being prosecuted with unprecedented speed, with some sentencing hearings lasting just seven minutes, and zero consideration given to the anti-gay or gender-based crimes committed by fighters on trial. The new crimes against humanity treaty would give LGBTI and women’s rights activists an historic opportunity to fight against hate-related crimes during armed conflict. For this reason, MADRE, an international women’s rights organization and OutRight Action International, a global LGBTI rights organization, have joined forces with lawyers at CUNY School of Law’s Human Rights and Gender Justice Clinic to challenge the treaty.

Civil society has until December 1, 2018 to provide input on the draft treaty. As part of their campaign, MADRE, OutRight, and CUNY Law have launched a new Crimes Against Humanity Toolkit that provides activists with concrete ways to make their voices heard before the deadline.

“We have real-world conflict situations, including those featuring hardline militias like ISIS, where women and LGBTI persons are being persecuted because of their gender,” said Lisa Davis, Associate Professor of Law, CUNY School of Law and MADRE Senior Legal Advisor. “The new treaty could help bring these perpetrators to justice. However, a treaty that adopts an opaque definition of gender could result in even greater impunity.”

“International criminal law has made almost no progress on LGBTI rights. This means that when LGBTI people are targeted in times of war and conflict, we lack the tools to hold perpetrators accountable and deliver justice to survivors,” says Jessica Stern, Executive Director of Outright Action International. “What we do now could determine how we protect LGBTI people for generations to come.”

The campaign will continue convening civil society groups and legal experts throughout the fall as part of an organized effort to amplify awareness of the ramifications of the treaty and encourage action to make ally and activist voices heard.

 

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Sign the submission calling on the International Law Commission to update the legal definition of gender and ensure everyone’s rights are protected under the new treaty – especially women and LGBTI persons. To stay connected and get an alert to sign the submission, sign up now.

 

United Nations Building

 

About the City University of New York School of Law

The nation’s premier public interest law school is driven by a mission to enhance the diversity of the legal profession and graduate outstanding public interest advocates. Founded in 1983, the public school offers full and part-time programs.

About MADRE

MADRE partners with grassroots women’s groups facing war, disaster and their aftermath. Together, we meet urgent needs and build women’s capacity to create lasting and positive social change by working with partners to apply the tools of human rights advocacy. We make international law accountable to the people it’s meant to serve.

 About OutRight International

OutRight International seeks to advance human rights and opportunities for LGBTIQ people around the world by developing partnerships at global, regional, and national levels to build capacity, document human rights violations, advocate for inclusion and equality, and hold leaders accountable for protecting the rights of LGBTIQ people.


There’s A New Proposed Crimes Against Humanity Treaty

There’s A New Proposed Crimes Against Humanity Treaty:

But Where Are Women’s and LGBTI Rights?

 

CUNY Law’s Human Rights and Gender Justice Clinic announces a new initiative and launches a Crimes Against Humanity Toolkit focused on promoting international gender justice.

 

Where We Stand: Progress on safeguards for gender justice

New YorkA new international treaty focusing on crimes against humanity such as massacres, torture, and rape is in the works.  However, the draft treaty adopts an opaque definition of gender, that would give some governments an excuse to ignore persecution committed against women and LGBTI people. Today, activists are launching a campaign calling on the international community to recognize and address crimes against humanity committed on the basis of an inclusive interpretation of gender, expanded to include sexual orientation and gender identity.

In Iraq, accused ISIS fighters are being prosecuted with unprecedented speed, with some sentencing hearings lasting just seven minutes, and zero consideration given to the anti-gay or gender-based crimes committed by fighters on trial. The new crimes against humanity treaty would give LGBTI and women’s rights activists an historic opportunity to fight against hate-related crimes during armed conflict. For this reason, MADRE, an international women’s rights organization and OutRight Action International, a global LGBTI rights organization, have joined forces with lawyers at CUNY School of Law’s Human Rights and Gender Justice Clinic to challenge the treaty.

Civil society has until December 1, 2018 to provide input on the draft treaty. As part of their campaign, MADRE, OutRight, and CUNY Law have launched a new Crimes Against Humanity Toolkit that provides activists with concrete ways to make their voices heard before the deadline.

“We have real-world conflict situations, including those featuring hardline militias like ISIS, where women and LGBTI persons are being persecuted because of their gender,” said Lisa Davis, Associate Professor of Law, CUNY School of Law and MADRE Senior Legal Advisor. “The new treaty could help bring these perpetrators to justice. However, a treaty that adopts an opaque definition of gender could result in even greater impunity.”

“International criminal law has made almost no progress on LGBTI rights. This means that when LGBTI people are targeted in times of war and conflict, we lack the tools to hold perpetrators accountable and deliver justice to survivors,” says Jessica Stern, Executive Director of Outright Action International. “What we do now could determine how we protect LGBTI people for generations to come.”

The campaign will continue convening civil society groups and legal experts throughout the fall as part of an organized effort to amplify awareness of the ramifications of the treaty and encourage action to make ally and activist voices heard.

 

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Sign the submission calling on the International Law Commission to update the legal definition of gender and ensure everyone’s rights are protected under the new treaty – especially women and LGBTI persons. To stay connected and get an alert to sign the submission, sign up now.

 

United Nations Building

 

About the City University of New York School of Law

The nation’s premier public interest law school is driven by a mission to enhance the diversity of the legal profession and graduate outstanding public interest advocates. Founded in 1983, the public school offers full and part-time programs.

About MADRE

MADRE partners with grassroots women’s groups facing war, disaster and their aftermath. Together, we meet urgent needs and build women’s capacity to create lasting and positive social change by working with partners to apply the tools of human rights advocacy. We make international law accountable to the people it’s meant to serve.

 About OutRight International

OutRight International seeks to advance human rights and opportunities for LGBTIQ people around the world by developing partnerships at global, regional, and national levels to build capacity, document human rights violations, advocate for inclusion and equality, and hold leaders accountable for protecting the rights of LGBTIQ people.


Professor Karen Flórez awarded grant for study of diabetes among Mexican Americans

Professor Karen FlorezDr. Karen Flórez, Assistant Professor of Environmental, Occupational and Geospatial Sciences at CUNY SPH, was awarded a three-year, $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseasesto conduct a study of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) among Mexican Americans.

The goal of the proposed project is to examine the influence of the personal social networks of Mexican American adults on diabetes-related health behaviors by drawing on a conceptual framework that conceives acculturation as a two-level phenomenon involving the group and the individual.

This project will build upon ongoing collaborations with two large Catholic churches in Los Angeles and New York. Flórez and her team will explore group differences in social networks between Spanish-dominant and English-dominant Mexican-American adults attending Sunday services at the churches. They will then select information-rich cases for in-depth interviews and ethnographic observations, which should provide insight into diabetes-related behaviors and values that may be socially transmitted. This study will provide preliminary data for an R01 application that will develop and test a church-based intervention that focuses on the most influential network members for diabetes-related health behaviors across the acculturation continuum.

“Before we begin leveraging social networks among immigrant and U.S.-born Latinos for health promotion purposes, we need to understand the extent to which these serve as conduits for diabetes-related health behaviors,” says Flórez. “Especially since the immigration and acculturation experience likely has both positive and negative repercussions on Latinos’ social ties.”


Professor Karen Flórez awarded grant for study of diabetes among Mexican Americans

Professor Karen FlorezDr. Karen Flórez, Assistant Professor of Environmental, Occupational and Geospatial Sciences at CUNY SPH, was awarded a three-year, $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseasesto conduct a study of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) among Mexican Americans.

The goal of the proposed project is to examine the influence of the personal social networks of Mexican American adults on diabetes-related health behaviors by drawing on a conceptual framework that conceives acculturation as a two-level phenomenon involving the group and the individual.

This project will build upon ongoing collaborations with two large Catholic churches in Los Angeles and New York. Flórez and her team will explore group differences in social networks between Spanish-dominant and English-dominant Mexican-American adults attending Sunday services at the churches. They will then select information-rich cases for in-depth interviews and ethnographic observations, which should provide insight into diabetes-related behaviors and values that may be socially transmitted. This study will provide preliminary data for an R01 application that will develop and test a church-based intervention that focuses on the most influential network members for diabetes-related health behaviors across the acculturation continuum.

“Before we begin leveraging social networks among immigrant and U.S.-born Latinos for health promotion purposes, we need to understand the extent to which these serve as conduits for diabetes-related health behaviors,” says Flórez. “Especially since the immigration and acculturation experience likely has both positive and negative repercussions on Latinos’ social ties.”


Professor Karen Flórez awarded grant for study of diabetes among Mexican Americans

Professor Karen FlorezDr. Karen Flórez, Assistant Professor of Environmental, Occupational and Geospatial Sciences at CUNY SPH, was awarded a three-year, $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to conduct a study of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) among Mexican Americans.

The goal of the proposed project is to examine the influence of the personal social networks of Mexican American adults on diabetes-related health behaviors by drawing on a conceptual framework that conceives acculturation as a two-level phenomenon involving the group and the individual.

This project will build upon ongoing collaborations with two large Catholic churches in Los Angeles and New York. Flórez and her team will explore group differences in social networks between Spanish-dominant and English-dominant Mexican-American adults attending Sunday services at the churches. They will then select information-rich cases for in-depth interviews and ethnographic observations, which should provide insight into diabetes-related behaviors and values that may be socially transmitted. This study will provide preliminary data for an R01 application that will develop and test a church-based intervention that focuses on the most influential network members for diabetes-related health behaviors across the acculturation continuum.

“Before we begin leveraging social networks among immigrant and U.S.-born Latinos for health promotion purposes, we need to understand the extent to which these serve as conduits for diabetes-related health behaviors,” says Flórez. “Especially since the immigration and acculturation experience likely has both positive and negative repercussions on Latinos’ social ties.”


Professor Karen Flórez awarded grant for study of diabetes among Mexican Americans

Professor Karen FlorezDr. Karen Flórez, Assistant Professor of Environmental, Occupational and Geospatial Sciences at CUNY SPH, was awarded a three-year, $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to conduct a study of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) among Mexican Americans.

The goal of the proposed project is to examine the influence of the personal social networks of Mexican American adults on diabetes-related health behaviors by drawing on a conceptual framework that conceives acculturation as a two-level phenomenon involving the group and the individual.

This project will build upon ongoing collaborations with two large Catholic churches in Los Angeles and New York. Flórez and her team will explore group differences in social networks between Spanish-dominant and English-dominant Mexican-American adults attending Sunday services at the churches. They will then select information-rich cases for in-depth interviews and ethnographic observations, which should provide insight into diabetes-related behaviors and values that may be socially transmitted. This study will provide preliminary data for an R01 application that will develop and test a church-based intervention that focuses on the most influential network members for diabetes-related health behaviors across the acculturation continuum.

“Before we begin leveraging social networks among immigrant and U.S.-born Latinos for health promotion purposes, we need to understand the extent to which these serve as conduits for diabetes-related health behaviors,” says Flórez. “Especially since the immigration and acculturation experience likely has both positive and negative repercussions on Latinos’ social ties.”


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, from Mark Berkowitz, September 17, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Thank you to all of the PTA volunteers and students who joined together to celebrate our return to school on Friday September 7th (K-5) and Friday September 14 (Grades 6-8 and 9-12). Our courtyards were filled with festive music and celebration.

In support of our commitment to developing students’ college and career readiness, please see How to Get the Most Out of College, from New York Times columnist Frank Bruni.

Though Bruni poses recommendations to support students success in their years after high school, each of his recommendations are equally important during students NEST+m years.

We believe that a close relationship with their teachers is akin to Bruni’s recommendation that students find academic and professional mentors. Our commitment to Upper Grades Community Service is aligned with our belief that mentorship beyond the school house is equally essential.

Please note that DOE schools are closed this Wednesday. We look forward to seeing you during next Wednesday’s Curriculum Night—the schedule for this special event will be distributed later this week.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Coming Up:

  • Monday, September 17, 8:30am – Whole Child meeting in Cafeteria
  • Wednesday September 19, 2018 – Schools are closed for Yom Kippur.
  • Thursday, September 20 – 5:45pm – PTA Volunteer Fair, followed by PTA Meeting at 6:15pm.
  • Wednesday September 26, 2018 – Save the Date for NEST+m’s K-12 Curriculum Night. This event is for parents and will run from 4:45 – 7:45pm. Details for each grades’ events – LG, MG and UG – will be sent later in the week.

Announcements

Notice to families with students who ride the DOE public yellow buses:
Please note that bus am pick-up and pm drop-off times might have changed as a result of stops being added to your child’s bus route. To check your child’s pick up or drop off time, please visit the Office of Pupil Transportation website; you will need to input your child’s OSIS number and birth date. You can also call the Office of Pupil Transportation at (718) 392-8855.

The NEST+m Ethos: Core-values within NEST+m’s K-12 school community. DOWNLOAD POSTER.

K-12 Partnerships for 2018-19: Here is a sampling of some of our new and continuing partnerships for 2018-19. Additional details will be provided during Curriculum Night.

Lower Grades (K-5)

  • Teachers College Reading & Writing Partnership
  • Jazz at Lincoln Center (5th and 6th Grade)
  • Dancing Classrooms (5th Grade)
  • Alvin Ailey Dance Program

Middle Grades (6-8)

  • Teachers College Reading & Writing Partnership
  • Wildlife Conservation Society: Inquiry-based partnerships that will provide hands-on learning experiences at NYC’s Zoos
  • Code Speaks Lab
  • College Access For All (NYC DOE program)

Upper Grades (9-12)

  • Late September 2018: We are honored to announce that William Kamkwamba, whose autobiographical story, The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity & Hope, was our schoolwide Summer Reading Text, will be visiting NEST+m’s Upper Grades & Middle Grades students in late September. For more information about William Kumkwamba, see the brief film, Moving Windmills
  • Gradewide bonding day trips will be happening in Fall 2018.  Details forthcoming.
  • College Access For All (NYC DOE program): To deepen our commitment to developing students’ college & career readiness, NEST+m’s Middle Grades and Upper Grades have formally joined the NYC Department of Education’s College Access For All program. Building upon our strong instructional core and wonderful college office, this partnership will allow us to develop additional systems and structures to support students’ post-secondary goals.

Student Safety

Student Opportunities

The Expanded Horizons College Success Program at Henry Street Settlement is currently recruiting students from grades 9-12! If you know any students who may be a good match for our program, please forward them to our Best Fit Questionnaire. This can also be found on the Henry Street website at the bottom of the Expanded Horizons Webpage. Interested students should complete this form ASAP, as spots are filled on a first come, first served basis.  The questionnaire should be completed no later than September 20th, 2018 .


Protected:

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:


CUNY Awarded Federal Grant to Study ‘Leaky Pipeline’ Between Community College and Bachelor’s Degrees

More than 80 percent of community college freshmen in the United States hope to eventually earn a bachelor’s degree, research shows, but fewer than one in five reach that goal within six years. Why that is – and what can be done to help more students graduate with bachelor’s degrees – are questions researchers at The City University of New York hope to answer with a $1.4 million grant from the federal Institute of Education Sciences.

The four-year study will focus on community college students, who represent nearly a third of the nation’s post-secondary students, and the extent to which the college transfer process might hinder their momentum toward earning bachelor’s degrees. Community colleges have long been plagued by extremely low graduation rates, but education researchers and advocates have focused mostly on associate-degree graduation.

“CUNY is at the forefront of a national effort to improve associate degree completion for  community college students,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “This research addresses the next critical step for the success of many of these students: transferring and completing a bachelor’s degree. The grant awarded to Professor Logue  and her colleagues will yield insights and generate strategies for colleges across the country to improve transfers and address one of the most vexing problems in higher education.”

“There’s a huge drop-off of students who transfer or plan to transfer from a community college to a bachelor’s-degree college,” said Alexandra Logue, the study’s principal investigator and a research professor at the Center for Advanced Study in Education at CUNY’s Graduate Center. “We have some hints about why that might be but nobody’s done a coherent study of what the most important factors are. There is some evidence that it’s not necessarily the students themselves but the nature of the college transfer process and the obstacles that are put in their way. That’s what we need to find out about.”

The study, titled “A Leaky Pipeline: Community College Students and Pathways to the Bachelor’s Degree,” is a collaboration between CUNY and MDRC, a highly regarded social policy research organization. The researchers will seek to identify the specific stages in the transfer pipeline at which many students stall, as well as the supports that might help keep them on track to transition to higher academic levels.

“What we know is that equivalent students who start at bachelor’s degree programs have a much better chance of getting a degree than students who start at a community college,” Logue said. “We want to come up with a list of what our funders at the Department of Education call ‘malleable factors’ – things that we think we can change in order to help these students get through this leaky pipeline better.”

Logue added that the study identifies several “drop-off points” and that “there are students who go to community college, get good GPAs but never apply to bachelor’s degree colleges. There are also hints that some students are accepted for transfer but never show up at the new college. We want to explore the reasons. Another thing we will look at is the problem of credit transfer: General education credits transfer very well but credits in majors do not and that’s a big issue. And finally, we will look at ‘transfer shock.’ Transfer students often show a temporary decline in GPA for one or two semesters, and that’s where we believe the bachelor’s degree programs may have some responsibility. Colleges have orientations and all kinds of programs to help high school students transition to college, but there’s often less for transfer students. They have to orient themselves, and if they’re coming from a community college it can be intimidating.”

To explore the issue, Logue and her colleagues will survey students and staff and analyze data from across CUNY and conduct focus groups at three of its senior colleges (Brooklyn, Queens and Lehman) and three community colleges (Bronx, Hostos and Guttman). “We’re using CUNY as a laboratory,” Logue said. “We will produce data and identify principles that would apply not only to this university but to post-secondary institutions across the country.”

Logue is the author of Pathways to Reform: Credits and Conflict at The City University of New York, a book about the college transfer issue published in 2017. “In previous generations,” Logue said, “people tended to go to one college and graduate from there. Students today transfer a lot more. More than half of students who graduate with a bachelor’s degree have credits from somewhere else. At CUNY, more than half of the graduates from every senior college did not start out at that college. But for too many students, transfer seems to inhibit graduation. That’s why it’s so important for us to understand the factors responsible for the leaky pipeline.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 


Pigments in Butterfly Wings Lead Scientists to Colorful Conclusions

A female Elymnias hypermnestra tinctoria, one of the butterflies studied for its pigment.

A study of the pigment molecules that give color to the wings of butterflies, led by two City College of New York professors and two former students, was published in the science journal PLOS ONE.

The paper, “Different ommochrome pigment mixtures enable sexually dimorphic Batesian mimicry in disjunct populations of the common palmfly butterfly, Elymnias hypermnestra, was authored by Professor George John of the Chemistry Department and Professor David Lohman of the Biology Department, with Silvio Panettieri who earned a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the CUNY Graduate Center and Erisa Gjinaj who graduated with a B.S. in Chemistry from Macaulay Honors College while working in John’s lab at CCNY.

The scientists identified the pigment molecules that give color to the wings of mimetic butterflies, those that mimic the behaviors or appearances of other insects. Although there are about 18,500 butterfly species, wing pigments from only a limited number of butterfly species have been chemically characterized, focusing on a small number of species many years ago, the authors point out. Few studies seek to explore the full extent of butterfly diversity to look for novel pigments and determine their chemical identity.

Most of the compounds identified in this study are new to scientific literature, and several lines of evidence point to a conclusion about the evolution of different mixtures of pigments. Mimicry, in which one species imitates another in appearance, odor, behavior, or some other trait, is widespread and takes diverse forms. In butterflies, model species are often avoided by predators because host plant-derived compounds render them distasteful, but model species might be avoided for other reasons, such as evasive flight maneuvers. Within a given area, predators learn to associate unpleasant taste or uncatchable species with particular visual cues.

With varied, brightly patterned wings, butterflies have been the focus of much work on the evolution and diversification. The CCNY scientists characterized the orange wing pigments of female Elymnias hypermnestrabutterflies from two Southeast Asian populations. Identifying pigments from butterfly populations in Thailand and Indonesia, which gave specimens different shades of orange on their wings, the scientists hypothesized that different pigments are responsible for differences in wing coloration. The findings suggest local adaptation or parallel evolution where mimicry generates changes, and more pigments remain to be discovered.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


Baruch College Earns Top Rankings for Academics, Alumni Success, Social Mobility, and Value

Latest U.S. News & World Report Rankings Add to High Marks from Prominent Review Organizations  

Baruch College continues to win national recognition and accolades for its academic excellence, value and low student debt, social mobility, and alumni success.

In the just-released U.S. News & World Report “Best Regional Universities – North,” Baruch College ranked #5 for public institutions for the third consecutive year, and #20 overall.

Best Undergraduate Business Programs:

  • #62 out of 503 colleges nationwide
  • #40 among public institutions

The national ranking among all schools represents a 15-point jump over the last two years for Baruch’s undergraduate business programs at the Zicklin School of Business.

At a Glance:

Below is a complete list of Baruch’s rankings among all “Regional Universities – North:”

  • #5 Top Public Schools
  • #20 Best Regional Universities (tie)
  • #2 “Ethnic Diversity” (tie)
  • #3 “Least debt, Class of 2017”
  • #9 “Schools with the Most International Students”
  • #11 “Most Innovative Schools” (tie)
  • #16 “Best Undergraduate Teaching” (tie)
  • #73 “Best Value Schools”

These top rankings from U.S. News add to the expanding list of high marks from other prominent review organizations received during this year alone:

Forbes: Socioeconomic Mobility and Academic Success

Baruch College is among 650 higher education institutions featured in Forbes“America’s Top College’s 2018” list. For all schools in the U.S., Baruch jumped 22 spots from last year—now placing at #178.

Forbes specifically pointed to the College’s success in advancing socioeconomic mobility among its students, as well as the institution’s academic success and campus resources.

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance: Lowest Average Graduating Debt

Based on data on nearly 1,200 U.S. four-year institutions, Kiplinger’s named Baruch College to its “Top 300 Best College Values” list of 2018.  The College ranked #2 nationally for the Best Colleges with Lowest Average Graduating Debt.

Kiplinger’s also pointed to Baruch’s New York City location, access to career opportunities, and the school’s diverse student body.

Money Magazine: ‘Superior education at an affordable price’

In its most recent “Best Colleges 2018” list, Money Magazine placed Baruch College among the top 10 schools. The national list, which is based on educational quality, affordability and alumni success, designated high rankings—both regionally and nationally—to Baruch College:

  • #1 among public institutions in the Northeast
  • #1 out of 81 public and private colleges in New York State
  • #5 “50 Best Public Colleges” in the U.S.
  • #8 “727 Best Colleges in America”

According to Money, the schools that top its rankings “deliver a superior education at an affordable price, enabling graduates to avoid heavy debt and succeed in the workplace.”

The Princeton Review: Top-Notch Faculty and Engaged Student Body

Baruch College was highlighted in The Princeton Review’s “The Best 384 Colleges – 2019 edition” for its top-notch faculty, career programs, and a diverse and engaged student body.

On top of this national recognition, Baruch College is included in The Princeton Review’s “Best Northeastern” list of 225 schools that are “academically outstanding and well worth considering,” and “Colleges That Pay You Back,” a selection of 209 schools based on institutional data, affordability, and career outcomes.

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Social Mobility

Baruch College ranked #1 for social mobility among four-year public institutions, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2018 Almanac of Higher Education, a yearly roundup of major stories and research in the world of higher education.

The Chronicle’s list was drawn from a widely reported study of colleges’ impact on social mobility by a team led by Harvard economics professor Raj Chetty (formerly of Stanford University). The team’s 2017 study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility,” tracked students from nearly every U.S. college, including nongraduates, and measured their subsequent earnings against millions of anonymous tax filings and financial aid records.

Learn more about Baruch College’s rankings in 2018 and during previous years.

# # #


Baruch College Ranks among the Best Regional Universities in the North by U.S. News & World Report

#5 among Public Institutions for Third Consecutive Year

Baruch College placed #5 among the “Best Regional Universities – North” for public institutions, and #20 overall, in the just-released U.S. News & World Report rankings of the top colleges and universities in the country. The 2019 rankings represent the third consecutive year that Baruch ranked #5 in this Regional University category.

At a Glance:

Besides being one of the “Best Regional Universities – North,” U.S. News recognized Baruch in several additional categories. Below is a complete list of Baruch’s rankings for the northeast region:

  • #5 Top Public Schools
  • #20 Best Regional Universities (tie)
  • #2 “Ethnic Diversity” (tie)
  • #3 “Least debt, Class of 2017”
  • #9 “Schools with the Most International Students”
  • #11 “Most Innovative Schools” (tie)
  • #16 “Best Undergraduate Teaching” (tie)
  • #73 “Best Value Schools”

Best Undergraduate Business Programs: Another Jump in Rankings  

  • #62 out of 503 colleges nationwide
  • #40 among public institutions

The national ranking among all schools represents a 15-point jump over the last two years for Baruch’s undergraduate business programs at the Zicklin School of Business.

Baruch College: A Place to Thrive

Additionally, the College made the “A+ Schools for B Students” list, which is not ranked numerically. According to U.S. News, the list was developed by screening “the universe of colleges and universities to identify those where ‘nonsuperstars’ have a decent shot at being accepted and thriving – where spirit and hard work could make all the difference to the admissions office.”

Methodology:

For the North region, U.S. News accumulated data for 196 schools. In total, it surveyed more than 1,800 independently regionally accredited institutions in the nation and ranked 1,400 schools.

According to U.S. News, the rankings formula uses exclusively statistical quantitative and qualitative measures that education experts have proposed as reliable indicators of academic quality. To calculate the overall rank for each school within each category, up to 16 metrics of academic excellence are assigned weights that reflect U.S. News’ researched judgment about how much they matter.

Learn more about how U.S. News calculated the 2019 Best College Rankings.

# # #


INNOVATIVE CRISIS INTERVENTION TEAM TRAINING PROGRAM AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE DELIVERS IMPRESSIVE RESULTS

Innovative Crisis Intervention Team Training Program at John Jay College Delivers Impressive Results

In 2015, the office of Professional Studies at John Jay College spearheaded a pilot program called Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training, along with faculty clinicians from our Psychology department to train 550 officers in the New York City Police Department in communication and de-escalation skills when dealing with people with mental disorders, and those in emotional crises. The delivery of the training was highly innovative, incorporating adult learning principles of experiential learning. The model used a stage production with professional actors to portray individuals in crisis based on real-life scenarios that officers encounter on a daily basis. The trainers would observe how the interaction was playing out, pause the scenario to discuss the positives and negatives, and provide feedback to help the officers reach a positive outcome for a successful de-escalation in real time.

The success of the pilot training led to a statewide recognition for non-credit program development by the Continuing Education Association of New York, for the creative approach in delivery, and the high impact the training has in serving the community at large. To date, 8,200 NYPD officers have been trained in CIT.

Fern Chan speaking at United Nations Office of Drug and Crime in Vienna “We strive to give officers practical skills that they can use on the job so they can reach a positive outcome when dealing with such challenging mental health situations,” says Fern Chan, Director of Professional Studies. “Knowing that our training model has been replicated at the state level for all incoming recruits, and being presented at an international arena for better policing has truly been transformative in the way we can advocate for criminal justice reform.”

Professional Studies continues to improve the training in response to current trends in mental health awareness and criminal justice reform, and has further customized the training to other law enforcement agencies with over 2,000 recruits and officers trained in the Department of Corrections and over 100 investigators from the Department of Investigations.

The collaborative efforts have also provided the opportunity to contribute to the 2018 revision of the New York State Basic Course for Police Officers in mental illness instruction, entitled Fundamental Crisis Intervention Skills for Law Enforcement. It has become the exemplary training manual for all police recruitment agencies in New York State.

The success of the training program is garnering attention internationally as well. Director Chan was invited to deliver a keynote at the United Nations Office of Drug and Crime in Vienna in August 2018, for the International Police Executive Symposium on the innovative approach to training law enforcement to handle mental illnesses. Police practitioners, academics as well as UN officials from over 40 nations were in attendance to learn about John Jay’s training model and open channels for potential international collaboration.


JOHN JAY WELCOMES THE INCOMING FRESHMAN CLASS

John Jay Welcomes The Incoming Freshman Class

Aaliyah JohnAaliyah John
Hometown: Lowmans Hill, St. Vincent
Potential Major: Computer Science & Information Security

Why John Jay?
My parents are both involved in the criminal justice system and I grew up being passionate about this field. As I got older, I also became interested in Computer Science & Information Security, and at John Jay I found the perfect blend of both my passions. John Jay was always a top choice since my older sister and two cousins are recent graduates, and from them, I heard nothing but good reviews.

What are you looking forward to the most about being at John Jay?
I am looking forward to adjusting to the New York lifestyle, meeting new people and learning about new cultures while getting an excellent education.

What are your future life and career goals?
I hope to develop skills for the forensic analysis of digital and multimedia evidence, and analyze information security breaches within companies, so I can help eradicate cybercrimes worldwide.
 

Linda SahinLinda Sahin
Hometown: Woodside, Queens
Potential major: English

Why John Jay?
It has been my dream to attend John Jay College since my sophomore year of high school, not only because of what the school stands for, but for how beautiful it is. It’s my passion to bring justice to others, and I hope that John Jay can prepare me for a way to achieve this passion through the law. I love English as well, and I hope that the major enriches my future law career.

What does justice mean to you?
For me, justice means keeping a balance between the worlds and bringing others what they deserve, almost like karma.

What are you looking forward to the most about being at John Jay?
Seeing myself grow and reach achievements in a new environment where I can leave negativity behind and become a more mature person.

What are your future life and career goals?
I hope to become an immigration lawyer, helping people live stable, happy lives.
 

Aaron FernandoName: Aaron Narraph Fernando
Hometown: Queens, New York
Potential major: Political Science/Law and Society

Why John Jay?
I applied to John Jay after visiting the campus as a high school junior during the Macaulay Honors College Open House event. There, I became intrigued by the school’s curriculum, revolving around the theme of justice, a value that I strongly believe in and guides much of what I do. Of all the colleges that I applied to, John Jay really spoke to me as a proud New Yorker and hopeful future advocate for justice.

What does justice mean to you?
For me, the idea of justice refers to our basic ideas of fairness and equality—if things are not fair and equal, they are not just, and as humans, we naturally want to make it right. The idea of justice encompasses our basic understandings of right and wrong, and our desire to make things right.

What are you looking forward to the most about being at John Jay?
I’m looking forward to taking as many law and politics classes as I can, so I can study topics that I’m really invested and passionate about, while getting out of my comfort zone and learning new things.

What are your future life and career goals?
One day I hope to be a civil rights lawyer and perhaps even take a job as a lawmaker or work in public service.
 

Gianna RussoGianna Russo
Hometown: East Northport, New York
Major: Forensic Science

Why John Jay?
When I was a junior at Saint Anthony’s High School, I decided to take forensics science as an elective, not knowing that one course would change what I wanted to do in the future. I had the best teacher who taught me everything from blood splatter to the behavior of serial killers. One day she approached me and asked if I ever considered doing something like this in the future and told me about John Jay. When I would look up forensic science programs, I would see John Jay everywhere. And, while attending different college showcase tournaments, I saw that John Jay had a soccer team. That’s when I knew that John Jay would be the best fit for me as an athlete and student.

What does justice mean to you?
Justice means fairness, peace, and order. I also see justice as being a voice for the people because it gets rid of the bad and brings us the good. Without it we would have more chaos in the world—more then we already have. People need to be held responsible for their actions and that’s exactly what justice does.

What are you looking forward to the most about being at John Jay?
It has always been a dream of mine to play soccer in college, and it hasn’t been easy for me to get to where I am. I was diagnosed with epilepsy when I was 13 and had to overcome that major obstacle in my life in order to accomplish what I’ve accomplished. I’m very excited to study something I love at one of the best schools for my major and have the opportunity to play a sport I love.

What are your future life and career goals?
My future life and career goals are to pursue my forensic science degree and find a job that I love in that field.

 

Yan Shan YuYan Shan Yu
Hometown: Brooklyn, New York
Potential major: Forensic Psychology

Why John Jay?
John Jay is a very diverse community and I hope to explore many topics with different opinions. Being part of John Jay will give me a chance to explore my own definition of justice, while being taught by some of the most professional and educated faculty members. I like how John Jay provides their students with the opportunity to take part of research and experimentation, which will be helpful for my major. John Jay’s successfulness in encouraging students to give back to the community, its mission of providing studies to prepare students for ethical leadership, global citizenship, and engaged service, is on par with my values and beliefs. This is why John Jay is the perfect fit for me.

What does justice mean to you?
Justice is when everyone is treated the same without any discrimination; the acceptance of all types of people no matter their color, background, beliefs, and values. Everyone should have the same basic human rights like life, liberty, and personal security. It is important to recognize this and try to help offenders rather than giving them a severe punishment. It’s important for those in the criminal justice field to understand the reasons behind offenders’ behavior and have a clear unbiased view.

What are you looking forward to the most about being at John Jay?
I am eager to meet experts from the Justice Department like police officers and FBI agents and learn about their definition of justice, their experiences in dealing with criminals, and how they problem-solved even in life threatening situations. I’m excited for the research and experiment opportunities in which I can conduct my own studies and gain first-hand experience through lab work and professional advice.

