School/Class News





CCNY CUNY Service Corp students travel to Puerto Rico for relief effort

Students in the CUNY Service Corps-Puerto Rico and their majors: [clockwise] Kenny Rodriguez (Civil Engineering), Emily Ernau (English), Abena Baah-Fordjour (Biomedical Science), Tamara Johnson (Ad/PR), Ngawang Tenzin (Architecture) and Myra Rosa (Interdisciplinary Studies).

Twenty-seven students from The City College of New York are journeying to Puerto Rico this summer as part of the CUNY Service Corps-Puerto Rico initiative. The initiative is in partnership with Governor Andrew Cuomo’s the NY Stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Effort.

Students from both CUNY and SUNY are traveling to Puerto Rico to work with non-profit organizations— NECHAMA and Heart 9/11—already rebuilding on the ground. While in Puerto Rico, students will earn a stipend and academic credit as well as build workplace and community service skills.

I want to dedicate my life to doing Humanitarian work; this service trip to Puerto Rico is deeply personal to me,” said Myra Rosa, interdisciplinary studies major with a concentration in social welfare at the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education. “I lost my maternal grandmother as a result of Hurricane Maria, and I am also of Puerto Rican descent—so giving back to my country is how I will honor my grandmother.”

First cohort of CUNY Service Corp volunteers to receive training and left for Puerto Rico on June 17. Second from left: Jeffrey Gyemibi (Architecture), Isabelle Cotte (Art Education), Jacob Grajales (Political Science).

The program will operate from mid-June to August 18, and each cohort of students will be spending two weeks in Puerto Rico to repair and replace roofs, windows and doors as well as sanitize and remove mold in homes in the towns of Barranquitas, Loíza, Toa Baja, Orocovis, Santurce and Río Grande.

The CUNY Service Corps-PR students are:

Omar Addasi

Abena Baah-Fordjour

Karen Brito

Kereen Brown

Joseline Carlson

Juan Pablo Celis Garcia

Isabelle Cotte

Kevin Davis

Yacine Diouf

Jenine Erdaide

Emily Ernau

Andrea Gomez

Jacob Grajales

Miledys Guzman

Jeffrey Gyemibi

Benjamin Jacquez

Mohsin Jafri

Tamara Johnson

In Sub Kim

Monica Martinez-Raga

Ivie Odiase

Ryan Olsen

Oneika Pryce

Kenny Rodriguez

Myra Rosa

Pristine Anne Sermeno

Ngawang Tenzin

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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THE 2018 STUDENT COUNCIL LOOKS AHEAD

The 2018 Student Council Looks Ahead

 

On June 1st, John Jay’s 2018 student council members were officially sworn in by President Karol V. Mason. Everyone on the team is excited for the coming academic year, and each of them has specific goals for the College, the faculty, and their fellow students. We chatted with a few of them to learn more about their backgrounds and aspirations.

 

Student Council

The 2018 Student Council with President Mason, Vice President Lynette Cook-Francis and Assistant Vice President Michael Martinez-Sachs

 

Steven Pacheco, 2018 Student Council President

Steven Pacheco, 2018 Student Council President

 

 

How would you describe your leadership style?

Unorthodox. Ever since my childhood days, I’ve had a tendency to critically analyze situations before deciding how to move forward. I take great pride in my identity, and I plan to critically analyze the identity of our students and our institution to inform the way I carry myself throughout this term. Steven Pacheco, President, Major: Social Thought and Marketing Management (CUNY BA)

My style of leading is through serving. The best leader is one who is able to talk with their feet and work with their peers.—Elijah Font, Graduate Representative, Concentrations: Criminal Law & Procedure, Criminology & Deviance

I am a listener, an observer and a hands on leader.—Jacqueline Aguilar, Undergraduate Student Senate John Jay Delegate, Major: Public Administration

My style of leading is through serving. The best leader is one who is able to talk with their feet and work with their peers.—Elijah Font, Graduate Representative

What are some of your main goals for the coming year?

I’m hoping to implement a senior week where students can celebrate their accomplishments with many different engaging activities—a carnival, a barbecue, an exciting service activity, a senior class trip, and some throwback days.Jasmine Awad, Senior Representative, Major: Criminal Justice 

I’d like to encourage students to get involved with committees, as well as getting involved on campus. That, and just having lots of events with good food.—John Ilawan, Junior Representative, Majors: Criminal Justice, Humanities and Justice

I want to ensure that John Jay students feel like their elected representatives have their backs.—Elisa Crespo, University Student Senate Delegate, College Council-at-Large, Major: Political Science

What are you most exited about being on student council?

I am really excited about our new team. I loved working in council last year, but I also really appreciate a change of pace. I think we have a very dynamic and diverse set of representatives this year.—Andrew Bandini, Secretary, Major: Law & Society

I’m most excited to work with the awesome John Jay faculty and staff. At our swearing-in ceremony, I became aware of the various staff support, from Dara Bryne in Student Affairs, to Allison Pease in the English Department.— Deandra Simon, Senior Representative, Major: English

I want to become more familiarized with the intersection of John Jay’s mission and the diversity at John Jay—whether it’s in our curriculum, scholarships, extra-curricular clubs, or within the faculty, administration, and staff.Musarrat “Mus” Lamia, Junior Representative, Major: Political Science

This is my first time in student council. I am excited and blessed to be given the opportunity to represent my fellow students. If you see me, view me as your fellow peer and friend first.Erik Perez, Sophomore Representative

Tell us something interesting about yourself.

I am grateful for the upcoming Immigrant Student Success Center that will open at John Jay College. As an immigrant who came from Russia nine years ago, I know that it is crucial to support our students and provide a safe environment.Elza Kochueva, Vice President, Major: Law and Society 

I am Bangladeshi and a first-generation college student. I am currently President of the UNICEF Club here at Club Row. UNICEF is an acronym for United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund. We are working to help support and bring attention to worldly issues facing children.Mahtab Khan, Senior Representative, Major: Political Science, Criminal Justice

This is my first time in student council. I am excited and blessed to be given the opportunity to represent my fellow students. If you see me, view me as your fellow peer and friend first.Erik Perez, Sophomore Representative, Major: Political Science 


DOE Early Career Award for Elizabeth Biddinger’s CCNY biomass research

 

CCNY chemical engineer Elizabeth Biddinger is the recipient of a DOE Early Career Award.

Elizabeth J. Biddinger, assistant professor of chemical engineering in The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering, is one of 84 recipients nationwide of U.S. Department of Energy Early Career Awards announced today. She’ll receive $750,000 over five years for her research in the emerging field of biomass electroreduction.

“Supporting talented researchers early in their career is key to building and maintaining a skilled and effective scientific workforce for the nation. By investing in the next generation of scientific researchers, we are supporting lifelong discovery science to fuel the nation’s innovation system,” said Secretary of Energy Rick Perry. “We are proud of the accomplishments these young scientists have already made, and look forward to following their achievements in years to come.”

Biddinger’s successful proposal was titled: “Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics for Electrochemical Hydrogenation and Hydrogenolysis of Biomass-Derived Species.”

“This is a great opportunity to focus on biomass electroreduction. The field is relatively new and there are so many exciting contributions we can make,” she said.

Biomass is from natural renewable resources such as plant or food matter and can be converted into renewable fuels and chemicals. This can replace the need to use fossil fuels such as petroleum and natural gas. Biddinger’s research at the Grove School will seek to advance efforts to develop proposed smaller scale, on-site upgrading of products from biomass conversion, known as Biomass Upgrading Depots (BUDs).

“By electrochemically converting biomass, modular units that do not require significant infrastructure or the same scale as traditional chemical processing facilities, can be utilized in these BUDs,” said Biddinger.

“When paired with excess renewable electricity (from sunny or windy days), the process has promise to be economical and sustainable, all while addressing the energy storage problem associated with renewable electricity generation,” she added.

The DOE Early Career Award is the latest honor received by Biddinger, whose research interests encompass green chemistry and energy applications utilizing electrochemistry, catalysis, alternative solvents and sustainable engineering methods.

Recent accolades include the 2016-2017 Electrochemical Society–Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship Award to work on battery safety switches using reversible ionic liquids, and the 2014 CUNY Junior Faculty Award for Science and Engineering from the Sloan Foundation to investigate CO2 electroreduction.

In addition to her appointment with CCNY, she also is part of the Graduate Center, CUNY, PhD chemistry program.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Hidetaka Hirota’s “Expelling the Poor” wins Rudnick Book Prize

CCNY faculty rolls out more titles

Expelling the Poor: Atlantic Seaboard States and the Nineteenth-Century Origins of American Immigration Policy,” by City College of New York historian Hidetaka Hirota is the co-winner of the 2018 Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize. The prize is awarded by the New England American Studies Association to the best academic book in American studies by a scholar from the region or about the region over a two-year period.

Latino City: Immigration and Urban Crisis in Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1945-2000,” by Llana Barber (SUNY Old Westbury) was the other Rudnick winner.

“Both books re-examined commonly held thoughts about immigration in New England in ways that will shape our notions around immigration, laws associated with it, and what happens after immigration,” said Jonathan Silverman, president, New England American Studies Association.

It is the second major honor garnered by Hirota’s seminal maiden book. In the spring, “Expelling the Poor” received the Immigration and Ethnic History Society’s Best First Book Award.

Following are other new titles from CCNY faculty:

In addition, a short story by Matthew G. Nagler, professor of economics and business in the Colin Powell School, appears in “Economic Inquiry,” a rarity for the highly regarded journal.

Titled “Eigenstaller’s Market,” it’s the tale of an American economics professor, an aging experimental economist he interviews in Switzerland, intrigue and dark secrets.

“To my knowledge, this is the first time that “Economic Inquiry” has chosen to publish a work of short fiction,” remarked Nagler.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families Mark Berkowitz, Week of June 18, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

I hope you had a wonderful Fathers Day today!

As we enter our final full-week of the 2017-18 school year, please join me in congratulating our 5th Grade and 8th grade students who will be Moving Up to  6thgrade and 9th grade respectively.

Please join me in congratulating our 12th grade students who will become high school graduates on Thursday!

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication,

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal
This week’s Moving Up/Graduation Ceremonies for our students in Grades 5, 8 and 12.

  • 5th Grade Moving Up Ceremony, Wednesday June 20th, in the NEST+m Auditorium. Family entry: 8:45am.
  • 8th Grade Moving Up Ceremony, Thursday June 21st, 12:30pm, The Great Hall of the Cooper Union
  • 12th Grade Graduation, Thursday June 21st, 9:00am, The Great Hall of the Cooper Union.

Our Week Ahead

Monday June 18:

  • 1st Grade End of Year Concert

Tuesday June 19:

  • 2nd Grade End of Year Concert

Wednesday June 20:

  • 5th Grade Moving Up Ceremony, 8:45am

Thursday June 21:

  • 12th Grade Graduation, 9:00am
  • 8th Grade Moving Up Ceremony, 12:30pm​

Friday June 22:

  • 4th Grade Concert

Looking Ahead:

  • June 26: Last Day of School. Procedures to be sent separately.

Take Advantage of a New and Innovative Healthcare Training Program at Bronx Community College

The Bronx is in desperate need of healing and recovery. Reports by government agencies and private organizations make it clear that there is a crisis in public health conditions and drug addiction in the borough. Such serious problems can only be resolved when they are challenged head-on by caring, dedicated and qualified professionals — perhaps someone like you.

If you are seeking a chance to truly help others to change their lives by reaching and maintaining their recovery goals for substance use disorders, and by providing healthcare to those in need, the Bronx Community College Behavioral Health Opportunity Program (BHOP) could be just right for you. BHOP is a new and innovative healthcare training program at Bronx Community College (BCC). The program trains students to become New York State Certified Recovery Peer Advocates (CRPAs) and prepares them for entry-level support positions in Community Health.

BHOP, provided by the BCC Division of Workforce Development and Continuing Education and the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, is a unique program, sponsored by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. BHOP is a stackable credential that enables qualified students to be trained to become CRPAs. In addition, BHOP provides additional college-level coursework through which students can earn up to nine credits toward an Associate in Science degree in Public Health at BCC. The training, coursework and college credits are free for program participants.

If you are interested in making a difference in your community, consider training to assist people with behavioral health issues. Get free vocational training and earn college credit at the same time. For more information, please call 718.289.5170 or 718.220.6202. Classes begin soon, so start your mission to help the Bronx heal and recover today.

 


Rare in-vivo study by CCNY-led team shows weak brain nodes have strong influence on memory network

Andrea Moreno

Gino Del Ferraro

Our ability to learn, remember, problem solve, and speak are all cognitive functions related to different parts of our brain. If researchers can identify how those brain parts communicate and exchange information with each other, clinicians and surgeons can better understand how diseases like Alzheimer’s and brain cancer affect those cognitive functions.

The majority of existing simulation studies show that the parts of the brain with high connectivity, the so-called “hubs”, are most important when it comes to several different cognitive tasks.  But the results of a recent and rare in-vivo study just published in Nature demonstrate that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) – a part of the brain with weak connections – plays an unexpectedly influential role in enhancing the memory network.

The study was led by Gino Del Ferraro, Research Associate in the Levich Institute at the City College of New York in collaboration with a team of CCNY researchers and a group of researchers at Instituto de Neurosciencia in Spain, led by Andrea Moreno. Del Ferraro and team provided the theoretical analysis, modeling and predictions, while the Spanish team performed the in-vivo validations of the predictions.

The study’s goal was to identify which areas of the brain could be stimulated to enhance memory by identifying which are the influential nodes in the memory brain network within the three different areas for brain integration: hippocampus, prefontal cortex and nucleus accumbens (NAc).

Previous studies of cognitive tasks showed the NAc was downstream of the hippocampus and the prefontal cortex and thus not influential for brain integration. In fact Del Ferraro and team proved that, for memory formation, the NAc  is upstream and influential.

The results of the CCNY-led research are worth noting, as is the methodology used to achieve them. Del Ferraro observes: “The effects of removing a node from a network has been studied with simulations, both for human and animal brain networks, but direct in-vivo validations are rare. Thus, up to this point, there was no well-grounded approach to predict which nodes are essential for brain integration.”

Del Ferraro and team are currently collaborating with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in NYC, trying to apply similar techniques on people who have brain cancer in the language parts of the brain. They are attempting to identify which are the essential nodes for language production so that if patients  undergo neural surgery, the surgeon knows which parts of the brain need to be preserved.

Read the Nature study here.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and

divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu (212) 650-7028

CUNY STUDENTS PRESENT PROPOSALS TO CITY TO INCREASE PARTICIPATION IN CENSUS

Two teams of CUNY students showcased their hi-tech solutions for increasing participation in the 2020 U.S. Census to New York City officials looking for ways to ensure that all New Yorkers are counted.  The Census determines the number of the city’s representatives in Congress and the amount of federal funding the city receives.

The CUNY teams recently competed at Baruch College in the annual CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition, which challenges students to think about how they would apply cognitive computing to improving how institutions of higher education and local governments  serve the public.  The city officials were with the Department of City Planning and the Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer.

“The CUNY-IBM Watson competition affords students a unique opportunity to apply what they have learned in class to solving challenging public policy issues,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz.  “The creative solutions that our students proposed to city officials are a reflection of the University’s commitment to educating the next generation of socially-engaged and forward-thinking New Yorkers.”

One of the teams that presented was the third-place winner of the 2018 CUNY-IBM Watson competition and included Vincent Vitiello, Egor Semeniak, Anthony Astarita—all three are enrolled in the Macaulay Honors College at the College of Staten Island—and Yuri Yurchenko, who attends the College of Staten Island.

“This was a great opportunity for city officials to see what students from The City University of New York can do,” said Stan Altman, professor at the Baruch College Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, who is the lead organizer of the competition. “Like all the teams involved in this competition, this team was able to bring its expertise and knowledge to propose an approach to solving a problem that affects all of New York City, demonstrating, once again, that CUNY is New York City’s University.”

Their project proposed using Watson’s artificial intelligence capabilities to create a chat bot function they called Synthia: The SMS Census Assistant, which could speak multiple languages and answer any question an individual might have with respect to completing the census questionnaire.

Other winning teams in the 2018 CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition sought to work on additional issues facing the city, including climate change and lowering recidivism rates. The competition’s first-place winner sought to leverage IBM Watson capabilities to increase the city’s ability to identify areas at risk of flood as climate change increases the frequency and severity of storms, while the second-place team proposed using technology to help inmates prepare for returning to society months before being released from prison.

Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs administered the competition, along with support from IBM and The Lawrence Field Center for Entrepreneurship at Baruch College. The Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer, the NYC Department of Health & Mental Health and the NYC Administration for Children’s Services also participated.  This year, 177 students from 17 campuses competed.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Baruch College Leads National Dialogue on Social Mobility

Baruch College’s Start-to-Finish Philosophy Enables Students to Excel in Professional World, Highlighted in CollegeNET’s Digital Publication and Bestselling Author Steven Brill’s Latest Book

Baruch College, and its acclaimed success as an engine of economic mobility for students, received top billing in CollegeNET’s just-published e-book, “Social Mobility through Higher Education – Best Practices for Student Success,” and is prominently highlighted in bestselling author Steven Brill’s latest book Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty-Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It.

Both publications position Baruch College as among those exemplary higher-education institutions leading the national dialogue on social mobility, and successfully propelling low-income students up the economic ladder.

CollegeNET’s e-book was nationally distributed to the media on June 5. Brill’s book Tailspin, published on May 29 and available in bookstores and libraries nationwide, is reaping high praise from both reviewers and notable individuals, including Jill Abramson, former executive editor at The New York Times, former U.S. senator Bill Bradley, and legendary journalist Bob Woodward.

The two publications feature the opinions and insights of Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD. They also point to Baruch’s “Startto-Finish Philosophy” for students that has helped establish the College’s nationally recognized social-mobility track record.

 

CollegeNET: “Social Mobility through Higher Education”

For its first e-book dedicated to social mobility, CollegeNET selected Baruch College and only three other higher education institutions across the country to contribute opinion pieces. According to CollegeNET, the digital publication “offers best practices from student success professionals who are investing in cutting-edge programs that support under-served and under-represented students’ academic, personal and financial needs.” See press release here.

President Wallerstein kicks off the collection of first-person essays with his article “College as a Catalyst for Social Mobility.” He begins, “In this age of entrenched income inequality, higher education is perhaps the key path out of poverty in the United States.” A rigorous education, he contends, benefits “everyone, rich and poor, and better educated citizens drive our economy and enrich our culture.”

President Wallerstein concludes, “Higher education and social mobility are an essential part of the American success story. Baruch and other public institutions of higher learning are the gateway to get there.”

Academic leaders from the University of California, Irvine; University of California, Santa Cruz; and Winston-Salem State University also contributed to the e-book.

 

Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty-Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It

In his latest book, award-winning journalist Brill turns a critical eye towards America’s last half century to understand the country’s current challenging times. He argues “The celebrated American economic mobility engine is sputtering” and “income inequality has snowballed.”

Yet, Brill expresses hopefulness and points to Baruch as an example of a higher education institution that is “laying the foundation for real, lasting change.” In the section about the College, “A Non-Elite Mobility Engine,” Brill writes that Baruch “has developed a menu of programs that leaves little to chance and that offers a road map for how more higher education institutions can create new kind of meritocracy that is not nearly as generationally entrenched.”