What are your future life and career goals?
My future life and career goals are to be part of the Justice Department. I want to study criminals and know how they think and commit the crimes they do. To reciprocate my mom’s struggle in coming to the United States for better opportunities and to support my family, I will continue to work hard to achieve these goals. I want to make sure that my parents get the best of everything because they gave up a lot for my success and happiness. Through my hard work, I hope I can influence other immigrants who come from families that are struggling to never give up on their goals.


JOHN JAY CUNY SERVICE CORPS STUDENTS VOLUNTEER IN PUERTO RICO

John Jay CUNY Service Corps Students Volunteer In Puerto Rico

Click here for a Spanish translation

 “They were excited to interact with us and would say ‘¡Por fin! Tengo mas gente con quien yo puedo hablar’, ‘finally I have more people to talk to.’”—Aaron Fortin, John Jay student volunteer.

 

Dedicated to making a difference in the world, this past June, John Jay’s CUNY Service Corps students participated in a Puerto Rico relief effort. After the destruction of last year’s Hurricane Maria, residents of the island are still struggling to rebuild their homes. “I became aware of the devastation hurricane Maria left on the island through the media, and I wanted to find a way that I could help,” says Aaron Fortin, a second-year graduate student majoring in Emergency Management. “Regardless of any cultural barriers, it is our responsibility to make a difference in people’s lives.” By repairing homes, the students hoped to bring a sense of unity, compassion and support to the island, all while connecting with the local community. To find out more about their transformative experience, we spoke with a few of the volunteers.

 

Aaron Fortin 
Second-Year Graduate Student in Emergency Management

Aaron Fortin with a fellow volunteer

Aaron Fortin with a fellow volunteer

Aaron and his teammates take a break from rebuilding a house

Aaron and his teammates take a break from rebuilding a house

“If there are any opportunities to go help out, go help out. We shouldn’t wait for someone to tell us to give a helping hand.”—Alexis Augustine, John Jay student volunteer.

 

As a fluent Spanish speaker, Aaron Fortin found it easy to communicate with everyone in the community. “Each homeowner connected with us exceptionally well,” says Fortin. “They were excited to interact with us and would say ‘¡Por fin! Tengo mas gente con quien yo puedo hablar’, ‘finally I have more people to talk to.’” Putting his Spanish speaking abilities to good use, Fortin helped enhance the communication between homeowners and non-Spanish speakers, forming a stronger bond between everyone. One particular community member struck a special chord in Fortin’s heart. “Though I didn’t see this one homeowner much, when I did, she would approach me with a big smile and a kiss,” says Fortin. “She would go to her backyard, pick tomatoes and give them to us. She gave us the most she could as a token of appreciation.”

 

Alexis Augustine
Senior Majoring in Law and Society

Alexis Augustine, helping to fix a homeowner’s roof

Alexis Augustine, helping to fix a homeowner’s roof

“As a global citizen, if a person is in need, it is our duty to answer the call.”—Jeremy Brown, John Jay student volunteer.

 

Prior to going to Puerto Rico, Alexis Augustine was worried about the potential language barrier she might face since she doesn’t speak Spanish. But after arriving in San Juan, and interacting with the people, her concern disappeared. “A lot of the students on the trip came from diverse backgrounds,” says Augustine. “And many people in San Juan understood English. But no matter what language people in the community spoke, everyone was amazingly welcoming.” Fully embracing the experience, Augustine found that the homeowners were warm and helpful in every way. “I was working on concrete roofs when I met an amazing man named Filiberto,” says Augustine. “Filiberto was always on the roof working, but he would immediately run out and get tools whenever we needed them. After a lot of hard work, people in the community would make us lunch, showing both their appreciation and kindness.” Grateful for her experience and the people she met, Augustine offers this piece of advice to her fellow students. “If there are opportunities to go help out, go help out. We shouldn’t wait for someone to tell us to give a helping hand.”

 

Jeremy Brown, 
Senior Majoring in International Criminal Justice

A fallen tree from the hurricane, painted with the Puerto Rican flag

A fallen tree from the hurricane, painted with the Puerto Rican flag

Even though Jeremy Brown isn’t from Puerto Rico, the trip felt personal for him. As an Afro-Latino from the South Bronx, the island’s culture was engrained in him. “I have lived in the South Bronx all my life,” says Brown. “The roots of the Borinquén culture have raised me.” With this personal connection, Brown deeply felt the importance of supporting the people of Puerto Rico when they needed it most. “The numerous hurricanes and tropical storms have deeply affected many parts of Puerto Rico, making it a struggle to rebuild the land,” says Brown. “Interacting with the locals was crucial. Just having a basic conversation with the people goes a long way.” After his experience on the island, Brown understood the value and need to volunteer on a deeper level. “As a global citizen, if a person is in need, it is our duty to answer the call.”


NY STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY DEBATE THROUGH THE EYES OF JOHN JAY STUDENTS

NY State Attorney General Democratic Primary Debate Through The Eyes of John Jay Students

On August 28th the four Democratic candidates for New York State Attorney General came to John Jay for a heated debate moderated by NY1’s Errol Louis and Spectrum News’ Liz Benjamin. Many John Jay students submitted questions for the candidates—Leecia Eve, Letitia James, Sean Patrick Maloney, and Zephyr Teachout—but four student ambassadors had the added opportunity to meet and speak directly with the candidates, while getting a behind-the-scenes look at the political arena. We spoke to the student ambassadors both before and after the event to get their thoughts on the debate.

John Jay Student Ambassadors: (left to right) Elza Kochueva, Cataydra Brown, Karla Galiano Herrera, Kavon Lee

 

“I was surprised that the candidates didn’t spend enough time on immigration issues. It’s one of the crucial problems of our city, state, and the nation.” —Elza Kochueva

 

Elza Kochueva

Student Ambassador: Elza Kochueva, Senior
Major: Law and Society

Before the Event:
“As the Vice President, I’m excited to hear the candidates talk about immigration because the previous Attorney General spent a lot of time filing lawsuits about immigration. Since I want to be an attorney, this debate is a great opportunity for me to not only network, but to get a behind-the-scenes look at the life of a politician or council member.”

After the Event:
“I learned that all candidates agree that the position of Attorney General must be independent, free from the influence of other officials. I’m glad that they spent time making sure that it was clear that the Attorney General’s office must be neutral. However, I was surprised that the candidates didn’t spend enough time on immigration issues. It’s one of the crucial problems of our city, state, and the nation. I was disappointed that that didn’t happen. I was fortunate enough to speak with candidates, Sean Patrick Maloney and Leecia Eve, and am grateful that they spent their time talking with John Jay students. It shows their appreciation for young voices.”

“My favorite part was being able to talk with the candidates, who were all friendly and full of energy and enthusiasm.” —Karla Galiano Herrera

 

Karla Galiano Herrera

Student Ambassador: Karla Galiano Herrera, Junior
Majors: Law and Society and Latin American Studies

Before the Event:
“I look forward to being able to get the candidates standpoint on immigration. As the previous President for the John Jay Dreamers and future immigration attorney, immigration is something that I am passionate about, especially for the undocumented students here at John Jay. With students coming from a mixed status family, I really want to know how the candidates’ future politics are going to affect not only the students at John Jay, but their families and communities.”

After the event:
“While some of my questions in regard to immigration where not answered, I was still impressed by the debate and some of the answers from the candidates. I was actually quite impressed by Tish James’ views on fair housing and protecting immigrants from fraudulent organizations, and from being taken advantage of because of their status. I was extremely impressed by all the hard work that the stage and tech crew did behind the scenes. They were there from the early morning and left almost past midnight, constantly checking and retesting all the equipment so they could get as close to perfection as possible.”

“My favorite part of the debate was the cross between the candidates.” —Kavon Lee

 

Kavon Lee

Student Ambassador: Kavon Lee, Senior
Major: Political Science

Before the Event:
“For me it’s important to see the stances each candidate has. With this upcoming election we have had a lot of controversy. So I would like to see what kinds of reforms they would bring, especially in regards to criminal justice and education. In particular, I would like to see lesser sentences for minimal crimes like possession of marijuana, because institutionalizing people for petty crimes increases recidivism rates for prisons.”

After the Event:
“I enjoyed learning more about the candidates and their stances on issues like prison reform, which is something that really concerns me. My favorite part of the debate was the cross between the candidates. Watching the candidates pose questions and state their rebuttals really caught me. I was truly captivated by Tish James. Her presence commands the room.”

“I’m looking forward to casting my primary vote on Thursday, September 13th.” —Cataydra Brown

 

 

Cataydra Brown

Student Ambassador: Cataydra Brown, Senior
Major: Law and Society

Before the Event:
“As a student in the honor’s program, I am excited just to see the candidates talk about all the issues. There are some really pressing issues right now, and I’m curious to see how all four of them navigate through the questions. Specifically, I would like to see how the candidates answer the questions students submitted about how they would better our community.”

After the Event:
“It was interesting to be a part of the backstage production and have access to the theater while Spectrum/NY1 set up the event. We also had permission to enter the green room while the candidates were preparing for the debate. My favorite part was being able to sit in the front row while the debate was happening. I was able to get a better understanding of the candidates and where they stand on issues important to me, including, housing, mass incarceration, and immigration. I’m looking forward to casting my primary vote on Thursday, September 13th.”


UNDERSTANDING 9/11 THROUGH VOLUNTEERISM

Understanding 9/11 Through Volunteerism

For many John Jay students, understanding the impact of September 11th is an educational journey, not a memory. Sutoy Sufian, an APPLE Corps student who volunteered at the September 11th Memorial and Museum for five weeks, had the opportunity to deepened his knowledge about the event, while interacting with visitors. We chatted with Sufian to learn more about his journey.

Sutoy Sufian

Sutoy Sufian

Before volunteering at the memorial and museum, what were your thoughts and feelings about September 11th?
Although I was aware of what happened on September 11th, I wasn’t fully educated about it until high school. Being born and raised in a different country, I wasn’t taught about 9/11 in a detailed manner. Then my family immigrated to the United States in 2011. As an immigrant who just began learning to speak English in middle school, I was shocked and frightened each time I gained more knowledge about this tragic day.

When you first walked through the September 11th Memorial and Museum, how did the sights and exhibits affect you?
Walking through the memorial and museum for the first time, I realized that it wasn’t a typical museum. People visit it to remember and honor the loved ones they lost from the attack. Visitors don’t seem cheerful. Some people can barely hold back their tears as they look around at the debris of World Trade Center and the beautiful pictures of the Twin Towers. I realized my job was to interact and assist these visitors. I was scared, yet grateful, to help them pay respect to the innocent lives that were lost.

What was your best memory from helping the visitors?
My favorite story would have to be when I asked a visitor about his favorite memory at the Twin Towers. He revealed that he proposed to his wife on top of one of the buildings. He also had dinner with her in one of finest restaurants in the building on their anniversary.

What would you want people to know about the memorial and museum?
I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in learning more about the day. The museum allows its visitors to gain knowledge through its contents. There are multiple pictures with informative captions and debris from the building, giving visitors an unforgettable experience and crucial knowledge.

How do you connect your experience as a student John Jay to September 11th?
During my internship, I learned that many John Jay alumni lost their lives due to the attack on September 11th. I often think about those men and women, and I wonder what their lives would be like if they weren’t taken away from us. They would have had such a positive effect on our society. I’m majoring in Economics, and although I’m not studying information that would give me the expertise to stop a terrorist attack, I truly respect my John Jay peers who are studying Criminal Justice, Forensic Psychology, Cybersecurity, Security Management, and other subjects that could prevent any other tragedies from occurring.


CCNY, University of PR receive NSF grant to enhance resiliency in islanded communities

Professor Jorge Gonzalez's Head Shot

Principal investigator Jorge E. Gonzalez of the Grove School of Engineering.

As part of the $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, The City College of New York and the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez will virtually recreate Hurricane Maria and its impact on Puerto Rico. The virtual creation of the hurricane will enable research focusing on the critical infrastructure that left the island and its people without power and water for months.

According to principal investigator Jorge E. Gonzalez of the Grove School of Engineering, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the future risks and expected damage due to extreme climate and catastrophic events that will most likely occur with more frequency and intensity, affecting most coastal tropical regions such as Puerto Rico and the Caribbean.

“Our research will integrate cutting-edge weather forecast models, data driven identification and characterization of damage to the physical infrastructure,” said Gonzalez. “It will also integrate advanced approaches for analysis of community generated data and creative solutions for planning and scoping of the rebuilding process to be used for the long-term recovery of Puerto Rico.”

Co-principal investigators include:

  • Reza Khanbilvardi, professor of civil engineering at the Grove School of Engineering and director of the NOAA-CREST Center
  • Masoud Ghandehari, professor of civil engineering at New York University
  • Eric Klinenberg, director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University
  • T. Agami Reddy, professor of the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University
  • Eric Harmsen, professor of agricultural and biosystems engineering at University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez

“The research will engage graduate and undergraduate students from CCNY and partner schools providing opportunities for unique training and learning via field data collection, community engagement to reconstruct the events, and in design studios to provide realistic scenarios for a resilient infrastructure and long term recovery of the Island,” said Gonzalez.

About The City College of New York 
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families, September 12, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

We are hoping that you have been experiencing a warm, caretaking start to our 2018-19 school year.

This week, school resumes with our fourth day of instruction on Wednesday September 12th.

Each week I will send an email similar to this one that will provide key information related to our schoolwide calendar and/or learning resources to support you, NEST+m’s students and families.

Together we create NEST+m each day.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication.

Warmly,


Mark Berkowitz
Principal


The NEST+m Ethos: Thank you Parent Coordinator Lisa Seale Cruz for graphically representing core-values within NEST+m’s K-12 school community. DOWNLOAD POSTER.

K-12 Partnerships for 2018-19: Here is a sampling of some of our new and continuing partnerships for 2018-19. Additional details will be provided during Curriculum Night.

Lower Grades (K-5)

  • Teachers College Reading & Writing Partnership
  • Jazz at Lincoln Center (5th and 6th Grade)
  • Dancing Classrooms (5th Grade)

Middle Grades (6-8)

  • Teachers College Reading & Writing Partnership
  • Wildlife Conservation Society: Inquiry-based partnerships that will provide hands-on learning experiences at NYC’s Zoos
  • Code Speaks Lab
  • College Access For All (NYC DOE program)

Upper Grades (9-12)

  • Late September 2018: We are honored to announce that William Kumkwamba, whose autobiographical story, The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity & Hope, was our schoolwide Summer Reading Text, will be visiting NEST+m’s Upper Grades & Middle Grades students in late September. For more information about William Kumkwamba, see the brief film, Moving Windmills
  • Gradewide bonding day trips will be happening in Fall 2018.  Details forthcoming.
  • College Access For All (NYC DOE program): To deepen our commitment to developing students’ college & career readiness, NEST+m’s Middle Grades and Upper Grades have formally joined the NYC Department of Education’s College Access For All program. Building upon our strong instructional core and wonderful college office, this partnership will allow us to develop additional systems and structures to support students’ post-secondary goals.

Student Safety

Reminders:

  • Schools are closed next Wednesday September 19th, 2018 for Yom Kippur.  For those who observed Rosh Hashanah, wishing you a Happy & Healthy New Year.
  • Save the Date:  NEST+m’s K-12 Curriculum Night is Wednesday September 26, 2018. Details forthcoming.

Club drug users on PrEP at increased risk of contracting bacterial sexually transmitted infections

people in club exchanging drugs

Club drug (ketamine, ecstasy, GHB, cocaine, and methamphetamine) use has been documented to be higher among gay and bisexual men (GBM) and has been shown to increase the risk of HIV transmission due to its connection with sexual behavior.

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce the risk of HIV transmission and may be particularly beneficial for those who use club drugs. Nevertheless, there is a growing concern about bacterial sexually transmitted infections (BSTIs) associated with decreasing condom use among PrEP users.

To determine the characteristics of PrEP users at the highest risk of contracting BSTIs, a team of researchers including CUNY SPH Professor Christian Grov and Dr. Steven A. John at the Center  for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies & Training at CUNY Hunter College, surveyed GBM who were active PrEP users at the time of enrolment. The findings were published in the journal Epidemiology.

Twenty-six percent of GBM on PrEP reported a diagnosis of BSTI in the past six months. Men

who reported using club drugs had 6.6 times the odds of reporting at BSTI and those reporting more frequent condomless anal sex in the past 30 days had 1.1 times odds of reporting a BSTI.

“The fact that club drug users demonstrated higher odds of bacterial STIs, even after controlling for condomless sex, suggests other variables may be putting club drug users greater at risk for exposure,” said Dr. Grov

The study’s findings led the researchers to conclude that club drug users could be at a unique BSTI risk, perhaps because of higher-risk sexual networks. “We know that club drugs and sex often go hand-in-hand, and our findings may point to a concentration of STIs that are being passed between club drug users,” said Grov, “But more research would be necessary to confirm the network hypothesis.” The researchers recommend ongoing BSTI screening and risk reduction counselling for GBM on HIV PrEP.

John SA, Parsons JT, Rendina HJ, & Grov C. Club drug users had higher odds of reporting a bacterial STI compared with non-club drug users: results from a cross-sectional analysis of gay and bisexual men on HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis. Sex Transm Infect. 2018 Aug 20.


Club drug users on PrEP at increased risk of contracting bacterial sexually transmitted infections

two men exchange drugs at a nightclubClub drug (ketamine, ecstasy, GHB, cocaine, and methamphetamine) use has been documented to be higher among gay and bisexual men (GBM) and has been shown to increase the risk of HIV transmission due to its connection with sexual behavior

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce the risk of HIV transmission and may be particularly beneficial for those who use club drugs. Nevertheless, there is a growing concern about bacterial sexually transmitted infections (BSTIs) associated with decreasing condom use among PrEP users.

To determine the characteristics of PrEP users at the highest risk of contracting BSTIs, a team of researchers including CUNY Graduate School of Public Health Professor Christian Grov and Dr. Steven A. John at the Center  for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies & Training at CUNY Hunter College, surveyed GBM who were active PrEP users at the time of enrolment. The findings were published in the journal Epidemiology.

Twenty-six percent of GBM on PrEP reported a diagnosis of BSTI in the past six months. Men who reported using club drugs had 6.6 times the odds of reporting at BSTI and those reporting more frequent condomless anal sex in the past 30 days had 1.1 times odds of reporting a BSTI.

“The fact that club drug users demonstrated higher odds of bacterial STIs, even after controlling for condomless sex, suggests other variables may be putting club drug users greater at risk for exposure,” said Dr. Grov

The study’s findings led the researchers to conclude that club drug users could be at a unique BSTI risk, perhaps because of higher-risk sexual networks. “We know that club drugs and sex often go hand-in-hand, and our findings may point to a concentration of STIs that are being passed between club drug users,” said Grov, “But more research would be necessary to confirm the network hypothesis.” The researchers recommend ongoing BSTI screening and risk reduction counselling for GBM on HIV PrEP.

John SA, Parsons JT, Rendina HJ, & Grov C. Club drug users had higher odds of reporting a bacterial STI compared with non-club drug users: results from a cross-sectional analysis of gay and bisexual men on HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis. Sex Transm Infect. 2018 Aug 20.


City College ranks high among public colleges, regional universities, according to U.S. News

City College ranked among best public colleges.

The City College of New York is among the top 100 Best Regional Universities in the North and a Top Public School in the North, as reported in U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 Best Colleges.

City College is ranked #14 of the Top Public Schools rankings in the North, and also ranked high at #55 in the Best Regional Universities rankings among 196 universities. Schools are ranked by U.S. News according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence.

To calculate the rankings, U.S. News gathers data from each college on up to 15 indicators of academic excellence. The publication’s strategists made significant changes to the ranking methodology for the 2019 edition of Best Colleges, placing the greatest value on student outcomes, which account for 35 percent of the rankings – up from 30 percent last year. The 2019 approach incorporates new social mobility indicators that measure how well schools succeed at enrolling and graduating students from low-income families.

City College also continues to be one of the nation’s Best Colleges for Veterans. Schools reported on their enrollment of and benefits for veterans and active-duty service members as part of U.S. News’ annual statistical survey of undergraduate schools during spring 2018.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


U.S. News & World Report Ranks Eight CUNY Campuses Among Top Public Colleges in the Country

Eight senior colleges of The City University of New York are among the top 50 public colleges in the country in this year’s U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges Rankings, released Monday, with two campuses listed in the top 10. Three CUNY schools also made the list of top regional colleges in the northern part of the country.

“This year’s U.S. News & World Report list of best colleges and universities shows once again that CUNY is among the nation’s leaders in offering high-quality, affordable education to students of diverse backgrounds,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The high ranking of many of our colleges is evidence of our progress in increasing academic momentum and graduation rates and our success in developing cutting-edge strategies to help students achieve their goals.”

For the second year in a row, the U.S. News list ranked Baruch College the fifth-best public college in the nation, with Hunter College right behind at No. 6. City College of New York and Queens College were tied at No. 14; York College was No. 15; Brooklyn College, No. 19; Lehman College, No. 37; and John Jay College of Criminal Justice, No. 46.

In the list of top regional colleges in the North, York was ranked No. 34, the New York City College of Technology, No. 36, and Medgar Evers College, No. 46. The list defines regional colleges as those that focus on undergraduate education and grant fewer than 50 percent of their degrees in liberal arts disciplines.

The annual survey assesses more than 1,800 colleges and universities throughout the United States. Among those institutions, 1,388 receive rankings. U.S. News & World Report says its rankings evaluate colleges and universities on 16 measures of academic quality, which allows prospective students, college counselors and parents “to compare at a glance the relative quality of U.S. institutions based on such widely accepted indicators of excellence as first-year student retention, graduation rates and the strength of the faculty.”

A change in this year’s ranking criteria was the inclusion of indicators of a school’s success in promoting social mobility – an area where CUNY has been recognized as a national leader in recent years. U.S. News said it factored in data on graduates who received federal Pell grants, financial aid that typically goes to students from households whose family incomes are less than $50,000 a year. “One impact of adding the two indicators for social mobility into the 2019 Best Colleges rankings is that economic diversity contributes toward 13 percent of the Best Colleges ranking indicators,” U.S. News said.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

###


CUNY Awarded $3.9 Million NSF Grant to Promote Minority Participation in STEM

The National Science Foundation has awarded a five-year, $3.97 million grant to 13 CUNY institutions to increase the number of underrepresented minority students graduating with degrees in the STEM fields—science, technology, mathematics and engineering.

Specifically, the funding will support the efforts of the New York City Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (NYC-LSAMP) to provide training and academic support to STEM majors and prepare students for graduate school and STEM careers. The grant will also be used to broaden minority student recruitment into STEM fields and encourage faculty collaboration across the colleges participating in the initiative. Since its inception at CUNY, the LSAMP program has provided scholarships to more than 3,000 students.

“At CUNY, we take enormous pride in the University’s history of helping generations of low-income, underserved and immigrant students succeed,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Even as perhaps the most racially and ethnically diverse university in the world, CUNY’s commitment to campuses that are inclusive and diverse has never been more central to its mission. This grant helps the University build on that extraordinary legacy in new and exciting ways, creating opportunities for the growing numbers of CUNY students interested in STEM careers.”

Lehman College will oversee NYC-LSAMP. The other participating colleges are Baruch, Queens, Medgar Evers, Brooklyn, The City College of New York, Macaulay Honors College, New York City College of Technology and College of Staten Island; as well as Bronx, Guttman and Hostos Community Colleges. Hunter College will participate by staffing the social science component of the project. An educational psychologist and team from Hunter will document the program’s progress so that the LSAMP model can be replicated at other institutions.

“Receiving this grant is very exciting,” said Lehman College President José Luis Cruz, the grant’s principal investigator and project director. “The NYC-LSAMP program has a long tradition of providing access to quality education programs and life-changing opportunities for CUNY students. With this new grant, even more underserved minority students will have the opportunity to participate and work towards STEM careers that will enrich their lives and also transform the lives of the people they will be serving. The impact of these students in their respective industries, companies and organizations, given the support from the NSF and Louis Stokes Alliance, is incalculable.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

###


CUNY School of Professional Studies Awarded Over $200K for Transformative “U Turn” Project

New York, NY – September 10, 2018 – A two-year grant from Graduate NYC’s College Completion Innovation Fund (CCIF) will support the creation of “U Turn,” a transformative admissions process for working adults at the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS).

U Turn: A Nontraditional Admission Approach for the Post-Traditional Student seeks to increase access to college and improve student success. It creates a holistic admissions process that allows returning adults who would not otherwise be eligible for admission to CUNY SPS to demonstrate proficiency in communication, quantitative analysis, research, project management, and other competencies via an electronic portfolio. Upon admission, the candidate’s portfolio will be reviewed for possible prior learning credit.

“This much-needed support from CCIF will enable the CUNY School of Professional Studies to improve adult transfer students’ success and more effectively serve our adult students,” said Jennifer Sparrow, associate dean for academic affairs. “Our institutional data shows that CUNY SPS transfer students who have earned Credit for Prior Learning graduate up to two semesters sooner than their peers. Our students have indicated that the portfolio process itself is a motivator, reinforcing that prior life and work experience are valued by the institution.”

“I am delighted that Graduate NYC’s College Completion Innovation Fund has given CUNY SPS the opportunity to help adult learners return to college and finish their degrees through an alternative admissions process,” said John Mogulescu, dean of the School. “The project’s focus on providing a fresh start and increased academic momentum for adult students returning to college fits perfectly with the mission of our School, addresses key goals of the University’s Strategic Framework, and represents the kind of innovative thinking that is the hallmark of CUNY SPS.”

Applicants who apply though the U Turn program will also complete an online learning simulation, be provided with support from a dedicated admissions adviser, and develop portfolios of work and life experience to be assessed for credit.

About the CUNY School of Professional Studies

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Affirming its role as a leader in online education, CUNY SPS was ranked in the top 5% in the Nation in U.S. News & World Report’s list of the 2018 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs. Of the institutions listed, CUNY SPS ranks 1st in New York State.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Queens College Godwin-Ternbach Museum to Present From The Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles September 13 – December 13, 2018

Queens, NY, September 7, 2018 – We are pleased to announce From The Desert to the City: The Journey of Late Ancient Textiles, an exhibition placing textiles from Late Antique Egypt into multiple contexts —their original use in the 3rd-7th centuries, their rediscovery in the early 20th century, and their reception in the present day—bringing these colorful remnants of the ancient past to life for to today’s audiences.

Curated by Queens College professor of art history Warren Woodfin in collaboration with museum co-directors Elizabeth Hoy and Brita Helgesen, the exhibition highlights the recent gift of eighty-five textile pieces from the Rose Choron collection to the GTM.

The first part of the exhibition sets the stage for the original use of these textiles, placing them in context with other household and religious objects, all of which provide comparisons for motifs and themes that dominate the textiles: myth, the natural world, and health and prosperity. The GTM’s own Late Ancient objects are joined by important loans from the Brooklyn Museum, including two elements from a large-scale Roman floor mosaic and a selection of architectural and figural sculptures.

The second part of the exhibition addresses the discovery of “Coptic” textiles in the late 19th and 20th centuries, both by the archaeologists who excavated them and the artists who turned to them for fresh inspiration. Here, comparative works highlight the impact of the rediscovery of these textiles on modern art from the visual to theatrical, including drawings by Henri Matisse and costume designs for Jules Massenet’s opera Thaïs.

The third and final section juxtaposes the Late Antique textiles with contemporary works inspired by them. From the Desert to the City features work by Brooklyn artist Gail Rothschild, who has created large-scale paintings directly inspired by the fragmentary condition of the Choron textiles. Figurative works in crochet by Queens-based Caroline Wells Chandler propel stylized late antique figures into bold, humorous, 21st century Technicolor. By tracing the reception of the textile arts of the Late Ancient world into the 21st century, the exhibition will attest to their continued vitality as sources of creative inspiration as well as scholarly insight.

A cultural gem on the Queens College campus, the Godwin-Ternbach Museum boasts a wealth of artworks from antiquity to the 20th century. As always, admission to the GTM is completely free of charge! As with a number of past exhibitions at the museum, Queens College’s students are contributing to the research and writing for the exhibition and accompanying catalogue. This was facilitated through an Art History graduate seminar taught in Spring 2018 by Warren Woodfin. The full color catalogue presents essays by Jennifer Ball, Glenn Goldberg, Elizabeth Hoy, Thelma Thomas, and Warren Woodfin, along with contributions from Queens College graduate students in Art History.

From The Desert to the City is open Monday–Thursday: 10am–5pm and Saturday: 11am–5pm. The opening reception will be Thursday, September 13 from 6–8 PM. Additional information on public programs is available at www.gtmuseum.org.

The Godwin-Ternbach Museum is located in 405 Klapper Hall at Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard in Flushing, Queens.

ABOUT THE GODWIN-TERNBACH MUSEUM
The Godwin-Ternbach Museum, a part of Queens College’s Kupferberg Center for the Visual and Performing Arts, presents contemporary and historical exhibitions and programs that provide exciting educational opportunities and aesthetic experiences to the Queens College community and residents of Queens, Manhattan and Long Island. As the only collection of art and artifacts in the borough, housing over 6,000 objects that date from ancient to modern times, the museum introduces visitors to works they might not otherwise encounter. Lectures, symposia, gallery talks, workshops, films, concerts, and tours as well as digital displays, catalogues, and an active website, complement and interpret the art on view, to serve the needs and interests of local communities. All exhibitions and programs are free. www.gtmuseum.org

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Baruch College Students to Study Abroad in Asia with Freeman-ASIA Awards

Francesca Adamski, standing in a white blouse, half smilingVivian Chen, standing and smiling in a white blouse and black blazerNatalie Chu, standing ad smiling holding her hands to her neckJoyce Yu, sitting and smiling with flowers in the background

    From l to r: Francesca Adamski, Vivian Chen, Natalie Chu, and Joyce Yu were awarded Freeman-Asia Scholarships

Four Baruch College students earned Freeman-ASIA awards to study abroad during the fall 2018 semester. The program provides scholarships for undergraduate students in the U.S. to study in East or Southeast Asia.

Freeman-ASIA, sponsored by the Freeman Foundation, seeks to strengthen the bonds of friendship between the United States and countries of East Asia. Through education and educational institutes, the foundation hopes to develop a greater appreciation of Asian cultures, histories, and economies in the United States. At the same time, it aims to cultivate a better understanding of the American people and the country’s institutions and purposes by the peoples of East Asia.

According to Valeria Hymas, Director of the Office of National and Prestigious Fellowships Advising, this group of students represent the largest number of Baruch applicants who have received Freeman-ASIA awards in one competition.

“These type of study abroad opportunities are competitive and the requirements for eligibility can be rigorous,” said Hymas.  “To have four students accepted at once for this prestigious scholarship really speaks to the talent, persistence and ambition of our undergraduates.”

Meet the Freeman-ASIA Students

Francesca Adamski (’20), B.S. Political Science & Sociology, Weissman School of Arts and Sciences

Destination: Japan

“I firmly believe studying abroad in will aid me in developing my skillset and present me with situations that necessitate maturity, adaptability, and cross-cultural understanding. These are qualities representative of a competitive job candidate and more importantly, a well-rounded individual who is able to establish meaningful connections with all people.”

Vivian Chen (’19), B.B.A. Finance, Zicklin School of Business

Destination: Taiwan

“I hope to use my experience to develop more of an understanding of the economy, political, and social settings in East Asia, especially since I am an Asian-American student. I want to find a career in which I can utilize my unique background and experience to connect people. I would also recommend students to study abroad in Asia since it is so different from what we are accustomed to in the United States.”

Natalie Chu (’19), B.S. Public Affairs, Marxe School of Public and International Affairs

Destination: Japan

“I’m ecstatic to learn about Japan, its history and politics, and its role in globalization. As someone who aspires to be a Foreign Service Officer in the region, this experience will help aid me in my future endeavors. I will be culturally sensitive enough to understand what is going on in other countries, and equipped with the knowledge and communication skills needed to succeed. Not to mention traveling itself is an eye-opening, self-enriching, invaluable experience that you can share and inspire so many others with.”

Joyce Yu (’19), B.B.A. International Business, Zicklin School of Business

Destination: Japan

“With the help of Freeman-ASIA, I am facing less of the financial burden that comes with studying abroad. Being able to immerse myself in Japanese culture and language is the best part of this experience. My Japanese professors have been incredibly supportive, along with Valeria Hymas, and have made this an opportunity to look forward to.”

# # #


Baruch College Among Washington Monthly’s “Best Bang for the Buck–North” Colleges 2018

Social Mobility Is Key Factor in the Ranking

Baruch College placed #14 of 400 schools on Washington Monthly’s 2018 “Best Bang for the Buck–North” ranking of private and public colleges and universities in the Northeast. This year’s ranking represents a seven-point jump from #21 in 2017. Among public institutions in the Northeast, Baruch College ranked #5.