In his research, Brill spent a day at Baruch interviewing students, administrators, and President Wallerstein to learn first-hand how the College is moving so many low-to-middle class students into successful, financially lucrative careers. He cites a dozen Baruch programs as examples of the College-wide efforts to help students obtain jobs and internships, such as soft-skills workshops, a real-time trading center, and the Starr Career Development Center.

Brill writes, “Although as Wallerstein pointed out, Baruch has a history of being a gateway into the middle class, in recent years, it has done much more to get its students ready to ride the escalator.  Many public colleges and universities enroll large numbers of poor and lower-middle class families, but few succeed the way Baruch does in propelling so many so far.”

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CCNY students get a lesson in love and journalism from the New York Times

CCNY student reporters (left to right) Greta Mantilla, Radhamely De Leon, Philip Laudo, Katie Herchenroeder, Michael Ailes, Maty Drame, Tajae Hinds, Sonyi lopez, Austin Steele (Not pictured: Anthony Viola)

One of 24 New York Times Magazine covers

On a rainy Saturday in May, ten journalism students from the City College of New York fanned out across the five boroughs – from Clinton Hill to Riker’s Island, Bronx Center to the Flatiron – and beyond. Their mission: to help create Love City, a special issue of The New York Times Magazine dedicated to love in New York City.

The student reporters worked with some of the best photographers in the country during this 24-hour odyssey of romance, lust, and heartache to photograph 24 couples kissing between 12 am and 11:59 pm on May 19. Their task: to quickly identify the couples in each photo – their names, where they were from, and most importantly, what their story was.

Student reporters included:

  • Michael Ailes
  • Radhamely De Leon
  • Maty Drame
  • Katie Herchenroeder
  • Tajae Hinds
  • Philip Laudo
  • Sonyi Lopez
  • Greta Mantilla
  • Austin Steele
  • Anthony Viola

Student Austin Steele hustled to keep up with photographer Ruddy Roye in Brooklyn. “I had to chase and interview the couples on the spot. Then transcribe the interviews and pull out the most interesting quotes – in as short a time as possible.”

Student Mely De Leon refined her interviewing skills on the fly while working with Hannah La Follette Ryan, the photographer behind @subwayhands. “I learned how to get as much information as possible within the few minutes we had…and about a lot of really beautiful love stories of normal everyday couples living their lives in New York City.”

In addition to the 24 different covers of the special issue, which were distributed to subscribers and newsstands at random, the New York Times Magazine also posted photo essays and videos online.

The collaboration – the first of its kind between The New York Times and CCNY – was facilitated by New York Times Magazine contributing writer Linda Villarosa, who also directs the journalism program at City College and Jeannie Choi, the Associate Editor of the New York Times Magazine.

Linda Villarosa: “The New York Times believes in our mission; it was an honor to have the vote of confidence in our students. I’m extremely proud to teach here at City College and to have this group of students who can shine at a high level.”

Jeannie Choi, Associate Editor of the New York Times Magazine, responded: “Everyone on our staff who worked with the students from the City College of New York’s journalism program was impressed by their skill and willingness to work hard to get accurate and interesting information from their subjects. We could not have accomplished such an ambitious New York issue without the students’ contributions.”

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

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Contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera@ccny.cuny.edu (212) 650-7028

Alumnus Harold Scheraga receives honorary degree from City College

Alumnus Harold Scheraga (right) shaking hands with President Vince Boudreau (left) with CCNY Professor David Jeruzalmi (middle) in the Physical Sciences Building at Cornell University.

Alumnus Harold Scheraga ’41 receives an honorary degree from The City College of New York for seven decades of research at Cornell University. City College President Vince Boudreau presented Sheraga with his degree Doctor of Science honoris causa at the university in Ithaca, New York.

“It’s a real a real joy to be able to do this,” said President Vince Boudreau, who received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1991. “Harold Scheraga’s story—as someone from humble socioeconomic beginnings who came to City College when it was free—embodies CCNY’s commitment to promoting social mobility for its students.”

Scheraga received his Ph.D. from Duke University in 1946. He joined the faculty at Cornell as an instructor in 1947 and became a full professor in 1958. He was named a Todd Professor in 1965 and served as chair of the chemistry department from 1960-1967.

Through his research, funded by the National Institute of Health for sixty years, Scheraga has over 1,300 scientific papers to his name with five published in 2018. He has received many awards for his work and is a fellow of the American Chemical Society, the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The citation presented to Scheraga by City College named him a true pioneer; it also mentioned that in the course of more than six decades he’s played a major role in elucidating the physical principles underlying the behavior of proteins. His work laid the foundation for understanding forces responsible for protein structure and stability, the prediction of the native structure of proteins and the folding of proteins into three-dimensional objects, as well as for current efforts in precision medicine to treat human diseases by specifically targeting damaged proteins.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Queens College Freshman Renuka Surujnarain Awarded Prestigious Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship

— One of 15 Recipients City-Wide of Prestigious Honor That Provides Local College Students With Paid Summer Internships to Prepare the Next Generation of Leaders —

June 15, 2018 2018 (Queens, NY) – Queens College freshman Renuka Surujnarain, a Jamaica, Queens, native, has been awarded a prestigious Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship.

Established in 1999, the Watson Fellowship provides New York City college students with three years of paid summer internships, in New York City or abroad, with leading nonprofit, for-profit, and governmental organizations. The program is designed to develop students’ leadership skills, introduce them to intercultural experiences, and enhance their personal and professional growth. Watson Fellows participate in seminars that build their confidence and expand their understanding of their place in the world, attend cultural events that immerse them in the diversity of New York City, and receive mentorship from industry leaders. Queens College has produced over 20 Watson Fellows to date.

One of 15 area students to receive the award in 2018, Surujnarain begins her fellowship this year by interning with the Generation Study Abroad Initiative at the Institute of International Education in Manhattan. Generation Study Abroad seeks to double the number of U.S. students studying overseas by the end of the decade through study abroad programs, service learning trips, internships, and non-credit academic experiences. Surujnarain’s responsibilities involve digital communications strategy and implementation; her tasks range from managing the initiative’s website and producing e-newsletters to working on social media content, research, and event planning.

“We congratulate Renuka on this impressive accomplishment.  We thank the Watson Foundation for giving our students opportunities that enable them to make the most of their undergraduate years at Queens College. These experiences will prepare them to enter the workforce ready to contribute on day one,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “We know Renuka’s time as a Jeannette K. Watson Fellow will serve her well in her own development and enrich the Queens College community.”

“The second I heard about this opportunity through an information session at school, I knew it was a program meant for me. After multiple application drafts and mock interviews, I won a fellowship that would brighten the next three years of my college life,” said Surujnarain. “I am excited to work alongside different organizations, which will help me determine where I have the greatest potential. I am also grateful to have the chance to travel beyond New York City and experience what other cultural spaces have to offer.”

At Queens College, Surujnarain is exploring the subjects of education, anthropology, neuroscience, and public administration. As a member of Project Start, she visits elementary school classrooms to teach young students about science.

About Queens College
Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, Queens College helps its over 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, under the guidance of an accessible, award-winning faculty. The college was recently ranked tenth among U.S. public colleges by the Chronicle of Higher Education for upward social and economic mobility. The Center for World University Rankings placed Queens College in the top 3.5% of schools worldwide, based on the quality of its education and faculty, the number of its alumni who find employment, and other factors. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year by the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, and is routinely ranked a U.S. News & World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit qc.cuny.edu to learn more.

A leader in preparing future educators, Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the New York metropolitan area. It also contributes to New York City’s talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more undergraduate computer science majors than any city college. Students from across the country and around the world come to Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors, and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past forty years.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY Professor Awarded $558K Office of Naval Research Grant

Xi Chen, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering and a researcher in the Nanoscience Initiative at the Graduate Center’s Advanced Science Research Center, was awarded a three-year, $558,000 grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

Chen’s research project will focus on gaining a fundamental understanding of how water-responsive materials react through studies on nanoscale levels. Understanding the scientific reasons for how these materials respond to water or humidity levels will lay the foundation for developing new hybrid and synthetic materials with potentially broad applications for underwater robotics, artificial muscles and their evaporation energy harvesting techniques.

“This innovative research by Professor Chen is another example of outside recognition of CUNY’s talented and dedicated faculty,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz.

“We’re excited that the U.S. Navy sees promise in our work,” said Chen. “This research will provide critical insight into how water in nanoscale structures could contribute to the development of bioinspired materials and devices.”

Though his research is cutting-edge and could lead to pioneering applications, Chen is quick to point out that he and his research team of Ph.D. students are fundamentally  trying to understand the world around them. “We’re learning from nature,” he said. “Nature has already developed amazing materials. All we are doing is studying and imitating what nature does.”

Earlier this year, Chen was awarded a Feliks Gross Award from the CUNY Academy for the Humanities and Sciences and Graduate Research Technology Initiative (GRTI) Equipment Funding from CCNY.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Séamus Scanlon’s “The McGowan Trilogy” goes to Japan

Seamus Scanlon, CCNY librarian, author and playwright.

What started as a 300-word award winning flash fiction piece by City College of New York librarian Séamus Scanlon debuts as a theatrical performance in Japan on June 29 to a sellout audience at the Toyohashi Arts Theatre PLAT in Aichi. “The McGowan Trilogy,” three interrelated one-act plays set against the backdrop of “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland, has also sold out venues in Hyogo [July 4-8] and Tokyo [July 13-29].

Scanlon’s work is set around the 30-year conflict in Northern Ireland (1969-1999) and examines issues such as fanaticism, “The Disappeared,” trauma, love and Irish style honor. “Trilogy” consists of the plays, “Dancing at Lunacy,” “The Long Wet Grass,” and “Boys Swam Before me.”

“The Long Wet Grass” was originally a 300-word story that won Scanlon, a native of Galway, in the Republic of Ireland, first prize in Fish Publishing’s Flash Fiction Prize international competition in 2011.  Nancy Manocherian of The Cell Theater then asked him to write a play based on the piece and two other one-act plays to complement it. It was directed by Kira Simring and won three awards in the annual Origin’s 1st Irish Theatre Festival.

A film version of “The Long Wet Grass” (Ireland, 14 minutes, 2017) is on the film festival circuit.

Scanlon, who in addition to being a Carnegie Corporation prize-winning librarian is also an associate professor at CCNY’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education, will be in Tokyo for the “Trilogy” performances.

Tori Matsuzaka, one of Japan’s most accomplished actors with almost a million followers on Twitter, will play the lead. Eriko Ogawa, Japan’s premier director, will direct.

“The producer is Takeshi Eguchi who saw my book in the Drama Bookshop in New York while on a visit to find new plays! The play was published by Arlen House in 2014 to coincide with the New York City production,” said Scanlon.

Other highlights of Scanlon’s Japanese trip include a talk entitled “The McGowan Trilogy – From Flash Fiction to Stage and Screen” at Tokyo’s 50,000-student Waseda University.

He’ll also be feted at an Irish Embassy luncheon. Guests will include cast and crew of “Trilogy,” local theater professionals and Tokyo-based academics who research and teach drama, colonial history, peace studies and Irish studies.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Chemical engineering professor Chen awarded Office of Naval Research grant

Xi Chen, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the Grove School and with the Nanoscience Initiative at The Graduate Center’s Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC), is the recipient of a $558,000 grant from the Office of Naval Research to explore and develop better actuators using water-responsive materials. Chen’s proposed work will focus on gaining a fundamental understanding of the nanoscale water-responsive mechanisms that will lay the foundation for developing new hybrid and synthetic water-responsive materials for broad applications including evaporation-energy harvesting techniques pioneered by his team at the ASRC and CCNY.

“We’re excited that the U.S. Navy sees promise in our work,” said Chen. “This research will provide critical insight into how water in nanoscale structures could contribute to the development of bioinspired materials and devices. It’s a great start.”

Earlier this year, Chen received The Feliks Gross Award from the CUNY Academy for the Humanities and Sciences and Graduate Research Technology Initiative (GRTI) Equipment Funding from CCNY.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of June 11, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Here we are, in the final 11 days of our school year!
Tomorrow Monday June 11th is a K-8 clerical day; no Lower or Middle Grade students attend school. 
It is also the final day of instruction prior to Regents Week for Upper Grades students.

  • Thank you Custodian Engineer Stephen Marinaro for leading NEST+m’s 5th grade scientists for a tour of our school’s rooftop Solar Panels.
  • Thank you to 6th grade teacher Jillian Fletcher  and our 6th grade actors for creating and performing last week’s original plays!
  • Congratulations to Pieter Voorhees and Craig McGorry for leading our Middle Grades and Upper Grades Musicians to Silver and Gold Awards at this past week’s NYSSMA: in specific, NEST+m’s Upper Grades Jazz Band received a Gold Rating, Leve IV. Our Middle Grades Advanced Band and Jazz Band scored a silver Medal.
  • Last Tuesday was NEST+m’s 12th grade Prom; this past weekend our 12th graders and dedicated teacher chaperones took to the Catskills for a celebratory trip to the Frost Valley YMCA.
  • In alignment with DOE policy, each month our administrative team conducts a monthly safety meeting which is attended by our administrative team, School Safety Agents, Custodian Engineer and PTA Co-President(s). Parents are welcome to attend tomorrow’s June safety meeting, 8:45am in the Cafeteria.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication,

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Our Week Ahead

Monday June 11

June Monthly Safety Meeting open to parents, 8:45am in the Cafeteria

  • K-8 Clerical Day – no LG or MG students in attendance
  • 9-12 Final Day of Instruction: Students should return all school-issued books and supplies except those still being used for Regents Prep.
  • PSAL End of Year BBQ

Tuesday June 12

  • Upper Grades Regents Week Formally Begins

Wednesday June 13

  • Regents Testing
  • Orientation for incoming K-2 families.

Thursday June 14

  • Regents Testing
  • Kindergarten Concert
  • 5th Grade Concert and Art Show
  • College Financial Aid Presentation
  • 4pm: SLT Meeting in Library

Friday June 15:

  • Schools Closed Eid al-Fitr

FIRST GROUP OF CUNY VOLUNTEERS BEGINS PREPARING TO HELP PUERTO RICO REBUILD

The first cohort of students from throughout The City University of New York system began training today to help rebuild Puerto Rico, which is still suffering a humanitarian crisis nearly nine months after Hurricane Maria devastated the island. More than 2,700 CUNY students applied to volunteer for the NY Stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Initiative launched by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. The first 40 of 200 selected students that CUNY is sending to Puerto Rico leave for the island on Sunday.

“We take great pride in the CUNY students who have volunteered to make an impact on the lives of our fellow citizens in Puerto Rico,” said CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. “Our students are letting everyone in Puerto Rico know they are not forgotten.”

“These students, through the work they have volunteered to do this summer, are setting a high standard for all of us as caring global citizens,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita Rabinowitz. “This program is a perfect example of the University’s commitment to service and social engagement.”

Every week for the next eight weeks a group of CUNY Service Corps students will receive two days of training before departing for the island, where they will stay for two weeks, volunteering with different nonprofits as they work five days a week rebuilding homes, including repairing doors, windows and roofs, and removing mold.

Students have the option to receive credit for their volunteer work. Most have opted for a hybrid course entitled Global Citizenship, Community Engagement, and Service in Latin America and the Caribbean, created at Lehman College but open to all CUNY students. Other colleges are offering courses specific to their own academic programs, such as a Construction Management course for New York City College of Technology students.  CUNY has waived all tuition and fees associated with these courses.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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PROFESSOR DAVID BROTHERTON EXAMINES AMERICA’S “DEPORTATION REGIME”

Professor David Brotherton Examines America’s "Deportation Regime"

 

A couple of years after David Brotherton first arrived to John Jay in 1994, he received a curious invitation from Professor Luis Barrios to visit the church where Barrios preached uptown. It was at Barrios’ Episcopalian church that Brotherton, who had done research on gangs in California, first met Latin King leader Antonio Fernandez, a.k.a. King Tone.

“We want to change the world,” King Tone told Brotherton. “What do you want?” Brotherton responded: “I want to write your story.”

That was the beginning of a years-long relationship between Brotherton and the Latin Kings that would eventually culminate in the book Gangs and Society: Alternative Perspectives, edited by Louis Kontos, David C. Brotherton, and Luis Barrios. During that time, Brotherton hosted the first major gang conference since the 60s, here at John Jay, to help further understanding of what street gangs actually did.

“These guys produced music, spoken word, dances,” says Brotherton. “You couldn’t call them a gang, so we had another term, ‘street organization.’ If you look at it from a different angle, it’s not just violence and guns. It’s a culture. These guys were fighting back against their marginalization and the only way they knew how is through this culture.”

 

Brotherton with Professor Luis Barrios and leaders of the Latin Kings, 1997
Brotherton with Professor Luis Barrios and leaders of the Latin Kings, 1997

 

Brotherton continued to work with the Latin Kings and even traveled to Ecuador to document the effects of Ecuador’s legalization of gangs—an effort that contributed to an astonishing drop in homicide rates. But by the early 2000s, Brotherton became interested in another problem: thousands of people in New York, many in the Washington Heights area, were being deported. From 2002 to 2003, Brotherton moved to the Dominican Republic to find out what was happening, and held the first conference on deportees in the Caribbean with an attendance of 1,200 people from several countries. It was an eye-opening experience.

“Most of these deportees were completely assimilated, total New Yorkers,” says Brotherton. “But they were raised during the crack era and got into the mix somewhere along the line, and then the laws became harsher and harsher. It wasn’t that they were so horrible. It was that we became more and more punitive.”

Now, Brotherton’s newest book, Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishmentexamines the different aspects of deportation, which he says make up a larger deportation regime. “ICE, detention camps, the court system—it’s all interconnected,” he says. “But from a sociological standpoint, how does it fit together? We still don’t know.”

To answer that question, Brotherton created a group at John Jay and the CUNY Graduate Center called the Social Anatomy of a Deportation Regime, made of up several workgroups that look at the different aspects of deportation. At John Jay, this work is particularly relevant. “Deportation in America is totally involved in criminal justice,” Brotherton says. “Many cases that should be purely administrative are now completely mixed up in the criminal justice process.”

 

“Deportation in America is totally involved in criminal justice. Many cases that should be purely administrative are now completely mixed up in the criminal justice process.” –David Brotherton

 

For a college with a diverse student population, some of whom are targeted by punitive deportation laws, investigating immigration policy and deportation is especially important. “Students or their family members are personally under threat,” Brotherton says. “If you look at deportation laws, they draw from a racially exclusionary history and use language from the Indian Removal Act and the Runaway Slaves Act. Our detention laws are similar to the Japanese detention laws of the 1930s. As a Hispanic Serving Institute, we need to know those histories and how the continuities of those histories are now playing out in a different era.”


ALUMNA TAMYKAH ANTHONY-MARSTON SETS A POWERFUL EXAMPLE FOR YOUNG SUPERHEROES

Alumna Tamykah Anthony-Marston Sets a Powerful Example for Young Superheroes

 

Alumna Tamykah Anthony-Marston has become a successful scientist since graduating from John Jay in 2015. She’s also a testament to the fact that you don’t need to be a superhero to achieve your wildest dreams.