Baruch also received top rankings in three key categories for the region:

  • #1 in First-Generation Performance
  • #5 Pell Performance
  • #12 Net Price

A Focus on Social Mobility and Affordability

According to Washington Monthly, these rankings are intended to help “non-wealthy students attain marketable degrees at affordable prices.” The publication ranks four-year schools based on their “contributions to the public good” in three equally weighted categories: Social Mobility (recruiting and graduating low-income students); Service (encouraging students to give back); and Research (producing scholarship and graduating PhD students).

Washington Monthly notes, “We give high marks to colleges that enroll lots of low-income students and help them graduate and earn a good living without too much debt.”

Propelling Students Up the Economic Ladder

Baruch College is consistently receiving national recognition for success in advancing social mobility among its diverse student body. In August The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked Baruch College #1 for social mobility among four-year public institutions, according to its 2018 Almanac of Higher Education, a yearly roundup of major stories and research in the world of higher education.

In the spring, the College was named a 2018 Social Mobility Innovator by CollegeNET and has ranked #1 on CollegeNET’s annual Social Mobility Index for the past three consecutive years. Also this year, Baruch College received top billing in CollegeNET’s e-book Social Mobility Through Higher Education – Best Practices for Student Success and is prominently featured in bestselling author Steven Brill’s latest book Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty-Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It.

Money magazine recently placed Baruch College among the top 10 schools on its “Best Colleges 2018” list, based on educational quality, affordability, and alumni success. The magazine cited Baruch as among “The Most Transformative Colleges in the Country” that help “students do far better than would be expected from their academic and economic backgrounds.”

The New York Times also recognized Baruch’s success in promoting social mobility in a series of articles that draw from the Equality of Opportunity Project datasets.

Methodology

For more detailed ranking information, go to Washington Monthly’s explanation of its methodology.

# # #


Finish Fridays: An Innovative Plan Makes Enrollment Easier

At Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), “We are constantly strategizing to streamline the registration and enrollment process,” says Kristin Albright Waters, Director of Enrollment Management Services. “Our goal is to make a student’s first experience with our college a positive one.”
In Summer 2018, the Division of Enrollment Management moved closer to that goal by piloting five “Finish Fridays,” an opportunity for students to visit the campus and work one-on-one with counselors and staff to complete their enrollment ‘To Do’ list.
The choice of Friday as the day to “finish” the business of enrollment happened in response to the natural traffic patterns of students, explains Waters, who led the program.
“We learned that due to work schedules and other constraints, Friday was the day many students chose to visit campus and complete their enrollment—but many times they would find offices closed on a Friday, as BMCC follows the CUNY-wide Summer Fridays schedule,” says Waters. “This made it clear that enrollment services should be accessible to students during more hours throughout the summer months, especially as we enter August.”
To accommodate the Finish Fridays schedule, Enrollment staff alternated with Mondays off—instead of Fridays—and were able to sit down one-on-one with more than 2,300 incoming students to complete enrollment steps and resolve any issues they might have relating to admissions, testing, the registrar, health services, the bursar, the Help Desk and advising.
“I had the pleasure of working one of the Fridays that were designated ‘Finish Fridays’,” says José Altamirano, Admissions Specialist. “Some students were not aware that many CUNY colleges are closed on six Fridays during the summer, and were there to conduct business as normal. Others, quite a few in fact, were pleasantly surprised and grateful that there was a special program open to provide services to them on a day much of the college is closed.”
“Not only did Enrollment Management staff meet with students on campus, they personally called more than 1,000 incoming students to remind them of their To Do List items,” says Waters. “Their commitment to move students through the process in an efficient and supportive way was impressive. We even had enough staff to escort students from service to service, as they went through the steps for registration and enrollment.”
According to Waters, “This sends a strong message—that BMCC supports student success from their very first interaction with the College on into their coursework and completion of their degree.”

BMCC Math Professor Receives $1.5 Million NSF Grant to Create Developmental Math Test

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Mathematics Professor Claire Wladis has received a $1.5 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant—the largest ever received by a BMCC faculty researcher— to develop a test that measures how well college students understand fundamental algebra concepts.

This will be the first test of algebraic conceptual understanding for college students developed and validated in the postsecondary context according to Wladis, who is the Principal Investigator of the five-year research project.

Kathleen Offenholley, Professor of Mathematics at BMCC and Jay Verkullien, Professor of Educational Psychology at the CUNY Graduate Center will serve as the Co-Principal Investigators. BMCC Mathematics Professors Dale Dawes, Elisabeth Jaffe and Audrey Nasar will participate in the research and development of the test.

Elementary algebra and other developmental math courses have long been identified as barriers to student degree progress and completion.  As few as one fifth of the students who get placed into development math courses ever successfully complete a credit bearing math course in college according to data from the Community College Research Center at Columbia University.

At BMCC, almost 80 percent of first-time freshmen require developmental math according to the college’s 2015 Enrollment, Retention and Completion Report.

Wladis and her team will create and validate an item pool of roughly 200 items that test conceptual understanding in algebra.  She says algebraic concepts are critical because without them, students are simply calculating things without actually understanding them.

“That lack of understanding leads to misuse of calculations and mistakes, not just in algebra class, but also for students who go on to take other math classes like statistics and calculus,” said Wladis.

The current CUNY algebra entrance and exit exams test how well students can perform certain algebraic calculations—but the tests do not tell educators why students get certain problems wrong.

“The test that we are developing should provide us with insight into what students are thinking—helping us to pinpoint specific misconceptions, or to identify specific ways of thinking that students are employing when approaching algebra problems,” said Wladis.

The research team plans to recruit math developmental math instructors at BMCC as well as other CUNY colleges to give their students sample questions during class and then provide feedback to the research team.  She expects that approximately 5,500 BMCC students will take the test at some point and another 2,500 students from other colleges will also participate.

“Our hope is that the resulting test will allow instructors to better pinpoint student misconceptions in algebra so that they can address them during teaching, and that it will allow researchers to figure out which methods best help students to learn critical algebra concepts,” said Wladis.


Queens College Students Launch App to Connect Users With Halal Cuisine Through Recipes, Restaurant Mapping and Video Content

— The Hungry4Halal App, a Collaborative Effort of the College’s Tech Incubator and Its Food and Nutrition Program, Began as an Exercise in Cultural Ambassadorship —

Queens, NY, September 7, 2018—One thing became immediately clear to Professor Gina Keatley during sessions of the “Eat and Tell” component of her International Cuisine class at Queens College: few students were familiar with Halal food—food that is permissible or lawful in traditional Islamic law. Keatley, who asks her students to describe a meal to the class each week for “Eat and Tell,” also noticed that when Muslim students spoke about Halal dishes to their classmates, the presentations sparked wider conversations about culture and religion, providing the Muslim students—all of whom were female—with an opportunity to act as cultural ambassadors.

“This is how the Hungry4Halal idea was born,” says Keatley of the free app, which launched August 19 on both iOS and Android platforms. Developed by a team of five students through the college’s Simmer program, “the app fills a need for the user, as well as its creators,” adds Keatley. “Users have an easily accessible way to learn about and enjoy Halal food, and the creators have an opportunity they might not otherwise have had to educate others about aspects of their culture.”

The Hungery4Halal app provides users with eat-in or dine-out options and a video library. The eat-in option features recipes—some contributed by the developers—and a search function that allows users to locate recipes by ingredient or title. The dine-out option uses a mapping function to locate the user and pinpoint the nearest eateries offering Halal selections. The video library is a compilation of cooking how-to demonstrations by the Hungry4Halal team—including bloopers—and from across the web highlighting a wide variety of cultural cuisines featuring Halal food.

The student team that developed the app includes three young Muslim women of Bangladeshi heritage, majoring in food sciences; a young Latino Navy veteran majoring in food sciences; and a young Muslim man of Bangladeshi heritage, who is a computer science major and served as project manager and tech incubator liaison.

“When I think about the best experiences I’ve had working on teams, what comes to mind is the feeling of satisfaction and a sense of accomplishment. I was very motivated to work on the app because I gained valuable tech and business experience. It’s also something I did for my community. By working on the app, I was able to share my knowledge of and experience with Halal food. I think our community will see long-term benefits in sharing aspects of our culture with the world,” says Afroja Mustofa, a Muslim woman on the team who is studying to become a dietitian. Read more about the students and Keatley on the Simmer homepage, under Who we are.

“What an extraordinary demonstration of learning through diversity, something that we are well acquainted with at Queens College,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “A vital component of a diverse learning environment is a faculty skilled in bringing students together in ways that demonstrate there is more that unites than divides us.”

Simmer is a new tech and food collaboration between the Queens College Tech Incubator (QCTI) and the school’s Food, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences Department (FNES) that unites students from multidisciplinary fields to create food- and health-related technologies. Students in the Simmer program gain a deeper understanding of programming language and familiarize themselves with the features of code development and the integrated development environment (IDE). They also gather and create all application, as well as handle marketing and the app launch, providing them with a complete entrepreneurial experience.

“The Hungry4Halal project brought together students who study nutrition and those who study computer science. With Professor Keatley’s encouragement and guidance, the team worked hard to make the app a reality, while they gained skills in business development, design, entrepreneurship, and marketing. It was a great experience for all those involved,” says Ying Zhou, executive director, Queens College Tech Incubator.

With state-of-the-art labs, wireless access, and the largest number of undergraduates majoring in Computer Science in the New York area, Queens College is committed to technology. Recruitment measures and programs supportive of students from underrepresented populations—including those who are the first in their families to earn a college degree—encourage the diversity of our student body. Reflecting the borough in which we are located, Queens College has students from more than 150 nations.

The Department of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences offers a course of rigorous academic study that prepares students for careers in such fields as food management, fashion and textiles, family and consumer sciences teacher education, nutrition and dietetics, nutrition and exercise sciences, and physical education. It also seeks to prepare individuals to work in culturally, racially, ethnically, socioeconomically, educationally, and professionally diverse environments.

About the Queens College Tech Incubator
The Tech Incubator at Queens College highlights the college’s efforts to expand its technology footprint as it continues to be an agent for economic development and prosperity in the borough. The college has cultivated new relationships with a host of business/technology organizations and individuals, who will be invited to serve as “ambassadors” for the incubator. In addition, it has expanded existing partnerships with key organizations, including the Queens Chamber of Commerce and the Queens Economic Development Corporation. The Tech Incubator will also be a resource for the college’s students, who will have opportunities to serve as interns and/or create their own ventures in this facility.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past forty years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Mark Shpizner of Blackrock, World’s Largest Asset Management Firm, Will Discuss How a Liberal Arts Degree is a Tool for Business Success

Business Forum Breakfast
Friday, September 14, 2018 8:00 – 10:00 am

WHAT:
A discussion by Mark Shpizner, director, BlackRock, the world’s largest asset management firm, about how a liberal arts degree can help students develop a skill set to help them advance in a corporate career.

His presentation, From American Studies to Asset Management: The Value of a Liberal Arts Education in Today’s Business Environment, is free and open to the public.

Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5453, or register online here.

Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background: Mark Shpizner is a member of the Financial Markets Advisory (FMA) team at BlackRock. FMA supports clients across a range of advisory services focusing primarily on balance sheet management, capital markets and transaction support, data and analytics, and risk and regulatory matters. Prior to joining FMA in July 2018, Shpizner was part of BlackRock’s Strategic Partner Program (SPP), where he was responsible for delivering the full depth and breadth of BlackRock’s capabilities to a subset of the firm’s largest financial-institution clients. Shpizner also led SPP’s Americas Analyst program.

Before joining BlackRock in October 2014, Shpizner was a vice president at BNY Mellon in the Platinum Client Group (PCG). In this role, Shpizner was responsible for developing deep, mutual, strategic partnerships with a subset of the company’s most complex, top global financial institution clients across Investment Management and Investment Services. Prior to joining PCG in July 2010, Shpizner was a trust associate in BNY Mellon’s Corporate Trust division.

Shpizner is on the Board of Directors of Minds Matter NYC, a not-for-profit organization that transforms the lives of accomplished high school students from low-income families by broadening their dreams and preparing them for college success. Shpizner earned a BA in American studies and English, with honors, magna cum laude, from Northwestern University and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

Launched in 2005, the QC Business Forum brings together the business community, local government, academia, and students to provide an opportunity for town and gown to interact. Influential leaders in a number of fields serve as keynote speakers at its breakfast and lunchtime lectures, touching on issues vital to the local business community.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Baruch College Recognized for Its Diversity by the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education

#1 Ranking in “Environment” for Northeast Schools, #5 Among U.S. Public Institutions

Baruch College earned top placements nationally and regionally for its “environment” in the 2019 Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings. According to WSJ/THE, the list reflects the priority U.S. colleges and universities place on “student success and learning.”

“Environment” Accolades Reflect Baruch’s Diverse Campus

WSJ/THE’s “environment” category—one of four areas ranked—poses the question, will students “find themselves in a diverse, supportive and inclusive environment while they are at college”? In this category, Baruch ranked:

  • #1 for all Northeast schools (of 286 public and private institutions)
  • #5 nationally (of 423 public institutions)
  • #8 nationally (of 968 public and private institutions)

The factors weighted include the make-up of the student body (financial and ethnic diversity; proportion of first-generation and international students) and the diversity of the faculty. Especially telling, according to WSJ/THE, is the school’s proportion of international students, which signals whether it “is able to attract talent from across the world and offers a multicultural campus where students from different backgrounds can, theoretically, learn from one another.” Baruch students speak more than 104 languages and hail from 168 countries.

High Marks: Additional Categories

Baruch College ranked #287 overall, placing it in the top third for all 968 public and private institutions surveyed. Additional standings are:

  • #8 lowest average net price in the Northeast (of 286 public and private institutions)
  • #9 for “outcomes” in the Northeast (of 88 public institutions)—based on graduation rate, graduate salary, academic reputation, and ability to repay student debt
  • #47 lowest average net price nationwide

Methodology

The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings, now in their third year, tabulate 189,000 responses from students to survey questions. Rankings are based on 15 key indicators that assess colleges in four areas: Outcomes, Resources, Engagement, and Environment.

A full explanation of the methodology is available here.

# # #


2018 Equality Indicators Conference

Leaders from Dallas, New York City, Oakland, Pittsburgh, St. Louis,
and Tulsa Will Discuss Using Data to Make Progress Toward Equality/Equity

On Friday, September 7, the Equality Indicators project, of the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG), will host the 2018 Equality Indicators Conference. The full-day conference will feature speakers from Dallas, New York City, Oakland, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Tulsa; all six cities have developed tools to measure progress toward equality/equity and will present their findings at the conference, alongside discussion of the innovative ways they are working to effect change. William Thompson, the chair of the board of trustees of the City University of New York, will deliver the keynote address, while Otis Rolley, managing director at 100 Resilient Cities, pioneered by The Rockefeller Foundation (100RC), will discuss the role of equity in developing resilient cities.

ISLG developed the Equality Indicators project in 2014. The project aims to help cities advance policies and practices to reduce disparities in their areas of greatest concern (e.g., economy, education, health) and increase transparency and accountability around efforts to promote equality. Each city worked closely with community partners and with input from a wide range of stakeholders to develop a robust, tailored tool to measure and track their progress toward greater equality or equity. The tools are based on local data across specific sectors (e.g., economic opportunity, public health) and measure disparities and track changes over time. They provide key metrics that leaders and decision-makers can use to craft more effective policy for their communities.

  • The City of Dallas’s Equity Indicators tool examined 72 indicators within the areas of economic opportunity, education, housing and neighborhoods, justice and government, public health, and transportation and infrastructure.
  • New York City’s Equality Indicators tool includes 96 indicators across the areas of economy, education, health, housing, justice, and services.
  • The Oakland Equity Indicators tool includes 72 indicators across six themes: economy, education, public health, housing, public safety, and neighborhood and civic life.
  • The City of Pittsburgh’s Equity Indicators tool analyzed 80 indicators across four domains: health, food, and safety; education, workforce development, and entrepreneurship; housing, transportation, infrastructure, and environment; and civic engagement and communications.
  • The St. Louis Equity Indicators tool measures 72 indicators across three themes that reflect the priorities of the Ferguson Commission Report: youth at the center, opportunity to thrive, and justice for all.
  • Tulsa’s Equality Indicators tool focuses on 54 indicators across six priority areas: economic opportunity, education, housing, justice, public health, and services.

The conference will be held at the CUNY Graduate Center on Friday, September 7 from 9am to 5pm. RSVP and view the full agenda online.

About the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance

The Equality Indicators is a project of the CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG). ISLG is a nonpartisan research and policy institute within the City University of New York (CUNY). The Institute’s mission is to work with government and non-government organizations to improve systems to produce better results worthy of public investment and trust. We aim to advance data-driven approaches that influence policy and operations and that support work in diverse communities. In short, we help government—and organizations connected to it—do better. We focus on working with cities and states because they are ideal laboratories for developing new approaches to longstanding social problems, and are ripe with opportunities and momentum for real, sustainable change. For more information, please visit equalityindicators.org and islg.cuny.edu.

###

 


CCNY inventor Patricia Broderick addresses global nanotech congress

Patricia A. Broderick, an inventor, researcher and medical professor, is the keynote speaker at the 30th Annual Congress on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials in Stockholm, Sweden.

In recognition of her pre-eminent status in the field, City College of New York inventor, researcher and medical professor Patricia A. Broderick is the keynote speaker at the 30th Annual Congress on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials in Stockholm, Sweden, Sept. 10-11. Her talk is entitled “A Live Imaging Nanotechnology: Sensing the Brain from Spectral Analysis to Neuromolecular Imaging to Voltaic Photonics.”  It focuses on the BRODERICK PROBE®, her unique series of nanobiosensors that have changed the way scientists and doctors view the brain.

Based on nano biotechnology, the probes are biomedical sensing devices, smaller than one strand of human hair. They have proven successful in   sensing exact neuronal transmitters in the temporal lobe brain in epilepsy patients, intraoperatively, during surgery performed at New York University’s Tisch Hospital.

Along with providing online images of the living brain in vivo, Broderick designed the devices to diagnose and treat debilitating neurodegenerative and psychiatric brain disorders. “My keynote focuses on this unique series of nanobiosensors specifically as miniature nanosurgical biomedical devices for epilepsy, Parkinson’s and affective disorders,” she said.

The BRODERICK PROBE® is named after Broderick’s father, Paddy, an Irish immigrant.  The probe is marketed by Eazysense Nanotechnology Incorporated, founded by Broderick in concert with CUNY’s Technology Commercialization Office.

In addition to her keynote address at the biggest annual gathering of nanotech experts in the world, Broderick will pen the welcoming letter to congress participants – a distinction, she noted, that’s never extended to the keynote speaker.

She’s also been asked to deliver a second speech to her nanotech peers on Sept. 11 in Johanneshov, a district of Stockholm.

Broderick will preview her forthcoming book “Neuroimaging, Nanosensing Biochemistry in the Brain,” (Pan Stanford Publishing, Singapore, 2019).

About The City College of New York 
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION $5 MILLION AWARD

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Bronx Community College a $5 million dollar grant for Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (S-STEM) (Department for Undergraduate Education, Award #1833852). This is one of the largest S-STEM grants that NSF has ever awarded to a community college. Principal Investigator Vicki Flaris will implement this grant with Co-Principal Investigators Luis Montenegro, Nancy Ritze and, at Lehman College, Pamela Mills.

Over the next five years, this will benefit 575 Bronx students who are pursuing degrees in math and the sciences. This S-STEM grant will fund a collaboration with Lehman College to provide and coordinate scholarships, research opportunities and faculty mentoring to STEM students while at BCC and as they transfer to continue their studies at Lehman College.

The National Science Foundation $5 Million Award grant for Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (S-STEM).

“This NSF S-STEM grant will help BCC as it builds a community of excellence,” says BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe. “The grant will leverage proven resources — on both ca

mpuses — to provide academically talented, low-income students with academic, financial, advisement, mentoring, career and enrichment supports intended to help them to secure a degree, further their education and enter the STEM workforce.”

The NSF grant also will fund BCC faculty to research, develop and design an instructional model to support these STEM students to persist and succeed in their studies.


Art and Politics Are Inseparable in Little Rock, the Hit Play from Award-winning Playwright/Director Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj ’11 M.F.A.

New York Times Critic’s Pick, the production about the “Little Rock Nine” comes out of the Brooklyn College alumnus’s tradition of bearing witness, testifying, and shining a light on uncomfortable, necessary truths.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

Award-winning writer/director/choreographer/producer Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj ’11 M.F.A. draws on his diverse background and traditions to inform his approach to art.

Little Rock—a play with music, about the lives, tribulations, and triumphs of the nine black students who were the first in the nation to integrate an all-white high school in Little Rock, Arkansas—is a New York Times Critic’s Pick. And while he is overjoyed at the acclaim his work is receiving, what humbles the play’s award-winning playwright/director/choreographer/producer Rajendra Ramoon Maharaj ’11 M.F.A. most is the fact that the members of the “Little Rock Nine,” as they have come to be known historically, had the opportunity to attend the show and give it their stamp of approval.

“It was transcendent,” Maharaj says of the meeting. “They’re in their 70s and 80s now and live all around the world. I believe very much what Dr. Maya Angelou said that if the only prayer you ever say is ‘thank you,’ it will be enough. So to have the Little Rock Nine turn to me, the grandson of a Caribbean-immigrant domestic, a person who grew up without his dad, and say, ‘thank you,’—all the times I was called the n*gg*r, or dot-head, or f*gg*t, or all the things that kids do to bully you when you choose to live a life that is creative, artistic, and free—it all went away. I knew at that moment, I had arrived.”

Born in Brooklyn and raised mostly in Long Island, Maharaj is of Haitian, Bahamian, Trinidadian, and Indian descent, and spent many of his formative years in the West Indies. He says his family and Caribbean heritage was a tremendous influence on his life and the impetus for his understanding that art and activism are not separate endeavors.

“My culture has shaped who I am as an artist and activist. From Junkanoo [an ancestral African festival], with its beautiful elaborate costumes, to going to church and seeing the robes and the nativity—it all lends itself to my passion as a storyteller,” Maharaj says, adding that luminaries like Marcus Garvey, Angela Davis, Dr. Maya Angelou, and James Baldwin impacted him in transformative ways. On the interior of his right forearm, Maharaj has a tattoo of an excerpt from one of Baldwin’s final interviews where he responds to a question about the meaning of his work:

“At the end of the day, my work is this: Witness to whence I came, where I am. Witness to what I have seen and the possibilities that I think I see.”

 

Maharaj completed his undergraduate studies at St. John’s University, receiving degrees in criminal justice and communications. He always knew that he was a creative person, but did not foresee that he was going to be a playwright. He came to Brooklyn College and attended classes with Woodie King, Jr. ’99 M.F.A.—the NAACP Image Award- and Obie Award-winning director and producer known as “the Godfather of Black Theater”—and enrolled in the Department of Theater‘s Master of Fine Arts in Theater Directing.

“I always felt that when I read a play that it was just something I could articulate and be the bridge for. Going to Brooklyn College I knew that I wanted to get my master’s because I wanted to learn how to speak to designers,” says Maharaj.

“That’s the beauty of the program at Brooklyn College and the experience I had there. It was really hands-on. You had to move your own props and your own chairs, and there were dust balls the size of tumbleweeds in the room,” he laughs. “But that all shaped me because I came through the downtown theater scene and kept me honest and humble.”

Many people in the Little Rock‘s very diverse audiences, as well as reviewers, have noted the timeliness of the story and how it echoes the current sociopolitical milieu in the country. Maharaj sees that as a gift and a lesson, particularly for the modern-day African diaspora.

“If these black teenagers could persevere two years after Emmett Till’s death, then who are we today to not be the change we wish to see in the world, to not be stewards of justice, light, and truth? If we have in us even a portion of the resolve the Little Rock Nine had in them, then we come from a mighty stock! And we must never forget that.”

Maharaj has been directing for years. He said he has always seen and interpreted things visually, which is why directing feels most natural to him. But playwriting came to him as a gift after a chance encounter with “the Black Shakespeare,” two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, August Wilson.

 

“Woodie, who founded the New Federal Theatre in New York, was doing a production of one of Wilson’s plays, and during the intermission, I got the chance to meet him and walk with him a little bit. He talked to me about the concept of Sankofa [a Ghanaian philosophy for remembering the past in order to forge an informed present and future] and how as a playwright, your ancestors take a hold of you. You won’t be able to let go of them, and they will guide you. And if you don’t answer the call, they may be lost in time and space.”

Following that conversation with Wilson, Maharaj says he was given three signs that led him to write Little Rock. He was directing Dreamgirls at Arkansas Repertory Theater, visited Little Rock Central High School and learned the students’ stories of courage. He then saw the Little Rock Nine on an episode of the Oprah Winfrey Show, and when some of them came to see Dreamgirls at the Arkansas Repertory Theater, he believed the ancestors were calling upon him to tell the story. Maharaj spent 13 years interviewing the members of the Little Rock Nine as well as many of the residents of the town. Some of them were on the wrong side of history in 1957, but went through a transformation; some remained stuck in their hatred of marginalized peoples.

The challenges that Maharaj faced in getting Little Rock to the stage were not of the artistic kind. Instead, he says, the obstacles came from certain producers.

“They told me as a person of color that you cannot be, as Walt Whitman would say, ‘multitudes.’ You have to be one thing. I have always seen myself as multitudes. Unapologetically. I tell every single person in my tribe that you have to be multitudes, particularly in these very strange political times we’re living in, where people are literally, trying to roll back the clock of history and the progress we have made,” Maharaj says. “We must all become beacons of light and truth. If we do not show up as our fully authentic selves, then, to paraphrase Nelson Mandela, the world is a much dimmer place.”

Little Rock is playing at the Sheen Theater for Thought & Culture in New York until September 8.

 

The Brooklyn College Department of Theater is able to provide its graduate and undergraduate students with the kind of comprehensive learning and experience they need to thrive in the theater world thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. To learn about the various ways to contribute to student success, please visit the foundation website.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Grove School leads national translational medicine program

Dean of CCNY’s Grove School of Enginnering Gilda Barabino [2nd from left] with members of the Brown University team that placed first in the Biomedical Engineering Society Coulter College training program. Barabino and the Grove School crafted the national program held in Minnesota this year.

As the home of New York City’s only Master’s in Translational Medicine (MTM) program, City College’s Grove School of Engineering is a leader in teaching a diverse student population new medical technology. At the 2018 BMES Coulter College – a highly selective summer training program focusing on translation of biomedical innovations — the school incorporated its rigorous standards into the event for top national students.

Gilda A. Barabino, dean of the Grove School, and Jeffrey S. Garanich, who directs its MTM program, led this year’s Coulter College for 48 students and 12 faculty advisors in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Matthew Walker, associate professor of biomedical engineering, Vanderbilt University, was co-lead.

The four-day event hosted by medical device company Medtronic focused on the design of new medical technologies, with emphasis on health disparities and resource-constrained design.

“Clinical, design, and business advisors guided student teams through a highly dynamic process designed to help them better understand how to develop solutions that address unmet clinical needs,” said Barabino, who delivered the opening remarks.

The student teams presented their designs and final projects in a venture capital pitch competition.  Brown University’s four-member team took first place with their concept “ComPaDre,” a solution to communication barriers between doctors and non-English speaking patients.

The winners will make another presentation at the Health Care Disparities symposium at the 2018 Biomedical Engineering Society annual meeting in Atlanta on Oct. 19. Barabino will chair that event, too.

“Jeff Garanich masterfully led the Coulter College and received rave reviews,” noted Barabino. “This type of national leadership in the field is exactly where we should be as we head into the Grove School’s centennial year of exemplary engineering education.”

About the BMES Coulter College
BMES Coulter College is a training program focused on translation of biomedical innovations. Mentors in key design areas guide student teams through a highly dynamic process designed to help them better understand how innovations can meet clinical needs, while providing tools and approaches used to develop novel solutions for identified clinical problems. The program is supported by funding from the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation.

About The City College of New York 
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY SPH researcher helps define subtypes of ovarian cancer

Micrograph of ovarian cancer cellsIn a new paper published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Associate Professor Levi Waldron and colleagues resolved the long-standing controversy over how to define molecular subtypes of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, the most common form of ovarian cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Understanding molecular subtypes of common forms of cancer is important because clinically similar cases may differ in their genetic underpinnings, causes, and outcomes.

“Lumping together potentially different diseases just because they appear similar confuses every effort at prevention or treatment,” said Waldron. “Our results and algorithm will help other epidemiological and clinical studies in determining whether these subtypes are relevant with respect to risk factors, treatments, and outcomes. We found that patient survival depends significantly on their molecular subtype, with the worst prognosis subtype having only half the survival rate of the best prognosis subtype, so we know they are relevant at least to outcomes.”

Several groups have independently performed genomic profiling of cohorts of ovarian carcinomas, in attempts to distinguish such molecular subtypes. Each has reported a different way of defining molecular subtypes. Waldron and colleagues reproduced the three most influential of these subtype classifiers and compared them in a comprehensive meta-analysis on individual patient genomic data. They found, while each of these classifiers assigns every tumor to a single subtype, the algorithms could be tuned to assign confidence levels to these classifications. By allowing classifiers to assign only those tumors they have high confidence in, these discordant classifiers defined by different research groups using different cohorts of patients became more self-consistent and more consistent with each other. Waldron and colleagues proposed a “consensus classifier” algorithm that identifies tumors that can be confidently classified. Ongoing work aims to understand whether the remaining tumors are ambiguous because they contain a mixture of subtypes, or whether they are indeterminate at all levels.

“We hope this study will help put to rest the ongoing questions of how to define subtypes of ovarian cancer and will provide a model for how to define and compare molecular subtypes for other cancer,” said Waldron.

The project was done in collaboration with investigators from the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Canada, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and the University of Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Center in Birmingham.

Chen GM, Kannan L, Geistlinger L, Kofia V, Safikhani Z, Gendoo DMA, Parmigiani G, Birrer MJ, Haibe-Kains B, Waldron L: Consensus on Molecular Subtypes of High-grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma. Clin. Cancer Res. pii: clincanres.0784.2018. doi: 10.1158/1


“We’re on our own”: Home health care workers report inadequate support from employers

Senior woman in wheelchair getting her blood pressure takenHome health care work is not only physically demanding, but also emotionally taxing. Home care workers do an enormous amount of emotional labor to keep clients feeling safe, calm and happy. This work can be rewarding but also very stressful. The stressful aspects often go unrecognized and are not reflected in job descriptions, training, or pay.

CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy researchers Emily Franzosa, a graduate of the doctoral program, and Assistant Professor Emma Tsui led a study examining home health workers’ perceptions of the emotional effects of caring work, how they cope and how they would like to be supported by their employers. The findings were published in The Gerontologist.

The health care aides responded that more connection with their supervisors and the care team, as well as structural supports like paid time off, more control over their schedules, and access to counseling and mental health benefits would help them better cope with job-related stress.

Workers of all kinds are more likely to flourish on the job and stay productive when they are well-supported, Franzosa recently told Home Health Care News. Agencies should make this a priority, she said, especially as funding becomes more dependent on quality of care and patient satisfaction.

“Overwhelmingly, aides told us that they loved their jobs and their clients, but they needed more support. If we’re going to retain a skilled, qualified workforce that can meet the needs of our aging population, we need to acknowledge aides’ emotional labor, and build that into the way we train workers and supervisors, design care plans, and pay for care,” Franzosa says.

Franzosa E, Tsui EK, Baron S. “Who’s Caring for Us?”: Understanding and Addressing the Effects of Emotional Labor on Home Health Aides’ Well-being. Gerontologist. 2018 Aug 17. doi: 10.1093/geront/gny099.


PrEP, interrupted

young man with a PrEP pillThe HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis medication known as PrEP is currently recommended for the prevention of HIV acquisition in populations at higher risk such as gay and bisexual men (GBM). The number of eligible and recommended people taking PrEP, about 136,000 people as of mid-2017, is a significantly small percentage of the number at risk for HIV – about 1.2 million individuals. Although the rate of adoption of PrEP has been increasing over the last several years, with prescriptions having increased 73 percent each year since 2012, there remain concerns that those who are on PrEP may not adhere to the regimen well enough to benefit from its protection. Adherence to a daily PrEP regimen ensures its maximum protective effect, so it is critical to understand how GBM respond and possibly adjust their behavior in the event of missed PrEP doses. In a paper published in the journal AIDS Education and Prevention, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Professor Christian Grov and colleagues examine how users respond when their PrEP regimen is interrupted.

Grov and a team of researchers conducted one-on-one qualitative interviews with 104 GBM in New York City who were on a daily PrEP regimen. Each participant was asked how they “made up” for missed doses, as well as their reflections on how having missed doses impacted their subsequent sexual behavior, if it did. Using thematic analysis, the researchers identified three distinct, but sometimes overlapping, behavioral responses to having missed a PrEP dose: 59 percent of participants reported continuing with their next dose as scheduled, 49 percent described ‘making up’ for a missed dose by taking the medication as soon as possible, within 24 hours of its scheduled dosing time, and 11 percent reported ‘doubling’ their next PrEP dose. When asked whether participants made adjustments to their sexual behavior in response to a missed dose of PrEP, participants provided varied narratives about their behavior after a PrEP regimen interruption. 54 percent reported making no changes to their sexual behavior, 49 percent described adjusting their sexual behavior to minimize risk, and 10 percent said the decision to adjust behavior would be contingent upon how many doses were missed. Many of the participants reported engaging in multiple behavioral responses.