Anthony-Marston, who was born on the small island of Saint Vincent, has known what she’s wanted to do with her life ever since she first learned the term “scientist” after arriving to the states in fourth grade. But her path to success wasn’t without its challenges. She was admitted to foster care and became pregnant in her teenage years, which put her dream of becoming a scientist on hold. Eventually, she enrolled in John Jay’s Forensic Science program, but during her third year of the program, she became pregnant again.

By then, Anthony-Marston was on the Dean’s List and was one of the first John Jay students to receive a research prize at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) conference. Nothing could stop her from completing her degree. “I knew I needed to graduate on time because I already made it this far,” she said. “I was at St. Luke’s hospital and I was supposed to be on bedrest, but I would sneak out to class with my IV bags.”

That fierce determination paid off. Using the knowledge she learned through her concentration in toxicology, Anthony-Marston soon developed a line of natural products called Xanthines, which she created as an alternative to harmful cancer-causing products. “I started going back to my John Jay textbooks to learn about pHs, and I created my first natural deodorant,” she says. Xanthines has been so successful that it now carries 24 products in its line.

But while Tamykah enjoys making natural products, her passion has always been working with children. On weekends, she hosts science workshops at the Seneca Village Montessori School in Brooklyn for children and their family members. When she saw how popular the Black Panther film was this February, she decided to launch Camp Wakanda over spring break, where she taught students that they could be superheroes by using science. “I’d tell the students they could make things move without touching them. It’s called the superpower of static electricity,” says Anthony-Marston.

 

“The goal was to teach these kids that they’re already super powerful, and to also help them redefine what it means to be a superhero.” –Tamykah Anthony-Marston

 

With its STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) curriculum, the weeklong camp covered not only science, but a variety of subjects. From culinary demonstrations to hip-hop classes taught by a member of the Bronx-based group Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Camp Wakanda taught students new skills and nourished existing passions. “The goal was to teach these kids that they’re already super powerful, and to also help them redefine what it means to be a superhero,” says Anthony-Marston. “Being a superhero isn’t about what you can do, but something that’s inside of you.”

Students learn forensic science, including how to dust for fingerprints using cocoa powder

Students learn forensic science, including how to dust for fingerprints using cocoa powder

 

Camp Wakanda was so successful that Anthony-Marston is now hosting a summer long version of the camp at sites in both Brooklyn and Queens. Her goal is to impact 10,000 children by the end of the year.

For Anthony-Marston, who grew up in Brownsville and has experienced the challenge of being a black scientist in a predominantly white field, it’s important to provide these educational opportunities to students who otherwise might not have them. To her, all that any child needs to succeed is for someone to show them that they, like Black Panther, can be superheroes, too.

“In Black Panther, Killmonger wasn’t really a villain,” says Anthony-Marston. “It was just that he was unloved. Similarly, in real life, someone will only do bad because they don’t yet know their value. But once they know their value, they’ll cherish it. All you have to do is show them how dope they are.”


PRESIDENT MASON TALKS CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM AT THE ASPEN INSTITUTE

President Mason Talks Criminal Justice Reform at The Aspen Institute

 

John Jay’s President Karol V. Mason was a featured speaker for the The Aspen Institute’s Conversations with Great Leaders Series, which was created in memory of esteemed businessman and philanthropist Preston Robert Tisch. The Aspen Institute, an education and policy studies organization, smartly chose Mason based on the talk’s theme, “To Form a More Perfect Union: Reforming the Criminal Justice System.”

 

Linda Lehrer
Linda Lehrer

 

Sitting in New York’s historic Roosevelt House, with an audience filled with John Jay students, faculty and staff, along with community leaders and local residents, Linda Lehrer, The Aspen Institute’s Director of New York Public Programs, kicked off the event. “The criminal justice system is not just about prisons, laws and those who break laws. It’s about race and opportunity—or lack there of,” said Lehrer. “It’s about injustice imbedded in the social structure. And, it’s about the kind of future we want for our community and democracy.” Then she invited Mason and Lauren-Brooke Eisen, a Brennan Center for Justice Senior Fellow, to dive deep into the problems and solutions surrounding our criminal justice system.

Reality on Race
Straightforward and compassionate, Mason didn’t pull any punches. “We can’t talk about these issues without talking about race. We’ve got to have real dialog, real conversations, and really listen to each other, and understand how our history has placed us in the situation where we are today,” said Mason. “I don’t believe in people being criminalized for being young people. We’ve all made mistakes, it’s part of adolescent development. The problem is, we give some young people the room to make mistakes, but we don’t give black and brown children the room to make mistakes.”

 

President Mason and Lauren-Brooke Eisen
Lauren-Brooke Eisen and President Mason 

 

“The problem is, we give some young people the room to make mistakes, but we don’t give black and brown children the room to make mistakes.”  President Karol V. Mason

 

Staying Hopeful
When Eisen marveled at her unjaded perspective—even after years of working on criminal justice reform—Mason asked the John Jay students in the audience to stand up. “They’re the reason why I’m hopeful,” said Mason. “It is John Jay College of Criminal Justice, but it’s a liberal arts institution. We’ve got lots of different majors in the house with us today. But they’re all going to go out into the world with that understanding [of justice] and foundation of community.”

 

President Mason’s “hope” stands up
President Mason’s “hope” stands up

 

Effecting Change
When Eisen asked her, “What steps can we take to make the world a better place in the justice system?” Mason focused on where real change can occur. “What we all need to recognize is that most criminal justice issues are at the state and local level, not federal,” she said. “I used to say in the Obama administration, the bad news is, there’s a limit to what the federal government can do. Today, I say the good news is, there’s a limit to what the federal government can do.” Mason also encouraged people to avoid the rhetoric, noting that criminal justice reform was a bipartisan issue. “The Koch brothers are just as committed to this work as all of us in this room,” she said. “It’s the notion that this country is built on fairness and opportunity, and people committed to that are across the political spectrum.”

 

President Karol Mason with students
President Mason with John Jay students attending the event

 

“What we all need to recognize is that most criminal justice issues are at the state and local level, not federal.” President Karol V. Mason

 

Money Talks
Both Eisen and Mason talked about the staggering amounts of money going into the criminal justice system—80 billion dollars a year incarcerating people in the United States. And Mason asked the audience a question, “Do you know what we could do with 80 billion dollars? We could send every child to pre-K. There are so many things we could do with that money better than incarcerating people.” Mason continued saying she didn’t really care why people came to the issue of criminal justice reform—be it the expense, moral or religious concerns—as long as they acknowledge that there’s a problem and they want to help correct it. “We need to invest in our young people so they don’t get caught in the criminal justice system. We need to be investing in education. We need to be investing in opportunity,” said Mason. “And when I say investing, I mean investing in our most challenged young people, who are our hope and our future.”

Click here to see the full conversation.


CCNY Senior Ana Guerrero, 53, and four others win Gilman scholarships

CCNY Undergraduate Ana Guerrero will spend part of the summer in Spain as a Benjamin A. Gilman Scholar.

DeAndre Eccles, another one of CCNY’s five Gilman summer Scholars, is headed to Amsterdam’s Vrije Universiteit.

Ana Guerrero, an Ecuadorian immigrant who at age 53 proudly proclaims herself a role model for her three children, is one of five City College of New York students headed to Africa and Europe on Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships.  The competitive national award provides support for overseas travel and research.

Guerrero and two other City College undergraduates, Doris Monsac and Lamia Khan, travel to Spain this month for four weeks.  DeAndre Eccles and Zoltan Lucas Zoltan, CCNY’s other Gilman Scholars this summer, will do their research in the Netherlands and South Africa, respectively.

Guerrero is a romance language senior with a 3.95 GPA and a full time employee at The CUNY School of Medicine as a course/clinical coordinator.

Her concentration is Spanish and she will spend a month at Universidad de La Rioja in Logroño immersed in the literature. “It will help me acquire a general knowledge of the Spanish literary panorama as well as history,” said Guerrero, who will earn college credits for her work.

The Gilman further burnishes the role model status Guerrero’s embraced for her three-school sons. Her first born, Matthew, 21, is a member of CCNY’s Class of 2018. He graduated with a degree in computer engineering, with a 3.96 GPA. Her other sons are in high school and middle school.

“I am glad to be a role model for them, a 53-year-old woman who follows her dreams and continues to pursue education thanks to the Gilman Scholarship,” proclaimed the Bronx resident.

Dutch-bound DeAndre Eccles is a senior Pre-PA student majoring in biology senior who will take two courses at Amsterdam’s Vrije Universiteit.

“Both are on the topic of mental health and global health which are passions of mine and fields that I am hoping to pursue in medicine,” said Eccles. “This is one step that I am taking on my goal to be a part of the movement to destigmatize mental illness and the need for mental health care across the globe.”

She will receive credits for the courses that will help fulfill requirements for physician assistant school and a required psychology course at CCNY.

Eccles is a Jamaican immigrant and has lived in the Bronx since arriving in the United States 11 years ago.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


The CUNY Graduate School of Journalism receives $20 million gift from Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist and Craig Newmark Philanthropies

Transformational gift will sustain the School in perpetuity and advance its
mission to serve the public interest

School to be renamed as the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism
at the City University of New York

New York, NY – June 11, 2018 – A new $20 million gift to The City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism from craigslist founder Craig Newmark will enhance its mission of graduating skilled journalists, diversifying the voices in the media and encouraging innovation and entrepreneurship.

In honor of this truly historic gift, the CUNY Board of Trustees has approved the renaming of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism as the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York.

“Craig Newmark’s extraordinary generosity ensures that our still-young school will have the resources and flexibility it needs to remain at the forefront of journalism education,” said Sarah Bartlett, dean of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

This transformational gift, made through Newmark’s foundation, Craig Newmark Philanthropies, will enable the School to recruit additional faculty, continue to develop innovative programs, and pursue activities that support greater trust in journalism, among other vital functions.

“At a time of rapid, digital innovation, eroding public trust in news, and increased governmental oversight, it is imperative that we build a sustainable future for journalism,” said Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist and Craig Newmark Philanthropies. “The CUNY Graduate School of Journalism is committed to producing skilled, ethically minded, and diverse journalists.”

As the only publicly supported graduate journalism school in the Northeast, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism provides one of the best values in advanced journalism education in the U.S. With affordable tuition and extensive scholarship support, the School attracts talented students from a vast array of backgrounds and experiences, ensuring that the next generation of journalists is inclusive and diverse.

“We are thrilled and honored by this extraordinary gift to the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism,” said CUNY Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson, Jr. “It is an important and timely investment, not only in the university, our city and the nation, but in the future of our democracy. At a time of profound challenges to the vital role of a vigorous free press, it has never been more important to support reliable, high-quality reporting – and to ensure that the next generation of journalists has the skills and values to earn the public’s trust and reflects the communities it serves.”

In receiving this gift, the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism is joining a pantheon of other journalism organizations that have been the recipients of Craig Newmark’s philanthropy, including the Columbia Journalism Review, Data & Society Research Institute, First Draft, the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, ProPublica, Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, and the Sunlight Foundation. Newmark’s goal is to strengthen trust in high-quality journalism by supporting institutions and initiatives that are tackling the wide range of issues that affect the news industry, including strengthening transparency and media ethics, supporting real-time fact-checking efforts, championing a diverse and inclusive journalism pipeline, and disarming harmful technologies that spread disinformation.

# # #

About the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

The CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, founded in 2006, is the only public graduate journalism school in the northeastern U.S. With affordable tuition and extensive scholarship support, it prepares students from diverse economic, racial and cultural backgrounds to produce high-quality journalism. The school offers three master’s degree programs: a Master of Arts in Journalism, an M.A. in Entrepreneurial Journalism and an M.A. in Social Journalism. In Fall 2016, it launched a unique Spanish-language program to train bilingual students interested in covering Latino and Hispanic communities in the U.S. and abroad.

About the Craig Newmark Philanthropies
Craig Newmark Philanthropies was created by craigslist founder Craig Newmark to support, connect, and drive powerful civic engagement. The organization works to advance people and grassroots organizations that are getting stuff done in areas that include trustworthy journalism, voter protection, gender diversity in technology, and veterans and military families.

Press Contacts
Amy Dunkin, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism,
Amy.dunkin@journalism.cuny.edu, (646) 758-7826

Carner Round, Craig Newmark Philanthropies,
craignewmarkfoundation@webershandwick.com, (212) 445-8062


CCNY study shows plastic waste can be converted into energy and fuels

Marco J. Castaldi

Demetra Tsiamis

Enerkem

Plastic waste is flooding our landfills and leaking into the oceans, with potentially disastrous effects. In fact, the World Economic Forum predicts that if current production and waste management trends continue, by 2050 there could be more plastic than fishes in the ocean.

Why is this happening when there are processes and technologies that can effectively recycle, convert to valuable products and extract the imbedded energy from these waste plastics? According to Science Advances, as of 2015, of the 6,300 million tons of plastic waste generated in the United States, only 9 percent has been recycled, 12 percent has been incinerated, with the vast majority – 79 percent – accumulating in landfills or the natural environment.

The Earth Engineering Center (EEC|CCNY) at the Grove School of Engineering of the City College of New York is on a mission to transform plastic waste to energy and fuels.

A recent EEC study titled “The Effects of Non-recycled Plastic (NRP) on Gasification: A Quantitative Assessment,” shows that what we’re disposing of is actually a resource we can use. The study, by Marco J. Castaldi, Professor of chemical engineering Director of Earth System Science and Environmental Engineering and Director of the EEC|CCNY and Demetra Tsiamis Associate Director of the EEC|CCNY, explores how adding NRPs to a chemical recycling technology called gasification – which transforms waste materials into fuels – adds value.

Adding NRPs to the gasification process helps reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while significantly reducing the amount of waste byproduct to landfill – by up to 76 percent.

In the study, published by the American Chemistry Council, the effects of increasing the percentage of non-recycled plastics (NRPs) are measured at Enerkem, a Montreal-based energy company, in collaboration with the City of Edmonton in Alberta, Canada.

“This study demonstrates that because carbon and hydrogen rich plastics have high energy content, there is tremendous potential to use technologies like gasification to convert these materials into fuels, chemicals, and other products. We were fortunate to engage a couple of students and engineers from our team enabling them to learn about this novel process,” said Castaldi.

Tsiamis added: “Plastics have an end of life use that will be turning waste into energy, which is something we all need and use.”

Learn more by reading the full study and viewing the CUNY TV Study With the Best spotlight.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu

Gregg Bishop, Commissioner of NYC Department of Small Business Services, to Discuss Growing a Small Business in New York

Business Forum Breakfast
Friday, June 15, 2018
8:00 – 10:00 am

WHAT:
A presentation by Commissioner of NYC Department of Small Business Services Gregg Bishop, Small Business is Big Business in Queens, addresses economic sustainability and mobility for small businesses in Queens and New York City and State.

Email Business.Forum@qc.cuny.edu, call (718) 997-5210, or register online here.     Members of the media will be provided with complimentary parking and reserved  seating.

WHERE:
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, New York
Student Union, Fourth Floor Ballroom
Click here for directions to the college, and here for campus map.

Background
As Commissioner of the New York City Department of Small Business Services (SBS), Gregg Bishop is charged with running a dynamic city agency focused on equity of opportunity that fosters economic self-sufficiency and mobility for New York City’s diverse communities. SBS connects New Yorkers to good jobs, creates stronger businesses, and builds a thriving economy in neighborhoods across the five boroughs.

Born in Grenada and raised in East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Bishop began his career at the agency in 2008. He was initially responsible for a suite of programs designed to make it easier for businesses to start, operate, grow, and recover from emergencies. He has been successively promoted into higher positions at SBS, including Deputy Commissioner of the Business Development Division and Assistant Commissioner of the Division of Economic and Financial Opportunity, where he oversaw parts of the Minority- and Women-Owned Business Enterprise (M/WBE) program.

Prior to his career in government, Bishop was the Senior Manager of Workforce Development at NPower, and the Director of Web Operations at Oxygen Media. He was Vice President of Technology Operations at TheStreet.com, and began his career at VIBE magazine during the pioneering days of the web.

Bishop received a master’s degree in Integrated Marketing and Management Communication from Florida State University, and a BS in Business Administration from Florida A&M University. He is a graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Senior Executives in State and Local Government program.

Launched in 2005, the QC Business Forum brings together the business community, local government, academia, and students to provide an opportunity for town and gown to interact. Influential leaders in a number of fields serve as keynote speakers at its breakfast and lunchtime lectures, touching on issues vital to the local business community.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY BA Student Libby Ho Wins US Department of State Critical Language Scholarship to Study Chinese

CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies student Libby Ho will study Chinese language in Changchun, China with a  US Department of State Critical Language Scholarship during Summer 2018. Ho, a Macaulay Honors College student based at the City College of New York, is pursuing her studies in Human Physiology through CUNY BA.
The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) program is part of a U.S. government effort to expand the number of Americans studying and mastering critical foreign languages. CLS scholars gain critical language and cultural skills that enable them to contribute to U.S. economic competitiveness and national security. These students join approximately 550 competitively -selected American students at U.S. colleges and universities who received a CLS award in 2018. CLS provides scholarships to U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to spend eight to ten weeks overseas studying one of 14 critical languages: Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bangla, Chinese, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Punjabi, Russian, Swahili, Turkish, or Urdu. The program includes intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences designed to promote rapid language gains. CLS scholars are expected to continue their language study beyond the scholarship and apply their critical language skills in their future careers.
“Critical” languages are those that are less commonly taught in U.S. schools, but are essential for America’s engagement with the world. CLS plays an important role in preparing U.S. students for the 21st century’s globalized workforce, increasing American competitiveness, and contributing to national security. CLS scholars serve as citizen ambassadors, representing the diversity of the United States abroad and building lasting relationships with people in their host countries. CLS participants represent a broad diversity of backgrounds and perspectives. CLS actively recruits in states and regions of the United States that have been historically under-represented in international education.
Recipients of the 2018 CLS awards include students from over 230 institutions of higher education across the United States,including public and private universities, liberal arts colleges, minority-serving institutions, and community colleges. Since 2006, CLS has awarded scholarships to more than 5,700 American students to learn critical languages around the world. CLS scholars are among the more than 50,000 academic and professional exchange program participants supported annually by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. These exchange programs build respect and positive relations between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The CLS program is administered by American Councils for International Education.

CUNY BA is the University-wide, individualized degree. It is an exciting, versatile, rewarding degree route for highly motivated, self-directed students whose academic goals transcend traditional majors. Students create their own degree plans working directly with faculty mentors and academic advisors.


What Will We Tell Our Son?

Two queer members of the CUNY Law community on the Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission ruling.

By Professor Allie Robbins (’09) and Lisa Zayas (’11)

Whenever anything big happens, we ask each other, what will we tell our son?

Our goal is to raise a kind, compassionate, person. We want him to be happy and to see the good in the world. But it’s also important to us that he knows that some people might treat him differently just because of who he is, and who his mommies are. (For some context, our son is not yet three years old. His main concerns are Paw Patrol and the metamorphosis of the caterpillars in his daycare classroom.)

On Monday, the Supreme Court sided with the baker in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. We have had to process our feelings, and figure out what we might want to tell him. Since Monday, a lot has been written about how narrow the decision is, and how queer folks have nothing to be afraid of. It’s not open season on discrimination.

Yes, thankfully the decision is narrow. But many are. Narrow decisions can be expanded over time. That’s part of what we were trained to do at CUNY Law School, to take a narrow decision, and argue the need to apply it to a new set of facts and slowly expand it. We are prepared to tell our son that people who say they can now discriminate against queer people because of their religious beliefs are not right. That is not what the Supreme Court said. But they may still try. People don’t always read full Supreme Court opinions, especially long ones with multiple concurrences. So, it is our duty as his parents to tell him that he has to be vigilant, know his rights, and know how to get help if something happens. While our son is still too young to comprehend what is happening in the world, we always tell him to find the helpers, the people who are helping when times are bad.

We have to tell him that it’s ok if this decision makes him feel bad. The Supreme Court looked at a man who denied a wedding cake to a couple because they were having a same sex wedding, and decided that he was the one who was discriminated against. The inarticulate comments of a couple of commissioners at the first stage of due process were given more weight than layers of subsequent adjudication. That hurts. It’s ok to feel sad and angry about that. It’s ok to feel like the justices engaged in legal gymnastics to reach their decision, and that they were wrong.

What do we tell him about what comes next? What do we say when he is afraid that someone might not want to sell him cookies anymore because of who his mommies are, or that his daycare might decide that he can’t go to school there anymore because someone’s sincerely held religious beliefs are counter to the use of assisted reproductive technology? We tell him that we don’t know exactly what comes next. We don’t know where the next case will come from, and we can’t control what the people around us do, or how they might skew this opinion for their own false righteousness. But we also tell him that our job is to be proud of who we are and to be authentic. We must celebrate life and celebrate who we are. We must also continue to fight.

We know how quickly change can happen (though we also know that progress actually takes long time, a lot of hard work, and movement building). We have witnessed and benefited from an enormous amount of change, even over the short course of our relationship. That change has allowed us to get legally married and have a son whose birth certificate bears both of our names. But the rapid nature of change also means that progress can be also rolled back quickly. We need to make sure that doesn’t happen. We need stronger anti-discrimination laws. We need to keep fighting in courtrooms, legislatures, in the streets, and in our communities. We need to remain vigilant and visible. We will continue to remind him that it’s Pride month, and that Pride and visibility matter. In fact, they change the course of history.

Of course, we will also tell him that we will read him “that dinosaur book” one more time before bed.

 


“Handia/Giant” opens CCNY’s fifth annual TAFFNY Film Festival

The fifth annual The Americas Film Festival of New York (TAFFNY) opens from June 7-15.

Week-long festival, June 7-15, led by CCNY’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies, brings documentaries, panels and lectures to film audiences interested in the Americas

“Giant” (“Handia”) is the opening film for the fifth annual The Americas Film Festival of New York (TAFFNY). The event, a cultural project of The City College of New York’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education(CWE), runs from June 7-15.

“TAFFNY is in its fifth edition and through the years it has been growing,” said Dr. Juan Carlos Mercado, dean of the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies. “This year, we wanted to honor the students and faculty of City College’s MFA program in film, one of the oldest film schools in the U.S. and the only public institution in New York City to offer a BFA in film.

The film school was founded in 1941 by Dada artist and filmmaker Hans Richter and was originally the Institute for Film Techniques. Among the list of people who studied or took classes at CCNY’s film program are Woody Allen, Judd Hirsch, Stanley Kubrick, Jackie Mason, Richard Schiff, Eli Wallach and Ben Gazzara.

TAFFNY aims to create a new culture of cinematography appreciation by providing a dynamic space for the public and artists to meet, reflect on multiculturalism and diversity in our society, while promoting the work of new and emerging filmmakers. TAFFNY presents feature-length films, documentaries and shorts and animations that represent the rich diversity of cultures, languages and stories of the Americas.

The festival will also offer workshops, debates and lectures. It will host The Americas Short Film Competition, exclusively dedicated to the promotion and exhibition of short-length audiovisual works by emerging filmmakers.

TAFFNY closes on Friday, June 15 at 6 p.m. with the Awards Ceremony of The Americas Short Films Competition at the National Museum of the American Indian, which is followed by the New York premiere of “Out of State” by Native Hawaiian filmmaker Ciara Lacy. “Out of State” is a character-driven documentary that chronicles the experience of two men who find their cultural identity while housed in a private prison, thousands of miles from their island home of Hawaii.

The Americas Short Film Competition is exclusively dedicated to the promotion and exhibition of short-length audiovisual works by emerging filmmakers. The festival’s competition will showcase films with a maximum length of 20 minutes that portray contemporary concerns of filmmakers living in the region. This year, TAFFNY screens 40 short films in competition for The Americas Award in the categories of animation, documentary, experimental and fiction.

The Americas Panorama is an exciting program that will bring the richness of the cultures of The Americas through eight award winning, feature-length films in fiction and documentary.  The films reflect the multiplicity of stories and identities that form the “American” experience, ranging from documentaries that explore the complexities of community in a globalized world to stories, both personal and social, of perseverance, memory and love.

TAFFNY is a cultural project of the Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education of The City College of New York, in collaboration with the National Museum of the American Indian and Instituto Cervantes. TAFFNY is made possible with the generous support of its partners and sponsors: the CCNY President’s Office, the CCNY Division of Humanities and the Arts, the CCNY Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, CUNY Bildner Center for Western Hemisphere Studies, Telemundo 47, Ron Barceló,  Goya Foods, Consulate General of Argentina, NYU’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, Ines Rosales, Aceites Castillo de Canena, Begonia Sangria, Ole Imports, and Event Model Agency.

For more information and the schedule, please visit www.taffny.com or email Professor Carlos Aguasaco at caguasaco@ccny.cuny.edu .

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Alumni service honors for Issa Salame and Tara Nachtigall

 

Alumni service award winners at CCNY Issa Salame and Tara Nachtigall

Issa Salame, assistant professor in the Division of Science, is the recipient of the Alumni Association of The City College of New York’s 2018 Faculty Service Award. Tara Nachtigall, department administrator in the Division of Humanities and the Arts will receive the Administrative Staff Service Award. Both awards will be presented at the alumni association’s 166th annual meeting at City College on June 14.

A 1997 CCNY alumnus who later earned a PhD in analytical chemistry from the Graduate School, CUNY, Salame is hailed by his students in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry as an energetic and passionate teacher.

“His great skills of teaching students by various methods inspire them to participate and ask questions in class,” said Nermin Mostafa, one of Salame’s protégés.

Nachtigall is recognized as a “treasured resource” by the students she serves in the Department of Theatre and Speech, according to chair Rob Barron.

She’s been a catalyst there in the five years since she was originally hired as an administrative coordinator. Under her, the department “has blossomed, expanded and exploded with activity,” added Barron.

The program in CCNY’s Great Hall at 7 p.m. includes Alumni Service Awards presentations to the following:

  • Quincy A. Allen ’00,  Black Alumni Group;
  • Lawrence S. Greengrass ’73, Alumni Association treasurer;
  • Wai (Helen) Mui ’91BS, ’93MSB, Asian Alumni Group;
  • Paul Schwartz ’69, Washington DC Alumni Chapter; and
  • Jessica Wang ’12CE, Engineering School Alumni Group.

Guest speakers include CCNY President Vince Boudreau.

A buffet dinner at 6 p.m. precedes the meeting. Tickets are $40 per person and can be ordered through the Alumni Association at 212-234-3000. The meeting is free and open to the public.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Alumni service honors for Issa Salame and Tara Nachtigall

 

Alumni service award winners at CCNY Issa Salame and Tara Nachtigall

Issa Salame, assistant professor in the Division of Science, is the recipient of the Alumni Association of The City College of New York’s 2018 Faculty Service Award. Tara Nachtigall, department administrator in the Division of Humanities and the Arts will receive the Administrative Staff Service Award. Both awards will be presented at the alumni association’s 166th annual meeting at City College on June 14.

A 1997 CCNY alumnus who later earned a PhD in analytical chemistry from the Graduate School, CUNY, Salame is hailed by his students in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry as an energetic and passionate teacher.

“His great skills of teaching students by various methods inspire them to participate and ask questions in class,” said Nermin Mostafa, one of Salame’s protégés.

Nachtigall is recognized as a “treasured resource” by the students she serves in the Department of Theatre and Speech, according to chair Rob Barron.

She’s been a catalyst there in the five years since she was originally hired as an administrative coordinator. Under her, the department “has blossomed, expanded and exploded with activity,” added Barron.

The program in CCNY’s Great Hall at 7 p.m. includes Alumni Service Awards presentations to the following:

  • Quincy A. Allen ’00,  Black Alumni Group;
  • Lawrence S. Greengrass ’73, Alumni Association treasurer;
  • Wai (Helen) Mui ’91BS, ’93MSB, Asian Alumni Group;
  • Paul Schwartz ’69, Washington DC Alumni Chapter; and
  • Jessica Wang ’12CE, Engineering School Alumni Group.

Guest speakers include CCNY President Vince Boudreau.

A buffet dinner at 6 p.m. precedes the meeting. Tickets are $40 per person and can be ordered through the Alumni Association at 212-234-3000. The meeting is free and open to the public.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


CITIZENSHIP NOW! 2018 Citizenship Application Assistance and Immigration Fair WILL BE SATURDAY, JUNE 30, AT JOHN JAY COLLEGE

The City University of New York and the New York Daily News will hold a Citizenship Application Assistance and Immigration Fair on Saturday, June 30, at John Jay College. At the event, lawful permanent residents will receive personal, hands-on assistance with their U.S. citizen applications while immigrants, regardless of their status, can connect with health, financial and educational officials regarding services they may be eligible to receive.

At this year’s event, which continues the 16-year partnership between CUNY and the Daily News, staff and volunteers will be available for one-on-one consultations to confirm if green card holders are eligible for citizenship or if they qualify for a fee waiver. Permanent residents, who want to become citizens in time to vote in the 2020 election, will be encouraged to process naturalization applications now.

Last year, Rosa Campos, a Nicaraguan-born immigrant, came to the event and walked out with her application complete and ready to send to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigrations Services (USCIS). This year, the event aims to help 600 participants, such as Rosa, who is to be sworn in as a U.S. citizen this spring. “I am going to have the right to vote, and above all, to choose our leaders and to give my opinion on politics and immigration issues,” she said.

“CUNY has been educating New York’s immigrants since its founding in 1847. As part of the University’s historic mission to open the doors of opportunity to all, we are proud to provide valuable legal services to help New Yorkers on the path to U.S. citizenship,” said William C. Thompson Jr., chairperson of the CUNY Board of Trustees.

“CUNY has established itself as a national leader in providing legal assistance and other support and services to immigrants, and the University takes great pride in those efforts,” said CUNY Interim Chancellor Vita Rabinowitz.” CUNY Citizenship Now! is the largest university-based legal assistance service in the nation, and through our initiatives – co-sponsored with the Daily News – we have provided assistance to many thousands of immigrants pursuing educational, economic and other opportunities in this country.”

Jim Rich, editor-in-chief of the Daily News, said: “We are pleased to partner again with CUNY to ensure that those seeking U.S. citizenship have the legal help they need. Immigrants remain the lifeblood of New York, and New York’s hometown paper remains their advocate.”

Rafael Toro, director of public relations of Goya Foods, said: “We are always proud to support the positive contributions of immigrants and all those who have come to the United States for a better life, just like Goya’s founder did more than 80 years ago. We take great pride in our history and will continue to support programs like CUNY Citizenship Now, that help our immigrant communities thrive and achieve the American Dream.”

“Green card holders are seeking U.S. citizenship at an increasing rate.  CUNY and the Daily News are here to help with free, high-quality legal assistance,” said Allan Wernick, the director or CUNY Citizenship Now! and a Daily News immigration law columnist.

To register for the citizenship application portion of the event, permanent residents should call 646-664-9400 to find out about the documents to bring. Registration is not needed to participate in the immigration resource fair.

The Citizenship Application Assistance and Immigration Fair on Saturday, June 30 at John Jay College from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Green card holders can register, beginning June 7. Registration is not required to attend the immigration resource fair.

WXTV Univision 41, our Spanish-language media partner, will provide extensive outreach to the Hispanic community. Univision 41 has been a partner of the program since its inception. WABC-TV will once again serve as our English-language media partner. Both stations’ coverage will include live coverage, on-air promotional announcements and special news segments.

This year’s generous sponsors include: the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), N.Y. Chapter; Bloomberg Philanthropies; Capalino+Company;  Casa Puebla, Consulate General of Mexico in N.Y.; CUNY Service Corps; the CUNY School of Professional Studies; CUNY TV, Dominicanos USA; Fragomen Worldwide; Goya Foods; I Am An Immigrant; Immigrant Heritage Month; Immigrant Justice Corps; John Jay College for Criminal Justice; MIRA USA; NALEO Educational Fund; NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA); the New York State Office for New Americans (ONA);  New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC), The Legal Aid Society; The New Americans Campaign; The YMCA; Qué Buena 92.7 FM; Unimás Nueva York; WADO 1280 AM and X96.3.

English/Spanish: 646-664-9400

 About the Partners:

The City University of New York:

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies. For more information, visit www.cuny.edu.

The New York Daily News:

With 2 million readers in New York, and 42 million national unique visitors online each month, the Daily News is the most widely read tabloid in the city and one of America’s fastest-growing web sites. Covering breaking news, politics, sports, entertainment, celebrity, lifestyle, opinion, business and health, the Daily News delivers up-to-the-minute reporting, rich photography and compelling video to readers of its print newspaper, industry-leading website, tablet apps, and iPhone, Blackberry and Android editions.

The Daily News has won 10 Pulitzer Prize Awards for excellence in journalism. In 2015, it was awarded seven New York State Associated Press Association awards and took the Associated Press Sports Editors awards’ “Triple Crown,” as well as first place in the Investigative category across all circulation categories. In addition to its news operations, the Daily News runs Daily News Digital Solutions and the Innovation Lab.

About the Media Partners:

Univision Communications Inc.

Univision Communications Inc. (UCI) is the leading media company serving Hispanic America. The Company, a chief content creator in the U.S., includes Univision Network, one of the top networks in the U.S. regardless of language and the most-watched Spanish-language broadcast television network in the country, available in approximately 88% of U.S. Hispanic television households; UniMás, a leading Spanish-language broadcast television network available in approximately 82% of U.S. Hispanic television households; Univision Cable Networks, including Galavisión, the most-watched U.S. Spanish-language entertainment cable network, as well as UDN (Univision Deportes Network), the most-watched U.S. Spanish-language sports cable network, Univision tlnovelas, a 24-hour Spanish-language cable network dedicated to telenovelas, ForoTV, a 24-hour Spanish-language cable network dedicated to international news, and an additional suite of cable offerings – De Película, De Película Clásico, Bandamax, Ritmoson and Telehit; an investment in El Rey Network, a general entertainment English-language cable network; Univision Local Media, which owns and/or operates 63 television stations and 58 radio stations in major U.S. Hispanic markets and Puerto Rico; Univision Now, a direct-to-consumer, on demand and live streaming subscription service; Univision.com, the most-visited Spanish-language website among U.S. Hispanics; and Uforia, a music application featuring multimedia music content. The Company also includes assets that serve young, diverse audiences. This includes news and lifestyle English-language cable network FUSION TV and a collection of leading digital brands that span a range of categories: technology (Gizmodo), sports (Deadspin), lifestyle (Lifehacker), modern women’s interests (Jezebel), news and politics (Splinter), African American news and culture (The Root), gaming (Kotaku), Environment (Earther), and car culture (Jalopnik). Additionally, UCI has ownership in comedy and news satire brands The Onion, Clickhole, The A.V. Club and The Takeout. Headquartered in New York City, UCI has content creation facilities and sales offices in major cities throughout the United States. For more information, please visit corporate.univision.com.

WABC-TV:

WABC-TV, Channel 7, is the Disney owned ABC television station in New York City and the most watched television station in the United States. The station has always valued the strength of New York’s diversity, especially the importance of its various ethnic communities. The station’s staff reflects that diversity and their mission is to keep viewers informed. That’s why the station produces more than 45 hours of local, community focused content under the Eyewitness News umbrella, including Tiempo – the city’s most watched English language program focused solely on issues important to the Hispanic communities.  The station also co-hosts several annual campaigns including immigration information forums and voter registration drives.

El Diario:

Founded in 1913, El Diario/La Prensa is the longest publishing Spanish-language daily newspaper in the United States. Since its inception as a small publication in Lower Manhattan named La Prensa, the newspaper has grown into one of the largest and most influential Latino media outlets in the nation. In 1963, it merged with El Diario de Nueva York, forming El Diario/La Prensa, as it is known now. Keeping up with the new century, the newspaper is now a state-of-the-art multimedia operation that includes print, digital, and other platforms.

Media Contacts:

Frank Sobrino, CUNY
(646) 664-9300
Frank.Sobrino@cuny.edu

Griselda Garcia, Daily News
(347)-486-1049
ggarcia@nydailynews.com

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LaGuardia Community College Confers More than 1,600 Associate’s Degrees at 46th Commencement Ceremony

Activist Shaun King delivered keynote;
Bronx Borough President Rubén Díaz Jr. delivered alumni address;
Student address delivered by Karina Ramos-Caraballo, a 25-year-old secondary education major & mom of a 2-year-old daughter

June 5, 2018

More than 1,600 [1] New Yorkers celebrated earning their associate’s degrees at LaGuardia Community College’s 46th Commencement Ceremony, held this morning at Barclays Center ( View class profile).

“A brighter future lies ahead for today’s graduates,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “Many have dealt with significant obstacles along the way. For some, earning a college degree may have seemed impossible. Their graduation is a testament to their resilience and fortitude. Our ceremony today aimed to help them see that their achievement marks how far they’ve come, and that they’re ready for the next step in their education or professional career.”

Lifetime earnings increase more than $400,000 for students with an associate’s degree. Ninety-three percent of LaGuardia graduates have no student loan debt. And a Stanford University study of economic mobility of US colleges—that is, the ability of a college to move low-income people to the middle class and beyond—ranked LaGuardia #5 among all two-year colleges nationwide. LaGuardia students are 35 percent more likely to transfer to a four-year college than community college students nationally.

Commencement News

Today’s LaGuardia graduates earned an associate’s degree in one of the 60 majors offered at the college, ranging from AccountingCommercial PhotographyComputer ScienceCriminal JusticeDeaf StudiesEngineeringNursing, and New Media Technology.

A majority (71 percent) of LaGuardia Community College’s approx. 50,000 students have family incomes of less than $30,000/year. They come from 150 countries and speak 96 native languages. Forty-two percent are age 23 or older. Some are parents (who can often be seen dropping off young children at our on-campus daycare). Thirty-six percent came in as transfer students, meaning that they had some college credits—some started their college journey at a four-year college, but dropped out due to financial pressures or family set-backs—while others came to LaGuardia to pursue an associate’s degree in a different field than their bachelor’s. Many relied on LaGuardia’s extensive support services—from advisors that keep them on track academically, staff ready to help them navigate the maze of financial aid and apply to scholarships, and counselors that help them sign up for public benefits and access our on-campus food pantry.