The study found that, for the most part, participants took the PrEP medication in accordance to clinical guidelines. Even when missing a dose, their ‘make up’ methods paralleled recommended courses of action. Currently, CDC guidelines suggest that, in the event of a missed dose, patients should take their pill as soon as they remember—unless this would mean taking two pills within a few hours of each other, in which case patients are advised to wait until their next regularly scheduling dosing time. While participants’ beliefs on how to medically mitigate the effect of a missed dose were in line with current guidelines, participants varied in their reports of how best to navigate sexual behavioral response to minimize HIV risk in after a missed dose, particularly in reference to specific sex acts (e.g., oral versus anal sex). In terms of sexual behavior, Grov explains that participants understood that PrEP was “forgiving” of the occasional missed dose and thus some said they would not change their sexual behavior. For those that did change their sexual behavior, it was always in a way to reduce HIV risk (e.g., abstain from sex, engage in oral sex instead of anal sex, use a condom) but there wasn’t universal agreement on how “much” someone should change their sexual behavior.

The results of the study highlight that PrEP users make decisions about sexual behavior based on an assessment of their protection from PrEP. Though most participants understood that their protection from PrEP decreased with multiple missed doses, there was considerable variation in their beliefs about how much protection was retained for given sex acts. The paper points out that this ambiguity marks not only an important opportunity for healthcare providers serving GBM that are on a PrEP regimen to provide guidance, but also the need for clearer pharmacological data about how variations in PrEP blood concentrations protects against HIV across a variety of sex acts in the hours and days since a dosing lapse began.

Grov suggests that further research in this niche is necessary. “What messages do we need to send to people on PrEP about how safe or unsafe certain behaviors are should they miss one or more doses?” Grov says, suggesting the direction of future research.

Christian G, D’Angelo AB, Flynn AWP, Lopez-Rios J, Pantalone DW, Holloway IW, Whitfield THF, and Parsons JT. “How Do Gay and Bisexual Men Make Up for Missed PrEP Doses, and What Impact Does Missing a Dose Have on Their Subsequent Sexual Behavior?” AIDS Education and Prevention: Vol. 30, No. 4, pp. 275-286.


CUNY SPH researcher receives NSF grant to study the food-energy-water nexus of urban agriculture

Dr. Nevin CohenDr. Nevin Cohen, associate professor of health policy and management at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and research director of the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute, was awarded a three-year, $385,766 grant from the National Science Foundation to measure the food, energy, and water impacts of urban agriculture. Cohen’s project involves colleagues from the Poznan University of Life Sciences (Poland), the Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development (Germany), the University of Portsmouth (UK), AgroParisTech (France), and the University of Michigan (US), who are funded by their respective national science agencies.

The project was one of 15 selected by the Sustainable Urbanization Global Initiative (SUGI), a European Commission-sponsored program to develop innovative solutions to interconnected food, energy and water constraints faced by cities worldwide by encouraging trans-disciplinary research and collaborations with local stakeholders in business, the public sector, and civil society.

The study will involve in-depth evaluations of urban agriculture projects in each of the five countries and the development of a digital platform to aggregate, analyze, and share data on food production, water and energy use, and social and economic impacts. The team will model resource flows of urban agriculture and identify methods to improve efficiency and increase the social, environmental, and health benefits of urban food production. The grant will enable Cohen to build on an existing evaluation study of the Farms at NYCHA, a project that uses large-scale urban agriculture to improve the health and well-being of residents of six large-scale public housing developments across the city.

“This project is much more than just an impact assessment of urban agriculture,” Cohen says. “It aims to build a community of practice among urban farmers, entrepreneurs, community-based organizations and academics that not only addresses critical social and resource challenges but also demonstrates the value of multi-sector, international research collaboration in achieving urban sustainability.”


CUNY SPH professor receives NSF grant to study the food-energy-water nexus of urban agriculture

 

CUNY SPH Associate Professor Nevin Cohen

Nevin Cohen

Dr. Nevin Cohen, associate professor of health policy and management and research director of the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute, was awarded a three-year, $385,766 grant from the National Science Foundation to measure the food, energy, and water impacts of urban agriculture. Cohen’s project involves colleagues from the Poznan University of Life Sciences (Poland), the Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development (Germany), the University of Portsmouth (UK), AgroParisTech (France), and the University of Michigan (US), who are funded by their respective national science agencies.

The project was one of 15 selected by the Sustainable Urbanization Global Initiative (SUGI), a European Commission-sponsored program to develop innovative solutions to interconnected food, energy and water constraints faced by cities worldwide by encouraging trans-disciplinary research and collaborations with local stakeholders in business, the public sector, and civil society.

The study will involve in-depth evaluations of urban agriculture projects in each of the five countries and the development of a digital platform to aggregate, analyze, and share data on food production, water and energy use, and social and economic impacts. The team will model resource flows of urban agriculture and identify methods to improve efficiency and increase the social, environmental, and health benefits of urban food production. The grant will enable Dr. Cohen to build on an existing evaluation study of the Farms at NYCHA, a project that uses large-scale urban agriculture to improve the health and well-being of residents of six large-scale public housing developments across the city.

“This project is much more than just an impact assessment of urban agriculture,” Cohen says. “It aims to build a community of practice among urban farmers, entrepreneurs, community-based organizations and academics that not only addresses critical social and resource challenges but also demonstrates the value of multi-sector, international research collaboration in achieving urban sustainability.”


CUNY researcher helps define subtypes of ovarian cancer

Micrograph of ovarian cancer cellsIn a new paper published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Levi Waldron and colleagues resolved the long-standing controversy over how to define molecular subtypes of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, the most common form of ovarian cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

Understanding molecular subtypes of common forms of cancer is important because clinically similar cases may differ in their genetic underpinnings, causes, and outcomes.

“Lumping together potentially different diseases just because they appear similar confuses every effort at prevention or treatment,” said Waldron. “Our results and algorithm will help other epidemiological and clinical studies in determining whether these subtypes are relevant with respect to risk factors, treatments, and outcomes. We found that patient survival depends significantly on their molecular subtype, with the worst prognosis subtype having only half the survival rate of the best prognosis subtype, so we know they are relevant at least to outcomes.”

Several groups have independently performed genomic profiling of cohorts of ovarian carcinomas, in attempts to distinguish such molecular subtypes. Each has reported a different way of defining molecular subtypes. Waldron and colleagues reproduced the three most influential of these subtype classifiers and compared them in a comprehensive meta-analysis on individual patient genomic data. They found, while each of these classifiers assigns every tumor to a single subtype, the algorithms could be tuned to assign confidence levels to these classifications. By allowing classifiers to assign only those tumors they have high confidence in, these discordant classifiers defined by different research groups using different cohorts of patients became more self-consistent and more consistent with each other. Waldron and colleagues proposed a “consensus classifier” algorithm that identifies tumors that can be confidently classified. Ongoing work aims to understand whether the remaining tumors are ambiguous because they contain a mixture of subtypes, or whether they are indeterminate at all levels.

“We hope this study will help put to rest the ongoing questions of how to define subtypes of ovarian cancer and will provide a model for how to define and compare molecular subtypes for other cancer,” said Waldron.

The project was done in collaboration with investigators from the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Canada, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and the University of Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Center in Birmingham.

Chen GM, Kannan L, Geistlinger L, Kofia V, Safikhani Z, Gendoo DMA, Parmigiani G, Birrer MJ, Haibe-Kains B, Waldron L: Consensus on Molecular Subtypes of High-grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma. Clin. Cancer Res. pii: clincanres.0784.2018. doi: 10.1158/1

 


We’re on our own: home health care workers report inadequate support from employers

Senior woman in wheelchair getting her blood pressure takenHome health care work is not only physically demanding, but also emotionally taxing. Home care workers do an enormous amount of emotional labor to keep clients feeling safe, calm and happy. This work can be rewarding but also very stressful. The stressful aspects often go unrecognized and are not reflected in job descriptions, training, or pay.

CUNY SPH researchers Emily Franzosa, a graduate of the doctoral program, and Assistant Professor Emma Tsui led a study examining home health workers’ perceptions of the emotional effects of caring work, how they cope and how they would like to be supported by their employers. The findings were published in The Gerontologist.

The health care aides responded that more connection with their supervisors and the care team, as well as structural supports like paid time off, more control over their schedules, and access to counseling and mental health benefits would help them better cope with job-related stress.

Workers of all kinds are more likely to flourish on the job and stay productive when they are well-supported, Franzosa recently told Home Health Care News. Agencies should make this a priority, she said, especially as funding becomes more dependent on quality of care and patient satisfaction.

“Overwhelmingly, aides told us that they loved their jobs and their clients, but they needed more support. If we’re going to retain a skilled, qualified workforce that can meet the needs of our aging population, we need to acknowledge aides’ emotional labor, and build that into the way we train workers and supervisors, design care plans, and pay for care,” Franzosa says.

Franzosa E, Tsui EK, Baron S. “Who’s Caring for Us?”: Understanding and Addressing the Effects of Emotional Labor on Home Health Aides’ Well-being. Gerontologist. 2018 Aug 17. doi: 10.1093/geront/gny099.


Important information for our first day of school!

Dear NEST+m families,

Our 2018-2019 school year begins on Wednesday, September 5th, 2018 at 8:20 AM. Unless arriving for a pre-scheduled activity, student entry begins no earlier than 7:30am. Please see below some important information and procedures for the first days of school.

Grades 6-12
Students in Grades 6-12 will be able to view their schedules on Tuesday, September 4th by logging into their PupilPath accounts. If you have forgotten your PupilPath password, visit https://pupilpath.skedula.com/Register/Forgot/ to have reset instructions sent to you.

If your child is entering 6th or 9th grade, or is new to NEST+m this year, a PupilPath invitation code was mailed to you via US mail on Thursday, August 30th. This code will allow you to create an account. If you are not able to access PupilPath before the start of school, 1st period classes will be posted on the 3rd floor. The first day of school for 6th grade students will be an Orientation Day, and teachers will walk their students through all the information that students will need to know.

Students should enter the building as follows:

  • Upper Grades students should enter the building via the Columbia Street entrance, and proceed to their Period 1 classrooms on the 3rd floor.
  • Middle Grades students should enter the building via the main entrance and proceed to their Period 1 classrooms on the 3rd floor.

Lunch is free for all students and will be served in the Cafeteria on the Lower floor. 9th graders have lunch on site at NEST+m; however, students in grades 10-12, with signed permission slips, may leave our campus, staying in close proximity to school grounds. Middle Grade students are not permitted to leave the building for lunch.

Metrocards will be distributed to all eligible students during the first few days of school.
Photos for student IDs will be taken within the first few days of school.

Grades 1-5
Our first day of school is a full day and lunch will be served. The school day runs from 8:20 AM – 2:40 PM.

Please arrive in the courtyard between 8:00- 8:20 AM. There will be clearly marked signs along the perimeter of the courtyard directing you to your designated line-up spot. There, your child will be met by their teacher and escorted into the building. If your child is taking the public/private bus to school on the first day, they will be welcomed into the building and escorted to the Cafeteria (Grades 1 – 2) or Auditorium (Grades 3-5). Students will then be brought to their classrooms.

On Thursday, September 6th, students in Grades 1-2 will proceed to the Cafeteria for line-up through the Columbia Street entrance.

Students in Grades 3 – 5 will proceed to the auditorium for line-up. (As always, breakfast is available for all students beginning at 7:30 AM in the cafeteria.)

Dismissal will take place at your child’s line-up spot in the courtyard at the end of the day. If your child is taking the bus home, they will be brought to their designated bus line-up spot for dismissal.

Our lower grade teams spend many hours, and put immense effort and thought into making class placements that are equitable for all of our students. Later this week, 1-5 families will be receiving a letter via US mail informing them of their child’s teacher assignment.

Kindergarten Students
Our first day of school is a half day for all kindergarten students. Later this week, K families will be receiving a letter via US mail informing them of their child’s teacher assignment. Kindergarten students will be greeted by their teachers in the courtyard and then escorted into their classrooms. Parents are invited into their child’s classroom at 10:30 AM (morning session) and 1:00 PM (afternoon session) where your child will show you around their kindergarten class. Dismissal will take place in the courtyard immediately thereafter.

  • Session I: Student last name A – L, 9:15 AM – 10:45 AM (courtyard line up beginning 9:05 AM)
  • Session II: Student last name M – Z, 11:45 AM – 1:15 PM (courtyard line up beginning 11:35 AM)

Lunch is not served on the first half day of school for Kindergarten students. Lunch service for Kindergarten students begins on Thursday, September 6. We recommend that Kindergarten students bring lunch from home on this day to alleviate potential anxiety and to ease your child’s transitions.

On Thursday, September 6th, your child will again be greeted in the courtyard by their teacher.

Beginning on Friday, September 7th, Kindergarten students will enter our building through the Columbia Street entrance and proceed to the cafeteria. NEST+m Faculty will welcome students at our Columbia Street entrance and escort students into the cafeteria.

A Note About Supply Lists

Bus transportation

  • To find out about parent-organized private bus service, visit: http://www.nestmpta.org/private-bus-service.html
  • To learn more about NYCDOE Public Bussing, please visit this webpage. You will need to stop by the Main Office once school starts and see Marcy Duran, Transportation Secretary, in order to sign up for public bus service.
  • If students have bussing listed on their IEP, they should call Office of Pupil Transportation (718) 392-8855 to check on route information.

Medical Forms

  • The Department of Health Child & Adolescent Health Examination Form, signed by your child’s doctor, can be dropped off in the Main Office during the first couple of week of school. (These are not required every year, but all students new to NEST+m must submit this form).
  • Medication authorization forms for asthmaallergiesdiabetes, or other concerns, must be signed by child’s doctor and parent, and should be dropped directly to the Medical Office in Room 257.

Registration forms
If you are new to NEST+m this year – welcome! – and you have not completed your registration documents, please come to the Main Office to see Eileen Braccia, our Pupil Accounting Secretary.

Have a great remainder of summer!


Baruch College Expands Global Footprint by Forming Partnerships with International Universities

Zicklin School of Business offers first-of-its-kind worldwide MBA/MS dual-degree programs

Baruch College continues to strengthen its global footprint as its Zicklin School of Business, the leading business school within The City University of New York (CUNY) and the top ranked public business school in the City of New York, signed agreements with three Chinese universities and two Italian higher education institutions for students to obtain dual-degrees. The new partners to join the College’s innovative MBA/MS global dual-degree program are Shanghai International Studies University, Renmin University of China, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano and University of Padova.

These five new partnerships add to the existing MBA/MS dual degree programs the College already has with College of Management Academic Studies in Israel (COLLMAN)—which graduated its first cohort of students in June—and Peking University HSBC Business School in China.

Besides these established relationships, Baruch College is looking to create more innovative dual-degree programs and partnerships with high quality academic institutions throughout the world including in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and South America.

How Dual-Degree Program Works

Students enrolled in the MBA/MS global dual-degree programs complete the MBA portion at their respective international institution, and then fulfill the MS portion of the program at Baruch. The MS portion of this dual-degree program lasts approximately 12 months. The total number of credits dual-degree students need to complete at Baruch is 16.5-27 credits.

The Zicklin School offers 10 MS degrees that are highly relevant to today’s global business environment, including: accountancy, entrepreneurship, finance, financial risk management, information systems, marketing, quantitative methods and modeling, real estate, statistics, and taxation.

“We are the pioneers of this MBA/MS global dual-degree program,” said Qing Hu, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Innovation at the Zicklin School of Business. “In the last 10 years, there’s been a surge in demand for specialized MS programs because of the technology-driven, digital economy that now requires specific skills in additional to general management skills. Industries in all sectors are currently undergoing disruption, and managers must possess highly specialized skills in order to navigate a business environment changing at a dizzying rate.”

Dual-Degree Program Benefits

Participating in the MBA/MS global dual-degree programs offer students many career, educational, and cultural advantages. For example, Baruch students in New York City get to interact with international MBA students and expand their global network.

For international students, the dual degree programs significantly enhance their employment opportunities and career potential by receiving an MS degree from a high quality U.S. university. The MBA/MS global dual-degree programs also provide these students exposure to the diverse cultures exemplified by New York City residents and businesses, as well as the ability to study in the “business capital of the world” and gain a truly global perspective and international experience.

# # #


Ad/PR student wins Plank Center travel scholarship

Saam Malik Hassan

The Plank Center for Leadership in Public Relations award winner Saam Malik Hassan.

Saam Malik Hassan, senior in the Ad/PR Program at The City College of New York, is the winner of The Plank Center for Leadership in Public Relations award. The center awards five students $7,500 in travel scholarships to help further their professional development in areas of public relations leadership, mentorship and diversity and inclusion.

Each scholarship provides students with the opportunity to attend two events sponsored by the Center:

  • The inaugural Summit on Diversity & Inclusion in Public Relations where attendees will gain a deeper understanding of D&I in the profession and learn about the barriers to and best practices for growing, mentoring and retaining diverse populations within the field.
  • The “Milestones in Mentoring” Gala honors leaders throughout the profession who, by word and deed, have demonstrated a superior commitment to mentoring others, and who are committed to accelerating the success of others in the field.

During his time in Chicago, Hassan will have an opportunity to gain professional insights and to see, hear from and network with more than 400 successful professionals, educators and students.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Art Exhibit in Queens College Art Center: Dúchas: The Drive Within Showcases Irish, Irish-American and Irish-Inspired Artists Through September 7

Queens, NY, August 28, 2018 The Queens College Art Center in the Benjamin Rosenthal Library will present Dúchas: The Drive Within, an exhibition of work by Irish and Irish-American artists, as well as non-Irish artists whose work is inspired by Irish culture. A diverse array of media is represented, from paintings and drawings to photography, texts, and music. The exhibit is co-sponsored by the Queens College Irish Studies program and the Art Center.

An opening reception, with traditional Irish food and music, was held on Saturday, August 4. Award-winning author Caoilinn Hughes read from her new novel Orchid and the Wasp and signed copies for visitors.

The exhibit is co-curated by Amanda Nocera (Art Center Director), Eileen Colleran Sprague (Irish Studies Acting Director), and James McCaul (one of the featured artists). There will be a closing reception on Thursday, September 6 from 5:30 – 7:30 pm, which will include performances by traditional Irish musicians and dancers, as well as light refreshments.

The exhibit features the work of 13 artists, many of whom were born in Ireland or have Irish citizenship. Among them are the late Viola and Orwin Moynagh, a mother and son who were self-taught painters in Ireland. Featured artists Jim Tynan and Alen MacWeeney have both had their photos appear in numerous publications. Two Queens College graduates with Irish roots, Alexandra Dolan-Mescal and Tim Keane, also have their work displayed.

Additional participants are Dublin native Jo Cumminsis, an illustrator and graphic designer, Irish-born painters Bernard Reynolds and Peter Hendrick, and Brooklyn’s Jim Ebersole, who specializes in painting landscapes and urban scenes. Co-curator James McCaul, an abstract expressionist, Colleen Deery, a Queens-based painter whose work is inspired by a strong spiritual connection and her Irish ancestry, and Mary Tritschler, a spontaneous expressionist painter from Dunmore East, Ireland, round out the list of artists.

The exhibit is free and open to visitors through September 7, Monday through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm.

All visitors are required to show ID at the security desk on the main level of Rosenthal Library in order to enter. The exhibition is on the 6th floor, accessible via nearby elevators.

About the Queens College Irish Studies Program
The Queens College Irish Studies Program, established 45 years ago, is among the oldest such programs in the nation. Students my take courses in Irish history, folklore, literature, and language. The related Queens Irish Oral History Project is an effort to record and preserve the memories of Irish immigrants to the borough of Queens. Go to qcirishstudies.org for more info.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Victoria Ngo joins CUNY SPH

Victoria Ngo

Victoria Ngo

Victoria Ngo has joined CUNY SPH as an Associate Professor of Community Health and Social Sciences, and as Deputy Director of CUNY SPH’s Center for Innovation in Mental Health. She will lead CIMH in evaluation efforts and growing the CIMH as a place of innovation and leadership in mental health.

Victoria joins us from RAND where she served as a behavioral and social scientist. Also a clinical psychologist, she has expertise in developing, evaluating, and implementing evidence-based treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, for depression, anxiety, and trauma in diverse communities in the United States and abroad. Her research pays particular attention to understanding and promoting implementation strategies that can increase access and quality of evidence-based mental health services for ethnic minorities and underserved populations worldwide. Ngo specializes in implementation strategies, such as use of community partnerships, task-shifting evidence-based practices, and integration of mental health care into more accessible service settings, including primary care, maternal health, and HIV services.

Since 2000, she has worked to develop research and clinical training capacity and infrastructure in Vietnam, including development of the first graduate program in clinical psychology and development and evaluation of the Multicomponent Collaborative Care for Depression (MCCD) program, which was the first program to integrate mental health services into the primary care system in Vietnam.  Following this, she developed LIFE-DM, an integrated depression care and microfinance program to break the cycle of depression and poverty for economically disadvantaged women, which was effective in reducing depression and improving economic outcomes. Through the support of NIMH and Grand Challenges of Canada, both the LIFE-DM and the MCCD program are being scaled up and evaluated in Vietnam currently.  In Uganda, she developed depression services for HIV patients and is now leading an effort to integrate depression care into perinatal services for HIV positive pregnant women.

Ngo also has taken leadership roles in minority mental health policy efforts in the United States, including membership in the State of Tennessee Mental Health Planning Council Cultural Competence Committee (2001-2004) and chairing the State Cultural Competence Committee Service System Task Group (2004) and contributing to policy efforts to promote advancement of global mental health research and services.

Ngo earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Vanderbilt University. Her passion and commitment to working in ethnic minority and other underserved communities comes from her own experience as a Vietnamese refugee.


President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez Announces That Queens College Has Joined Nation-Wide Initiative to Advance Workplace Diversity and Inclusion

— Coalition Expands Reach and Impact into the Business
and Higher Education Community —

QUEENS, NY, August 24, 2018 – Queens College of The City University of New York has joined the growing nation-wide coalition pledging to advance diversity and inclusion in the workplace. One of more than 450 CEOs that have come together for CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™, President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez is committing himself and Queens College to advance diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

By signing on to this commitment, Queens College is pledging to take action to cultivate a workplace where diverse perspectives and experiences are welcomed and respected and where employees feel encouraged to discuss diversity and inclusion. The collective of more than 450 signatories have already shared nearly 500 best known actions, exchanging tangible learning opportunities and creating collaborative conversations via the initiative’s unified hub, CEOAction.com.

“Queens College enthusiastically endorses the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion,” says Matos Rodriguez. “Since the college was founded in 1937, we have offered an outstanding education to talented students without regard to their background or financial status, and maintain a campus that is diverse, inclusive, collegial, and respectful. We attract a multiethnic, multi-faith, and multilingual student body, which allows people to break down cultural barriers through shared activities. This experience prepares individuals to enter—and appreciate—the global economy. We are proud of what we have achieved so far and look forward to creating an even more welcoming environment for all members of the Queens College community.”

Part of the college’s mission, as noted in its current strategic plan, is to maintain a campus that is diverse, inclusive, collegial, and respectful.

“We are making every effort to increase the diversity of our students and our faculty to better reflect the population of our home borough, which draws its residents from all over the world,” adds Matos Rodriguez. “Our Office of Compliance and Diversity Programs prepares the college’s annual Affirmative Action Plan and provides on-campus information and training regarding discrimination prevention, including sexual harassment prevention.”

Organizations joining the pledge are taking a step towards effecting positive change. A diverse and inclusive workforce facilitates community, but also drives innovation and creativity. A recent study found that 85 percent of those surveyed reported that diversity is a key component to fostering innovation.

CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™ is cultivating a new type of ecosystem centered around collaboration and sharing. The actions, available via CEOAction.com, showcase real-life examples of the open and transparent conversations to cultivate more diverse and inclusive workplace environments. The addition of new signatories expands the impact of this work beyond the office to communities and industries.

The CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™ is led by a steering committee of CEOs and leaders from Accenture, BCG, Deloitte US, The Executive Leadership Council, EY, General Atlantic, KPMG, New York Life, Procter & Gamble, and PwC. The coalition represents 85 industries, all 50 US States, and millions of employees globally.

“We are so proud that we are continuing to build momentum and support for the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™ across companies, industries, and regions. This collaboration expands our reach and brings in unique values, actions and perspectives to continue to raise the bar for the entire business community,” said Tim Ryan, U.S. Chairman and Senior Partner of PwC and chair of the steering committee for the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™. “The overwhelming support for the coalition has been amazing to see and with each and every new organization signing on, we have the opportunity to put our commitments into action by working together to improve diversity and inclusion in our workplaces and communities.”

To learn more about the pledge, visit CEOAction.com. The website serves as a hub for information sharing, idea generation, and program development. With nearly 500 best known actions shared, companies that are not currently implementing the elements of the pledge can use it as an opportunity to learn from others that are already doing so. Learning from, and sharing, actions help companies drive greater engagement within their own programs, as well as mentor others on their journey.

About President Félix V. Matos Rodriguez
Félix V. Matos Rodriguez became the tenth president of Queens College of the City University of New York in August 2014 after five years as president of Hostos Community College, CUNY. His career spans both academia and the public sector: from 2006 to 2008,

Matos Rodriguez served as Puerto Rico’s cabinet secretary to the Department of Family Services. A native of Puerto Rico, he is a cum laude graduate in Latin American Studies from Yale University and received his PhD in history from Columbia University. Matos Rodriguez has published extensively and taught in the fields of Women’s, Puerto Rican, Caribbean and Latino Studies and Migration. At Hunter College, CUNY, he also directed its nationally renowned Center for Puerto Rican Studies. Matos Rodriguez, who served as Grand Marshal of the 2012 Puerto Rican Day Parade, has received numerous awards and honors including the Citizens Union Community Leadership Award and ASPIRA of New York Circle of Achievers Award. In 2017, he was elected as board chair of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU). Matos Rodríguez is married to Dr. Liliana M. Arabia, a dentist, and they have two sons: Lucas and Juan Carlos.

About CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™
CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™ is the largest CEO-driven business commitment to advance diversity and inclusion within the workplace. Bringing together more than 400 CEOs of America’s leading organizations, the commitment outlines actions that participating companies pledge to take to cultivate a workplace where diverse perspectives and experiences are welcomed and respected, employees feel comfortable and encouraged to discuss diversity and inclusion, and where best known—and unsuccessful—actions can be shared across organizations. Learn more at CEOAction.com and connect with us on Facebook: CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion and Twitter: @CEOAction.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY Researcher Surveys Clinical Abortion Practices for Quality

Gynecological chair in gynecological room.

Clinical abortion practices impact a sizable portion of reproductive-aged women in the United States, with nearly one in four women (23.7 percent) undergoing an abortion by age 45.

In its recent comprehensive review of abortion care in the U.S., the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identified evidence-based practice and the availability of trained providers as critical components of quality care. Determining the extent to which abortion practices align with evidence-based guidelines is important to ensure quality, as well as to protect providers against spurious liability claims and forge future research priorities.

In a study published by the journal Contraception, CUNY SPH Associate Professor Heidi Jones and colleagues assessed whether first-trimester aspiration abortion practices of U.S. providers agree with evidence-based policy guidelines.

The researchers found the practices to be largely in accordance with current evidence-based guidelines. The study recommends continued research into very early abortion provision, pain management, optimal antibiotic prophylactic regimens, and the impact of allowing support persons to accompany patients during abortion procedures.

“These findings may explain why these procedures have such a phenomenal safety record,” Jones said.

White KO, Jones HE, Lavelanet A, Norman WV, Guilbert E, Lichtenberg ES, Paul M. First-trimester aspiration abortion practices: a survey of United States abortion providers. Contraception. 2018 Aug 17


ICYMI: IN METRO OP-ED, CHANCELLOR RABINOWITZ: THIS IS AN EXCITING TIME IN UNIVERSITY’S HISTORY

Metro New York today published an op-ed by Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. The text of the op-ed is available below and can be viewed online here.  Chancellor Rabinowitz also recorded a message welcoming students, faculty and staff back to CUNY campuses across the City.  The message can be viewed here.

By Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz

Throughout the city this week, more than a quarter of a million students are beginning classes on the 25 campuses of The City University of New York, an annual ritual that reaffirms CUNY’s long-standing and inseparable connection with the city.

This is an exciting time in the University’s history, one marked by prestigious awards for our students and faculty and national acclaim for our senior and community colleges.

In the past two weeks, CUNY colleges have figured prominently in the rankings of the Chronicle of Higher Education and Money magazine, among other publications. The rankings take a variety of factors into account, including tuition charges, alumni earnings and social mobility, a measure of a school’s success in lifting low-income students into the middle class.

The rankings affirm research by leading economists showing that CUNY’s singular quality, affordability and diversity set it apart as perhaps the most potent engine of economic advancement in the United States.

Not surprisingly, that quality, affordability and diversity have fueled a surge in enrollment over the past 10 years of 40,000 students – an increase roughly equivalent in size to the student body of the University of Michigan!

As we grow, we do more and more to ensure that our students are graduating on time and pursuing successful careers. CUNY is on the cutting edge of implementing academic strategies and programs that help students to navigate intractable challenges and achieve their goals.

Throughout my 40-year career at CUNY, I’ve always embraced what makes our community dynamic and special. CUNY is arguably the most diverse university in the nation, if not the world, in all the ways that matter: race, ethnicity, country of origin and languages spoken at home, gender identity, sexual orientation, and religious affiliation and observance.

That diversity is not happenstance. We are built for the students we have, and out of this grows our sense of purpose.

###

 


Developing church-based health interventions for African-Americans and Latinos

In the United States, African-Americans and Latinos have substantially higher burdens and poorer outcomes than whites on a number of health conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, HIV, and obesity.

Many complex factors contribute to this disparity, including reduced access to quality healthcare and reduced utilization of healthcare including important primary preventive services. One option for addressing this disparity is through partnerships between public health providers and faith-based organizations. These partnerships can increase the capacity of health departments and the broader public health community to access underserved populations.

Together with researchers from the RAND Corporation and community partners from the Los Angeles Metropolitan Churches, CUNY Graduate School of Public Heath and Health Policy Professor Karen Flórez helped develop a multi-ethnic, multi-denominational faith and public health partnership in South Los Angeles to address health disparities through community-based participatory research (CBPR). A report detailing the results was published in the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.

The report notes that a diverse staff with deep ties in the faith community, both among researchers and the primary community partner agency, was key to recruiting African-American and Latino churches. Involvement by local health department and community health clinic personnel provided technical expertise and support regarding health data and clinical resources. Selecting a health issue (obesity) that affected all subgroups (e.g., African-Americans and Latinos, women and men, children and adults) garnered high enthusiasm among partners, as did including some innovative aspects such as a text/e-mail messaging component and a community mapping exercise to identify issues for advocacy.

The researchers found that building partnerships through which multiple CBPR initiatives can be done offers efficiencies and sustainability in terms of programmatic activities, though long-term infrastructure grants, institutional support, and non-research funding from local foundations and health systems are likely needed.

“This study highlights the importance of working with community partners to develop effective interventions for vulnerable communities, but also all the complex factors that must be addressed if we want to ensure that public health interventions have long-lasting changes in these same communities,”Flórez says.

Derose KP, Williams MV, Branch CA, Flórez KR, Hawes-Dawson J, Mata MA, Oden CW, Wong EC. A Community-Partnered Approach to Developing Church-Based Interventions to Reduce Health Disparities Among African-Americans and Latinos. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2018 Aug 17.


Developing church-based health interventions for African-Americans and Latinos

In the United States, African-Americans and Latinos have substantially higher burdens and poorer outcomes than whites on a number of health conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, HIV, and obesity.

Many complex factors contribute to this disparity, including reduced access to quality healthcare and reduced utilization of healthcare including important primary preventive services. One option for addressing this disparity is through partnerships between public health providers and faith-based organizations. These partnerships can increase the capacity of health departments and the broader public health community to access underserved populations.

Together with researchers from the RAND Corporation and community partners from the Los Angeles Metropolitan Churches, CUNY SPH Professor Karen Flórez helped develop a multi-ethnic, multi-denominational faith and public health partnership in South Los Angeles to address health disparities through community-based participatory research (CBPR). A report detailing the results was published in the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.

The report notes that a diverse staff with deep ties in the faith community, both among researchers and the primary community partner agency, was key to recruiting African-American and Latino churches. Involvement by local health department and community health clinic personnel provided technical expertise and support regarding health data and clinical resources. Selecting a health issue (obesity) that affected all subgroups (e.g., African-Americans and Latinos, women and men, children and adults) garnered high enthusiasm among partners, as did including some innovative aspects such as a text/e-mail messaging component and a community mapping exercise to identify issues for advocacy.

The researchers found that building partnerships through which multiple CBPR initiatives can be done offers efficiencies and sustainability in terms of programmatic activities, though long-term infrastructure grants, institutional support, and non-research funding from local foundations and health systems are likely needed.