Shaun King, a prominent voice within the Black Lives Matter movement, gave the keynote address to the audience of 10,000 comprised of graduates’ family and friends, LaGuardia leadership, faculty, staff, and representatives from the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York

“LaGuardia Community College’s Class of 2018 graduates have reached an important finish line, but are also at an important starting point,” said Shaun King. “I encouraged them to seek out opportunities to talk about their community college experience and to tell their stories of overcoming obstacles—in order to remind others of the importance of broad access to higher education to achieve social justice, and to motivate other young people, particularly low-income and underserved communities, thinking about making the leap to enrolling in college. With their accessibility and affordability, community colleges like LaGuardia help support the real empowerment and liberation of historically disadvantaged groups.”

Shaun King

Bronx Borough President Rubén Díaz Jr. and a member of LaGuardia’s Class of 1998 gave the alumni speech. A lifelong resident of the Bronx, Borough President Díaz is serving his third term in this role, during which time he’s credited with bringing thousands of new jobs, improving infrastructure, housing, education, health, wellness, and public safety, to the Bronx.

“LaGuardia Community College set me on the greater path to success, and I would not be where I am today without the lessons I learned as a student there,” said Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. “LaGuardia is a place that provides opportunity for New Yorkers who need it the most, and my own experience shows that graduates of this great institution can go on to do amazing things—they can ‘dare to do more.’ I am proud to be a part of this year’s commencement celebration at LaGuardia, as we send more than 1,600 proud men and women on the path to continue their education and start their careers.”

The 2018 Class Speaker, Karina Ramos-Caraballo, who received her Associate in Arts degree in Secondary Education, reminded her fellow graduates of their journey to graduation—encouraging them to use their journey as motivation to pursue future goals in their lives.

“LaGuardia Community College helps people see their potential by providing a welcoming, diverse atmosphere,” said Ms. Ramos-Caraballo. “I’m grateful to LaGuardia for opening the door of opportunity and for placing our education in the hands of extraordinary professors. I’m proud to be part of LaGuardia Community College—thanks to LaGuardia, I know that my family is on a better track. My husband, Marcos Ramos, also graduated today. We’re setting a great example for our daughter about the value of education.”

Karina, age 25, is the first member of her family to graduate college. She was born and raised in a low-income immigrant family in Brooklyn, where they struggled to make ends meet.

Like many students, Karina came to LaGuardia for a second chance. A few years ago, she’d been dismissed from a different community college for poor grades. Around the same time, she met LaGuardia student Marcos Ramos who became her boyfriend and encouraged her to enroll at the college. Just after she enrolled, they learned Karina was pregnant with their first child, so Karina delayed her start at LaGuardia to have their daughter, Keilani. They got married, and once Keilani, was 12-months-old, making her eligible for LaGuardia’s on-campus daycare, Karina jumped back in to pursuing her dream of earning a college degree.

Karina is pursuing her bachelor’s degree in secondary education at Brooklyn College, and her husband Marcos, a criminal justice major, is transferring to John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Marcos’s brother Brian Ramos, a 2017 graduate of LaGuardia, is currently pursuing his bachelor’s at Baruch.

Karina Ramos

LaGuardia’s Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs Paul Arcario, EdD, gave the welcome remarks and introductions. Mathematics professor Reem Jaafar, Ph.D., served as Grand Marshal.

The City University of New York was represented by The Honorable Henry T. Berger, JD, a member of the Board of Trustees, and Matthew Sapienza, MBA, Senior Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer of CUNY, who both addressed the graduates.

The LaGuardia Vocal Ensemble performed the Star Spangled Banner, arranged and conducted by LaGuardia music professor Marianne Solivan, MMus.

Please click here for more information about LaGuardia’s 46th Annual Commencement, or click here to view/download commencement photos.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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[1] 1,250 have completed their graduation requirements; 350+ expected to finish class requirements by August 2018


NEWEST EDITION OF CUNYMATTERS FEATURES SOME OF CUNY’S MOST INSPIRING STUDENTS

The City University of New York this week published a special issue of its news publication, CUNYMatters, celebrating the more than three dozen CUNY students who won some of the nation’s most prestigious awards this academic year.

In her first CUNYMatters column, newly named Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz writes that CUNY’s winners of Rhodes, Fulbright and many other fiercely competitive awards reflect the drive of CUNY’s students across the city.“There’s no question that these students are stars, but if you read through their stories, you’ll find they typify our general student body,” she writes. “Hardworking. Smart. Altruistic. Idealistic. Inspired and inspiring.”

One of the most compelling of these stories leads the special CUNYMatters issue: Joel Sati came to the U.S. from Kenya when he was 9, became a DACA recipient at 19, graduated from City College and was recently named a winner of one of the nation’s most hard-earned academic honors, the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans. Among the other award recipients profiled in CUNYMatters are Thamara Jean, a 2018 graduate of Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College who won a Rhodes Scholarship to continue her research of Black Lives Matter; Safia Mahjebin, a key voice in changing New York’s marriage law who won a Truman Scholarship as a senior at Hunter; and Istou Diallo, from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, who won a Fulbright to travel to India and study how women with disabilities deal with their political marginalization.

The new issue of CUNYMatters also features an interview with Brooklyn College professor Alex Vitale, a leading advocate of police reform whose new book, The End of Policing, comes at a crucial moment in the national debate about deadly force and other police issues.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies. For more information, visit www.cuny.edu.

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CCNY students CREATE new ways to eliminate workplace barriers for people with disabilities

NYSID President & CEO Ron Romano Prof. Zhigang Zhu, Ms. Celina Cavalluzzi (Goodwill), two AVR4ASD team members (Rafael Li Chen and Xinyu Xiong), and NYSID Market Manager Brian Bateman

ASSIST team: Manjekar Budhai with Vishnu Nair (on laptop screen)

New York’s current unemployment rate continues to hover below 5 percent. But for New York residents with disabilities the rate is a staggering 70 percent –  partly due to the challenges they face in the average workplace.

Students of the Grove School of Engineering at the City College of New York are trying to change that by taking part in the CREATE Competition, which challenges them to develop innovative technologies that remove workplace barriers.

CREATE, a New York State Industries for the Disabled (NYSID) program, offers student engineers the opportunity to put their knowledge to use in the context of a real-life experience during their capstone projects. Students representing 14 teams from eight colleges are provided $1,000 per team to prototype an invention and compete for CREATE prizes of $15,000, $10,000 and $5,000. Nine NYSID member agency not-for-profits are the recipients of the new technologies.

This April, two City College teams attracted attention from professionals and NYS policymakers for their innovative solutions during the 2018 NYSID CREATE Symposium held in the Legislative Office Building in Albany. Both projects were rated high by a panel of eight judges of field engineers and rehabilitation professionals during the half-day exhibition, listed No 2 and No 5 respectively.

Rafael Li Chen, Xinyu Xiong, and Yuxuan Huang, all computer science majors, won the second-place prize of $10,000 for creating AVR4ASD (Augmented and Virtual Reality for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder) which trains and guides individuals with ASD to independently travel between home and their workplace.

Manjekar Budhai and Vishnu Nair, both computer engineering majors, received significant media coverage for their ASSIST (Assistive Sensor Solution for Independent and Safe Travel) cell phone app. The app guides those who are autistic or visually impaired, helping them safely navigate an indoor location using voice commands. The app has been supported by National Science Foundation, Department of Homeland Security, Lighthouse Guild and Bentley Industries, Inc.

Both of these CREATE projects were developed in partnership with Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and Northern New Jersey.

The faculty advisor for both teams was Dr. Zhigang Zhu, Herbert G. Kayser Professor of Computer Science in the Grove School of Engineering. For the last seven years, Zhu has run a joint senior design program with Dr. Jizhong Xiao, Professor of Electrical Engineering (EE) of the Grove School on Assistive Technology for CS, CpE and EE seniors. The program is supported by the National Science Foundation, VentureWell and NYSID.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu


CUNY School of Professional Studies Establishes Nursing Scholarship with $150,000 Petrie Foundation Grant

New York, NY – June 5, 2016 – A generous grant from the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation is helping the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS) establish and sustain the Petrie Nurse Scholarship program for nursing students.

Starting in Fall 2018, Petrie Nurse Scholarship awards will provide tuition assistance for students enrolled in the CUNY SPS online bachelor’s degree in nursing (RN to BSN) who previously earned an applied science (AAS) degree with a major in nursing from a CUNY Community College. Awards will underwrite 100% of tuition, and will follow recipients through degree completion.

“This much needed support from the Petrie Foundation has enabled the School to create the Petrie Nurse Scholars program,” noted Marge Reilly, academic director of nursing programs at CUNY SPS. “We are thrilled to be able to provide critical tuition support to high-achieving students in the online RN to BS in nursing degree program. More than 60% of students in the CUNY SPS nursing program are self-payers, and fewer than 30% receive state or federal financial aid. The award provides essential support that directly addresses these issues.”

John Mogulescu, dean of the School, echoed Dr. Reilly, and said, “I am delighted that the Petrie Foundation has provided CUNY SPS with the opportunity to help our nursing students finish their degrees and go on to positively influence New York City’s healthcare provider system, impacting countless patients’ lives throughout their careers.”

The CCNE-accredited bachelor’s degree in nursing at CUNY SPS is specifically designed to increase the number of diverse, BS-prepared nurses in New York City. With a current enrollment of more than 450 students, undergraduate nursing has rapidly become the School’s largest degree program.

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


SEVEN CUNY GRADUATES WIN BIG APPLE AWARDS HONORING EXCEPTIONAL TEACHING IN NYC PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Seven alumni of The City University of New York have won 2018 Big Apple Awards, a recognition of their exceptional skills as New York City public-school educators. The winners, announced by the New York City Department of Education, represent four colleges – Brooklyn College, City College, Hunter College and Queens College – and the CUNY Graduate Center. CUNY is well represented among the winners, with nearly half of the 17 awards coming from the University.

The seven teachers who won were selected from a pool of more than 6,500 nominations, representing schools in all five boroughs. All will serve as Big Apple Fellows during the 2018-19 school year.

“This impressive showing by CUNY alumni among the Big Apple Award winners highlights the University’s critical role in educating teachers for New York City’s public schools,” Interim Chancellor Vita C. Rabinowitz said. “With 16,000 students enrolled in our teacher-education programs, CUNY is the largest pipeline of educators for the largest public-school system in the nation, and our innovative programs reflect the University’s commitment to New Yorkers.

“We are honored and delighted to have played a role in these exceptional teachers’ education and career accomplishments, which enrich young New Yorkers’ lives year after year,” Ashleigh Thompson, University Dean for Education, said. “Congratulations to all of this year’s Big Apple Award winners.”

As Big Apple Fellows for the coming academic year, the award-winning teachers will serve on the NYC Schools Chancellor’s Teacher Advisory Group and meet monthly for career development sessions, giving them the opportunity to broaden their expertise in the classroom.

This year’s CUNY alumni Big Apple Award winners are:

Nina Berman is an Early Childhood Education teacher at the LYFE Program at Pathways to Graduation Downtown Brooklyn, and earned two degrees at Brooklyn College, a  B.A. and a Graduate School Counseling Program MSED.

Damen Davis is a sixth-grade English Language Arts teacher and lead ESL teacher for the sixth grade at I.S. X303 Leadership & Community Service in the Bronx. He earned his Master’s of Education at Hunter College.

Sandra Fajgier is a Pre-Kindergarten teacher at Magnet School of Math, Science and Design Technology in Brooklyn and graduated from Brooklyn College.

Stephanie Flete is a teacher of fourth-grade Mathematics at Urban Scholars Community School in the Bronx and earned her B.S. at City College.

Jae Lee is a High School Foreign Language-Korean teacher at Bayside High School, in Queens and earned an M.Phil in Linguistics at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Ryuma Tanaka is an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher at I.S. 145 Joseph Pulitzer in Queens and earned his M.A. in TESOL at Hunter College.

Alberto Toro is a Middle School Instrumental Music teacher at I.S. 007 Elias Bernstein in Staten Island and earned his M.A. in Jazz Performance and Composition at Queens College.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies. For more information, visit www.cuny.edu.

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Daring LaGuardians—Stories of Four Members of the LaGuardia Community College 2018 Graduating Class

More than 1,600 New Yorkers are expected to celebrate earning their associate’s degree at tomorrow’s  2018 Commencement for LaGuardia Community College.

Since it’s a large number, we want to share the stories of four members of the Class of 2018. Stories that are emblematic of LaGuardia Community College, where a typical student might be considered “non-traditional” at a four-year college. Approx. 46 percent are age 25 or older, with 20 percent over age 30. They’re often poor—71 percent have family incomes of $30,000 or less—are recent immigrants or have otherwise disadvantaged backgrounds. And a good number are the first in their family to pursue a college degree.

“A LaGuardia education gives students the knowledge and tools they need to excel in their careers and in their lives,” said LaGuardia Community College  President Gail O. Mellow. “Our graduates, having overcome obstacles that often include balancing multiple demands of work, family and academics, have incredible grit and determination to excel. Graduation is a time to celebrate their accomplishments and to join them in imagining how they will improve the lives of their families, our city and our nation.”

Many came to LaGuardia seeking a second chance after a bad start at a four-year college. Or they chose LaGuardia after a negative high school experience—and as a result, came in with poor study habits, or needing to take remedial classes in math, reading, or writing. Or despite having the academics for a four-year college, they needed an affordable route to begin their college journey.

They’ll graduate in one of more than 60 majors. For the Class of 2018, Business AdministrationCriminal Justice, and Liberal Arts: Social Science & Humanities are the three most common majors. If not entering the workforce, many are transferring to a public four-year college, a private college, or one of the most selective colleges and universities this country has to offer, to pursue their bachelor’s.

The stories below include: a mother-daughter duo, where the mother always dreamed of going to LaGuardia, but dropped out after one semester nearly three decades ago when she became pregnant with her first child; a woman with a bachelor’s from Boston University who enrolled at LaGuardia to pursue her passion for theatre and ended up earning a prestigious Fulbright Scholarship where she’ll study in India; and a young man from The Bronx who came to LaGuardia to get his college journey back on track after getting expelled for poor grades from a four-year college—at LaGuardia, he ended up finding a passion for journalism and has been selected as a 2018 Pulitzer Center Campus Consortium Fellow.

Their stories are below. Congratulations to the LaGuardia Class of 2018, who are all embodiments of our school motto, ‘Dare To Do More’!

 

Mother-Daughter Duo: Lakima Lewis and Tamecca ReidMother-Daughter Duo: Lakima Lewis and Tamecca Reid

Lakima Lewis, age 45 (pictured at right below), is a paralegal studies major, who is transferring to Queens College to pursue her bachelor’s in political science.

Lakima first studied at LaGuardia in 1990, but dropped out after one semester when she became pregnant with her first child, a son (now 26 and a graduate of Brooklyn College).

After she got injured on the job in 2011, she decided to re-enroll at LaGuardia, where her daughter, Tamecca Reid (pictured at left), was studying. Ms. Lewis, who relies on a wheelchair and a cane to get around, found support and resources from LaGuardia’s Office for Students with Disabilities.

At LaGuardia, the two, who live together in Brooklyn, often met for breakfast together before classes.

Now they’re really excited to be celebrating earning their associate’s degrees on the same day. Tamecca, age 21, is a deaf studies major.

“I cried when I found out that we’d be graduating together because I thought it was really special,” said Ms. Lewis, who is a member of Delta Alpha Pi, the international honors society for students with disabilities. “Especially for me to come back to a school I always wanted to go to when I was 18.”

 

Fulbright Scholar: Ambar CastilloFulbright Scholar: Ambar Castillo

Ambar Castillo (pictured at right), is a theater major who was recently awarded a prestigious Fulbright Scholarship to study performance-based initiatives to combat social problems in rural villages in India, continuing the work she pursued as a Pulitzer Center Reporting Fellow in Gujarat last summer.

The Fulbright Program aims to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. Fulbright alumni include 59 Nobel Laureates, 82 Pulitzer Prize winners, 71 MacArthur Fellows, 16 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipients, and thousands of leaders across the private, public and non-profit sectors.

Ambar holds a B.A. in Latin American Studies & Journalism from Boston University. She was working a secure job with benefits when she decided to pursue her passion for theatre and enrolled at LaGuardia.

Ambar’s acting roles have ranged from cross-gender ones in Boston-based William Suspension Productions to a role in “Vagina Monologues” with Athena Players and that of a mayfly at LaGuardia, for which she earned a 2017 Irene Ryan acting nomination.

Her goal is to earn a master’s in public health, and then a Ph.D. in performance studies.

 

Pulitzer Center Reporting Fellow: Jonathan CustodioPulitzer Center Reporting Fellow: Jonathan Custodio
Jonathan Custodio, age 23 (pictured at right), is a journalism major who plans to begin pursuing a bachelor’s in journalism this fall at City College.

He was recently one of just 43 emerging journalists selected from across the U.S. as a Pulitzer Center 2018 student reporting fellow. Jonathan, who speaks Spanish, plans to travel to Mexico in January where he’ll report on Afro-Mexican identity.

Jonathan started his college journey at a four-year college upstate, but was asked to leave after one semester for a 1.1 GPA. Being expelled was deeply disappointing for Jonathan, who especially feared letting down his parents, immigrants from the Dominican Republic. When they instead responded with love and understanding, his fears subsided.

Deciding that perhaps a school closer to his family home The Bronx would provide better structure for himself, he enrolled at LaGuardia where he realized his passion for writing and switched his major from business administration to journalism, and became editor-in-chief of LaGuardia’s student newspaper, The Bridge. He also served as a Civic Fellow for LaGuardia’s government affairs team—engaging civically with community members about the opportunities at the college.

His gift for writing is evident in the personal statement for his application to four-year schools, in which he writes passionately about the turmoil he felt upon leaving his first college. Read below.

In Depression to Independence

By: Jonathan Custodio

The letter arrived on a rainy June afternoon. I had been expelled from the University at Buffalo.

It was expected for months but it still struck me like a thunderous punch that I didn’t anticipate. I could not bear the shame, the disappointment, nor the depression that followed. The days went by slowly; the nights even more so.

My time at the university had come to an end because of academic ignorance. Growing up in a strict Dominican household, I was rarely given the autonomy to be as social as I had liked to be. So after being thrown into a situation in which I had complete freedom, I could not manage leisure with responsibility and my studies suffered. As a result, I ended my first and only academic year there with an atrocious 1.1 Grade Point Average (GPA).

“Jonathan, we are headed to the movies. Do you want to come?” “No, I’m okay.”

“Jonathan, are you feeling alright. Is everything okay?” “Everything is fine.”

These were the sullen answers that were given to genuine concern from my family because I felt too embarrassed to face them and explain my failures.

My father worked ten-hour shifts in a factory and my mother did housework gigs. I always noticed how tired my parents were when arriving home from work and told myself that I would do everything in my power to ensure that his final decades were as relaxing as possible.

Immigrants from the Dominican Republic, my parents always preached the importance of an education and placed immense pressure on me to succeed. That pressure was only exacerbated by the bachelor’s degrees that were earned by both of my older brothers.

All of these factors contributed to a rapidly developed depression. Overwhelmed by my lack of success, I could not bear disappointing them and thought that everything would be easier if I removed this liability from their lives.

With no job or school enrollment, I had hours in the day to myself that I would alternatively spend between crying or pressing a blade to my wrists and wondering what it was like to experience the sweet release of death. My pride always stopped me. My story was not going to end that way. It was time to speak up.

I waited until the night before returning students were scheduled to start the sophomore year to tell my parents. Before the words could even come out, my eyes became faucets. I had never felt so emotional and could only manage to keep my eyes fixed on the floor because I was too afraid to see the reaction of my mother, who was more critical of me than anyone else.

But suddenly, the support interjected. They proved what it meant to be family: togetherness and just being there for someone when he or she needs it most. I was at a loss for words as each member of my family showered me with love and words of encouragement.

Fear turned into relief. Depression converted to comfort.

Almost five years later, I sit here writing this statement as easily as blinking. I do so with no regrets, and with no remorse.

I went to college because I was told that you were supposed to. You go to college, get a job and have a family. Hence, I believed that I needed to seek what was familiar and safe. I followed my older brother’s path in studying Business Administration because he was doing well for himself and my parents approved of it.

I decided to pursue my passion in journalism at LaGuardia Community College. Why did I choose LaGuardia? The reason isn’t profound or deep. It was the only school in all of CUNY still accepting students at the time.

To my surprise, LaGuardia has been nothing but a venue of support, development and education. There, I have honed my leadership, networking and communal skills while being a Civic Fellow; embraced a journalistic integrity in being editor-in-chief of our school newspaper The Bridge for more than a year; and developed a passion for uplifting fellow students and dreamers towards their wildest aspirations.

I love to write and I love the news. I feel a compulsion to properly inform the people and give them a platform to be heard. Real change happens through people, and the biggest mistake is not believing that we have the power to have a massive impact on the issues that matter to us.  I learned to believe in myself.

LaGuardia Community College helped me develop those beliefs; I would not be as content and driven as I am today without the experience of being a student at this college in Long Island City, Queens.

I recently finished my classes towards my major and am getting ready to graduate in June. After which time I plan to go to a four-year school towards a bachelor’s in journalism.

We cannot improve upon ourselves until we tackle our greatest fears; until we follow our passions; until we learn from our past. I didn’t know that at nineteen years old. I know it at twenty-three.


ON THE DOCKET: The latest on the Supreme Court Circuit

Today’s 7-2 Supreme Court ruling on Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission has a lot to unpack. The central question, of whether the First Amendment’s Free Speech Clause could be wielded as a weapon against non-discrimination law, seems to have received a stay of execution. And unlike Jack Phillips’ confectionary creations, these layers need to be consumed and commented on. Read on for our roundup of must-reads… we’ll be updating this post throughout the day to serve you the latest.

 

The Supreme Court Ruling Itself

 

SCOTUS Finds Colorado Civil Rights Commission Hostile to Religion in Masterpiece Cakeshop

By CUNY Law Professor Ruthann Robson, Constitutional Law Prof Blog

“Certainly, the Court’s opinion rests on narrow grounds, perhaps unique to this case. But it nevertheless represents the Court chipping away at equality on the basis of sexual orientation.”

 

A Statement from the ACLU, representing the couple that brought the original complaint

The Masterpiece Cakeshop Case: What You Need to Know

By Ria Tabacco Mar, ACLU

“In the 1960s, Piggie Park barbecue restaurant argued that its owner’s religious beliefs meant it could refuse to serve Black customers. In the 1970s and 1980s, schools claimed that they should be allowed to pay women less than men based on the belief that men should be the head of the household. Time and again, courts have recognized that religious views, no matter how deeply felt, don’t entitle any of us to discriminate. The same is true today.”

 

Justices Rule for Colorado Baker Who Refused to Make a Cake for Gay Wedding

By Marcia Coyle and Tony Mauro, New York Law Journal

“Kennedy also made clear the decision was relevant for this case only. ‘The outcome of cases like this in other circumstances must await further elaboration in the courts, all in the context of recognizing that these disputes must be resolved with tolerance, without undue disrespect to sincere religious beliefs, and without subjecting gay persons to indignities when they seek goods and services in an open market,’ he wrote.”

 

Gay Americans Have Little to Fear From the Supreme Court’s Compromise in Masterpiece Cakeshop

By Mark Joseph Stern, Slate

The ruling came down to free exercise law.

“…SCOTUS didn’t directly answer that question on Monday. Rather, it chose to handle this case solely on free exercise grounds. The Supreme Court has held that the government violates the First Amendment’s Free Exercise Clause when it targets a particular faith for disfavored treatment. In an opinion by Justice Anthony Kennedy, the court found here that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission had done precisely that in its dealings with Jack Phillips.”

And additional comment on non-discrimination law and the LGBTQIA community:

“…Kennedy’s opinion is also littered with dicta that shows states how they can enforce LGBTQ non-discrimination law without crashing into constitutional problems. He approvingly describes states’ authority ‘to protect the rights and dignity of gay persons who are, or wish to be, married but who face discrimination when they seek goods or services.’ He clarifies that ‘gay persons and gay couples cannot be treated as social outcasts or as inferior in dignity and worth.’ And he reaffirms the basic principle that religious objections ‘do not allow business owners and other actors in the economy and in society to deny protected persons equal access to goods and services under a neutral and generally applicable public accommodations law.'”


Baruch College Holds 2018 Commencement Ceremony

Students Take First Steps to Becoming Future Leaders in their Chosen Fields

Baruch College 2018 Valedictorian and Salutatorian at Commencement on May 30, 2018 at Barclays Center

L to R: Salutatorian Kevin Savarese and Valedictorian Patrycja Koszykowska are among the 5,024 graduates in Baruch College’s Class of 2018.

Baruch College conferred 5,024 degrees in business, business administration, public and international affairs, education, and arts and sciences at its Commencement on May 30, 2018 at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. The Class of 2018 included more than 3,800 undergraduate and more than 1,200 graduate degree recipients.

Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, presided over the exercises, and David Christy, PhD, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, served as the master of ceremonies.

VIDEOS:  To view the full ceremony, visit here.

“An American Dream Machine”

In his opening remarks, President Wallerstein welcomed graduating students, their families and friends, returning alumni from the classes of 1958 and 1968, and members of the faculty. He spoke of Baruch as “an incredible institution and a stellar college” within the nation’s largest urban university system, the City University of New York.

“Baruch College is an American dream machine (whose) students represent the world,” said President Wallerstein. “You have what it takes to be a leader in your chosen field and contribute to your community and society,”

Also addressing the students were distinguished guests U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer and James B. Milliken, Chancellor of The City University of New York.

Commencement Speaker and Honorary Recipients

Keynote speaker Jane Chu, PhD, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, who received an honorary doctorate of humane letters degree, told the Class of 2018 that their Baruch College education has instilled upon them the necessary qualities to be future leaders.

Dr. Chu said “as leaders we have a great opportunity to help ourselves, as well as others to be creative and not remain stuck, to keep moving, and to take those kind of creative risks that are necessary to making a positive impact on others and bring out the good in us.”

Austin W. Marxe (’65), who graduated with a Bachelor’s of Business Administration, was also awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters degree. Marxe is the president and managing director of AWM Investment Company, a firm he founded in 1991 which supports small companies that would otherwise not be financeable.

In 2016, Baruch Colleges received a $30 million gift from Marxe, the largest single gift in the history of Baruch College.

Degrees Conferred

The Zicklin School of Business conferred 789 Master of Business Administration and Master of Science degrees, as well as 2,736 Bachelor of Business Administration degrees.

The Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs conferred 274 Master of Public Affairs and Master of Science in Education degrees, and 52 Bachelor of Science degrees.

The George and Mildred Weissman School of Arts and Sciences conferred 161 Master of Arts degrees, and 986 Bachelor of Arts degrees.

At a separate CUNY ceremony held a week prior to Commencement at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall, Baruch College awarded seven doctoral degrees in business to students who completed their coursework and dissertations under the supervision of the faculty.

# # #


President Antonio Perez Steps Down After 23 Years

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) President Antonio Pérez will step down after having served with 23 years of leadership at the college. Effective August 31, 2018, President Pérez will be leaving BMCC to pursue other opportunities in New York City higher education.

Appointed in 1995, President Pérez led BMCC to have the highest undergraduate enrollment of any college in New York City, increasing from 16,500 students when he came on board, to more than 27,000 today. BMCC has also grown to provide almost 50 Associate degree programs in the Liberal Arts and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).

Under the leadership of President Pérez, BMCC has become a premier institution of higher learning on the national level, leading the way in grant-funded STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) research, Open Educational Resources (OER), pipeline programs to ensure seamless transfers for graduates, and staff and faculty leadership development. He has led the development of programs at BMCC that increase the participation of women and low-income students in the STEM fields, as well as programs that prepare students to enter other high-demand fields. Throughout these efforts, President Pérez has demonstrated a solid commitment to the BMCC mission that values, at its core, equity and success for all students.

BMCC President Antonio PerezPresident Pérez is also widely known for having shepherded the BMCC community through the aftermath of the attacks of September 11, 2001. BMCC is the only college in the United States to have lost a building to a terrorist attack. Fiterman Hall was destroyed when World Trade 7 collapsed and fell against it, and the college’s main campus at 199 Chambers Street became a command center for about 2,000 rescue workers.

“That was the beginning of a new chapter in the life of our college and in my presidency,” says President Pérez. “Suddenly we were faced with new and unprecedented challenges.”

BMCC President Antonio Perez

President Pérez approached those challenges with strategies and a vision that have helped define leadership in a crisis and impacted crisis management protocols for higher education institutions, nationwide. He also led efforts to create a public and private partnership that enabled BMCC’s Fiterman Hall to be razed and rebuilt. It reopened in 2012.

After the college reopened, President Pérez addressed the BMCC community. “Darkness cannot be defeated by darkness,” he told students, faculty and staff who were determined to resume their education. “It will only be overcome by light, and education is all about light.” At commencement that Spring 2002, he spoke to graduates whose achievements sent a message of hope. “We at BMCC have witnessed first-hand the destructive power of terrorism,” said the President. “Terrorism feeds on hatred, and hatred is the child of ignorance. Hatred is overcome only by understanding, by knowledge and by human compassion, all of which are the best fruits of education.”

BMCC President Antonio Perez

This focus on the positive, and on student success has characterized the legacy of President Pérez. After 9/11, he was determined to let BMCC students know their college was going to remain open. To get that message out, he approached one of the news trucks lined up along the West Side Highway, and offered a reporter a better vantage point—BMCC’s rooftop.

“All I asked in return is that as long they were reporting the news, they would have subtitles scrolling across the bottom of the screen announcing, ‘BMCC will be reopening’,” he says, and it did open its doors within three weeks after the attacks, as he had predicted.

BMCC President Antonio Perez

In the years that followed, the revitalization of lower Manhattan gained momentum and BMCC thrived, increasing its enrollment, degree programs, retention rates, innovative curricula and student support programs.

“As the area revitalized, BMCC stayed in step with that growth,” says President Pérez. “The resiliency of our institution reflects the types of students we attract, who are looking for a better life with the same tenacity and positive response to adversity that we hold as a college. Our faculty, staff and students show a determination that reverberates within the institution. I feel strongly that the most important thing I can leave to the college is the realization that our students can start here and they can go anywhere.”

 

 

Embedded photos, top to bottom:

BMCC President Antonio Pérez and presidential candidate Barack Obama, 2007

BMCC President Antonio Pérez, center, walking to Fiterman Hall groundbreaking ceremony, 2009

BMCC President Antonio Pérez, center, at New York Stock Exchange, 2013

BMCC President Antonio Pérez with CBS reporter Lou Young on BMCC rooftop after 9/11, 2001

 


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of June 4, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students & Families,

Congratulations to our Lower Grades actors for their weekend performances of Shrek!

Thank you to all who were able to attend and assist during last week’s Middle Grades and Upper Grades Orientations on Wednesday evening. There was wonderful energy and enthusiasm for our NEST+m Community, and great pride in speaking of our school community with its soon-to-be newest Middle Grades and Upper Grades families.

Families, please complete this short survey to provide your feedback on our recent Curriculum Showcase & Science Fair. It is a work-in-progress and we want to make next year’s event even better!

Our week ahead features:

  • The 4th grade Science written exam tomorrow, Monday June 4, 2018
  • The Global History and Geography NYS Regents Exam on Tuesday June 5th
  • 12th grade Prom, Tuesday June 5
  • 6th grade plays:
    • Wednesday June 6th: 6th grade Plays, Classes 6D, 6C, + 6A, 5:30pm -7:00pm
    • Friday, June 8th, Classes 6B + 6E, 5:30pm -7:00pm
  • Anniversary Day, Thursday June 7th. No school for students.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication,

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


Diversity and Inclusion Celebrated at Brooklyn College’s 93rd Commencement Ceremony

The event, which drew politicians from all around the city, highlighted student success with hopeful messages from alumni and friends of the college.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

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CUNY Chancellor James Milliken and Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson greet #BCGrad2018 keynote speaker, honorary doctorate recipient, and “mother of the disability rights movement” Judith Heumann.

“We know that our diversity is our strength and enhances the academic experience for all,” said Brooklyn College President Michelle J. Anderson at the 2018 Brooklyn College Commencement Ceremony, held for the second year in a row at the Barclays Center in Downtown Brooklyn. “Studying at Brooklyn College provides our students with the opportunity to engage with difference and complexity, which makes them more inter-culturally competent and willing to assume challenging positions of leadership in the service of others.”

The Class of 2018 was one of the largest in the borough, with more than 4,100 graduates–3,035 baccalaureate, 1,029 master’s, and 67 Advanced Certificate students. The very diverse body of scholars come from more than 125 countries and speak over 85 languages. Approximately 88 members of the class identify as disabled, and 37 students are veterans or currently enlisted in the U.S. military.

Introduced as a hero and a legend by CUNY Interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Christopher Rosa, disability right activist Judy Heumann gave the keynote address and accepted an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, presented by President Anderson. Known as the “mother of the independent living disability rights movement,” Heumann’s work has had a significant impact on the implementation of legislation and policies that benefit and protect people with disabilities.

“Without ever planning to, my parents, who had come from Germany and had lost so many family members in the Holocaust, taught me the value of advocacy,” Heumann shared. “They taught me that if a situation feels wrong, it probably is wrong. They taught me about the need to join with allies to speak up and, especially, to speak up for equality and rights in the face of discrimination and injustice. Eventually, the time came when I needed to become my own advocate. Some of you would say, ‘stand up on your own.’ I would say, ‘sit up in my own wheelchair.'”

Born in 1947, Heumann grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were German Jewish refugees who came to the United States in the 1930s. In 1949, Heumann contracted polio, resulting in her being a quadriplegic and using a wheelchair for mobility. The New York City Board of Education deemed it sufficient to provide Heumann with only 2.5 hours a week of home education until the fourth grade, at which time she was allowed to go to P.S. 219 special education classes. Heumann’s mother and other mothers banded together to force New York City’s Department of Education to make some of their high schools accessible.

In 1970, Heumann became the first public school teacher in the New York City system to use a wheelchair. During the Clinton presidency, Heumann served as assistant secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services in the Department of Education. She then served as the World Bank’s first adviser on disability and development, and was also the director for the Department on Disability Services for the District of Columbia. In the Obama administration, she was appointed as the very first special advisor for International Disability Rights in the U.S. State Department from 2010¬2017. She continues to advocate on behalf of disabled people globally, participating in protests and giving lectures, including a popular TED Talk titled “Our Fight for Disability Rights and Why We’re Not Done Yet.” Recently, she was the featured subject of Comedy Central’s very popular web series, Drunk History.

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The #BCGrad2018 Distinguished Alumnus Award recipient Roger Hinds ’77, head athletic trainer for the NY Knicks, and President Anderson are excited for the ceremony to begin.

“Here’s this immigrant from the West Indies, who has lived his dream of working in the NBA for 24 years, and talking to these stars, all these stars, the future leaders of this country. This is what makes America great,” said NY Knicks Head Athletic Trainer Roger Hinds ’77, this year’s recipient of the Distinguished Alumnus Award. Quoting Norman Vincent Peale, he continued, “‘Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you will land among the stars.’ I’m in the midst of stars. Chase your dreams, graduates.”

Hinds been an athletic trainer for some of the most well-known athletes in basketball. Born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, Hinds moved to Brooklyn with his parents and five siblings at age eight. He earned a Bachelor of Science in physical education from Brooklyn College in 1977.

Hinds was the strength-and-conditioning coach for the gold-medal-winning U.S. Olympic Team at the 1996 Atlanta Games. He is the contributing author of two books: Condition the NBA Way (Cadell & Davies 1994) and Total Fitness the NBA Way (Perennial Currents 2000). Currently in his 24th NBA season, Hinds spent four seasons as assistant athletic trainer and strength-and-conditioning coach, for the Atlanta Hawks; eight years as the head athletic trainer for the Dallas Mavericks; and also served as host athletic trainer for the East squad at the 2015 NBA All-Star Game at Madison Square Garden. He is entering his 14th season as head athletic trainer for the Knicks. Hinds is just the sixth head trainer in the franchise’s 70-year history, joining Jim Nevins, Don Friederichs, Bill Norris, Danny Whelan, and Mike Saunders.

Hinds is also an active Brooklyn College alumnus. Since 2016, through an alliance with the Magner Career Center, he has taken time to guide current Brooklyn College students as well as high-school seniors in the Brooklyn College Academy, and provide them with the benefit of his industry expertise through class visits, panel discussions, and career mentorship.

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“The best is yet to come.”

The valedictorian of the Class of 2018, William E. Macaulay Honors College Scholar and English educationmajor Margaret Iuni, inspired the audience by sharing a hopeful philosophy and challenging to audience to reach for the highest of common goals.

“We are more likely to believe that our individual success is determined by our own hard work than citizens of nearly any other country in the world,” she said. “The narrative of individual achievement without the assistance of others is a fiction that persists in American culture. We cannot and will not succeed without one another.”

She continued: “Together we can be fearless, we can be confident, and we can learn. We can create communities that foster individual growth without forfeiting our need for human connection. We can take the meaningful relationships we have forged over the years we have spent at Brooklyn College and help redesign our world to be a more unified and filial one. Remember the words of the American poet, author, and teacher Gwendolyn Brooks: ‘We are each other’s harvest; we are each others’ business; we are each other’s magnitude and bond.'”

The theme of inclusiveness and triumph continued throughout the day.

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“Never be afraid to have game.” – Jumaane D. Williams ‘01, ‘05 M.A. #BCGrad2018

“My first bit of activism on the Brooklyn College campus was a small organization called S.O.F.E.D.U.P., having Tourette’s syndrome that meant a lot to me. So thank you for your work,” said New York City Council Member Jumaane D. Williams ’01, ’05 M.A. “Some of my proudest achievements are my Brooklyn College degrees. This is the best education I could have gotten. The education I got inside and outside the classroom was simply amazing.”

Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams shared: “They told me I could not be a captain in the police department; I became a captain.They told me I couldn’t be a state senator; I became a state senator. They told me I couldn’t be the first person of color borough president; I became borough president. In three years they say I can’t be the mayor; I will be the mayor. There are only two types of Americans: those who live in Brooklyn and those who wish they could.”

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Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams.

During the conferral of degrees, Brooklyn College Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs William A. Tramontano called for a moment of silence to honor Jean Joseph. Joseph, who majored in kinesiology and was anticipating graduating with his fellow students in the Class of 2018, passed away suddenly last week, stunning and saddening the entire campus community. His bachelor’s degree will be awarded posthumously.

Other distinguished guests and speakers included outgoing CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, and members of the Brooklyn College 50th Anniversary Class of 1968, Brooklyn College Foundation Board of Trustees, and Brooklyn College Alumni Association.

Additionally, 106-year-old Ethel Lagarenne Hagquist ’32, the sole surviving member of Brooklyn College’s very first graduating class, filmed a message for the most recent class, providing advice and well wishes.

For more on Brooklyn College’s 2018 Commencement Ceremony, follow the hashtag #BCGrad2018 on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Lehman College Celebrates 50th Commencement in Historic Ceremony

Lehman College of The City University of New York today conferred a record 3,446 undergraduate and graduate degrees to a celebratory crowd on the College’s South Lawn.

The ceremony featured greetings by Lehman College President José Luis Cruz and CUNY officials and a keynote address by author and professor André Aciman, who also received the College’s 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award. In addition, Professor Emeritus Jacob Judd, one of the College’s longest-serving faculty members, received an honorary doctorate of humane letters.

“Most of you had significant responsibilities outside our classrooms and labs: you held down jobs and internships, you raised children, you cared for family members, you dealt with illness,” President Cruz commented to the graduates, while noting that more than half of the undergraduate students receiving degrees—55%—are the first in their families to earn a college diploma. “But you persisted and came to our campus, and you expanded your knowledge, deepened perspectives, learned new skills…Above all, each and every one of you exhibited what I have come to learn is the drive and determination that characterizes those who strive to make their lives here, in the world’s greatest city, The City of New York.”

President Cruz added an exhortation to the graduates that “it is time for you to lead others—in your families and the communities you represent—to become part of the fabric of change.” CUNY General Counsel and Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs Loretta Martinez and CUNY Trustee Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez also addressed the graduates. Jonathan Berenguer, who received his master’s degree in Organizational Leadership, delivered the student speech and spoke of how he overcame tremendous adversity to attend and succeed at Lehman College.

“No matter the ingredients in your life; past, present, or future; remember that when life gives you lemons, you make Lehman Lightning Lemonade,” concluded Berenguer to a standing ovation.

Dr. Aciman, who received his bachelor’s degree from Lehman in 1973, is the author of four novels, including Call Me by Your Name, which was adapted into an Academy Award-winning film last year. He is the author of the memoir Out of Egypt, and also two collections of essays. Widely published in leading magazines and journals, Dr. Aciman is the recipient of the Whiting Writers’ Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a fellowship from the New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

In his remarks, Dr. Aciman noted that he was also the first one in his family to graduate from college, and an immigrant to the U.S. as well—much like many of the Lehman students in attendance, but “here a half-century earlier.”

“Lehman College changed my life,” he said, adding that the degree he received from Lehman was “an invitation” to further learning and success.

A nationally recognized scholar specializing in Colonial American history, the Revolutionary War, and the early years of the republic, Dr. Judd first taught on campus in 1967 when Lehman College was still Hunter College in the Bronx. The editor of the four volume collection of Van Cortlandt family letters and papers, he was also program director for the Rockefeller Archives American Business History Series. At Lehman, Dr. Judd was chair of the Department of History for twelve years, acting dean of Arts and Humanities, and chair of the Lehman College Retirees Association until 2016.

The Commencement was filled with applause and cheers. Professor Joseph Fera from Lehman’s Department of Mathematics, named Teacher of the Year, was the master of ceremonies; and the Adjunct Teacher of the Year award was given to Professor Kenneth Piccininni from the Department of Counseling, Leadership, Literacy and Special Education. Provost Harriet Fayne presented the candidates for degrees while the noise on Lehman’s South Field swelled. Amid the celebratory nature of the proceedings, this year’s Commencement included a somber recognition of loss as well. Professor Young Kun Kim, a beloved member of the College’s Department of Political Science, died earlier this month as a result of a random act of violence near his Manhattan home; an award in his name has been established to honor his scholarship and long service to the College. And a posthumous Bachelor of Arts degree was conferred to Yoryi Joel Dume, an outstanding student majoring in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, who had completed his Honors Thesis with distinction before he passed away this spring. An award has been created in the Department of Latin American and Latino Studies to honor Yoryi’s memory as well. After the Commencement ceremony, there was a luncheon for the graduates and guests, who mingled and strolled around the 37-acre campus while the Lehman College and Community Latin Jazz Ensemble, conducted by Professors Victor Rendón and Armando Rodríguez, performed.

Lehman College provides undergraduate and graduate studies in the liberal arts and sciences and professional education within a dynamic research environment. With a diverse student body of more than 13,000, Lehman offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs. Ranked as having the fourth highest mobility rate in the nation by the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Equality of Opportunity Project, Lehman is a proud catalyst for economic and social mobility for its students, almost half of whom are first generation college students.

 


Saluting Gina Rodriguez, the BCC 2018 Salutatorian

Our Salutatorian’s post-BCC career has already begun — Gina Rodriguez completed her graduation requirements last August and is now an English major at Hunter College. Born in New York City but raised in the Dominican Republic, Ms. Rodriguez returned to the United States in 2015 to attend BCC. “Here I learned it’s not just about where you go to get a degree it’s what you do with it.” At BCC, Gina did a lot. She got involved in the creative writing club and the student literary magazine, Thesis. “I love to write, read and teach others to love reading and writing as much as I do.” Gina was also a semi-finalist for the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship. Upon graduating from Hunter, she plans to earn a master’s in New York University’s Creative Writing Program and return to BCC to teach English 11, the course she cites as the inspiration for her achievements. When not studying, Gina gravitates towards activities related to writing. “Last year I went to the Bronx Book Fair, I go to readings at Lehman College, writing workshops.” Among her favorite writers: Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison, whose work she calls “raw and truthful.” Not surprisingly, Ms. Rodriquez is currently working on a novel of her own.


Invested in Student Success

Launched in 2015 with the generous support of Martin D. Sass ’63, Brooklyn College’s M.D. Sass Investment Institute has ensured that students gain the real-world financial experience and access to Wall Street movers and shakers that give them an edge in the job market.

<p>Martin D. Sass '63 is the visionary behind Brooklyn College's M.D. Sass Investment Institute (MDSII), which gives students real-world investment experience and direct access to some of the greatest financial minds in the country.</p>

Martin D. Sass ’63 is the visionary behind Brooklyn College’s M.D. Sass Investment Institute (MDSII), which gives students real-world investment experience and direct access to some of the greatest financial minds in the country.

M.D. Sass, which manages over $7 billion in assets, has been a leading name in investment strategy and innovation for 42 years. Martin D. Sass ’63, the company’s founder, chairman, and CEO, has been a stalwart supporter of his alma mater, committed to helping its students gain opportunities to follow in his footsteps. His generous donation to Brooklyn College to found the M.D. Sass Investment Institute (MDSII) is helping students to get closer to achieving their professional goals.

“Brooklyn College has opened doors to highly successful careers for many students who, like me, came from humble backgrounds,” said Sass, just before the MDSII was established in 2015. Currently serving as vice chair of the Brooklyn College Foundation (BCF) Board of Trustees, Sass began his career at the Wall Street brokerage firm Ira Haupt & Co. after graduating from Brooklyn College with a bachelor of science in accounting. He founded M.D. Sass in 1972.

“My hope is that the institute will help keep those doors open for tomorrow’s Brooklyn College students by providing them the chance to learn, grow, and succeed in a business environment, through hands-on financial and investment experiences, invaluable mentoring, and Wall Street connections.”

That dream is being realized.

Today, MDSII, which is a part of the college’s Murray Koppelman School of Business, operates as a student-involved hedge fund where students “manage funds for the Brooklyn College Foundation,” says Associate Professor Hyuna Park, who is the Herbert Kurz ’41 Endowed Chair in Finance and Risk Management, and faculty adviser for MDSII.

“Normally, students learn theory in classrooms. But with MDSII, they gain real-world experience by applying the theories of capital investment in real time. They get to buy stock, sell short stock, and help analyze stock. They conduct research and evaluate risk. They regularly make presentations before the investment panel. So not only do students help the foundation perform better financially, they also receive feedback from the industry leaders on their work.”

That last part, Park says, is what differentiates MDSII from business programs at other colleges, as most students do not receive that sort of direct feedback from industry professionals. Additionally, the institute’s curriculum is highly rigorous. Students must complete courses in introductory accounting, economics, statistics, principles of financial management and investments to participate in the program. It requires a great deal of the students’ time as well as their peak intellectual and analytical skills. If this sounds demanding, it is because of how high the stakes are and how priceless an opportunity participation in the program is.

Judging by the outstanding performances and successes of MDSII students, the return on Sass’ investment has been immediate.

<p>Graduating senior Kelly Alvarez is the M.D. Sass Investment Institute's first award-winning participant. Photo: David Rozenblyum.</p>

Graduating senior Kelly Alvarez is the M.D. Sass Investment Institute’s first award-winning participant. Photo: David Rozenblyum.

Take Kelly Alvarez, who will be graduating with the Class of 2018 on May 31. In spring 2017, Alvarez was the first recipient of the MDSII Security Analysis Program Award. Her analysis of Liberty Latin America Ltd Class C (LILAK) stock earned her $2,000 and certificate of achievement.

“I remember working that entire semester on that stock and initially doubting myself and my research, says Alvarez, who is majoring in finance. “And then getting into that room to present—a room, frankly, full of men. It was intimidating. There’s still so much to be done in finance for women to be equally represented. But I think even something as small as my winning that award—it means a lot. I didn’t think I could do it and then I did. I hope that’s the message other women looking to participate in the program get.”

For that reason and others, the victory was quite sweet for Alvarez, a Brooklyn native of Cuban descent and the second person in her family to attend Brooklyn College (her brother Daniel graduated from the college last year and participated in the Journey to Commencement campaign video). She admits to not living up to her true potential in high school at first, and, as a result, did not initially gain admission to Brooklyn College.

“I spoke with my guidance counselor and advocated for myself. I believed that just because I had figured out high school late, didn’t mean I wasn’t a good fit for college. After making a strong case for myself, I was accepted to BC. So there was a little bit of adversity in that respect, but it has been amazing experience since. How many 21-year olds can say they presented in front of a hedge fund manager who oversees more than $7 billion? You’re not going to have that opportunity anywhere else.”

Given that opportunity, Alvarez has thrived. She will be graduating magna cum laude with a bachelor of business administration (B.B.A.). She is co-president of the Murray Koppelman Student Leadership Council, whose goals are to enrich the campus experience of Murray Koppelman School of Business students, promote student involvement in on-campus activities, and increase the visibility of the School of Business itself. She was also a participant in the Summer Financial Careers Academy, a program at Brooklyn College’s 25 Broadway campus. The program provides an understanding of the financial services industry, the largest industry in New York City. It also includes career development activities and workshops through the Brooklyn College Magner Career Center, founded by BCF Foundation Trustee Marge Magner ’69. Additionally, Alvarez is the recipient of the Anthony R. Castellanos ’85 Scholarship and the Financial Careers Academy Scholarship. She was also the subject of the winning 2015–2016 CUNY Student Photo Challenge.

Alvarez is grateful for the education and experiences she received in the M.D. Sass Investment Institute, the sought-after paid internships at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. she scored with help from the Magner Center and its director Natalia Guarin-Klein, and valuable connections to alumni like Sass, and BCF Trustee Anthony R. Castellanos ’85, global accounts lead partner and industry leader for KPMG US. She has already secured a position with the global finance and business management team at JPMorgan Chase & Co., which she begins in August.

<p>Graduating senior Sebastian Komuda stands proudly in front of Whitehead Hall, where most of the School of Business' courses take place. He is the most recent winner of the MDSII Security Analysis Program Award. Photo: David Rozenblyum.</p>

Graduating senior Sebastian Komuda stands proudly in front of Whitehead Hall, where most of the School of Business’ courses take place. He is the most recent winner of the MDSII Security Analysis Program Award. Photo: David Rozenblyum.

“I knew coming into college I had the desire to pursue finance and declared my major during sophomore year, as soon as I was able,” says graduating senior Sebastian Komuda, who is double majoring in finance and business management, and minoring in financial planning. His reasons are quite personal.

“When I was a little kid, my dad invested in the stock market. I was probably in the sixth grade when he gave me $100, a list of stocks, and said: ‘Put your money in any of these companies.'” Komuda was unfamiliar with the stock market and the companies his father instructed him to invest in, and picked one randomly. At the end of junior high school, Komuda’s father returned to him. “He said, ‘Look. Your $100 is now $180!’ I didn’t understand how it got to $180 and my father explained: ‘That’s what happens when you invest in a good company.'”

Komuda is the recipient of a Financial Careers Academy Scholarship. He is also the winner of the spring 2018 MDSII Security Analysis Program Award for his astute research on B&G Foods, Inc. (BGS) and GSV Capital Corporation (GSVC), which he presented to the investment panel headed by Sass himself.

“It was nerve-racking,” he recalls. “But once you get the hang of it, it’s basically like talking to anyone else. Mr. Sass, Mr. Ante Basic, Mr. Tanner Coyle, and the entire panel are very accepting of you. They like to see you thrive on the knowledge that you’re gaining. They’re constructively critical, genuinely seeking to improve their knowledge of these companies, and interested in how your research might help do that.”

Komuda credits Professor Park’s rigorous instruction, as well as guidance from Professor and Department of Finance Chair Sunil Mohanty, for preparing him to participate at his highest level in MDSII. “What feels great,” Komuda added, “is when you present your research and the investment panel’s theses align with your own.”

Like Alvarez, Komuda’s older brother, also named Daniel, graduated from Brooklyn College, too. Komuda says his brother is the reason he decided to attend the college. “He told me that Brooklyn College was extraordinary; that the professors really cared about the students; and the classrooms weren’t overcrowded, particularly in the majors.”

Komuda works part-time at his uncle’s restaurant, attends college full-time, and also participated in paid internships at Vision Financial Services, New York Life Insurance Company, and HSBC. He secured the last two internships through the Magner Center.

“At HSBC, my primary focus was networking efficiently, this resulted in an opportunity to assist various teams on the trading floor, which is one of the biggest deals in banking.”

Komuda has quite a few interviews lined up with companies like Morgan Stanley and UBS, which he said he scored because of the inclusion of MDSII on his resume and a letter of recommendation from Sass. While all of this is very exciting for Komuda, he has something else he wishes to accomplish as well.

“I’m definitely pursuing a master’s degree in finance. I know many people don’t find grad school intriguing, but I enjoy school, so it’s not a problem for me. And it will better position me for the job market as well.”

<p>In Fall 2017, Luiz Cazares placed third at the MDSII Security Analysis Program Awards for his analyses of Comcast Corporation (CMCSA) and Discover Financial Services (DFS). Photo: David Rozenblyum.</p>

In Fall 2017, Luiz Cazares placed third at the MDSII Security Analysis Program Awards for his analyses of Comcast Corporation (CMCSA) and Discover Financial Services (DFS). Photo: David Rozenblyum.

While he does not currently have plans to attend graduate school, senior Luiz Cazares does want to take the exam to become a certified public accountant (CPA).

Born in Brooklyn to Mexican immigrant parents and raised in Queens, Cazares is only the second person in his family to attend college and will be the first to graduate. He was enrolled at another school before attending Brooklyn College, but says that none of its resources or services were a match for those of Brooklyn College.

“The courses I took, people I met, faculty I spoke to, and even the career center I sought out—none were up to the standards I have since become accustomed to at Brooklyn College,” Cazares says. “One of my dad’s friends, who sadly passed away a year after I came to the college, received his master’s degree here. He was someone who pushed me toward this college, informing me that it was one of the top CUNY schools. At that point I thought, ‘I have to go now because he went and he’s really great.’ So, I followed his route and I think it paid off.”

Cazares is double majoring in accounting and finance and has received the Dean’s List honor multiple times. He has been attending school full-time, taking a minimum of 15 credits each semester, while working full-time as a reservations manager at U-Haul. He says that he found the will and the drive to put in this kind of effort because of his mother, whose dream it is for him to attain a level of success that she and his father were unable to.

Cazares is most proud of his honorable placement in the MDSII Security Analysis Program Awards. “That recognition did not come easy. There were times when I spent the entire night trying to discover what it is I needed to do, especially as a person who had no significant finance background. What that award said to me was that all I had to do was try to do my best.”

He has completed paid internships at Union Bank of Switzerland (UBS), where BCF Trustee Lorraine Levy Laighold ’64, founder of Brooklyn College’s Lorraine Laighold Summer Leadership Academy, is senior vice president and wealth management financial adviser, and at PwC, where he says he was inspired to employ critical thinking and develop the ability to be proactive, rather than reactive, in problem-solving. For both opportunities, Cazares has nothing but gratitude for both MDSII and the Magner Center.

“These were the most important and vital things for me: the college’s career services, especially Andre Fontenelle and Natalia Guarin-Klein—my two favorite people even though they might not know it. Natalia introduced me to Ms. Laighold, who interviewed me for the UBS internship. Additionally, having MDSII on my resume helped tremendously. Employers are eager to find candidates who have real-world experience, and MDSII ensures we have that—even before we receive our degrees.”

In January, Cazares begins working at PwC as an auditor in the alternative investments group.

 

The M.D. Sass Investment Institute and the Magner Career Center are able to provide students like Kelly Alvarez, Sebastian Komuda, and Luiz Cazares the assistance, skills, values, and opportunities that are essential to fulfilling their career aspirations thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends received through the Brooklyn College Foundation. There are many ways donors can support Brooklyn College and its students: Make a planned gift through a will, trust, or retirement plan; designate gifts for specific purposes, such as scholarships, awards, prizes, internships, travel funds, research fellowships, or departmental discretionary funds; join the Boylan Society, a monthly sustainer program; purchase a Commemorative Brick and leave behind a lasting legacy at Brooklyn College; or make a one-time gift online. The Brooklyn College Foundation, Inc. was established in 1958 to encourage and promote the academic purposes of Brooklyn College of The City University of New York and the educational welfare of students, faculty, alumni, and the community. Through a full spectrum of fundraising programs, the foundation provides resources that advance the mission of Brooklyn College.

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


172nd CCNY Commencement salutes Class of 2018

Some stellar members of CCNY’s Class of 2018. From the top: John Kopyta, Fatimah Barrie Valedictorian Yasmine El Gheur, Etienne Forbes, Claire Lynch, Salutatorian Zhiying Zhu and Kevin Gonzalez.