“This study highlights the importance of working with community partners to develop effective interventions for vulnerable communities, but also all the complex factors that must be addressed if we want to ensure that public health interventions have long-lasting changes in these same communities,”Flórez says.

Derose KP, Williams MV, Branch CA, Flórez KR, Hawes-Dawson J, Mata MA, Oden CW, Wong EC. A Community-Partnered Approach to Developing Church-Based Interventions to Reduce Health Disparities Among African-Americans and Latinos. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2018 Aug 17.


The Chronicle of Higher Ed Ranks Queens College in Top 1% of All U.S. Colleges for Upward Social and Economic Mobility

FLUSHING, NY, August 24, 2018—The results of a recent study, as reported on this week in the Chronicle of Higher Education, provides insight into how well Queens College is propelling students up the economic ladder. The Chronicle’s list is drawn from Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility, the widely reported study in which a team led by former Stanford economics professor Raj Chetty assessed colleges’ impact on social m­obility.

The study tracked students from nearly every U.S. college, including non-graduates, and measured their subsequent earnings against millions of anonymous tax filings and financial-aid records. It looked at how well colleges helped students whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent of income levels reach the top 20 percent for individual earnings. Queens College ranked in the top 1% of all colleges, public and private, and was listed 11th among the top 20 four-year public colleges.

“The Stanford University study powerfully demonstrates that when it comes to economic mobility, Queens College—now in its 81st year of serving the people of New York—is making a larger impact than virtually every other college in the country,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “When our students—rich in ambition, talent, and creativity—are given the advantage of a high-quality, world-class faculty, they become the backbone of our city and state workforce.”

Queens College’s social mobility track record also helped it earn a place in the top quarter of Money magazine’s August ranking of the “Best Colleges for Your Money.” The magazine measured colleges by 27 criteria.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. It also contributes to the city’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any New York City college. Students from across the country and around the world come to the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

The college enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


$945K NSF grant for CDI’s David Jeruzalmi

David Jeruzalmi, JillianChase and Silas Harley

As scientists have learned from working on diseases like HIV and Tuberculosis, sometimes the best way to develop a new therapy is to think about how it might work in combination with other therapies. In order to do that, it’s important to identify, visualize, and modify new targets so a disease can be attacked from multiple vantage points.

David Jeruzalmi, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the City College Center for Discovery and Innovation and his team have identified and visualized a three-dimensional model of a new target AND a helicase protein that can modify it – opening and closing it (like a vault) at the origin of DNA replication.

The National Science Foundation has issued a $945 thousand grant to fund the project as well as four years of follow-on studies related to the helicase protein. The project’s official name: Molecular mechanisms of bacterial helicase assembly and activation at a replication origin.

Jeruzalmi’s team is one of the only groups working on this particular new target. So their ability to visualize the target and how the protein can modify it could provide a new potentially powerful arrow with which to attack the target.

Two doctoral students, Jillian Chase and Silas Harley are contributing to the research. Jeruzalmi is quick to add “The award owes a lot to the New York Structural Biology Center, an independent facility on CCNY’s south campus which houses a large collection of electron microscopes, and excellent personnel to assist in their use. We couldn’t have gotten this far without ready access to this unique resource.”

It’s worth noting that 95% of the new drugs approved in the last 16 years were highly correlated with being able to visualize the 3-dimensional structure of the target. This means that scientists who use Jeruzalmi’s basic research in the future to help them develop new drugs could have an increased chance of approval.

 

About The City College of New York 
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Media contact: jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu


What I did this summer: the Pixar Story Summit

Pilar Newton at Pixar HQ

Pilar Newton making friends at Pixar

The eyes have it!

Summer is ending. But the fun continues for Pilar Newton, an Adjunct Professor who teaches 2D animation in Electronic Design and Multimedia. Newton was one of two City College faculty members who got to spend a few days in her happy place – Pixar Animation Studios. And now she gets to bring what she learned into the classroom.

Newton was thrilled to be part of the Pixar Education Story Development Summit. “Pixar was amazing! A whirlwind of famous character statues; meetings with legendary story artists, a talk by Adrian Molina the Co-director/Co-writer of Coco (who started as an intern at Pixar). Not to mention the homework.”

Yes, homework. Newton and 16 other educators from across the nation (including Philip Birch—also from CCNY’s EDM Program) were given a surprise assignment and a tight deadline. Using Khan Academy’s Pixar in a Box as their starting point, they had to come up with a story, then bring it to life as a storyboard and pitch it to Pixar.

“It was a masterclass in storytelling and critique that I can’t wait to share with my students”, said Newton. “Storytelling underpins everything we do. I look forward to sharing what I learned to help students create their own

story, character, story structure, and storyboard. They’ll pitch their work and learn how to give and receive feedback – which is important because criticism can make the work better. The end goal is to help students come away with a strong portfolio piece that helps them get the attention of festivals and studios.”

About The City College of New York 

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and

visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

« BACK TO NEWS

Media contact: Rebecca Rivera, rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu


Baruch College Earns #1 Ranking for Social Mobility from The Chronicle of Higher Education

New York, NY – August 22, 2018 – Baruch College ranked #1 for social mobility among four-year public institutions, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s just-released 2018 Almanac of Higher Education, a yearly roundup of major stories and research in the world of higher education. Baruch College topped the list with a social mobility rate of 12.9 percent, ahead of eight other City University of New York schools, all of which were ranked among the top 20.

In the Chronicle’s new ranking, “Colleges With the Highest Student-Mobility Rates, 2014,” mobility rate is defined as the percentage of all students who attended a particular college and who met both of the following conditions: They had parents in the bottom 20 percent of the national income distribution among those in their birth cohort, and in 2014, they reached the top 20 percent of the national income distribution for their birth cohort.

“We are pleased to be recognized by The Chronicle of Higher Education for our social mobility leadership and academic success,” says Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD. “Higher education plays an essential role in addressing the worsening socioeconomic gap that currently exists in our country, and Baruch’s extremely low tuition, high quality academic programs, and extensive support services have helped generations of students, and their families, move permanently to a higher economic status. At Baruch College, we take enormous pride in our students’ success and their high rate of graduation. The American Dream is alive and well here.”

Additional data in support of Baruch’s top ranking included:

  • Median parent household income: $42,800
  • Median child earnings (2014): $57,600
  • Parents in bottom 20 percent of income distribution: 27.6 percent
  • Children from bottom 20 percent who reached top 20 percent: 46.8 percent

The Chronicle’s list was drawn from a widely reported study of colleges’ impact on social mobility by a team led by Harvard economics professor Raj Chetty (formerly of Stanford University). The team’s 2017 study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility,” tracked students from nearly every U.S. college, including nongraduates, and measured their subsequent earnings against millions of anonymous tax filings and financial aid records.

In the Spotlight for Social Mobility Success

Baruch College’s success propelling graduates into the middle class and beyond has been garnering national accolades for years. Baruch College was named a 2018 Social Mobility Innovator by CollegeNET and has ranked #1 on CollegeNET’s annual Social Mobility Index for the past three consecutive years. The College received top billing in CollegeNET’s just-published e-book “Social Mobility Through Higher Education – Best Practices for Student Success” and is prominently featured in bestselling author Steven Brill’s latest book Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty-Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It. Both publications position Baruch College as among those exemplary higher education institutions leading the national dialogue on social mobility and successfully propelling low-income students up the socioeconomic ladder.

In addition, Money magazine recently placed Baruch College among the top 10 schools on its “Best Colleges 2018” list, based on educational quality, affordability, and alumni success. The New York Times also recognized Baruch’s success in promoting social mobility in a series of articles that draw from the Equality of Opportunity Project datasets.

Methodology

The students in the current study were born between 1980 and 1982, and their college attendance was measured when they were between the ages of 19 and 22, roughly in the early 2000s. Parental income is the average annual household total income before taxes and transfers over the five years when the child turned ages 15 to 19; parental income is adjusted for inflation to 2015 dollars. Children’s earnings are the sum of their individual wages and self-employment earnings in 2014. Students who attended colleges are included even if they did not graduate. Colleges with fewer than 300 students in the average cohort for 1980, 1981, and 1982 were excluded from the ranking.

Media Contact

Evan Nemeroff, (646) 660-6146, or evan.nemeroff@baruch.cuny.edu

# # #


Baruch College Launches First Digital Portal to Archives from the Institute of Public Administration

Rare Historical Collection Contains Trove of Images, Items, and Memorabilia, Majority Never Before Available to the Public     

Newly digitized by Baruch College, image from the IPA collection: "The New York Primer," a 1939 picture book school problems, by Luther Gulick and Rudolf Modley, founder of Pictorial Statistics 

Newly digitized by Baruch College, image from the IPA Collection: “The New York Primer,” a 1939 picture book on school problems, by Luther Gulick and Rudolf Modley, founder of Pictorial Statistics

NEW YORK, NY – August 21, 2018 – Baruch College has launched the first digital portal to historic materials on government reform from the Institute of Public Administration (IPA) at www.baruch.cuny.edu/library/ipa.

At a time of widespread disdain for government and public service, the new online archive, funded by Carnegie Corporation of New York, offers fresh insights into model operations of local and national governance in America.

Founded in 1906 as the Bureau of Municipal Research, the IPA with its motto, “An Adventure in Democracy,” represented a revolt against systemic national and local municipal corruption at the dawn of the 20th century, a revolution fostered by titans like Andrew Carnegie, E.H. Harriman, and John D. Rockefeller Jr., and masterminded by a pioneer of public administration, Luther Halsey Gulick III.

For several years, archivists from the College’s William and Anita Newman Library have been processing and digitizing thousands of pages of city records, files, memorabilia, historic photos, and other documents—most of which have never before been seen by the public.

This new digital library features 175 reports from 1920 to 1959, as the first phase of a longer-term effort to make large portions of the IPA collection accessible online to students and scholars. Highlights of the collection include:

· Rare studies of police practices in crime-troubled cities like Chicago, New Orleans, East St. Louis, Baltimore and New York, and the origins of Uniform Crime Reporting, by the nation’s preeminent expert in policing, Bruce Smith.

· Luther Gulick’s struggle to reorganize the executive branch for Franklin D. Roosevelt, creating the powerful modern Presidency instrumental in battling the Great Depression and World War II.

• Historic reports on New York City financial problems and commercial trends – including a 1941 study of the soon-to-vanish garment industry – charting the city’s path to world metropolis.

“We have begun by digitizing a series of reports produced by the IPA on a wide range of topics, such as snow removal, police reform, and local governance,” said Professor Jessica Wagner Webster, Digital Initiatives Librarian and Director of the Project at Baruch College. “Researchers can keyword search across the full text of all of these reports, allowing them to locate all the material produced on a specific topic or region. We are thrilled to be able to provide access to these materials, and look forward to continuing to digitize this rich collection.”

This project was made possible through philanthropic support from Carnegie Corporation of New York, whose century-long history of generous support for effective and accountable government enabled Baruch College to begin the preservation, organization, and digitization of the IPA Archive for the benefit of the public, scholars and researchers. The history of the project is told in the Archives’ blog, An Adventure in Democracy.

According to Professor Wagner Webster, the next phase of the project will be the digitization and posting of reports from 1907-1919 as well as records of Luther Gulick’s role in World War II. The public will be able to access and study:

• The investigation that brought down the Manhattan Borough President and established the Bureau of Municipal Research as preeminent crusaders for good government.

• Gulick’s copy of the 1945 Potsdam Ultimatum demanding that Japan surrender unconditionally or face complete destruction.

• A series of Public Affairs pamphlets dealing with racism, prostitution and other pressing issues.

• Charts showing how Gulick’s refugee organization saved some half a billion war victims.

LUTHER HALSEY GULICK III: THE MAN BEHIND THE ARCHIVELuther Halsey Gulick III

The IPA, and its predecessor organization, the New York Bureau of Municipal Research, spearheaded municipal reform in America at the dawn of the 20th century. Its guiding spirit was Luther Halsey Gulick III (1892-1993), New York’s first City Administrator, who joined the BMR in 1915 and trained alongside future power broker Robert Moses before Gulick went on to head the IPA throughout his celebrated career.

Gulick’s imprint on public administration was legendary throughout the United States and the world. “No question he was the leading reformer of the 20th century,” says Kenneth J. Meier, Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Chair of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University. Gulick served as a prime consultant to the federal government during World War II, working for the National Resources Planning Board, the War Department, War Production Board, and the Office of Foreign Relief and Rehabilitation Operations. In the 1950s into the 70s, he was involved in numerous international projects, including implementing a national development plan in Iran, saving the flood-threatened monuments of ancient Egypt, and executing new water supply policies in Calcutta, India.

BARUCH COLLEGE: CARETAKER OF GULICK’S COLLECTION

In 2014, more than 700 cartons of IPA files and Gulick’s personal papers were donated to Baruch College. This trove of documents and materials—ranging from a letter to Gulick from Albert Einstein to Gulick’s 1946 credentials for the Nuremberg Trial where he cataloged the evidence against Nazi leaders, and his collection of Depression-era scrip — forms the basis of the IPA collection.

Baruch College is a natural home for the IPA Archive thanks to its long-standing commitment to education in the field of public administration, which began with the founding of its School of Business and Civic Administration in 1919 and goes back to its 1847 origins as the Free Academy, the first tuition-free public institution of higher education in America. Baruch today is proud to include the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, whose 54 full-time faculty will be active users of the collection.

According to David Birdsell, Dean of the Marxe School, “Having the archive on campus is both a tremendous resource and an inspiration. Luther Gulick set a very high bar for careful, evidence-based analysis of policy and administrative practice, decades before these terms came into wide use. Having his work and the broader endeavors of the IPA housed on campus puts us at the very foundation of modern thinking about how government works.”

Scholars and all students of history can immediately access the first phase of the digital collection at www.baruch.cuny.edu/library/ipa.

# # #

Media Contact:

Evan Nemeroff: evan.nemeroff@baruch.cuny.edu / 646-660-6146


Eight-Piece Student Band and Dance Team to Welcome Over 1,400 New Queens College Students

For Thursday, August 23, at 9 am

— Annual Event Ushers in the College’s 81st Year —

WHAT:          The college’s annual event to welcome freshmen and new transfer students. Musicians from the Aaron Copland School of Music and members of a Queens College dance club will lead senior college administrators and over 1,400 freshmen and new transfer students in a symbolic procession through the college’s main gate on Kissena Boulevard to begin their college careers (10 am). Student performers will be playing up-tempo music.

A welcome address to students by President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez is planned (10:30 am) with a confetti cannon salute to follow; an icebreaker event organized by student leaders designed to encourage friendships among the students (11 am); and club recruitment and a lunchtime dance performance from Bollywood fusion dance team QC Fanaa, as well as a musical performance by up-and-coming hip-hop artist Jay Critch (12:00 pm). All times are estimates. Not open to the public.

WHERE:        The Queens College Quad, 9 am, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing. Directions to QC: http://bit.ly/mX79LH; campus map: http://bit.ly/1toCpb7.

Background: Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and also ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Learn more at www.qc.cuny.edu<http://www.qc.cuny.edu/>.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Sing Handel’s Messiah With The Queens College Choral Society

FLUSHING, NY, August 21, 2018 – The Queens College Choral Society is seeking new members of all voice parts for its 2018-2019 concert season. Handel’s Messiah, one of the most beloved oratorios of all time, will be the featured work in December 2018.

Auditions for new members will take place on the following dates in Room 246 of the Music Building at Queens College:

Wednesdays: September 5 and 12, 6 – 7:15 pm

Rehearsals are held from 7:30 pm to 9:45 pm on Wednesdays at Queens College, and will begin on August 29. Auditions consist of basic singing skills—no preparation is necessary. We welcome all singers with prior choral experience.

From its founding in 1941, the Queens College Choral Society has offered Queens College students, faculty, and staff—and other music lovers from Queens, Manhattan, and Nassau/Suffolk Counties—the opportunity to learn and perform choral masterpieces. The society welcomes people of all ages and backgrounds and is open to anyone with prior singing experience. The Choral Society also has a special outreach program to allow talented high school singers to gain performance experience.

For further information, visit our website at www.qcchoralsociety.org. To schedule an audition, contact James John, music director, at 718-997-3818 or jmsjhn@aol.com.

Click here for a campus map and here for directions to Queens College.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Latina Researchers Network increases pipeline for future scholars

The 2018 4th Biennial Latina Researchers Conference "Collective Actions Towards Healing and Change" from August 23-25 at John Jay College. Alumnus Kevin Uribe, a BS/MS program in Biology major, is presenting his research at the conference.

The 2018 4th Biennial Latina Researchers Conference “Collective Actions Towards Healing and Change” takes place from August 23-25 at John Jay College. Alumnus Kevin Uribe, a BS/MS program in Biology major, presented his research at the 2014 conference.

The City College of New York’s Kaliris Y. Salas-Ramirez, assistant medical professor of the Sophie Davis Program of Biomedical Sciences at the CUNY School of Medicine, is helping bring together undergraduate and senior researchers interested in enhancing the voice of Latinos for the 2018 Biennial Latina Researchers Network Conference, August 23-25. This year’s conference is titled “Collective Actions Towards Healing and Change” and will be held at John Jay College.

“When it comes to resources, researchers and Latinas in the professoriate, we’re a total of four-percent of all professors nationwide, and that’s just Latinos as a whole,” said Salas-Ramirez. “I think a lot of us can feel voiceless, or can feel like this system isn’t set up for us. Part of the goal of the conference is not to just provide role models for junior or undergraduates, but also to provide a safe space for people in academe, researchers, or healthcare providers.”

CCNY President Vince Boudreau will speak at the opening reception, and Doris Cintron, senior associate provost for Academic Affairs, Accreditation and Assessment, is a featured mentor for early career researchers. Jorge E. Gonzalez, professor of mechanical engineering at The Grove School of Engineering, will participate in a panel discussing what grant and research initiatives he has been working on in collaboration with the University of Puerto Rico.

Kaliris and CUNY School of Medicine professors Dr. Marlene Camacho-Rivera and Dr. Michelle Juarez will present a workshop “Unsettling Medical Education” looking at how to create inclusive classrooms in addition to enhancing scholarship amongst the student population so it is not intimidating. Other topics include immigration reform; the state of Puerto Rico; career development and empowerment to move social justice and equity forward.

Dr. Silvia Mazzula, executive director of the Latina Researchers Network and associate professor at John Jay College, founded the Latina Researchers Network in 2012 in response to the underrepresentation of historically disadvantaged populations with advanced degrees and in support of examining the barriers and opportunities for advancement in research and academic positions. For more information about the conference, please visit: http://latinaresearchers.com/.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Promoting HIV self-testing via text message to sex workers in Kenya

Shot of an unrecognizable group of people social networking outsideAcross the globe, HIV prevalence among sex workers is estimated to be as much as 12 times that of the general population. In Kenya, HIV prevalence among sex workers is about 30 percent compared to 5.4 percent in the general population. A number of studies have found that bringing HIV self-testing to potential users can increase HIV testing rates among key populations such as sex workers.

Dr. Elizabeth Kelvin, Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, led a study looking at whether announcing the availability of HIV self-test kits in a clinic system in Kenya via text message would bring more female sex workers to the participating clinics for HIV testing compared to the standard of care text message reminder about HIV testing in general. The study specifically targeted the text messages to those not already accessing HIV testing regularly.  The findings were published in the journal Aids and Behavior.

The study found that the text messages did increase testing rates among the sample of hard to reach female sex workers. Many participants found self-testing to be an attractive alternative to the standard provider-administered blood-based HIV test and came to the clinic upon learning of its availability, but a sizeable proportion of participants 40.3 percent still opted for the standard HIV test even when self-testing was an option. Thus, testing choices may be the key to maximizing HIV testing rates.

“Text message might be a low-cost way to announce the availability of HIV self-test kits as self-testing is rolled out over time in order to maximize the impact this new technology has on HIV testing rates.”

Kelvin, E.A., George, G., Mwai, E. et al. AIDS Behav (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2248-5


Alfonso Chang joins the CUNY SPH Foundation Board

Alfonso Chang

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Foundation is pleased to announce the appointment of Alfonso Chang to its inaugural Board of Directors.

Chang is co-founder and Managing Director of the AC3 Group, a boutique strategy consultancy firm, bringing over 20 years of experience providing counsel to leading global companies, guiding them through complex product developments. He also serves as Managing Director of Relativity Healthcare Partners, an investment group providing growth capital to healthcare companies, where he identifies and structures investment opportunities and provides strategic guidance to investment clients. Chang alsoprovides analytical, development, manufacturing, and strategic solutions to pharmaceutical companiesas CEO and President of Purdue GMP Center.

Chang’s extensive experience in strategy and investments will complement the CUNY SPH Fund’s mission to support scholarships, emergency needs and programmatic activities in line with the school’s educational objectives.

“Alfonso’s experience as a business strategist will serve our students and faculty well as our foundation expands,” says CUNY SPH Dean Ayman El-Mohandes. “I have no doubt that his presence on the Board of Directors will be invaluable to realizing our foundation’s impact on the school.”

Welcoming Chang to the Board are fellow members Leah Abraham, Yin Ho, and Michael Meng, along with Interim Chair Lyndon Haviland, Interim Treasurer Emad Zikry, Interim Secretary Susan Klitzman, Dean El-Mohandes and Executive Director of the CUNY SPH Fund Adam Doyno. El-Mohandes and Doyno both serve as ex officio members of the Board.

About CUNY SPH

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) is committed to promoting health and social justice in New York City and across the globe through innovation and leadership. Our mission is to provide a collaborative and accessible environment for excellence in education, research, and service in public health, to promote and sustain healthier populations in New York City and around the world, and to shape policy and practice in public health for all. For more information about the School, please visit www.sph.cuny.edu.


Baruch Professor Awarded $600,000 Grant To Research Impact Of Undocumented Status On ‘Dreamers’and DACA Students

Robert Smith, a professor at Baruch College’s Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, was awarded a $600,000 grant from the William T. Grant Foundation to study how recent immigration policies affect education, labor and family welfare outcomes of undocumented youth such as DREAMers and DACA recipients.

The Grant Foundation funding supports Smith’s research through 2021. Begun in 2015, Smith’s work investigates how having, lacking, gaining or losing legal status impacts young people and their families, and the life choices they make. Smith’s project screened over 1,700 young people across New York State for Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and follows a subset of them over time. Long-term undocumented status has been a key driver of inequality for America’s roughly 11 million undocumented persons, and getting legal status can reset life trajectories, Smith said.

“This grant is a timely recognition of the importance and urgency of Dr. Smith’s research on immigration status and its effect on young people’s futures and on our society,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “Through waves of immigration and changes in immigration policy, this University has been a beacon of academic opportunity for those who struggle to reach this country for a better life. We are proud that this critical research is being conducted at CUNY.”

“The earlier you get DACA, the more positive the impact,” said Smith, who explained that the benefits of DACA, given to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as young children, include “people have gotten better jobs and their stress is less. And most importantly, they’ve been able to convert their college education into more income … Teens who got DACA are more likely to study hard. For those already doing well, DACA takes the brakes off their lives.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###


CUNY Again Dominates Chronicle’s Public College Social Mobility Rankings

Nine senior colleges and two community colleges at The City University of New York dominated the Chronicle of Higher Education’s rankings of public U.S. campuses with the greatest success in lifting low-income students into the middle class. CUNY held nine of the top 15 spots on the senior college list—including eight of the first 11—and two of the top five spots on the community college list.

The Chronicle’s list was drawn from a widely-reported study of colleges’ impact on social mobility by a team led by Stanford University economics professor Raj Chetty. The team’s 2017 study, “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility,” tracked students from nearly every U.S. college, including nongraduates, and measured their subsequent earnings against millions of anonymous tax filings and financial-aid records. The team of researchers looked to see how well colleges helped students whose parents were in the bottom 20 percent of income levels reach the top 20 percent for individual earnings.

“With social mobility increasingly used to determine which colleges are contributing most to the American Dream, CUNY’s singular quality, affordability and diversity set it apart as perhaps the most potent engine of economic advancement in the United States,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz.   “At CUNY, we take enormous pride in the University’s role in helping generations of low-income, underserved and immigrant students succeed.”

CUNY’s social-mobility track record also factored in Money magazine’s ranking last week of six CUNY senior campuses among the Best Colleges for Your Money 2018. Baruch College ranked eighth overall and fifth among the 50 Best Public Colleges, according to Money, while Queens, John Jay, Hunter, Lehman and Brooklyn Colleges also ranked among the top schools in the country.

The nine senior colleges in the Chronicle’s top 20 were Baruch College, No. 1; City College, No. 2; Lehman College, No. 3; John Jay, No. 5; City Tech, No. 7; Brooklyn College, No. 8; Hunter College, No. 10; Queens College, No. 11; and York College, No. 15.

The two community colleges on the Chronicle’s top five list were Borough of Manhattan Community College, No. 3, and LaGuardia Community College, No. 5.

Almost half of CUNY’s students come from households earning less than $20,000 of income; at the senior colleges nearly 40 percent came from such households, while at the community colleges, it was nearly 53 percent.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

#


CCNY participates in historic Harlem’s Percy Sutton 5K run and walk

Team CCNY at last year’s Percy Sutton 5k run and walk.

The City College of New York, in conjunction with the Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce, Harlem Week 2018 and the New York Road Runners (NYRR), are gearing up for the annual Percy Sutton Harlem 5K Run and the Harlem Health Walk on Saturday, August 25. CCNY President Vince Boudreau along with students, faculty, staff and alumni will run and walk through historic Harlem in recognition of the community.

This 5K race honors the late Percy Sutton, who as Manhattan borough president in the 1970s championed the New York City Marathon as a five-borough event and remained a supporter of NYRR until he passed in 2009. The run celebrates historic Harlem and is part Harlem Week, one of the northeast area’s largest cultural celebrations.

“It’s fun to run around the CCNY neighborhood, especially the long downhill on St. Nicholas Terrace,” said David Rumschitzki, professor of chemical engineering, who has run the marathon about five times. “I once passed Mary Wittenberg, the president of the Road Runners Club on that downhill.”

The Division of Government, Community, and Cultural Affairs coordinates and organizes team CCNY’s participation at this event.  This year, team CCNY will bring its largest contingent with almost 140 members of the college community participating in the run and walk. There will also be information about undergraduate and graduate programs and admissions process as well as information on  Continuing and Professional Studies.

For more information about the race and more Harlem Week events, please visit harlemweek.com. The run and walk will start at St. Nicholas Park located at St. Nicholas Avenue and West 135th Street at 8:30 am.
About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


A rare chance for undergrads to “do” science instead of just study it: B3 REU

B3 REU student fellows

This summer, ten pre-med and science majors (four of them from The City College of New York) got out of the lecture hall and into the lab to get hands-on with science.

Their first hurdle was to get into the BREU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) program, which is extremely competitive. In fact applicants had a better chance of getting into Harvard (4.9% acceptance rate) than getting into BREU – with an acceptance rate of just 4%.

It’s called B3 because student fellows are paired with faculty to perform research in biochemistry, biophysics, and biodesign in the Center for Discovery and Innovation and the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center. “Undergraduates interested in science don’t usually have one-to-one access to faculty. Nor do they get a chance to be embedded in a lab for a close-up view of how science really happens. This experience helps them better understand the highs and lows; the real world of science – and what lies ahead,” says David Jeruzalmi, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at City College, who directs the program.

The goal of CCNY’s B3 REU program is to find the most highly qualified and highly diverse candidates and help them learn something about science they would never have learned otherwise. Mission accomplished, according to Crystal Bella, a Biochemistry/Psychology junior at City College. “Physically experiencing scientific concepts and practices helped me understand how science is done on a deeper level.”

Poster presentation

All B3 REU fellows received stipends and plenty of mentoring, in the form of weekly group meetings, meetings with faculty and with Jeruzalmi. At the end of the program the fellows presented their lessons learned to all of the participating faculty.

The selection process to be funded by the National Science Foundation was also competitive. CCNY’s three-year BREU program was one of just 112 college sites in the country.

B3 REU student fellows:

  • Crystal Bella, The City College of New York
  • Zachary Cohen, Kenyon College
  • Andrew Huss, Chaffey College
  • Sakeenah Hussein, Queens College
  • Inzamamdeen Kassim, The City College of New York
  • Charlene Kotei, The City College of New York
  • Carolina Millan, Kingsborough Community College
  • Christo Varaimon, The City College of New York/Macaulay Honors College
  • Eva Verzani, Bowdoin College
  • Chyana Woodyard, Hampton University

 

« BACK TO NEWS


Alfonso Chang joins the CUNY SPH Foundation Board

 

Alfonso Chang

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Foundation is pleased to announce the appointment of Alfonso Chang to its inaugural Board of Directors.  

Chang is co-founder and Managing Director of the AC3 Group, a boutique strategy consultancy firm, bringing over 20 years of experience providing counsel to leading global companies, guiding them through complex product developments. He also serves as Managing Director of Relativity Healthcare Partners, an investment group providing growth capital to healthcare companies, where he identifies and structures investment opportunities and provides strategic guidance to investment clients. Chang alsoprovides analytical, development, manufacturing, and strategic solutions to pharmaceutical companiesas CEO and President of Purdue GMP Center. 

Chang’s extensive experience in strategy and investments will complement the CUNY SPH Fund’s mission to support scholarships, emergency needs and programmatic activities in line with the school’s educational objectives. 

“Alfonso’s experience as a business strategist will serve our students and faculty well as our foundation expands,” says CUNY SPH Dean Ayman El-Mohandes. “I have no doubt that his presence on the Board of Directors will be invaluable to realizing our foundation’s impact on the school.” 

Welcoming Chang to the Board are fellow members Leah Abraham, Yin Ho, and Michael Meng, along with Interim Chair Lyndon Haviland, Interim Treasurer Emad Zikry, Interim Secretary Susan Klitzman, Dean El-Mohandes and Executive Director of the CUNY SPH Fund Adam Doyno. El-Mohandes and Doyno both serve as ex officio members of the Board. 

About CUNY SPH 

The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) is committed to promoting health and social justice in New York City and across the globe through innovation and leadership. Our mission is to provide a collaborative and accessible environment for excellence in education, research, and service in public health, to promote and sustain healthier populations in New York City and around the world, and to shape policy and practice in public health for all. For more information about the School, please visit www.sph.cuny.edu. 


HOSTOS OFFERING HEALTHY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

A new free program being offered at Hostos Community College will put young adults into healthcare jobs quickly, thanks to a training partnership with the Department of Small Business Services and the New York Alliance for Careers in Healthcare.

Aimed at young adults between the ages of 18-24, the Medical Assistants for Modern Healthcare Delivery Training Program is being offered by the City at Hostos’ Division for Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD). It will train students for a variety of administrative and clinical tasks in physician offices, hospitals, outpatient clinics, and other healthcare facilities. Qualified participants will earn EKG, phlebotomy, medical assistant and CPR certifications and participate in a paid clinical internship at $15 per hour. The trainings begin Sept. 12 of this year and run until Sept. of 2019.

Carlos Molina, Ed.D., Vice President Division of CEWD at Hostos, said the program will make participants more marketable, employable, and professional.

“For 50 years, Hostos Community College has been committed to providing New York City residents with workforce development and comprehensive healthcare certification programs,” Molina said. “Our mission at Hostos is to build learning communities where people live and work. We teach the skills to provide excellence in the healthcare field allowing students the ability to embark on a career leading to intellectual growth and socio-economic mobility.  This new program is important to our college and city because it will train 20 young adults to become successful Clinical Medical Assistants.  For many, this will be a stepping stone in their career pathway to further their education within the medical field.”

These jobs are in high demand. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor, employment of medical assistants was projected to grow 29 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. The 2017 annual median pay for these jobs in the New York metropolitan area was approximately $36,000. The Bureau also noted that the growth of the aging baby-boom population will continue to increase demand for preventive medical services, which are often provided by physicians. As a result, physicians will hire more assistants to perform routine administrative and clinical duties, allowing the physicians to see more patients.

Interested applicants may register by calling Julissa Perez at 718-664-2542 or by email at julperez@hostos.cuny.edu

To RSVP for an information session, go to: https://www.campusce.net/hostoswdce/course/course.aspx?C=322&pc=79&mc=&sc=

About Hostos Community College

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for a half-century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Queens College Named a Princeton Review “Best College” for the 27th Consecutive Year Since the Guide Was First Published in 1992

— Queens College Also Ranked in the Top 11% Nationwide
of Money’s “Best Colleges for Your Money” —

QUEENS, NY, August 16, 2018—The number of schools in the Princeton Review’s “Best Colleges” roundup changes every year, but Queens College has remained a constant in every edition since the guide was first published in 1992—and this year marks the 27th time that the school has been named one of the country’s best institutions for undergraduate education by The Princeton Review. The renowned education services company features Queens College in the 2019 edition of its annual guide, The Best 384 Colleges, citing its high-quality academics, affordability and diversity. The school has also been recognized as “a great investment” by Money, in its “Best Colleges for Your Money” rankings.

“It comes as no surprise that Queens College has been recognized in every edition of the Princeton Review “Best Colleges” guide for our academic excellence, affordability, and accessibility to students of all backgrounds. We are delighted that Money has recognized us as a ‘Best College for Your Money.’​ For 80 years, we have provided an unparalleled combination of equal access and opportunity for ambitious students–many of modest means–to advance toward successful and rewarding futures,” says Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez.

Money magazine analyzed graduation rates, tuition charges, family borrowing, and alumni earnings (plus 22 other data points) to identify the nation’s Best Colleges for Your Money 2018, ranking Queens College at number 81, in the top 11% of the 727 schools recognized nationwide.

The results of student surveys from across the country on dozens of topics about their schools conducted by the Princeton Review round out the 2019 Best College profiles. Feedback from one Queens College student sums up the QC experience as, “Queens is about getting a valuable and quality education that does not drain you financially for the future.” Positive feedback on faculty included descriptions of professors who “genuinely care about [students’] grades and well-being”; as one student puts it, “They won’t let me fall behind.”

The Princeton Review is also famous for its annual rankings, including the much-publicized “Best Party Schools.” In contrast, Queens College continues to appear on the following lists: “Got Milk?” (#12) (campuses where beer is scarce) and “Scotch and Soda, Hold the Scotch” (#11) (no hard liquor). The school was also recognized in the categories Best Northeastern College, Green College, and Colleges That Pay You Back.

One of The Princeton Review’s most popular guides, The Best 384 Colleges rankings are based on surveys of 138,000 students at 384 top colleges that includes a wide representation by region, size, selectivity and character. Published annually since 1992, the book has detailed profiles of the colleges with rating scores in eight categories as well as ranking lists of top 20 schools in 62 categories. For more information on the rankings and methodology visit www.princetonreview.com/college-rankings/how-it-works

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

About The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep, and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. Its Tutor.com brand is the largest online tutoring service in the U.S. It comprises a community of thousands of tutors who have delivered more than 15 million one-to-one tutoring sessions. The Princeton Review is headquartered in New York, NY. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University. For more information, visit The Princeton Review. Follow the company on Twitter @ThePrincetonRev.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Racial and Gender Discrimination among Teens Exposed to Dating Violence

Teen dating violence (TDV) is an urgent public health concern associated with a range of lasting mental, sexual, and behavioral health consequences. Studies have revealed high rates of dating violence and sexual coercion among youth of color, with several studies finding black female teens reporting the highest rates of victimization among all demographic groups.

Dr. Lynn Roberts, Assistant Professor of Community Health and Social Sciences, led a study examining the combined associations of racial and gender discrimination and TDV. The findings were published in the journal Ethnicity and Disease.

Roberts and her colleagues applied the Critical Race Theory framework, which asserts that racism is ubiquitous in the lives of people of color, and intersectionality, which recognizes that social identities are interdependent and mutually constitutive, to better understand the disparate impact of TDV on Black female teens.

The study suggests that adolescents reporting both racial and gender discrimination were 2.5  times more  likely to  experience  dating violence  than  those who  did  not report  racial  and gender  discrimination  (after controlling  for  age and  sex). The researchers recommend that future studies of TDV should examine the relationship between experienced racial and gender discrimination, while controlling for correlates at the individual and family levels, in order to understand and address the impact of TDV.

“I am hoping that our findings will open up more pathways for public health researchers and practitioners to consider and explore intersectionality, a central tenet of Critical Race Theory,  in their research and interventions,” Roberts says.

Roberts, Lynn, Mahader Tamene, and Olivia R. Orta. “The Intersectionality of Racial and Gender Discrimination among Teens Exposed to Dating Violence.” Ethnicity & Disease, 2018. doi:https://doi.org/10.18865/ed.28.S1.253.


Hostos Partners With Building Skills New and New York Building Foundation to Help More City Residents Access Construction Training

Funding provided by the New York Building Foundation will enable participants in Building Skills New York (BSNY) to receive additional construction safety training provided by Hostos Community College. This additional workforce training programming will help BSNY further expand its ongoing efforts to bring much-needed employment opportunities to unemployed and underemployed workers in local communities across the five boroughs.

The $10,000 grant from the Building Foundation – the charitable arm of the New York Building Congress – will fund OSHA-30 safety training for 25 New York City residents in facilities located at Hostos Community College’s Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development. This new round of training courses will begin on August 18.

BSNY helps New York City residents in underserved neighborhoods connect with jobs in the construction industry. This year, BSNY has placed New York City residents in 115 local construction projects in or near their home neighborhoods. Of these workers, 64 percent are African American and 36 percent are Hispanic or Latino. In addition, 47 percent of placements were made in the Bronx – the most placements than any other borough so far, this year. This additional programming represents an important piece of BSNY’s mission to provide a pipeline of good-paying jobs to local residents of diverse backgrounds and communities to ensure a viable career path.

“Building Skills New York is committed to connecting City residents with construction jobs and helping them find the training and support services to turn such employment into a meaningful, well-paid career. We are honored to collaborate with Building Foundation and Hostos Community College to train and connect workers with good-paying jobs in local construction sites,” said David Meade, Executive Director of Building Skills New York. “This new programming will provide New York City residents with access to expanded career opportunities and equip workers with the necessary tools to practice safe and secure protocol in the workplace.”

“For the past 50 years, Hostos Community College has prided itself on improving the lives of its students through dynamic educational offerings that also answer the community’s call,” said Dr. David Gómez, Hostos Community College President. “Whether their success is achieved by way of credit-bearing courses, job training or other continuing educational programs, our goal is to consistently provide the best services to ensure our students are prepared for whatever field they pursue. We are confident this partnership will accomplish that objective.”

“The Building Foundation is proud to support the efforts of Building Skills New York and Hostos Community College, and we applaud these organizations for their commitment to training New Yorkers for good paying jobs in construction,” said Carlo A. Scissura, Esq., President of The New York Building Foundation. “As the building industry continues to flourish and our city’s infrastructure and development needs grow, it is critical that we invest in the local workforce and help communities thrive.”

“The Bronx’s double digit unemployment rate has been reduced to its current single-digit historically low. We have done what is need to provide our people with opportunities to work,” said Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. “This safety training program will help prepare Bronx residents for good construction jobs with a living wage, and I congratulate Hostos Community College and the New York Building Foundation on this important partnership.”

“I applaud Hostos Community College and the New York Building Foundation for funding and implementing this initiative,” said Council Member Rafael Salamanca Jr. “Helping New Yorkers get the training they need to stay employed or seek employment while keeping them safe on the job is critical for countless workers in my community.”

The program at Hostos offers fully covered OSHA-30 certification training, which provides extensive safety training on the safety and health hazards on construction sites. BSNY will work closely with the candidates, employers, and Hostos Community College to ensure successful completion of the program.

The new program will bolster the partnership between BSNY and the Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development at Hostos Community College, a key driver in providing skills training modules with highly qualified instructors. BSNY serves as an entry point into the construction field and real estate industry for unemployed and underemployed workers as well as individuals without pre-existing relationships with contractors.

About Hostos Community College

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for a half-century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.

About Building Skills New York

Building Skills New York provides an efficient and convenient process for finding a construction job for many City residents who have long been unable to gain access to careers in the construction industry.  The organization achieves its goals through a well-designed and targeted program that places underemployed and underserved New Yorkers in construction industry jobs.  BSNY transforms lives and helps residents revitalize communities by growing a skilled construction workforce that represents the diversity of New York City.  BSNY partners with the city’s leading workforce agencies to recruit and screen eligible NYC residents and provide them with the necessary skills and safety training.

About the New York Building Foundation

The New York Building Foundation, the charitable arm of the New York Building Congress, was founded by a group of dedicated professionals to improve and better coordinate the building community’s approach to promoting the New York City construction industry. Over its 20-year history, the Building Foundation’s activities have included grants and scholarships for educational programs aimed at developing an interest in the industry among K-12 and college students; support for training organizations that assist adults from various backgrounds with joining the trades; programs to encourage clean, safe worksites; and research on issues impacting both the building industry and the city’s economic future. The Foundation strives to maximize talents, relationships, and partnerships to broaden its reach and strengthen its influence to bolster New York City’s built environment, encourage the development of the next generation of the industry’s workforce, and enhance the diverse communities that make up the city.


Fall Exhibition Season Opens with Modes of Mapping

<i>States' Names II</i> by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, one of 14 artists featured in <i>Modes of Mapping</i> exhibition AUGUST 15, 2018

Modes of Mapping, an exhibition that presents a cross-section of contemporary artist engaged in aspects of mapping, will open at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) with a reception in The Shirley Fiterman Art Center, 81 Barclay Street in lower Manhattan, on September 6 from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibition will be on display through October 25.

“The work explores a wide range of artistic tendencies that employ cartography as a departure point,” says Lisa Panzera, Director of the Fiterman Art Center, who curated the exhibition. “The exhibition features 14 artists—including one collaborative—all of whom incorporate distinctly varied approaches; from the investigation of intricate networks, to explorations of identity and place, to depictions of entire imagined worlds.”

2 Rivers, by artist Joyce Kozloff

Other issues at play in the works on view include the technological, as well as making manifest the invisible. The artworks engage aspects of global positioning systems and radio wave frequencies, and make experiential interactions and psychological concerns visually tangible.

Also, Panzera explains, by moving away from the utilitarian function of maps, “The artworks make apparent the ways in which maps are inherently subjective and often political, charting arbitrary boundaries that shape our emotional, aesthetic and geographical perceptions of the world.”

The featured artists include Noriko Ambe, Jeffrey Beebe, Beth Campbell, Mary Ellen Carroll, Nathan Carter, Diana Cooper, Lisa Corinne Davis, Nina Katchadourian, Joyce Kozloff, Larson Shindelman, Robert Morris, Dennis Oppenheim, Francesco Simeti and Jaune Quick-to-See Smith.

A venue for diversity and dialogue

The Shirley Fiterman Art Center (SFAC), a spacious gallery and not-for-profit organization, is located on the first floor of BMCC’s Miles and Shirley Fiterman Hall.

Dedicated to organizing exhibitions of contemporary art and cultural programming, the SFAC promotes and enriches the educational mission of BMCC. It presents diverse gallery programs and fosters interdisciplinary dialogue and cultural understanding.

Leading philanthropists and collectors, Miles and Shirley Fiterman amassed a collection based on a deep passion for art and artists, and a profoundly held belief in the transformative power of art and culture. The Fiterman family has demonstrated ongoing commitment to BMCC’s mission to serve students from New York City, across the United States and from countries around the world, who are working to improve their lives through education.

The SFAC also serves as a resource for BMCC and lower Manhattan communities by providing artist talks, tours and exhibitions that are free of charge and open to the public.

For more information, please contact the Shirley Fiterman Art Center at (212) 776-5631, Tuesday through Saturday from 12 noon to 6 p.m. or ShirleyFitermanArtCenter@bmcc.cuny.edu.

 

Top Image: States’ Names II by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith

Bottom Image: Rivers 2, by Joyce Kozloff, 2017


Money Magazine Ranks Six CUNY Colleges In Top Quarter Of Nation’s “Best Colleges For Your Money”

Money magazine’s Best Colleges for Your Money 2018 features six CUNY colleges in the top quarter of 727 schools in the nation, ranking Baruch College eighth overall and fifth among the 50 Best Public Colleges. Also ranked among the top schools in the country were Queens, John Jay, Hunter, Lehman and Brooklyn Colleges.

“Money’s latest college rankings are further confirmation that CUNY is the nation’s premier urban university,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “We have experienced spectacular growth in enrollment, a remarkable expansion of our physical plant, national acclaim for our colleges and prestigious awards and grants are being earned by our students and faculty. The affordability, diversity and quality at our 25 campuses mark a high standard for public higher education in the United States.”

Money magazine ranks colleges based on 26 measures of educational quality, affordability and alumni success. A key factor in the rankings was the social mobility rate developed by Stanford University professor Raj Chetty. That study’s rankings measured how effective each college was at propelling low-income students into the middle class and beyond over the past 20 years. As Money magazine explains, that critical assessment ends up “pointing to colleges that help students achieve the American dream.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 


Changing neighborhoods and changing health perceptions

A cobblestone street in Madrid, Spain

Madrid, Spain

Cities are dynamic entities continually evolving and transforming. These changes, which may be structural, cultural, or both, often take place at the neighborhood level where the interaction between urban space and social environments are essentially indistinguishable. Environmental changes in an urban setting can not only have an effect on the health of residents, but also on their perceptions about their health in relation to their immediate environment.

A new study drew data from the Heart Healthy Hoods (HHH) project in Madrid, Spain, which studies the association between neighborhood and residents’ health, to qualitatively examine how neighborhood social changes were perceived by residents and how these changes affected residents’ perceptions about their own health. “Neighborhood changes or gentrification could have both negative and positive effects on residents’ health,” explained Dr. Luisa N. Borrell, a co-author of the study and professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy. “These health effects might be the result of the interaction of several neighborhood social features such as the presence (or lack of) social ties, family responsibilities, time availability, economic resources as well as access and awareness to health-promoting programs, and these features are very well captured through qualitative research.”

The findings from the study were published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

The study employed semi-structured interviews with adult residents and professionals living or working within a group of neighborhoods in the district of Ciudad Lineal in Madrid to describe the perceived social and neighborhood changes taking place. The major social changes related to health in the neighborhood were identified as economic changes, changes in demographic composition of the neighborhoods, and new socio-cultural values.

Luisa Borrell

Luisa Borrell

Economic changes, particularly when they are associated with impoverishment and job insecurity, tend to have the most direct impact on the perception of health. Changes in demographic compositions, reflecting the influx of immigrants and younger people into the neighborhoods, were perceived by some residents as the catalysts to changes in the traditional ways of life and social relationships that had been the standard in these neighborhoods for decades. With the changing demographics came changing socio-cultural values such as the breakdown of traditional social structures in favor of individualism, and fragmentation along cultural and generational lines. Loss of more traditional ways of life such as intergenerational coexistence was found to increase the perception of isolation, particularly among elderly residents, and in turn, increase health problems such as depression. The elderly were more affected by perceptions of loneliness and changes in relationships with neighbors, while younger residents were more affected by stress due to employment worries. The study did also identify some positive effects resulting from the neighborhood changes. With the release of more traditional social norms and the rise of individualism, there was value recognized in taking on individual responsibility for maintaining one’s health, engaging in self-care, as well as a respect for the role played by health institutions and health programs in the neighborhoods.

Ultimately, by parsing the features of a rapidly changing urban environment, the reduction of social relationships, increase of stress and labor precariousness were perceived as major health stressors, whereas the assimilation of self-care activities, and implementation of local health programs and institutes were seen by the residents as having a positive effect on health. This qualitative research can help shape community health policies in rapidly changing urban environments. “This type of research could provide important insight into crafting urban health policies to ultimately improve health outcomes in communities undergoing change,” said Borrell.

 

Conde, P., Gutiérrez, M., Sandín, M., Díez, J., Borrell, L., Rivera-Navarro, J., & Franco, M. (2018). Changing Neighborhoods and Residents’ Health Perceptions: The Heart Healthy Hoods Qualitative Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(8), 1617. doi:10.3390/ijerph15081617

Baruch College Earns Top Ten Rankings in “Best Colleges 2018” by MONEY Magazine

#1 in New York State and #1 among public institutions in Northeast

MONEY magazine placed Baruch College among the top ten schools on its most recent “Best Colleges 2018” list—a value ranking of 727 institutions throughout the country based on educational quality, affordability and alumni success. On the 2018 list, Baruch College claims high rankings both regionally and nationally:

According to MONEY, the schools that top its rankings “deliver a superior education at an affordable price, enabling graduates to avoid heavy debt and succeed in the workplace.”

Baruch College places ahead of such institutions as Yale, Harvard, University of Pennsylvania, University of Michigan, University of Virginia, and Vanderbilt.

Baruch among “The Most Transformative Colleges in the Country”

This year, MONEY added a new sublist to its annual ranking—the “Most Transformative Colleges in the Country.” On this specialty list, Baruch placed #16 as among the impressive colleges that help “students do far better than would be expected from their academic and economic backgrounds.”

To compile this list, MONEY ranked colleges based on graduation rates, earnings, student loan repayment, and included only those schools with graduation rates above 50%.

Highest score” for Socioeconomic Mobility  

Baruch earns the #8 spot in MONEY’s top-ranked colleges for a key reason: the success of its recent graduates. MONEY reports that Baruch alumni earn an average of $54,500 in their early careers, which is about 16% higher than graduates from similar universities.

In its evaluation, MONEY states: “Baruch of course does great on the data we use from The Equality of Opportunity Project. It has the highest score for mobility rate of any of the colleges in our ranking. The mobility rate combines a college’s access rate—the share of students from the bottom income quintile—and its success rate—the share of those students who then advance to the top income quintile by their mid-30s.”

MONEY also calls attention to Baruch’s above-average graduation rates. “Roughly two-thirds of Baruch students graduate within six years — a rate that is nearly 28% higher than at schools with students from similar academic and economic backgrounds.”

Low-Student Debt and Affordability

MONEY’s calculations found that the average student debt for Baruch students is one of lowest in the country—placing #6 out of the 727 colleges. It also says that attending Baruch is affordable and significantly lower than average—ranking the College #3 among all schools in the top 50.

A Year of Accolades

In addition to MONEY’s top rankings, Baruch has received national recognitions for academic excellence and value throughout the year. Most recently, The Princeton Review once again named Baruch College as one of the best in America, according to its annual survey of The Best 384 Colleges – 2019 edition. Forbes and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance also ranked Baruch as one of the top colleges for value in 2018.

MONEY: Reason Behind the Ranking

According to MONEY, college is now the second-largest financial expense. Buying a home comes in first. Therefore, many students and families are “taking a hard look at the costs and payoffs of any college they consider.”

To compile its data, MONEY has “has drawn on the research and advice of dozens of the nation’s top experts on education quality, financing, and value to develop a uniquely practical analysis of more than 700 of the nation’s best-performing colleges.

Methodology

MONEY ranks only U.S. colleges that have sufficient reliable data to analyze and a graduation rate that is at or above the median for its institutional category (public, private or historically black colleges and universities). This filtering resulted into a list of 727 schools, which were then ranked based on 26 factors in three categories: quality of education, affordability, and outcomes. Each category accounts for one-third of the school’s final score.

Calculations were performed by College Measures/American Institutes for Research. Data sources include the Equality of Opportunity Project, Moody’s Analytics, PayScale.com, Peterson’s, Standard & Poor’s, and the U.S. Department of Education.

A detailed explanation of this year’s methodology is available at money.com/bestcolleges.

# # #

 


CUNY START PROGRAM EXCELS, SURPASSING STANDARD REMEDIATION IN PREPARING STUDENTS FOR COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSES

The City University of New York’s pioneering CUNY Start program is significantly more effective than standard remedial education in preparing students who arrive at CUNY needing to master basic skills before they are ready for college-level courses, according to results from an assessment of the nine-year-old program.

“CUNY Start is a vital part of our broad and ongoing remediation reforms because it targets students with the most significant needs,” said Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz. “The program is unique in its approach and a model for the country. The results of this study are very exciting. They confirm that CUNY Start is very effective in raising these students’ chances of staying and succeeding in college.”

The newly published study – a federally funded partnership between CUNY, the MDRC social policy research organization and the Community College Research Center at Columbia University – compared the progress of 3,835 randomly assigned community college freshmen whose scores on CUNY’s math, reading and writing assessment tests weren’t high enough to qualify them to take college-credit courses. Students were assigned either to CUNY Start, a pre-matriculation program that employs intensive instruction, support, and carefully designed curricula, or to the standard associate-degree pathway and traditional developmental courses.

After one semester, higher percentages of the students in CUNY Start were ready to take courses required for associate degrees. The results were especially pronounced in math: About 57 percent of students qualified to take college-credit math courses after completing their CUNY Start semester, compared with 25 percent of those who took traditional developmental education courses. There was a 9 percent difference between the two groups in writing proficiency and 8 percent in reading.

A second report, due out in 2020, will track the students’ long-term progress and achievement. But the interim report, which employed the gold-standard research method of random assignment of participants, validates CUNY’s internal assessments of CUNY Start.

CUNY’s long-term strategy to address the needs of students who enter college underqualified to take college-level courses includes a range of new teaching approaches and interventions. CUNY Start was devised to tackle one of the most fundamental issues: The failure of conventional remedial education to build very underprepared students’ math, reading and writing skills to the levels necessary for them to enroll and succeed in college-level courses. CUNY Start is a one-semester program that targets students with significant remedial needs. It delays enrollment in a degree program and provides, instead, intensive instruction that uses a more student-centered teaching method and carefully designed curricula delivered by trained teachers. It also integrates advising, tutoring and a weekly seminar that teaches students skills they need to succeed in college. Students pay only $75 for the program, which fully preserves financial aid for credit coursework

“Our offer to students is: ‘Give us one semester and let us help you not just pass your skills assessment tests, but also become ready for your college coursework so you’re on more solid ground,” said Donna Linderman, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. “We are the only university in the country implementing a program this comprehensive in the pre-matriculation space. It’s exciting and very important to have good solid data to strongly affirm that our model is highly effective.”

Michael Weiss, one of the MDRC researchers who authored the report, said that CUNY Start is unique in several ways: “The main target is students who have needs in all three subject areas. It’s time intensive: In the full-time program it’s 12 hours a week of math and 12 hours of reading and writing instruction. And it really tries to tackle teaching methods. A lot of remedial education is traditional ‘chalk and talk’ and teacher lectures. CUNY Start is more discussion, student questioning, and getting more actively involved in learning. What makes it work is having the extra time that makes it implementable, and the very robust system CUNY has of hiring teachers who are willing and comfortable enacting the CUNY Start approach.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###

 


CUNY Hosts Business Opportunities Conference For Companies Owned By Minorities, Women And Service-Disabled Veterans

The City University of New York and the City University Construction Fund, CUNY’s public benefit construction corporation, hosted a conference to afford businesses owned by minorities and women (MWBE) and service-disabled veterans (SDVOB) access to key contract decision makers and procurement professionals representing all 25 CUNY campuses and selected contractors.

“This year’s theme: Opening doors to new opportunities and relationships,  underscores CUNY’s long tradition and commitment to embracing and supporting diversity in all aspects of what we do,” said CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson. “Diversity makes us better, stronger and more resilient. When MWBE’s and SDVOB’s do well all of New York does well. And the people that we care so much about, our students, have the opportunity to benefit.”

“CUNY is the proven economic engine of New York, and MWBEs and SDVOBs represent the future vitality of this city,” Interim Chancellor Vita Rabinowitz told attendees. “We want you to inspire our students and help us connect them with the world of work and with exciting careers.”

The conference, held at John Jay College, was designed to assist MWBEs and SDVOBs in connecting with procurement and construction opportunities and in conducting business with the University. More than 1,000 registered to attend the conference. The program kicked off with remarks from Chairperson Thompson, Interim Chancellor Rabinowitz, John Jay College President Karol V. Mason and Alphonso B. David, Counsel to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo.

The program included five panel sessions, boot-camp intensives and exclusive Open Doors business meet-ups for New York State-certified MWBEs and SDVOBs, which enabled participants to make one-on-one connections with prime contractors and procurement professionals. The event also included a help desk to provide real-time answers from experts and a Marketplace Exhibit Hall with more than 70 public, private and nonprofit organizations providing direct networking and new business opportunities for attendees.

About the City University Construction Fund

The City University Construction Fund (CUCF) is the core of CUNY’s capital construction program and is responsible for more than 300 buildings across 25 colleges and professional schools. The CUCF is a public benefit corporation established by New York State to provide facilities for CUNY and to support its educational purposes. The CUCF advances design, construction and development projects for new facilities and for the ongoing renovation of existing facilities.

 About the City University of New York

 The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

###


KARLA GALIANO HERRERA (’20) VOLUNTEERS AT CUNY CITIZENSHIP NOW!

Karla Galiano Herrera (’20) Volunteers at CUNY Citizenship Now!

 

On June 30th, several John Jay Students volunteered at the CUNY Citizenship Now! Citizenship Application Assistance & Immigration Resource Fair. We spoke to Karla Galiano Herrera, a third-year student majoring in Sociology and Latin American and Latina/o Studies, to learn more about her volunteer experience.

What did you do during the event?
My main role was greeting the guests and guiding them to our application assistance area. I also had the opportunity to shadow Laura, an applicant assistant. While she was helping a woman named Carla—she had come all the way from New Jersey for application assistance—I had a wonderful experience getting to learn more about her.

How did it feel participating in the event?
Being a bit shy, I was nervous at first. But the more guests I spoke to, the more at ease I felt. Talking to applicants and hearing their stories really warmed my heart. I even found myself sharing my own story of coming from a mixed-status family, being a Dream US Scholar, and being a first generation student. This helped me connect with these individuals as we prepared them to be screened.

“Filling out 20-page legal documents can become very confusing, especially when there’s a language barrier. Events like these have trained volunteers who are bilingual and understand how to fill out the application.”—Karla Galiano Herrera, John Jay student volunteer

 

How do events like this benefit immigrant communities?
CUNY Citizenship Now! has been a great help to the immigrant community. Filling out 20-page legal documents can become very confusing, especially when there’s a language barrier. Events like these have trained volunteers who are bilingual and understand how to fill out the application. They also have lawyers who can confirm that everything is done correctly. Naturalization costs $725, and a lot of people can’t afford it. CUNY Citizenship Now! offers waivers to help reduce this cost and make the process easier on immigrants.

Why was it important for you to be involved in this event?
Volunteering is one of the few driving forces for creating change and making a positive impact on one’s community. Many applicants traveled from other states to receive assistance. As a Dream US Scholar, I understand the hardships that come with going through the naturalization process. I wanted to volunteer with CUNY Citizenship Now! because they’ve done so much for the immigrant community. I felt that this experience would be a good way for me to do my share, and give back to my community.

“Volunteering is one of the few driving forces for creating change and making a positive impact on one’s community.” –Karla Galiano Herrera, John Jay student volunteer

 

What advice can you give to future volunteers?
Don’t be afraid to try new things. The people volunteering were so kind and were willing to help me when I needed them. Volunteering is a wonderful experience. Not only can you add it to your resume, but it leaves a warm feeling in your heart. When you see a participant nervously enter the room and leave with a sense of relief, there’s nothing better than that.

To learn more about the CUNY Citizenship Now event, click here.


Guttman Ranked No.1 Community College in New York State

Best Colleges badgeGuttman Community College has been ranked the Best Community College in New York State by BestColleges.com. With ranking based on academic quality and affordability, Guttman led other institutions with a high score of 94.4 out of 100. The runners up, Nassau Community College and Columbia-Greene Community College obtained scores of 78.25 and 69.56, respectively.

The methodology behind the ranking by BestColleges.com is grounded in most recent statistical data sourced from the National Center for Education Statistics. The ranking factors break down as follows:

Academic quality – 60% of total score

  • Full-Time Retention Rate – 20%
  • Part-Time Retention Rate – 20%
  • Graduation + Transfer Rate – 60%

Affordability – 40% of total score

  • In-state Tuition – 50%
  • Percent of Students Taking Loans – 50%

With a high graduation rate and unique program, Guttman has consistently ranked high among community colleges. In 2017, WalletHub ranked Guttman as the no.4 community college in the nation, and in 2016, the college was voted the best community college in New York State by EdSmart.com.


New Queens College-Google Partnership for Entering Freshmen Builds Tech and Career Skills

Computer Science Summer Institute Is Underway on Campus

QUEENS, NY, August 7, 2018 – For some fortunate students with a passion for technology, it’s a golden opportunity at the very start of their life at Queens College.

Thanks to a first-time collaboration between QC and Google, 26 incoming freshmen competitively selected by the college are spending three weeks in Google’s Computer Science Summer Institute Extension program on campus. Students learn not only software and programming fundamentals as a community, but also interact with Google engineers and computer science executives from Bloomberg L.P. and Magistek, Inc., a software training and consulting firm. This exposure is meant to help students gain insights about the field that can carry them through their educational and professional careers.

“I am very pleased to join with Google to offer students this rich opportunity,” says Félix V. Matos Rodriguez, president of Queens College, “and proud to be among the nine colleges nationwide selected to participate.”  Of the current summer cohort, 37 percent are female and 33 percent are from minority groups underrepresented in the computer science profession. That is no accident. “We are strongly committed to increasing the diversity of talent in the field,” says Matos Rodriguez. With more undergraduate computer science majors than any college in New York City, QC is well positioned to meet that goal.

“We’re excited about this program, and look forward to  building  confidence and community among students who have historically been underrepresented in STEM career fields,” says Ray Sawyer, Student Development Specialist at Google.

Says Eva Fernández, assistant provost and AVP for Excellence in Teaching and Experiential Education: “We want students—as early as possible—to get broad but direct exposure to industry leaders, and to see themselves as active participants in the tech community of New York City.”

Every day the students are taught relevant “soft skills” for academic and real world application. The curriculum, which provides students with the knowledge and tools to tackle CS problems, culminates in a team project—the development of an app—and presentation. They also hear from CS faculty researchers and meet recent QC grads working in computer science and current students doing tech-focused internships. One highlight is visiting Google’s office in Manhattan for an insiders’ view.

CSSI-Extension (https://sites.google.com/qc.cuny.edu/cssi) is inspired by Google’s longstanding CSSI program, which takes place at its  offices throughout the U.S. In contrast, the Extension program is independently run by university faculty on their college campuses in partnership with Google. The college adapts the curriculum for its needs. The lead instructor on campus is Edgardo Molina, who recently earned a PhD in computer science from the CUNY Graduate Center. Molina, trained at Google for the summer program, is also lead instructor for CUNY Tech Prep.

“When I received the email from QC saying that they are partnering with Google for the CSSI program, I was head-over-heels happy,” recalls Bibi Hassan, one of the student participants. “I applied because it’s just a really great opportunity to be part of a program offered by one of the big five tech companies in the world.” A native of Guyana and recent graduate of Bayside High School, Bibi says that she will “most definitely major in CS” but is unsure of her career plans at this early stage.

“Going in my first day, I was nervous, picturing the stereotypical Com Sci classroom environment much like in my high school, where the majority of the class are male and practically professional coders,” she says. “I was surprised to find there’s a good ratio between the sexes and over 50 percent of the class are beginners in coding.”

A key CSSI goal is to engage more students in tech and increase interest, enrollment and retention in computer science. Building a foundation in computer science in a friendly, supportive group environment before the start of freshman year can lead to success  later.

Hassan already has her eye on the future. “I found the soft skills workshops very helpful,” she says. “They have definitely given me insight on what aspects of my work in coding I should improve on, such as working within a group and building a portfolio. The CSSI program made me realize that getting good grades is a good thing, but to get a great job after graduating, I will need to do a lot more. Now I can set out the steps I need to follow throughout the next four years, starting as a freshman, to put me ahead of the game.”

“Research on student success in higher education shows that this kind of immersive experience builds confidence and helps students become more self-directed and motivated learners by helping them see that they are part of a larger community of practice,” says Fernández. “This program should directly influence interest in computer science, as well as enrollment and retention in CS, particularly for students underrepresented in this major.”

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past forty years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


Queens College Students Michelle Fang and Raymond Greene Receive Investors Bank Scholarships

— Fang, a Graduate Student and Widowed Mother, and Greene, an Undergrad, Are Both Flushing Residents Pursuing Careers in Business —

QUEENS, NY, August 1, 2018 – At the Queens College Business Forum in June, Investors Bank Awarded QC students Michelle Fang and Raymond Greene scholarships of $2,500 each.

Fang, who came to the U.S. from Shanghai as an eighth-grader, graduated from QC in 2005 with a degree in Accounting and Information Systems. Currently a student in the MS in Accounting program, she maintains a perfect GPA of 4.0.

After receiving her undergraduate degree, Fang worked in the accounting field until her husband suddenly passed away, leaving her with a one-year-old son. “My whole world was turned upside down,” she says. Yet it was during this difficult time, while balancing her studies with the responsibilities of being a single mother, that she became a Certified Management Accountant; she returned to work soon afterwards. Fang’s ultimate goal is to become a CPA, where she stresses the need to hold the profession to a “high ethical standard.”

“Receiving this scholarship has impacted my career and future studies in a very positive way,” Fang says. “It’s been a bumpy road the past six years, and I want to thank everyone who helped me get the award, especially my parents and Queens College professors.”

Like Fang, Raymond Greene lives in Flushing, where he grew up and attended PS/IS 499 on the QC campus. He is currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in Business Administration, earning a GPA of 3.8, and expects to graduate in 2019; he has already lined up an internship with J.P. Morgan for next summer. He is currently the director of marketing for the business club ALPFA, as well as vice president of the QC Economics and Business club.

After graduation, he plans to continue his studies at QC, enrolling in the MA in Risk Management program. “I’m very attracted to finance because of the complex nature of the industry and its potential for upward mobility,” Greene says. “This scholarship means a great deal to me, as it will allow me to comfortably attend school and dedicate myself to furthering my career in finance,” says Greene.

“Queens College has been in my life since I first started attending school,” he adds. Revealing a wry sense of humor, Greene adds: “After lagging behind my full potential throughout high school, it was wonderful to be accepted for the award and get a chance at redemption.”

Perseverance and taking advantage of opportunities is common to both students. Along with the expected business-related courses, Fang includes a communication class among “the most interesting and meaningful to her.”

“The class helped me not only in reading and writing but in expressing myself more clearly to others,” says the Chinese native, now an American citizen. “We can never stop learning no matter how much we already know.”

About Investors Bank
Investors Bank, headquartered in Short Hills, New Jersey, is a full-service community bank that has been serving customers since 1926. With over $23 billion in assets and a network of more than 150 retail branches, Investors delivers personalized services and products tailored to the needs of its customers. Investors’ banking services include complete deposit, loan and cash management products for consumers and businesses. Investors Bank. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past forty years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


The role of education in obesity inequalities among immigrant and native populations in Spain

Carrer Ferran, Barcelona, Spain

Barcelona, Spain

Obesity has been increasing in prevalence world-wide over the last four decades, and according to projections 18% of men and over 21% of women will be affected by the year 2025. Obesity contributes to a host of chronic diseases and premature mortality, and is associated with a high financial burden for health care utilization. In recent years, studies have shown social determinants, such as place of birth and socioeconomic position, and their unequal distribution to have an impact on health status. Prior studies have shown differences in obesity risk of immigrants, as compared to native populations. Other studies have shown educational attainment to be a factor in health outcomes. A newly published study examines the effect of both place of birth and education together on obesity in European men and women. “Place of birth is associated with obesity in men and women,” explains Dr. Luisa N. Borrell, co-author of the study and a professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy. “However, the role of place of birth depends on education and together they affect obesity differently in men and women.”

The findings were published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

The study was based on a cross-sectional analysis of data obtained from the Spanish National Health Survey of 2011-12 and from the 2014 European Health Survey in Spain. The surveys, both of which sampled representative populations of non-institutionalized persons in Spain, yielded data for 27,720 adults aged 18 to 64.

Luisa Borrell

Luisa Borrell

The findings showed the probability of obesity to be greater in immigrant women, and lower in immigrant men relative to their native counterparts, after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, self-rated health, and health behaviors. When looking at the effect of education on obesity, immigrant women were more likely to be obese than the native women, regardless of their educational attainment or specific country of birth, with a higher probability observed among women with the highest education. Among the immigrant men, those with lower educational attainment had lower probability of obesity, though the inequalities in obesity between immigrant and native men were inconclusive and dependent on a variety of factors, including the country of origin, the length of stay in the country of destination, and whether the men were first or second generation in the host country.

Despite existing research indicating a protective effect of higher educational attainment on health status, specifically on obesity, this study found a protective effect at lower educational levels in immigrant men relative to their native peers. This finding may be explained by a phenomenon known as healthy migrant effect, where the health status of immigrants tends to be better than that of the rest of the population in their home country, suggesting the migration process is being undertaken by those who are healthy to begin with. In Spain, discrimination in labor markets can direct healthy immigrant men into jobs requiring greater physical effort, such as construction, and agriculture, where obesity is less likely to result in employment, whereas immigrant women are more likely to be funneled into domestic and care jobs, characterized by low-income, long working hours, and high levels of stress, all of which can contribute to obesity.

This study delves into an understudied area, investigating the driving factors for obesity inequalities between immigrant and native populations. Dr. Borrell noted that future studies comparing health outcomes between immigrant populations relative to native populations should consider the interaction of place of birth, education, and gender. “Consideration and understanding of such interaction may help in the designing of strategies for health promotion to reduce health inequalities between immigrant and native populations,” said Dr. Borrell.

 

Rodriguez-Alvarez E, Lanborena N, Borrell L. Obesity Inequalities According to Place of Birth: The Role of Education. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018;15(8):1620. doi:10.3390/ijerph15081620


CCNY makes Princeton Review’s Best Colleges list for seventh year

For the seventh consecutive year, The City College of New York is listed among the top institutions in the nation by The Princeton Review®.  CCNY features in the Review’s 2019 “The Best 384 Colleges” guide (Penguin Random House / Princeton Review Books, $24.99, Aug. 7, 2018) available today.

The “Best 384” rankings are based on surveys of 138,000 students at 384 top colleges that includes a wide representation by region, size, selectivity and character. Published annually since 1992, the book has detailed profiles of the colleges with rating scores in eight categories as well as ranking lists of top 20 schools in 62 categories.

“City  College  is  one  of  the  toughest  CUNY  schools  to get  into,  with  an  admissions rate  of  about  33  percent  (some  schools  and  programs  within  can  be  lower),” notes the Princeton Review.

Students surveyed lauded CCNY’s fortes, from its “profound” diversity across the board, its “historic” location and the unique college experience it offers.

“The diversity  in  the  student  body,  as  well  as  the  faculty  and  administration,  ‘is  profound,’  which  helps  many people  interact  with  different  people  from  different  cultures  and  come  together  to  get  through  each  semester,” said one student.

Another student observed that most  CCNY  students are  not  looking  for  the  “typical  college  experience,”  but  rather  are  interested “in  the  intellectual  and  emotional  growth  that  comes  with  higher  education.”

City College annually receives high rankings from the Princeton Review. Last January, the education services company named CCNY among the top schools in the country that pay you back.  It listed CCNY in its 2018 annual guide “Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck.”

About the Princeton Review 
The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep, and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. Its Tutor.com brand is the largest online tutoring service in the U.S. It comprises a community of thousands of tutors who have delivered more than 15 million one-to-one tutoring sessions. The Princeton Review is headquartered in New York, NY. The Princeton Review is not affiliated with Princeton University.

About The City College of New York 
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Karrin E. Walks Named BMCC Interim President

Karrin E. Wilks, Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, has been appointed Interim President of BMCC by Interim CUNY Chancellor Vita Rabinowitz. She will assume the role as President Antonio Pérez steps down on August 31.

Wilks has served in public higher education administration for more than 30 years and has extensive experience developing and evaluating policy and programs aimed at improving student success, particularly for underserved populations.

Her leadership includes a focus on strategic planning, program design and implementation, college readiness and developmental education, evidence-based retention and success strategies, leadership development, and improving teaching and learning across disciplines.

Karrin E. Wilks, named BMCC Interim President

Wilks’ emphasis on equity in education, which includes building strategies to move students more quickly through remedial or developmental instruction and into credit-bearing courses, relates to national trends in access to higher education. Her commentary article, “Turning the Dial on Developmental Outcomes,” appeared in Community College Daily in December 2016, and she is featured in the Education Dive column, “Office Hours: Borough of Manhattan Community College Provost Karrin E. Wilks.” Wilks is also quoted on the subject of college readiness and equity in articles including “Solving the Remediation Riddle in Higher Ed,” (University Business, 2016) and others.

In 2016, Wilks was selected as one of 40 community college leaders nationwide for the inaugural class of the Aspen Presidential Fellowship, which is described by Walter G. Bumphus, President and CEO of the American Association of Community College as being “essential to preparing capable and courageous leaders ready to elevate community colleges to greater levels of student success, while maintaining a commitment to access.”

Prior to joining BMCC, Wilks served as the Senior Vice President and Interim Provost for Medgar Evers College, and held the position of University Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the CUNY Central Office of Academic Affairs.

Earlier in her career, she served as Senior Vice President for the Vermont State Colleges, taught writing and humanities courses at the Community College of Vermont and served on the faculty of the Vermont Leadership Institute. Wilks earned an Ed.D. in Policy and Leadership Development, and M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Vermont. She holds a B.A. in History/Creative Writing from Middlebury College.


Alaina Claire Feldman Joins Baruch College as Director of the Sidney Mishkin Gallery

Feldman will work to ensure that the gallery remains a valuable asset to the College, and the wider New York City community, for years to come

 

Dr. Aldermaro Romero, Jr., Dean of the Mildred and George Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, announced the appointment of Alaina Claire Feldman as the new Director of the Sidney Mishkin Gallery.

Located on 135 East 22nd Street and open to the public, the Sidney Mishkin Gallery has offered small, museum-quality shows for more than 25 years. Every year, the gallery mounts five shows, emphasizing scholarly, multicultural, single-artist, and group shows, as well as exhibitions out of the American mainstream. The permanent collection consists of over 300 artworks, featuring paintings, sculpture, prints, and photographs. It also hosts special class sessions, making it a valuable resource for the College’s efforts to encourage interdisciplinary education. Gallery talks and symposia are frequently offered to the college community and to the public.

Mishkin Gallery: A Valuable Asset to Baruch and New York City

As director, Alaina Claire Feldman will establish the artistic policy of the gallery and oversee day-to-day operations for both the permanent collection and visiting shows. Her duties include promoting the gallery to the College as an educational tool, attracting sources of funding, and fostering relationships with artists, critics, and the wider community.

Feldman’s work towards these goals will ensure that the Sidney Mishkin Gallery remains a valuable asset to the College, and as an arts and cultural resource to New York City residents and visitors, for years to come.

“This is an important and exciting time for universities to strengthen their communities and curriculum through diverse cultural platforms in which the art of our time can be exhibited and discussed,” Feldman said. “I’m very much looking forward to developing creative new programs, partnerships, and audiences that will extend Baruch beyond its campus as a unique place for artist-centric and interdisciplinary education.”

Arts Experience from Around the World

Prior to her appointment as Director of the Mishkin Gallery, Feldman served as Director of Exhibitions at the arts non-profit Independent Curators International (ICI). During her time at ICI, she produced and managed 20 traveling exhibitions with guest curators from around the world, and expanded the organization’s international programming three-fold, establishing lasting partnerships with art spaces in Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, and the Midwestern United States. Most recently, she curated the exhibition The Ocean After Nature, which traveled to various art institutions in numerous countries. She also co-curated the traveling exhibition Publishing Against the Grain, which continues to tour internationally.

Feldman also served as the editor of the exhibition catalogue for The Ocean After Nature, as well as the managing editor for ICI’s Sourcebook Series, which includes publications edited by world-renowned artists. Her projects have included the long-term support of artists and curators, as well as the promotion of artistic traditions outside of the Western canon.

Beyond her work at ICI, Feldman has curated numerous exhibitions while lecturing and teaching at the University of Porto, The School of Visual Arts, New York University, The Center for Feminist Pedagogy, and museums around the world. In 2017, she was the Annual Beckwith Lecturer at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston/Tufts. She has previously held positions at the French contemporary art journal May Revue and at the gallery Reena Spaulings Fine Art.

# # #

 


Students’ E-Portoflios Presented at the NYC Department of Education School Technology Summit

Students Thomas Jones, Professors Marla A. Sole and Rodrigo Lobo, Career Strategist Diana Zechowski, and student Angie Cordoba at the NYCDOE School Technology Summit.

Students Thomas Jones, Professors Marla A. Sole and Rodrigo Lobo, Career Strategist Diana Zechowski, and student Angie Cordoba at the NYCDOE School Technology Summit.

Guttman Community College Professors Marla A. Sole and Rodrigo Lobo along with Diana Zechowski, Career Strategist, and students Thomas Jones and Angie Cordoba gave a poster presentation on July 31st at the New York City Department of Education School Technology Summit.  The talk, entitled Electronic Portfolios: A Framework for Archiving and Assessing Students’ Educational Growth, described how students are introduced to and use electronic portfolios from their first semester in college until they graduate to archive their best academic work.

Presenters described how Guttman faculty and staff use this electronic collection of work, which is an indispensable tool to help determine if students are meeting each of the course learning outcomes.  Additionally, electronic portfolios, which highlight the rich, varied skills acquired in school, help students create a professional online presence, which can be beneficial when students enter the job market either part-time or full-time.  This was highlighted by sharing student presenters’ e-portfolios.


PROFESSOR AMY GREEN DIRECTS A POWERFUL PLAY ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Professor Amy Green Directs A Powerful Play On Criminal Justice

Mass incarceration, solitary confinement, maximum penalties, domestic violence, and sexual assault—these topics are regularly analyzed, discussed and contemplated at John Jay. But to really feel the impact of the criminal justice system in America, Associate Professor Amy S. Green in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies worked for three years developing and then directing the play whatdoesfreemean?, written by Catherine Filloux, which recently finished showing at The Tank theatre in Manhattan. To learn more about the play, her process and her hopes for change, we sat down and chatted with professor Green.

“One of the reasons why I was so excited to work on this project was that when we think about mass incarceration, broadly in the media, we mainly think about men.” —Amy S. Green

 

The Characters
The play follows two women entangled in the criminal justice system. Mary is an African-American woman convicted of a non-violent drug offense, serving a long sentence. And Ann is an older African-American woman serving a life sentence for killing an abusive husband. Throughout the play the audience sees a special friendship form as they talk about their families and lost dreams. “One of the reasons why I was so excited to work on this project was that when we think about mass incarceration, broadly in the media, we mainly think about men,” says Green. “We know it’s people of color that are disproportionally affected, but we don’t really think about what it does to women, both the women who are themselves incarcerated, and the children and spouses left behind.”

A scene in the play whatdoesfreemean?

Mary hallucinating a talking mouse while she’s in the SHU. Photo: Veronica Bella

“When we asked one of the women what it was like to be in solitary confinement, she said, ‘Lock yourself in your bathroom for an hour and see what that feels like.’” —Amy S. Green

 

The Confinement
To learn more about what it’s like being in solitary confinement—also known as the “Segregated Housing Unit” or the “SHU”—Green and her team spoke with a group of formerly incarcerated women. “When we asked one of the women what it was like to be in solitary confinement, she said, ‘Lock yourself in your bathroom for an hour and see what that feels like.’ That image really worked for us and it became a line in the play,” says Green. The character Mary ends up in the SHU because she was trying to get Ann critical medical attention. While in the SHU, Mary starts feeling the affects of complete isolation. “It’s a sensory deprivation that takes about 15 hours for people to start to decompensate, and then the brain takes over,” says Green. In the middle of the stage, in a simple box of light, Mary counts each of her body parts to stay connected to the real world, knowing that if she escaped reality, it would be hard to come back. Sadly, Ann dies while Mary is in solitary confinement.

The Way Out
One of the takeaways for Mary, and also the audience, is that she has to push past her own values, beliefs and personality to save herself from the system. “Mary’s public defender sees potential in her and counsels Mary to do whatever she needs to get out,” says Green. “And if that means telling the review board how grateful she is for everything she’s received, and how proud she is of making sandwiches in the kitchen, she’s got to do it because she deserves another shot at life.” There’s a mental toll it takes on Mary to debase herself to the board—with a myriad of “yes, sir” and “yes, ma’am” answers—but after Ann’s death, survival and reclaiming her life takes on a whole new meaning.

The Struggle
Green is quite clear that her play is a critique of our country’s current criminal justice system. “When we started writing the play, we had some hope because the Obama administration was working towards prison reform,” says Green. “And in the last eight months, we’ve moved backwards, and it’s really terrifying because it’s not sustainable.” Like many, Green views the current criminal justice system as a derivative of slavery. “It’s like slavery never ended. It just keeps changing form, from Jim Crow to the latest form, mass incarceration.” Understanding the destructive impact mass incarceration has had on families and communities of color, Green was always cognizant of her own race. “The entire cast is black except for one male actor. But I’m white, and the playwright is white. We gave the cast enormous freedom to tell this story from an authentic place, one that was respectful of black people in America,” says Green. “I didn’t want it to feel like all white people are bad and all black people are good, or vise versa. And, at the base level, the officers who run the prisons often look like the people in prison, making the cruelty even that much harder to imagine.”

“Can we be a free society when we are taking away the humanity of 2.2 million people?” —Amy S. Green

 

The Question
The title of the play, and one of Mary’s questions during the play is: What does freedom mean? So we asked Green, after years of preparing the play, what freedom means to her. “For me, instead of one answer, that question brings up more questions. Can I be free in a society in where this kind of mass abuse of fellow citizens is happening? Can we be a free society when we are taking away the humanity of 2.2 million people?” says Green. She ended her thought with an image that she’s viewed many times at the Eastern State Penitentiary, one of the most famous prisons in the world. There, in the prison’s courtyard, stands a 16-foot-tall, three-dimensional bar graph depicting the amount of people incarcerated in the world. “The U.S. just towers over every other country. The next highest level of incarceration is Rwanda after the genocide. It’s out of control, and it’s a blight on Americans,” says Green. “We’re hoping that our play gets people talking and voting on this issue.”


Éxito Del Congreso de Estudiantes de Español de CUNY

Los estudiantes de John Jay convierten el Congreso Estudiantes de Español de CUNY en becas de investigación y creación

 

A veces, salir de su zona de confort puede tener una gran recompensa. Y eso es exactamente lo que los estudiantes de la profesora María Julia Rossi encontraron cuando atendieron y participaron en el Primer Congreso Estudiantes de Español de CUNY el 5 de mayo pasado. “Las presentaciones públicas, como los simposios y las conferencias, son muy importantes para la profesión académica”, dijo Rossi, quien enseña en el Departamento de Lenguas y Literaturas Modernas. “Esto tiene mucho peso cuando estás buscando trabajo y empezando tu carrera en la academia. Yo quiero que mis estudiantes se benefician de esta experiencia”. Después de convencer a sus estudiantes para que usaran sus habilidades para hablar español en el simposio, Rossi se sorprendió gratamente con la profesionalidad de sus presentaciones. Nosotros hablamos con algunos de ellos para obtener más información acerca de su experiencia en el simposio y la posterior beca que algunos de ellos ganaron.

“Nosotros practicamos mucho antes del evento. Y ellos cometieron algunos errores durante los ensayos. Pero en el simposio no hubo ni un solo error, sólo presentaciones muy profesionales que impresionaron todos allí”. —Profesora María Julia Rossi, Departamento de Lenguas y Literaturas Modernas

 

El Congreso de Estudiantes de Español de CUNY

“Al leer mi historia, estaba nervioso al principio. Nunca antes había presentado algo tan personal como mi cuento a nadie más que a mi profesor. Pero después de pasar por la primera página, me sentí muy tranquilo y emocionado de estar en el momento”.  — Byron Sandoval (’20)

 

En el simposio, Melanie Chiluisa, una estudiante en su tercer año, con doble especialización en Criminología y Español: Literatura y Culturas de América Latina, presentó una historia que ella escribió llamada “Christina”. “La historia tenía influencia de mi experiencia con el divorcio de mis padres. Introduje algunos cambios para dramatizarlo, pero lo dejé realista”,  afirmó Chiluisa. “Tenía que traducir la historia de inglés a español y mientras la estaba leyendo, lo único en lo que podía pensar era en no cometer errores, no tartamudear y simplemente pasar cada página”. Byron Sandoval, un estudiante en su tercer año, con especialización en Ciencias de la Computación y Seguridad de Información, también presentó un texto propio en español.  “La historia se llama ‘Ouroboros’ y se trata de una niña que recuerda varios eventos que ha pasado en una cuidad ficticia de América Latina”, comentó Sandoval. “Al leer mi historia, estaba nervioso al principio. Nunca antes había presentado algo tan personal como mi cuento a nadie más que a mi profesora. Pero después de pasar la primera página, me sentí muy tranquilo y emocionado de estar en el momento”. Después de que todos sus estudiantes presentaron en el encuentro académico, Rossi no podía contener su orgullo. “Nosotros practicamos mucho antes del evento. Y ellos cometieron algunos errores durante los ensayos”, confesó Rossi. “Pero en el simposio no hubo ni un solo error, sólo presentaciones muy profesionales que impresionaron todos allí”.

La posibilidad de una beca
Después del éxito del Primer Congreso Estudiantes de Español de CUNY, Rossi sugirió que sus estudiantes se postularan para el Undergraduate Research/Creativity Assistant Scholarship. Al principio, muchos de los estudiantes no pensaban que pudieran solicitar porque su escritura era de ficción. Pero Rossi les explicó que la escritura de ficción era tan académica como cualquier otro trabajo y los provocó para que salieran de los terrenos conocidos donde se sentían cómodos una vez más. Tanto Chiluisa como Sandoval aplicaron y ganaron $ 1,000 cada uno para realizar su trabajo de investigación y producción creativa. “Yo ya estaba trabajando en otros cuentos cortos y la idea de expandir esa compilación a una investigación de la literatura salvadoreña surgió debido a esta beca”, comentó Sandoval.

“Uno de los mayores obstáculos para el logro es tu propia duda— dudar de sí mismo y de su escritura. Pero sin tomar los riesgos, como sabrías si eres bueno?”—Byron Sandoval (’20)

 

El trabajo por delante
Ahora que ganó la beca, Sandoval planea hacer una investigación inspirada por su historia original. “Planeo hacer un doble trabajo. Yo voy a seguir escribiendo cuentos cortos similares a ‘Ouroboros’ y la segunda parte va a ser un estudio de la estética de algunos escritores salvadoreños”, dijo Sandoval. También influenciada por la pieza que presentó en el simposio, Chiluisa planea escribir cuentos cortos de ficción que va a traducir de inglés a español. “Similar al proceso que utilicé para el simposio, quiero traducir mis textos al español.  Los resultados de este trabajo de auto-traducción pueden mostrar los obstáculos que enfrentan los auto-traductores latinoamericanos. Es un campo poco representado y quiero saber por qué”, expresó Chiluisa. Toda la experiencia ayudó a que los estudiantes se dieran cuenta de que a veces es importante superar sus miedos y tener confianza en tu trabajo y en ti mismo. “Uno de los mayores obstáculos para el logro es tu propia duda; dudar de ti mismo y de tu escritura,” añadió Sandoval. “Pero sin tomar los riesgos, ¿cómo sabrías si eres bueno?”


CCNY-based CUNY DSI, Adriano Espaillat, celebrate Tuskegee Airman Esteban Hotesse

Tuskegee Airman Esteban Hotesse.

Coming after the remains of a City College of New York student turned Tuskegee Airman lost in 1944 were finally discovered in Europe, CCNY pays homage to another deceased member of World War II’s famed squadron. On August 23, CCNY’s CUNY Dominican Studies Institute and U.S. Rep. Adriano Espaillat (NY-13) host a ceremony to award the Congressional Gold Medal to Esteban Hotesse posthumously. He will be remembered for his service to the all-Black fighter group.

The event, 6:30 – 8 p.m. in CCNY’s Shepard Hall room 95, is free and open to the public and media. Reservation is required by sending an email to RSVP.Espaillat@mail.house.gov or calling 212.663.3900.

Raised in New York, Hotesse was the only Dominican-born member of the Tuskegee Airmen when he died in a crash during a training mission in July 1945. He was 26 and had landed on Ellis Island with his mother from the Dominican Republic, at age four.

Three months before his death, Second Lieutenant Hotesse and 100 other Tuskegee Airmen had been arrested for resisting segregation at an officers’   club on a U.S. Army Air Corps base in Indiana. Their action is considered by historians as an important milestone in ending segregation in the military, and as a model for civil disobedience decades later during the Civil Rights struggle.

Three years ago, Hotesse was among numerous Dominicans featured in the CUNY DSI exhibit “Fighting for Democracy: Dominican Veterans from World War II,” at City College.

Although Hotesse did not attend City College, one known Tuskegee Airman from CCNY is Lawrence E. Dickson whose plane went down during a mission in December 1944.

An undergraduate between 1940 and 1942, Dickson’s remains were discovered in Austria recently and positively identified on July 27 by the U.S. Department of Defense.

The Harlem resident had been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for meritorious service and was on his 68th mission when he died.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CHANCELLOR RABINOWITZ NAMES COLLEGE PRESIDENTS; NEW PRESIDENT APPOINTED FOR KINGSBOROUGH, INTERIM PRESIDENTS FOR QUEENSBOROUGH AND BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

City University of New York Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz has appointed Claudia V. Schrader president of Kingsborough Community College and made interim appointments for the top posts at Queensborough and Borough of Manhattan Community Colleges.

The appointments are to be confirmed by the University’s Board of Trustees in the fall.

Schrader’s appointment at Kingsborough follows a highly accomplished 17-year career in the top ranks at two other CUNY community colleges. She is currently Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Success at Bronx Community College and previously served in senior positions at Medgar Evers College. Born and raised in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, Dr. Schrader earned her Doctor of Education degree in international and transcultural studies from Columbia University. She will take office Sept.15.

“This is an exciting time at CUNY, marked by spectacular growth in enrollment, a remarkable expansion of our physical plant, national acclaim for our colleges and prestigious awards and grants earned by our students and faculty,” said Board Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. “Dr. Schader is a valuable addition to the cohort of energetic new leaders on our campuses embracing the University’s proud history and helping CUNY set the standard for quality and access in public higher education in the United States.”

“I’m proud to recommend Claudia Schrader to the Board to lead Kingsborough Community College,” said Interim Chancellor Rabinowitz. “She has a proven record as an innovative leader, particularly in areas that are vital to student success at community colleges. Dr. Schrader has led initiatives that have resulted in improved graduation rates and the rapid expansion of ASAP, and she helped create a more positive educational experience and campus climate for the students, faculty and staff at Bronx Community College.”

Chancellor Rabinowitz also named Karrin E. Wilks to be interim president of Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) and Timothy G. Lynch as interim president of Queensborough Community College (QCC).  Both will take office Sept. 1.

Dr. Wilks has been Senior Vice President and Provost of BMCC since 2014.  Her eight years at CUNY also include senior positions at Medgar Evers and a tenure as University Dean of Undergraduate Studies.      She was previously senior vice president at Vermont State Colleges. At BMCC, Dr. Wilks led the college’s recent successful Middle States self-study and reaccreditation processes and reorganized academic affairs to better support student and faculty success.

Dr. Lynch is currently Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at Queensborough and has been a faculty member, department chairperson and chief academic officer at state maritime colleges in New York and California. A native New Yorker, Dr. Lynch earned history degrees at Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate School Center. His research interests focus on immigration and ethnicity and on America’s relationship with the sea.  As provost, he has worked with campus constituencies to advance student success through a data-driven approach to enrollment management, instructional support and degree completion.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 ###


$3.2M NIH grant for Grove School’s Mitchell Schaffler

Professor Mitchell B. Schaffler

Distinguished Professor Mitchell B. Schaffler’s $3.2 million grant will fund his research into determining how changes in osteocytes—the cells that reside inside bones—contribute to the development of osteoporosis and bone fragility.

Distinguished Professor Mitchell B. Schaffler, chair and Wallace H. Coulter Professor of Biomedical Engineering at The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, is awarded a five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.

Schaffler is researching the biomechanical and molecular mechanisms by which skeletal tissue, such as bones, grows strong or decays as people grow older. This new grant will fund his research into determining how changes in osteocytes—the cells that reside inside bones—contribute to the development of osteoporosis and bone fragility.

Osteoporosis and resulting bone fragility are a major public health threat affecting more that 40 million people in the United States. Schaffler’s work will build on recent discoveries by his team of researchers who found that osteocytes possess a specialized complex of proteins and membrane channels that act as mechanical sensors. With age or hormone-level shifts – such as estrogen loss by women during menopause – these sensors deteriorate.

“Bones are like muscles; you either use it or lose it,” said Schaffler. “The cells in your bones act as mechanical sensors and grow strong due to physical activity, exercise, etc. But as you age, the cells eventually grow deaf as it were, so that they no longer respond appropriately and that can lead to bone fragility.”

The Grove School of Engineering, named for alumnus Andrew S. Grove ’60, was established in 1919 as The City College School of Technology and currently houses 115 full-time faculty doing cutting-edge research in fields ranging from energy and sustainability, nanotechnology, materials engineering to transportation and remote sensing. Celebrating its 100-year anniversary, Grove School graduates continue to flourish receiving prestigious awards from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the Goldwater Scholars foundation just to name a few. Visit the Grove School website here.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Dr. Benito Mendoza Selected to Attend Faculty-in-Residence Program at Google

Dr. Benito Mendoza

City Tech’s Professor of Computer Science Dr. Benito Mendoza was one of 21 Computer Science faculty members selected to attend the second iteration of Google’s Faculty in Residence (FIR) program.

Faculty from 20 different institutions serving underrepresented students were invited to participate in this four-week program at Google’s world headquarters in Mountain View, California. Participants worked together to redevelop curriculum to better align with the latest trends in software engineering.

According to Google, “[t]he cohort explored hands-on, project based learning workshops and resources to augment their curriculum, discussed industry expectations, learned more about the technical interviewing process, and immersed themselves in Google’s engineering culture. The program provided faculty the time, space, and opportunity to collaborate with each other in the creation of learning materials that will be applied in their classrooms when they return to campus this fall. Faculty also provided Google partners with important insights that will help our teams continue to advance their commitment to diversity and inclusion for both Googlers and users.”

Google offers many opportunities for both faculty and students, including grants, scholarships, internships and residency programs. For more information, visit https://edu.google.com/computer-science/?modal_active=none.


Professor’s Research on Aging and Economic Insecurity Featured in The Lily

Mary GattaMary Gatta, Guttman Associate Professor of Sociology, has conducted extensive research on Florida’s elderly women suffering from economic insecurity. Her scholarship was featured in the article “Women are facing economic instability in retirement age. And it shows no signs of improvement” published by The Lily, a Washington Post publication. Professor Gatta’s report shows that women are significantly less financially secure in retirement than men because of how they’re treated in the workplace throughout their careers.

In this article Gatta notes that strengthening the social security drought and developing an economic security agenda that helps women and families across their lifetimes will help change the current landscape and allow women to age comfortably.


City College hosts largest climate conference

City College hosts largest urban climate conference

The City College of New York is host to the 10th International Conference on Urban Climate (ICUC10). This is the premier meeting on the field urban climate and weather, and it marks the first time in its 30-years of history that will be held in U.S. when it comes to CCNY’s campus August 6 through 10.

ICUC10 is a partnership between The American Meteorological Society (AMS), and the International Association for Urban Climate (IAUC).  The conference, sponsored by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF), is organized by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Earth System Sciences & Remote Sensing Technologies Center (NOAA CCNY/NOAA-CREST) and anticipates 600 delegates from around the world with more than 700 presentations.

The theme of the 2018 conference, Sustainable and Resilient Urban Environments, significantly coincides with a time when accelerated urban development is challenged by the risks and consequences of extreme weather and climate events and by global socio-economic disparity. Resiliency and reduced vulnerability to all socio-economic sectors have become critical elements to the achievement of sustainable development.

“New York City is an ideal venue for this conference, the first ever on American soil,” said ICUC 10 lead organizer and CCNY NOAA CREST Professor of Mechanical Engineering Jorge Gonzalez.  “The city is a vibrant coastal environment that provides unique opportunities to its people, and it is constantly facing the biggest challenges of climate induced extremes, from big storms to extreme heat, responding pro-actively to be more resilient with new science, planning and execution.”

The WMO Chief for Climate Applications Dr Rupa Kumar Kolli, will join the meeting at the opening ceremony. The Conference features five plenary speakers including past AMS President, Dr. Marshall Shepherd. Mayor David Collado of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, will be welcomed as well as Daniel A. Zarrilli, PE Senior Director, Climate Policy and Programs Chief Resilience Officer of the City of New York who will speak on Monday morning’s session.

“We hope our City College of New York campus venue is a living learning experience to the many scientists that will join the conference from around the world, inspiring discussions for new urban climate sciences and applications to a range of social value variables in urban planning, public health, energy, and other topics,” said Gonzalez.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


CCNY Grove School’s Gilda Barabino earns second national award this summer

Gilda Barabino, dean of CCNY’s Grove School of Engineering

The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers presents its 2018 Dr. Joseph N. Cannon Award for Excellence in Chemical Engineering to Gilda A. Barabino, dean of The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering this fall. The award recognizes her excellent achievements in chemical engineering.

Barabino will be honored at NOBCChE’s annual awards ceremony on   September 20 in Orlando, Florida. The prize is named for NOBCChE co-founder Joseph Cannon, a noted chemical engineer and Howard University professor.

This is Barabino’s second national award announced this summer. In June she received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring presented by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Science Foundation. It honors excellence in STEM teaching and mentoring and is the nation’s highest honor bestowed upon mentors who work to expand talent in the STEM fields.

Barabino has served as dean of the Grove School since 2013. She is the first African-American woman to serve as dean of engineering at a college that is not an HBCU.

A noted researcher in sickle cell disease, cellular and tissue engineering, she has distinguished herself as a leader and tireless advocate for diversity in science and engineering.

Barabino is esteemed nationally as a mentor and role model for underrepresented minorities and women, and as a mentor to undergraduate researchers.

In addition to this year’s honors, her other top accolades since 2015 have included:

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


JOHN JAY OFFERS A NEW AFRICANA STUDIES MINOR: COMMUNITY JUSTICE

John Jay Offers a New Africana Studies Minor: Community Justice

 

This coming fall semester The Department of Africana Studies will be offering a new minor: Community Justice. The courses incorporated into the minor expose students to new ways of thinking about justice and community-based problems, such as economic and racial inequality, as well as the prison system. The Community Justice minor requires students to complete 18 credits, nine of which include three required classes, and the other nine stemming from a wide selection of elective courses.

What You Can Learn
This new minor is focused on teaching students how to use what they learn as a way to better their community. The hope is that by looking at legal, economic, and social policies, students can address the root causes of community-based issues, finding new ways to bring about justice. In taking classes such as, Introduction to Community Justice in Human Systems, Community-Based Approaches to Justice, Culture and Crime, and Latina/os and the City, students can learn several theories and strategies enabling them to solve community problems more efficiently. And these problem-solving skills can then be applied in careers that could transform the criminal justice system.

What You Can Do
After completing this minor, students are going to be better prepared to enter justice-related fields, such as: criminology, criminal justice, sociology, law, forensics, and human services. They would also have a foundation to take the next steps to becoming attorneys, social workers, police officers, and forensic psychologists. These students would have the knowledge to bring about a change within their community—one that is peaceful, fair and most importantly brings community justice to all.


JOHN JAY WELCOMES PROVOST YI LI

John Jay Welcomes Provost Yi Li

 

Recently, after an extensive national search, President Karol V. Mason announced the appointment of Dr. Yi Li as John Jay’s new Provost. To get to know Dr. Li a little better, we sat down with him to learn more about his past experiences and his hopes for the John Jay community.

Q: Why were you passionate about joining John Jay College?

YL: John Jay’s model of educating for justice was really attractive and meaningful to me. I grew up during the Cultural Revolution, where like many families in China, my family suffered. I personally suffered from a lack of education. The graduating class from my high school only had a handful of students who were fortunate enough to get into a four-year college. Because of a lack of a college education, most of my high school classmates are already retired. I consider myself very fortunate to still be working and be able to help students and faculty.

Q: What are you biggest goals as the new Provost?

YL: What I realized during the interview process was how committed the faculty and staff are to their students’ success. My goal is to really support them, improving student retention and graduation rates. I’d like to help the faculty and staff provide a transformative experience for our students.

Q: What do you want students to know about you?

YL: I want students to know that in life, everyone goes through struggles. I want them to know that their Provost failed his first math class as a freshman. And, as a doctorate student in the Ph.D. program at the University of Minnesota, I failed my first qualifying exam. In life we make choices. You can call a fail a failure, or you can stand up and come back. Don’t be afraid to fail and come back. That’s the experience of life.

“In life we make choices. You can call a fail a failure, or you can stand up and come back. Don’t be afraid to fail and come back. That’s the experience of life.” —Provost Li

 

Q: You and President Mason were both Math majors in college. What else do the two of you connect on?

YL: I think we connected in multiple places. President Mason is very strong on social justice, and she wants to support our students, especially those who come from a disadvantaged background. That speaks so well to my own experience. I struggled to come to the U.S. and get my degree. I was under prepared. Fortunately, I was given strong support from my family and other people who were both wise and kind. This is who Karol is—she is strong on justice, and she is kind. This is where our connection is. Of course, we also talked about how we were both Math majors, and we’re both pretty good at numbers.

Q: Your experience during the Cultural Revolution in China significantly shaped your life. Can you tell us more about what that experience taught you?

YL: Throughout that period, my parents continued to be my role models, helping me form my core values and beliefs. My father would tell me to be optimistic, even during the most difficult times. And my mother taught me to stand up to those in power, but to treat those in need with care and kindness. During the Cultural Revolution I also learned about mentoring. I was mentored the entire time, even though I didn’t realize it then. At John Jay we need to be mindful how we engage and mentor our students, junior staff, and faculty. That’s how I got through a difficult time in my life, with support, kindness, and mentoring.

“At John Jay we need to be mindful how we engage and mentor our students, junior staff and faculty. That’s how I got through a difficult time in my life, with support, kindness, and mentoring.” —Provost Li

 

Q: What does justice mean to you?

YL: Fundamentally, it’s about fairness and equality. This is especially relevant in the current environment, where we are going to see—and this in not stoppable—that demographically there is going to be a titanic shift. And with that shift comes tremendous challenges. Currently, we have not been able to manage the gaps of higher education attainment between the “traditionally better served” and the “traditionally under-served.” That gap is widening. However, the population of the “traditionally better served” is getting smaller and the population of the “traditionally under served” is getting bigger. Unless we can actually move them and help them to get a four-year degree, we have a tremendous problem in terms of social mobility and in terms of moving people into the middle class. I believe that middle income is better for democracy. If we can’t help them, it will not only be a social justice issue, but an issue of national security. Justice in this case is how we support our students, making sure students of color get through college.

Q: Can you tell us something surprising about yourself?

YL: I like to play video games. Typically, it’s the kind of video games that have historical backgrounds, or just ones for fun. The last video game I played was “God of War.” In the summer, I’ll try to set aside about a week where I’ll do nothing but play video games. It all started because of my son. When he was in junior high, he played video games and I used to play with him. That’s how I got hooked.


NASA AWARDS $300,000 TO BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEG

 

Grant Will Prepare Middle and High School Students 

To Become the Science-Savvy Workforce of Tomorrow

 

July 31, 2018 – The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has announced an award of more than $300,000 to Bronx Community College (BCC) for a two-year program that will contribute to the training and development of the future workforce of NASA and other high-tech employers. The grant will fund a collaboration with Medgar Evers College to engage middle school and high school students in innovative hands-on science through workshops, field activities and mentoring from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) scholars and professionals. 

 Each summer, Bronx Community College and Medgar Evers College will also train middle school and high school teachers to teach STEM disciplines using NASA Planetary Modeling Platforms and geospatial technology, a fast-growing field that turns data from satellites into information-rich maps useful to government, business and consumers. Geospatial technology is part of our everyday lives: in every automobile with a GPS mapping display, every smartphone, smartwatch or smart television and in every component of the Internet of Things.

The program will be run at Bronx Community College by Dr. Sunil Bhaskaran, director of the College’s innovative Geospatial Center of the CUNY Crest Institute. Since Dr. Bhaskaran introduced the geospatial courses at BCC in 2014, 262 students have enrolled.

Bronx Community College was one of only five community colleges in the nation selected for the award by NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Project. The program also will provide related research opportunities for two Bronx Community College students each year.

“Bronx Community College is gratified by NASA’s confidence in our mission to turn today’s STEM students into tomorrow’s science and engineering professionals,” says BCC President Thomas A. Isekenegbe, “And to create a workforce built on the strength of America’s diversity.” 


ZERO-TEXT-COST COURSES EASE FINANCIAL BURDENS

Zero-Text-Cost Courses Ease Financial Burdens

 

John Jay prides itself on giving all students, coming from any financial background, the opportunity to succeed. Understanding that the price of textbooks is a cost barrier for many students, some professors are opting to use the zero-text-cost program.

Through this program, CUNY allocated grant money is used to offer courses that utilize Open Educational Resources (OER) and licensed Alternative Educational Resources (AER) instead of traditional textbooks that students have to purchase. “There are students who can’t engage in the classroom because of textbook costs,” says Karen Argueta, a recent class of 2018 graduate and current student in John Jay’s Human Rights Master’s Program. “I’ve had classmates who took pictures of another student’s textbook, just to have the reading for the following week.” Using OER and AER materials like DVDs, eBooks, and streaming videos, which are all digitally available, boosts student engagement and increases student success. To learn more about the zero-text-cost program and its impact on students and professors, we spoke with Argueta, Dr. Raymond Patton, Director of Educational Partnerships and General Education; and Verlene Herrington, John Jay’s OER Librarian and Adjunct Associate Professor.

“There are students who can’t engage in the classroom because of textbook costs. I’ve had classmates who took pictures of another student’s textbook, just to have the reading for the following week.”—Karen Argueta (’18)

 

Q: The majority of John Jay students work at least one job and many students are coming from low-income families. What impact do you think zero-text-cost classes have on these students?

KA: The cost of textbooks is one of the student expenses that doesn’t get a lot of attention. I’ve had classmates who spend their printing money photocopying a textbook, only to find that they don’t have enough money to print a paper due that day. For many students there’s a genuine sigh of relief when it’s revealed that the course is zero-text-cost.

RP: It’s no secret that our students struggle to afford college. We know from surveys that many students take classes without buying the book, or they buy the book too late, do poorly or drop the course. Anything to ease this financial burden, allowing our students to focus on academics, is extremely helpful.

Q: How do professors teaching zero-text-cost courses feel about the materials they’re using?

RP: John Jay professors know that our students struggle to buy books and care deeply about this as an educational issue. Those who chose to create a zero-text-cost course were eager to have their students afford their education. Of course, this does come with a challenge. Textbooks provide the structure and content of a course, so redesigning it introduces some philosophical questions and practical challenges. This requires a substantial amount of time and effort to address.

VH: The professors are committed to help. The cost of textbooks has increased to three times the rate of inflation. This is much faster than the real estate and healthcare industry. Anything that professors can do to help students with this cost, they are willing to do.

 “It’s no secret that our students struggle to afford college. We know from surveys that many students take classes without buying the book, or they buy the book too late, do poorly or drop the course.” —Dr. Raymond Patton

 

Q: Why do the new materials give professors more flexibility in comparison with regular textbooks?

RP: The typical textbook provides structure and content to a course—some even come with assignments, tests, and quizzes. However, in my experience as a History professor, the standard survey textbooks seemed to be designed with a traditional approach in mind. I was much more interested in cultivating critical reading, thinking, and expression skills, and in engaging how memory of the past is intertwined with our understanding of the present. Textbooks are simply not designed to support what I want to do with my courses.

VH: Learning outcomes for a course should drive the instructions, not a commercial textbook. Sometimes even a free OER textbook does not entirely address the learning outcomes. I tell faculty that they may need chapters from several OER textbooks, supplemented with library resources, like e-books, journal articles and videos to create the new material.

Q: Are there any “downsides” or “pitfalls” students should be aware of when using these new “zero-text-cost” materials?

RP: Most courses redesigned as zero-text-cost use a lot of digital materials, which brings up the challenge of guiding students to become digitally literate. Engaging with and annotating a hard copy written text is an unfamiliar experience for many students, and doing so with a digital text can be even more daunting.

Q: With technology affecting every industry in the world, do you see this type of classroom learning being the future?

RP: Many textbooks are digital already, and the library reports that students use digital materials more frequently than printed copies. We know the professional world demands digital literacy. Our challenge is preparing students to critically engage with the digitalizing world. Textbooks are a “textbook case” of planned obsolescence, with new editions supplanting the previous ones as often as publishers deem possible.


City Tech Civil Engineering Professor Wins 2018 Women of Color in STEM Award

Prof. Melanie Villatoro

Melanie Villatoro, Assistant Professor of Construction Management and Civil Engineering Technology at New York City College of Technology (City Tech), will receive the Educational Leadership Award at the 23rd Women of Color STEM conference in Detroit on October 13, 2018.

According to Career Communications Group Inc. (CCG), which organizes the conference, the Women of Color STEM awards recognize outstanding women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, focusing on the contributions they have made to address the challenges of gender harassment, gender bias, discouragement and overall lack of support in the STEM workforce. This year’s conference theme, “Press for Progress,” reflects the global push for gender parity.

National Chair of the 23rd Women of Color STEM conference Monica Emerson says, “Melanie Villatoro was selected because she is among an extraordinary group of forward-thinking STEM experts. This year the candidates were the strongest and represented the most diverse collection of professionals we have had the pleasure of evaluating.”

Villatoro enrolled at the Albert Nerken School of Engineering at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, where she was the only Hispanic student in her civil engineering class. In 2002, she graduated with her Bachelor of Engineering degree in Civil Engineering. She worked full time while pursuing her Master of Science degree, which she received from Columbia University in 2005. During her career in consulting with DMJM Harris and Langan Engineering and Environmental Services she provided engineering design services for residential and commercial  developments in the NYC area. She is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of New York.

Despite her many professional achievements, Villatoro longed for the opportunity to make a difference for New York City youth. Inspired by her brother’s dedication to NYC youth as a social worker, she obtained a civil engineering Assistant Professor position at City Tech, making her the first female Hispanic full-time faculty member in the Department of Construction Management and Civil Engineering Technology at the College. During her eight years there, Villatoro has mentored and advised many students; she has, and continues to, make a difference in many lives—inside and outside the university. Not surprisingly, given her professional accomplishments and her outstanding impact on the community, Villatoro received tenure at City Tech in 2017.

Villatoro’s approach to teaching builds on developing rapport with her students. She is highly effective in the classroom and as an advisor and mentor. She is involved in many projects within the College focused on student retention, first year experience and academic success. One of these initiatives is a grant-funded project (about $150,000 per annum) that, via career seminars for women, peer mentoring, faculty development and community outreach, aims to increase retention of female students across six departments in the School of Technology and Design. Prof. Villatoro also coordinates the Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL) program, a pedagogical approach allowing students to participate in workshops facilitated by peer leaders, and has worked with the Faculty Learning Center since 2016 to provide faculty development for her colleagues across the university.

Moreover, Villatoro is passionate about outreach in STEM from the elementary to the high school level. Her outreach events target under-represented groups in STEM, with the goal of increasing the number of diverse qualified students entering the fields of STEM, particularly engineering. For multiple years, Villatoro has secured about $80,000 in funding from the Federal Highway Administration to provide a summer program for high school students to strengthen STEM skills and provide exposure to transportation related careers. She also hosts an annual event for high school girls to provide exposure to STEM majors. In addition, since 2014, she has coordinated STEM outreach at Daniel Hale Elementary School, providing civil engineering lesson plans, afterschool programs, and family workshops to their students.

Throughout her career, Villatoro has filled leadership roles in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Metropolitan Section branch and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE), NYC branch. Currently, she is the secretary of the ASCE Committee on Faculty Development, a national committee recognized as a leader in faculty development for ABET accredited civil engineering programs.


The perception of PrEP as an excuse for promiscuity

Truvada pills and bottleIn 2012, the FDA approved the use of the drug emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (‘Truvada’) as an HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) to reduce the risk of HIV infection in the event of exposure. Taking daily PrEP essentially reduces the risk of HIV transmission to near zero. Since its approval, the drug’s uptake among gay and bisexual men has been met with conflict, stemming from the perceptions surrounding the drug and those who take it. Stigma has emerged associating PrEP use with sexual promiscuity. Adding to the negative perceptions, discourse in various media have likened PrEP to a ‘party drug’ with implications that users regularly engage in risky sexual behaviors.

A new study co-authored by Dr. Christian Grov, professor of Community Health and Social Sciences at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy (CUNY SPH), and Mark Pawson, doctoral candidate in Sociology at the Graduate Center of CUNY, sought to deconstruct the moral debate surrounding biomedical HIV prevention and the complex ways in which PrEP and PrEP users are defined within the gay and bisexual communities. The study examined the stereotypes attributed to PrEP users and how these stereotypes contribute to framing the use of PrEP by some as a social problem. The findings were published in Sociology of Health & Illness.

Christian Grov

Christian Grov

The study drew on discussions about PrEP in a series of focus groups with gay and bisexual men in New York City. The groups were intentionally comprised of a mix of races and HIV status in order to generate diverse dialogue. The participants were largely aware of PrEP, but not all had accurate information or were able to knowledgably discuss PrEP.

The study found that the participants who framed PrEP as a social problem tended to view PrEP users as being promiscuous, irresponsible, and naïve. They attributed PrEP to reducing condom usage and believed it was responsible for the spread of STIs among the gay and bisexual communities. Analysis of the discussions also showed some participants distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable reasons for using the medication. “Acceptable reasons that participants offered included if someone was in a monogamous HIV serodiscordant relationship; whereas, presumed unacceptable reasons were if someone just didn’t want to use a condoms,” said Grov.  “Unfortunately, this creates a narrative implying that some people deserve highly effective protection against HIV, whereas others don’t—and the deciding factor is grounded in a moral debate about sexuality,” continued Grov.

The findings provided important insight into the norms and values that shape the perception of PrEP as being either a useful tool to prevent HIV or a harmful practice encouraging promiscuity and “irresponsible behaviors” among its users. Grov pointed out, “Both perceived and experienced stigma of PrEP users are significant barriers to PrEP uptake. Data show that the number of PrEP users has increased year-over-year since being approved, but uptake is still not commensurate with the need.” The CDC recently estimated that as many as 1-in-4 gay and bisexual men would benefit significantly from the protection PrEP provides.

Historically, HIV has been an illness loaded with social stigma and cultural meanings that have had a negative impact on the ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent its spread. This study highlights that not only is the illness stigmatized, but methods of prevention can take on social meanings affecting their effectiveness at reducing the transmission and spread of the illness. Many HIV prevention efforts depend on the social aspect of the intervention, and so it is crucial to understand the social context in which new treatments and medications are introduced. The researchers note “future studies should focus on the ways advances in pharmaceutical technologies interact and potentially clash with cultural beliefs that construct symbolic boundaries between acceptable and unacceptable sexual health practices.”

 

Pawson M, Grov C. ‘Its just an excuse to slut around’: Gay and Bisexual Mens’ Constructions of HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) as a Social Problem. Sociology of Health & Illness. 2018. doi:10.1111/1467-9566.12765.


Dr. Elizabeth Geltman testifies before the EPA on it’s proposed ‘secret science’ rule

EPA building

The Environmental Protection Agency building in Washington, D.C.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently invited testimony on a new proposed rule entitled ‘Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science.” Dr. Elizabeth Geltman, a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy (CUNY SPH), appeared before the EPA to give testimony as an expert on environmental health policy on the EPA’s proposal to eliminate all studies based on non-publicly available data from consideration in constructing health affecting environmental policy.

In her testimony, Geltman noted the EPA’s proposed rule aims to “establish a clear policy” concerning the use of dose-response data and models that underlie ‘‘pivotal regulatory science’’ and promises “to change agency culture and practices regarding data access so that the scientific justification for regulatory actions is truly available for validation and analysis.”

Elizabeth Glass Geltman

Elizabeth Geltman

However, Geltman points out, in practice the new rule just creates new regulatory hurdles by discounting and precluding consideration of long-standing, established scientific practice. Geltman warns that rather than promote the transparency of the scientific information used to create environmental regulations, the rule will obscure the democratic process, slow the pace of science and progress and potentially prevent important health data from being considered by the EPA in outlining environmental policy.

Under the proposal, the EPA would eliminate certain types of studies including those drawn from data that has not been made public. This would preclude any study involving certain types of data, for example sensitive health data that cannot be made public for ethical concerns, from consideration when outlining environmental policy. Geltman points out that many studies require people who are study subjects to share very personal information, often on the legal or ethical condition that the private medical information provided will be protected from public view.

Geltman argues that the EPA has presented no scientific reason to prevent the use of human health studies simply because the underlying medical records are not available for public inspection and review. Geltman calls for the EPA to allow consideration of all available scientific data pertinent to a proposed environmental rule or regulation, including randomly controlled human health trials and other epidemiological studies, in order to be able to make informed decisions on environmental policy that affecs health.

Geltman has over 30 years of experience working on EPA regulated matters and has authored 17 books on environmental and natural resources policy.


Food insecurity among the immigrant population of NYC

SNAP EBT sign in store windowFor over 50 years, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as Food Stamps, has helped millions of Americans avoid hunger and improve their access to healthy and nutritious food, promoting better health outcomes and helping alleviate some of the consequences of poverty.

Recent federal policy changes and proposals are seeking to restrict the utilization of public benefits such as SNAP by select segments of the population, namely immigrants, through policies that seek to restrict immigration, and impose stringent requirements on those who receive aid through safety net programs.

A new report published by the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute (CUFPI), an academic and research center at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy (CUNY SPH), examines how the intersection of these two trends – reducing food assistance and restricting immigration – is affecting the immigrants of New York City. According to Emilia Vignola, the lead researcher on the report and a doctoral student at CUNY SPH, the report “focuses on challenges and opportunities for action in New York” and aims to provide evidence to inform New York City and State policy affecting assistance for the food insecure, who in some cases are immigrants.

Using an online survey of 50 staff from nearly 30 immigrant-serving and anti-hunger groups in the New York area, and in-depth interviews with key informants working in those organizations, CUFPI identified factors facilitating immigrant access to food benefits at the individual, organizational, and policy levels. These factors include the availability of social networks that connect immigrants to community services, adequate language skills and cultural competency of the staff of immigrant-serving and anti-hunger organizations, and sanctuary policies. CUFPI also identified barriers at each level including immigrants’ reluctance to provide personal information to service programs, insufficient organizational outreach and education, and exclusionary public policies.

Emma Vignola

Emma Vignola

While some of these barriers and facilitators have been identified in previous research, this report finds an unprecedented level of fear and anxiety among immigrant communities. Intensified immigration enforcement, along with threats to withhold citizenship or impose charges on those who have utilized safety net programs such as SNAP are effectively reducing the protections against food insecurity and hunger for many New York City residents. “Actions and threats from the Trump administration have made many immigrants even more afraid to participate in SNAP and other essential food programs than before, even though they’re eligible for many of those benefits,” said Vignola. “This is likely going to increase hunger and food insecurity in immigrant communities around the country – unless cities and states do something about it.”

With New York City counting more food insecure people and more immigrants than any other U.S. city, federal policies targeting food assistance programs and immigration have a significant effect on the city’s residents.

The report makes several recommendations that city and state policymakers can undertake to alleviate the barriers to food assistance for immigrants. These recommendations include creating and expanding programs that bring food assistance to immigrants without requirements to provide documentation, develop multi-pronged communications and policy initiatives to reduce stigma against immigrants, strengthen the language and cultural capacity of organizations and social service agencies serving immigrant communities, and improving outreach and education initiatives to ensure all immigrants are enrolled in programs for which they are eligible and that they are fully aware of their rights. Reflecting on the opportunities for action in New York set forth in the report, Vignola noted, “Our state has one of the largest immigrant populations in the country, so we have the power to make a big impact.”

 


Baruch College’s Convocation 2018 to Welcome Largest First-Year Class in More Than 10 Years

Convocation on August 23 will kick off the College’s 50th Anniversary Celebration

Opening Ceremony for Transfer Students on August 24

Baruch College continues its tradition of formally welcoming new undergraduates to the campus community with Convocation 2018 on August 23 for first-year students, and will hold an opening ceremony for transfer students on August 24.

Convocation will officially kick off the College’s yearlong 50th anniversary celebration, which will conclude at Baruch’s Commencement ceremony in late spring 2019.

“We are thrilled to welcome more than 1,850 first-year students, along with another 1,340 transfer students, to Baruch College,” said Art King, vice president for student affairs and dean of students. “This year represents our largest class of first-year students in more than a decade.”

According to King, it is fitting that the College’s 50th anniversary coincides with the impressive number of new students choosing to attend Baruch for the 2018-19 academic year. “We want them to feel a connection to our vibrant campus community and a college that is rich in history and true to its mission.”

King added, “Convocation and the opening ceremony mark a new beginning for the students and we are eager to demonstrate Baruch’s commitment to their success in pursuing an education and achieving career goals.”

The New Family and Student Programs (NSFP) office organized Convocation 2018, and developed the new fall opening ceremony for transfer students. The office, recently established as a resource for newly enrolled undergraduates, focuses on creating a smooth transition for both students and their families.

First-Year Students: August 23

Convocation 2018 for first-year students will be held on Thursday, August 23. President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, will address the students, along with Provost and Senior Vice President for academic affairs David Christy and Dean King.

Acclaimed author and historian Russell Shorto is the guest speaker. His internationally praised book, The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America, has been assigned to the students. They will be discussing the text in seminar classes, which will be led by upper-class students serving as peer leaders.

A Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence at Baruch, Shorto looks forward to speaking at Convocation.

“As a writer you want to be read; you want your work to matter and be part of the conversation,” Shorto said about The Island at the Center of the World selected to be the first-year book. “As the Sidney Harman Writer-in-Residence in the fall of 2017 I got to know many Baruch students. I found them to be intense, engaged, diverse, striving: true representatives not only of the College, but of New York.”

“Based on what I just said, above, I would love students to read the book and discover the New York roots of those qualities – intensity, engagement, diversity, a striving sensibility,” Shorto added. “They were all there in the Dutch colony of New Netherland, and its capital of New Amsterdam.”

Transfer Student Welcome – August 24

On Friday, August 24, Baruch College will hold an opening ceremony for newly admitted transfer students and their families. Dean King, NSFP staff, current transfer students, and members of the Transfer Student Organization will address the group.

A Student Affairs’ Student Services Panel will provide information about a wide range of resources and programs at Baruch. Parents can attend the question and answer workshop, and will receive information to sign up for a new parent advisory council.

First-year and transfer students can get more information on the New Family and Student Programs office webpage.

# # #


The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery Acquires Professor Patricia Cronin’s Sculpture

Memorial to a Marriage is one of 25 pieces of art selected for an annual show highlighting the gallery’s new acquisitions.

By AUDREY M. PETERSON

<p>Department of Art Professor Patricia Cronin's bronze sculpture, <em>Memorial to a Marriage</em>.  </p>

Department of Art Professor Patricia Cronin’s bronze sculpture, Memorial to a Marriage.

 

This spring, Brooklyn College Art Professor Patricia Cronin‘s sculpture, Memorial to a Marriage (2002), has been chosen to be part of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery‘s 50th Anniversary New Acquisitions exhibition.

Called an “icon of the marriage equality movement” by the Smithsonian, the larger-than-life-size bronze shows Cronin and her partner, artist Deborah Kass, in a loving embrace. The work was created in the style of nineteenth-century mortuary sculpture.

Made at a time when Cronin and Kass could not legally wed, (they have since married), the sculpture was created as a commemoration of their relationship, as well as a critique of the lack of real (as opposed to allegorical) women in public sculpture, and the near total absence of public art by women in American cities.

“I used a ‘nationalist’ form—American Neo-Classical sculpture—to address what I saw as a federal failure,” Cronin told the Smithsonian, “and I made a double portrait funerary sculpture because the only legal protections gay people could have were wills, health care proxies, and power of attorney documents, and those didn’t celebrate our life together but the end of it.”

A two-time recipient of the Brooklyn College Tow Professorship, which provides $25,000 to the awardee in support of exceptional new and ongoing projects, Cronin gained notoriety in 1993 for “Girls” and “Boys,” two mixed-media series of Polaroids and watercolors that showed sexual intimacy from the vantage point of the participants. Since then, she has continued to explore such themes such as gay and lesbian representation, the recovery and writing of women’s history, the relationships between feminism and contemporary art, and social justice and the human condition.

Memorial to a Marriage can be viewed at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. through November 2018.


$450K grant to CCNY’s Robert Messinger to avert Fukushima-style nuclear disaster

Robert Messinger

The likelihood of a Fukushima-type nuclear meltdown in the United States could soon be radically reduced, thanks to a new nuclear safety program in development at The City College of New York by chemical engineer Robert J. Messinger. He’s the recipient of a $449,998 Faculty Development Grant from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for his research.

The grant is one of 11 awarded nationally by the Washington, D.C.-based NRC. Other recipients include noted research institutions such as MITPennsylvania State University and the University of Florida.

Messinger will establish a nuclear safety research program at City College’s Grove School of Engineering aimed at significantly improving the emergency electrical power systems of nuclear power plants. His overarching research objective will be to mitigate core damage frequency and core meltdown risks during station blackout (SBO) and extended-loss-of-alternating-current-power (ELAP) events, during which back-up power is essential to ensure core cooling and operation of critical shutdown procedures and instrumentation.

Such risks were highlighted in Fukushima, Japan, in March 2011, where sequential earthquake and tsunami events resulted in prolonged ELAP and subsequent reactor meltdown.

Messinger and his team will develop novel rechargeable aluminum and zinc batteries as advanced back-up power systems that exhibit significantly improved energy densities, power densities, maintenance testing protocols, and safety compared to the vented lead-acid batteries currently used in nuclear power plants across the United States.

He will also teach safety modules focused on emergency power systems and reactor shutdown within nuclear engineering courses at CCNY. This program will synergistically leverage and expand the scope of existing nuclear engineering and energy programs in the Grove School and the CUNY Energy Institute.

Messinger is an assistant professor of chemical engineering in CCNY’s Grove School and a core faculty member of the CUNY Energy Institute.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY AND CITY UNIVERSITY CONSTRUCTION FUND TO HOST MWBE, SDVOB OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE

The City University of New York and the City University Construction Fund on August 8 will host their 10th annual business opportunities conference for companies owned by minorities, women and service-disabled veterans. This year’s conference theme, “Open Doors to New Opportunities and Relationships,” underscores CUNY’s long-held commitment to develop successful business connections with these enterprises and to encourage them to explore opportunities with the University and the fund.

CUNY and the CUCF have been dedicated to creating business partnerships with New York State-certified minority- and women-owned business enterprises (MWBEs) and service-disabled veteran-owned businesses (SDVOBs) for more than a decade.  These efforts by CUNY and the CUCF are among the state’s longest-running formal outreach initiatives.

“The University’s diversity is one of our greatest strengths,” said CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. “By connecting minority-, women- and veteran-owned businesses to CUNY and CUCF, we build on that strength and broaden the scope of the University’s historic objective to open the doors of opportunity to all.”

“Tapping into the full range of talent and experience that New York has to offer is common business sense,” said Interim Chancellor Vita Rabinowitz. “But more than good business, ensuring that MWBEs and SDVOBs compete for contracts speaks to the University’s foundational commitment to affording access and opportunity to all those willing to work for it.”

The daylong conference will occur from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, 524 West 59th St., in Manhattan. The event is designed to assist MWBEs and SDVOBs in connecting with procurement and construction opportunities and in conducting business with the University.

The conference program is designed to help businesses develop a toolbox that will enable them to successfully pursue business with CUNY and the CUCF. Chairperson Thompson, Interim Chancellor Rabinowitz, John Jay College President Karol V. Mason, and Alphonso B. David, Counsel to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, are featured speakers.

Philip A. Berry, Acting Chairperson of the CUCF’s Board of Trustees will moderate a panel discussion of opportunities with CUNY and CUCF. Panel participants include Judith Bergtraum, Vice Chancellor for Facilities, Planning, Construction and Management; Matthew Sapienza, Senior Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer; Sandra Wilkin, CUNY Trustee; Gerald Bushell, President and CEO, Dormitory Authority of the State of New York; and Lourdes Zapata, Chief Diversity Officer, office of Gov. Cuomo.

The program includes five panel sessions, boot-camp intensives and exclusive Open Doors business meet-ups for New York State-certified M/WBEs and SDVOBs, which will enable them to make one-on-one connections with prime contractors and procurement professionals. The event also includes a Help Desk to provide real-time answers from experts and a Marketplace Exhibit Hall with over 70 public, private and nonprofit organizations that provide direct networking and new business opportunities for attendees. The full program is available online at www.cunybiz.com/program.

Registration is currently open and New York State-certified MWBEs and SDVOBs, and those that aspire to be certified, from across New York State and the tristate region, are encouraged to attend. For more information and to register, visit www.cunybiz.com

About the City University Construction Fund

The City University Construction Fund (CUCF) is the core of CUNY’s capital construction program and is responsible for more than 300 buildings across 24 colleges and professional schools. The CUCF is a public benefit corporation established by New York State to provide facilities for CUNY and to support its educational purposes. The CUCF advances design, construction and development projects for new facilities and for the ongoing renovation of existing facilities.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields.  The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.  The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

###


CCNY PROFESSOR LANDS $3.2 MILLION GRANT FROM NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

Mitchell B. Schaffler, a Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, was awarded a five-year, $3.2 million grant from National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Schaffler is researching the biomechanical and molecular mechanisms by which skeletal tissue, such as bones, grows strong or decays as people grow older. This new grant will fund his research into determining how changes in osteocytes – the cells that reside inside bones – contribute to the development of osteoporosis and bone fragility.

Osteoporosis and resulting bone fragility are a major public health threat affecting more that 40 million people in the United States. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, fractures resulting from osteoporosis are both dangerous to individuals – 25 percent of hip-fracture patients age 50 and over die in the year following the fracture and costly to our health care system ($19 billion annually in the U.S. alone).

“This grant by the National Institutes of Health acknowledges the significance of professor Schaffler’s work and is another example of CUNY’s dedicated faculty actively engaged in impactful scientific research with benefits that extend far beyond New York City,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz.

Schaffler’s work will build on recent discoveries by his team of researchers who found that osteocytes possess a specialized complex of proteins and membrane channels that act as mechanical sensors. With age or hormone-level shifts – such as estrogen loss by women during menopause – these sensors deteriorate.

“Bones are like muscles; you either use it or lose it,” said Schaffler, who is also the Wallace H. Coulter Professor of Biomedical Engineering and the department chair. “The cells in your bones act as mechanical sensors and grow strong due to physical activity, exercise, etc. But as you age, the cells eventually grow deaf as it were, so that they no longer respond appropriately and that can lead to bone fragility.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

 

###


CCNY students join Governor Cuomo in PR recovery efforts

CCNY student Monica Martinez-Raga is one of the CUNY Service Corps-PR students helping with hurricane recovery efforts.

CCNY student Monica Martinez-Raga is one of the CUNY Service Corps-PR students helping with Hurricane Maria recovery efforts.

Colin Powell School economics major Monica Martinez-Raga, at The City College of New York, knows first hand the devastation Hurricane Maria caused. As a Puerto Rican native, Martinez-Raga was on vacation visiting her boyfriend in New York when the hurricane hit the capital of San Juan. Now, the CUNY Service Corps-PR student joins Governor Andrew M. Cuomo for a NY Stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Initiative trip to support ongoing recovery efforts.

“In September 2017, I had to move to New York as a refugee from Hurricane Maria and City