At age 55, John Kopyta, a soft-spoken 6-foot-four former Marine, can proudly claim another battle. He graduates from The City College of New York on June 1 with a 4.00 GPA, more than 30 years after leaving the University of South Florida as a sophomore and later overcoming homelessness.

Kopyta is one of 3,996 members of City College’s Class of 2018 (1,077 of whom will receive graduate degrees) marching in the institution’s 172nd Commencement Exercises, at 9:30 a.m. on the South Campus Great Lawn, 135th St. and Convent Ave., Manhattan.

His stellar academics have earned him a BA in interdisciplinary arts and science from CCNY’s Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Center for Worker Education (CWE).

“It’s been a great experience. Without CWE it would have been very difficult to go back to school – it’s a great service that City College provides,” said Kopyta.

His degree opens up a pathway to law school, after previous occupations as a C-130 aircraft electrician in the Marines and in construction.

Among the numerous other standouts in CCNY’s Class of 2018 are:

Anita F. Hill, the noted law professor, author and voice for gender and civil rights, is the keynote speaker at CCNY’s commencement. She will receive the honorary degree Doctor of Humane Letters.

City College will also honor two of its distinguished alumni:

  • Seymour L. Moskowitz, ’54ME, co-founder and retired president of CoVant Management Inc., honorary degree Doctor of Science;
  • Harold Abraham Scheraga, ’41, pioneering scientist and George W. and Grace L. Todd Professor Emeritus, Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, honorary degree Doctor of Science (in absentia).

Click here for more CCNY Class of 2018 student success stories.  Click here for more commencement week information.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Photonics Initiative Director Andrea Alù Selected as a Finalist for the 2018 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists: World’s Largest Unrestricted Prizes to Early Career Scientists

Andrea AluAndrea Alù, Einstein Professor of Physics at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (GC/CUNY) and director of the Photonics Initiative at the Advanced Science Research Center at GC/CUNY, has been selected as a finalist for the prestigious Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists.

Announced today, Alù is one of 31 U.S. researchers who will compete for the world’s largest unrestricted prizes for early career scientists. Each year, three Blavatnik National Laureates in the categories of life sciences, chemistry, and physical sciences and engineering are awarded $250,000 each. This year’s national finalists were selected from 286 outstanding faculty-rank researchers nominated by 146 institutions across 42 states (see list with brief summaries of their work below). These institutions comprise the nation’s leading academic and research centers, and each is requested to name their single most promising candidate in one or all of the three categories.

An electrical engineer and physicist by training, Alù is being considered in the Blavatnik Award’s physical science and engineering category for his seminal contributions to the science and technology of metamaterials that mold electromagnetic waves, light and sound in unusual ways. His work has pioneered discoveries in electromagnetic cloaking, nonlinear signal transmission and nanocircuitry.

“I’m humbled and excited to be selected as a finalist along with 10 other scientists for this award,” said Alù. “It’s a very competitive award, and the support it provides helps winning researchers advance their work in critical ways. This kind of opportunity can advance not only a scientist’s career, but also the work to bring life-changing discoveries and advances to humankind.”

“We are thrilled by this recognition of Andrea’s work,” said GC/CUNY Dean of Sciences Joshua Brumberg. “We knew when we recruited him to lead the ASRC’s Photonics Initiative that we were tapping an individual who would help lead the center toward becoming a global hub for interdisciplinary scientific research. The Blavatnik Award nomination highlights that The Graduate Center is on its way to achieving this goal.”

Spearheaded by the Blavatnik Family Foundation and administered by the New York Academy of Sciences, the Blavatnik National Awards recognize both the past accomplishments and the future promise of the most talented scientific and engineering researchers aged 42 years and younger at America’s top academic and research institutions. The three 2018 National Laureates will be announced on June 27, 2018.

“We created the Blavatnik Awards to identify the brightest young minds in science early in their scientific careers,” said Len Blavatnik, founder and chairman of Access Industries, head of the Blavatnik Family Foundation and member of the President’s Council of the New York Academy of Sciences. “These 31 finalists, through their creative, cutting-edge research, have demonstrated great promise for future discoveries of enormous scientific importance.”

Past finalists have gone on to make discoveries that turn science fiction into reality, including creating plants that emit light or detect explosives, formulating new theories of time travel through black holes, bioengineering micro-robots that can swim through arteries and heart valves, gene-editing DNA and RNA sequences to treat previously incurable genetic diseases, and detecting infectious epidemic viruses through a cellphone. Blavatnik Scholars advance the progress of humanity through scientific discovery.

“The 31 national finalists in the U.S. join the Blavatnik Awards community of scholars — a decade’s worth of finalists and laureates who are leading scientific research into the next century,” said Ellis Rubinstein, president and CEO of the New York Academy of Sciences and chair of the Awards’ Scientific Advisory Council. “With continued support and recognition from the Blavatnik Awards, our goal is to launch these pioneering young scientists onto an even higher trajectory of scientific pursuit, giving them a visible platform to attract new collaborators, future grants, investors, and other key resources.”

The Blavatnik Awards, established by the Blavatnik Family Foundation in the United States in 2007, and administered by the New York Academy of Sciences, began by identifying outstanding scientific talent in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The Blavatnik National Awards were inaugurated in 2014 and, in 2018, the awards were expanded to include young scientists in the United Kingdom and Israel.

By the close of 2018, the Blavatnik Awards will have conferred prizes totaling $6.6 million, honoring 271 outstanding young scientists and engineers.

The 2018 Blavatnik national laureates and finalists will be honored at the Blavatnik National Awards on Monday, September 24, 2018, at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Media Contact: Tanya Domi, 212-827-7283, tdomi@gc.cuny.edu; Shawn Rhea, 212-817-7180, srhea@gc.cuny.edu

 

Organizational Attribution

Our correct name is the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York. For the purpose of space, Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY is acceptable. On second reference, ASRC is correct.

About the Advanced Science Research Center

The ASRC at The Graduate Center elevates scientific research and education at CUNY and beyond through initiatives in five distinctive, but increasingly interconnected disciplines: environmental sciences, nanoscience, neuroscience, photonics, and structural biology. The ASRC promotes a collaborative, interdisciplinary research culture with renowned researchers from each of the initiatives working side-by-side in the ASRC’s core facilities, sharing equipment that is among the most advanced available.

About the Blavatnik Family Foundation

The Blavatnik Family Foundation is an active supporter of many leading educational, scientific, cultural, and charitable institutions in the United States, the United Kingdom, Israel, and throughout the world. Recipients of Foundation support include University of Oxford, Harvard University, Yale University, Tel Aviv University, Stanford University, New York University, the New York Academy of Sciences, Tate, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Carnegie Hall, the Royal Opera House, the Hermitage Museum, the Israel Museum, Lincoln Center, Jewish charitable organizations, and countless other philanthropic institutions. The Foundation is headed by Len Blavatnik, a major American and British entrepreneur and philanthropist. Len Blavatnik is the Founder and Chairman of Access Industries, a privately held U.S. industrial group with global strategic interests in natural resources and chemicals, media and telecommunications, venture capital, and real estate.

For more detailed information, please visit: www.accessindustries.com

About the New York Academy of Sciences

The New York Academy of Sciences is an independent, not-for-profit organization that since 1817 has been driving innovative solutions to society’s challenges by advancing scientific research, education, and policy. Throughout its history, the Academy’s Membership has featured thinkers and innovators from all walks of life, including U.S. Presidents Jefferson and Monroe, Thomas Edison, Lord Kelvin, Charles Darwin, Margaret Mead, Louis Pasteur, and over 130 Nobel Laureates. Today, the Academy numbers over 20,000 Members in 100+ countries, with a President’s Council that includes 36 Nobel Laureates and a distinguished Board of Governors comprised of leaders from business, academia, and philanthropy. It is also young and dynamic with nearly 10,000 post-doctoral, post-graduate, undergraduate, and gifted high school student Members. Through collective action, the Academy is partnering with the United Nations to address their Sustainable Development Goals, advising national leaders and organizing public-private partnerships to address the grand challenges of the planet.

Please visit us online at www.nyas.org and follow us on Twitter at @NYASciences

To follow the progress of the Blavatnik Awards, please visit www.blavatnikawards.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter (@BlavatnikAwards).

 

2018 Blavatnik National Finalists in Physical Sciences & Engineering

From predicting and understanding the behavior and make-up of astronomical bodies with astonishing accuracy to using enormous data sets to understand more about the human condition, the 2018 National Finalists in Physical Sciences & Engineering are pushing the boundaries of human knowledge and understanding of the universe around us, both near and far. This year’s Finalists are also rapidly advancing our scientific understanding of unique physical phenomena that exist at the nano- and even atomic scale, helping to create technologies that will revolutionize the telecommunications, opto-electronics, and energy storage industries.

Andrea Alù (City University of New York, Advanced Science Research Center; formerly of University of Texas at Austin) – Electrical engineer and physicist Dr. Alù has made seminal contributions to the theory and engineering of metamaterials and introduced new concepts to create metamaterials that mold electromagnetic waves, light and sound in unusual ways. He has made pioneering discoveries in plasmonic cloaking and invisibility, optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, and in generating nonlinear and nonreciprocal optical responses in metamaterials.

Alexandra Boltasseva (Purdue University) – A physicist and electrical engineer, Dr. Boltasseva’s research approach merges the field of optics with materials engineering and is making possible a new generation of nanophotonic technologies and all-optical devices for telecommunications, sensing, energy and information processing.  Her research in plasmonics – where light is confined to the nanoscale enabling a range of new devices to be developed – has uncovered new tailorable ceramic plasmonic materials, which have improved performance over previously used materials.

Xiangfeng Duan (University of California, Los Angeles) – As a physical chemist, Dr. Duan focuses on the design and synthesis of highly complex nanostructures with controlled chemical composition, structural morphology and physical dimensions. He places particular emphasis on the integration of nanoscale structures with different chemical composition, structure or function, thereby creating a new generation of integrated nanosystems with unprecedented performance or unique functions to break the boundaries of traditional technologies.

Jonathan Fortney (University of California, Santa Cruz) – A planetary scientist, Dr. Fortney’s research challenges our current understanding of the formation, evolution and structure of distant exoplanets and planets in our very own solar system. For instance, his research investigating hot Jupiter-class exoplanet atmospheres has provided strong evidence for the existence of two unique classes of exoplanetary atmospheres on these planets and is shaping our understanding of planetary composition and formation.

Ryan Hayward (University of Massachusetts Amherst) – As a polymer scientist and chemical engineer, Dr. Hayward creates material systems with elastic buckling instabilities that transform their shape, surface morphology and material properties, on demand. He has developed microscale polymeric sheets that self-fold into origami structures and 3D shapes in response to external stimuli such as light and heat. His work also focuses on the assembly of nanoscale materials such as polymer nanowires and polymer-embedded nanoparticles to control macroscale properties.

Sergei V. Kalinin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) – A materials scientist and nanoscientist, Dr. Kalinin creates novel technologies to study and control the functionality of nanomaterials by combining imaging, big data and materials theory. Dr. Kalinin and his collaborators recently challenged a 25-year paradigm by proposing and implementing the atomic forge — a new approach that uses the atomically-focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope to control and direct matter, manipulating single atoms to enable fundamental physical studies and also to develop quantum computing and single spin magnetoelectronic devices.

Jure Leskovec (Stanford University) – Dr. Leskovec is a computer scientist who has revolutionized our understanding of large social and information networks. Using experiments, analysis and modeling, he was first to validate the “six degrees of separation” hypothesis and demonstrated how influence and trust propagate through social networks and shape online communities, viral networking and media bias.

Ying Shirley Meng (University of California, San Diego) – Dr. Meng, a materials scientist and engineer, utilizes computational approaches and unique operando and in-situ experimental approaches to understand, develop and optimize the behavior and operation of electrolyte and electrode materials in batteries to drive better energy storage and conversion performance.  She and her team recently developed a novel type of liquefied gas electrolyte material that allows battery operation at ultra-cold temperatures.

Brian Metzger (Columbia University) – As a theoretical astrophysicist, Dr. Metzger works on a broad range of topics related to the “transient” universe.  In 2010, he predicted the visual flares — termed “kilonova” — that accompany the coalescence of binary neutron stars.  In 2017, the LIGO/Virgo collaboration detected gravitational waves from merging neutron stars for the first time.  The fading light seen following this event agreed remarkably well with Dr. Metzger’s predictions and revealed these mergers as factories of the heaviest elements — like gold — in the Universe.

Anastasia Volovich (Brown University) – Dr. Volovich is a theoretical physicist working in quantum field theory, general relativity and string theory. She has developed extremely efficient methods to evaluate scattering amplitudes, the key quantities that describe scattering of elementary particles, and discovered a remarkable connection between mathematical cluster algebras and scattering amplitudes, sparking an intense new interaction between physics and mathematics.

Gleb Yushin (Georgia Institute of Technology) – A materials scientist and nanoscientist, Dr. Yushin has made multiple transformative contributions to the synthesis of advanced materials for batteries and supercapacitors. Combining innovative nanoscale synthesis approaches with the development of novel analytical techniques, he develops nanostructured and nanocomposite materials with remarkable performance characteristics. He has recently discovered a fundamentally new synthesis mechanism to fabricate oxide nanowires from low-cost powders. His research has applications in next generation electric vehicles and electronic devices.


Meet BCC’s 2018 Non-traditional Valedictorian Alixan Ducreay

Non-traditional students like Alixan Ducreay are a Bronx Community College tradition. A Bronxite for the last 20 years, he came to BCC to earn his first college degree after years of working in banking and information technology and raising a family. The Caribbean-born Mr. Ducreay majored in political science while serving as a senator in the Student Government Association, vice president of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, vice chair of the Inter-Organizational Council, editor of the student newspaper The Communicator and a peer tutor. When not busy with all of that “I am an avid chess player, and I like to think I play a decent piano.” Alixan’s post-BCC plans include graduate studies in political science, with a concentration in urban studies, leading to legal advocacy for housing and human rights. When he addresses the Class of 2018 today, Mr. Ducreay says, “I want to speak for mature, non-traditional students like myself who have to balance work and family, and face doubts about their viability as students. I also wish to dispel the notion that older students are only in school to improve job prospects. The students I talked to and advocated for understand the benefits of a broad liberal arts education in making them better citizens and better humans.”

 


Baruch College Hosting Social Equity Leadership Conference June 12-13

The National Academy of Public Administration sponsored event will explore ways that states and localities can address inequality in the face of fiscal austerity

Baruch College’s Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs will host a two-day Social Equity Leadership Conference on June 12-13 sponsored by the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA). The theme of this year’s conference is “Promoting Equality in an Age of Austerity: The Role for State and Local Governments.”

This year’s annual conference will focus on best practices designed to achieve racial, gender, economic, and other forms of equity in the current climate of reduced federal budgets. The conference will explore ways that states and localities, working through government and alongside nonprofit partners, can feasibly address inequality in the face of persistent fiscal austerity.

“This national conference shares best practices in achieving social equity and highlights outstanding projects developed at the state and local levels from around the nation,” said David Birdsell, PhD, Dean of the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs at Baruch College. “States and localities have long been the crucibles of policy innovation; at this year’s Social Equity Leadership Conference, we aim to make sure that the best, most portable and most scalable solutions get the attention they deserve from government and nonprofit leaders everywhere.”

The Ford Foundation provided $30,000 to help support the conference.

Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein will open the conference with welcoming remarks. Terry Gerton, President, NAPA; Xavier de Souza Briggs, Vice President, The Ford Foundation; and Dean Birdsell will provide additional introductory remarks.

Conference Speakers and Sessions

The Social Equity Leadership Conference will feature the following keynote speakers:

Cristina Jimenez, executive director and co-founder of United We Dream; recently named as one of the most influential people of 2018 by Time. Jimenez holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration from the Marxe School.

Bruce J. Katz, co-founder of New Localism Advisors

Marc H. Morial, president and chief executive officer of the National Urban League

Jeremy Nowak, distinguished visiting fellow from Drexel University

Phillip Thompson, deputy mayor of New York City

Breakout sessions will examine, in detail, best practices gleaned from city and state governments, successful nonprofit organizations focused on human services, and academic research. These sessions will also concentrate on key substantive inequality concerns, such as workers right and workforce development, international migration and human rights, and areas showing promise for other cities and states.

A full list of the speakers and events is available here.

To register for the NAPA Social Equity Leadership conference, visit here.

If you are part of the Baruch community and wish to attend the conference, please contact Angelina.Delgado@baruch.cuny.edu.

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Queens College Honors Three Distinguished Alumni From Diverse Fields at its 94th Commencement

For Thursday, May 31, 9 am

— Graduates Include Marshall Scholar Planning to Study the Role of Dance Therapy in Neuro-Rehabilitation; STEM Student Who Will Pursue an Ivy League Biomechanical Engineering Degree; and an Opera Singer Committed to Helping Others —

WHAT:
The Queens College 94th commencement ceremony with over 2,600 degree candidates in attendance. President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez will preside over an audience that is expected to number more than 10,000, graduates included. Over 6,000 degrees will be awarded  to students graduating in summer and fall ’17, and winter, spring, and summer ’18.

WHO:
Cristina Jiménez Moreta ’07 will deliver the commencement address
and receive an honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. Jiménez Moreta, a 2017 MacArthur “Genius Award” Recipient and one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2018, is the cofounder of United We Dream, the largest Immigrant youth-led network in the country. Read more about Cristina Jiménez Moreta here.

Mattel CEO and philanthropist Jill Barad ’73, who broke the glass ceiling to lead a Fortune 500 company, will also be awarded an honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. Barad is credited with building the Barbie® brand from a $200 million enterprise in 1981 into the most recognized toy brand of all time with sales of $2 billion by the year 2000. Read more about Jill Barad here.

Renowned math educator Alan Schoenfeld ’68, who holds the Elizabeth and Edward Conner Chair in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley, will be given an honorary Doctor of Science degree. Schoenfeld was recognized with the Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education Award in 2013, “the premier acknowledgment of outstanding achievement and success in education research,” and the Klein Medal in 2011, the highest international distinction in mathematics education. Read more about Alan Schoenfeld here.

WHERE:
Campus Quadrangle, Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, NY
Click here for directions to the college, and here for a campus map.
Media Sign-in: Table located to right of the stage when facing it. Pick up press kits and programs here. We will escort you to reserved seating.
Media Parking is Available: You must enter the campus at Gate 2 on Melbourne Avenue and 150th Street no later than 8 am (the Kissena Boulevard gate will be closed). Please bring press ID.

Highlighted Graduates
The student speaker is Marshall Scholar Josephine Cooke. A neuroscience and psychology double major who will graduate summa cum laude, Cooke was selected as one of 43 students nationwide to receive a 2018 Marshall Scholarship from the British government. The highly competitive award will provide for her post-graduate studies at Imperial College London, where she plans to pursue a PhD focusing on how dance therapy can be used to rehabilitate neurological disorders. Upon completing the degree and returning to the United States, Cooke hopes to open a clinic dedicated to arts therapy and neuro-rehabilitation. She is the third student from Queens College to be named a Marshall Scholar. Cooke, a Seattle native, says, “The advisors and mentors I have had while at Queens College have been invaluable in helping me to get to this point, and I’ve gladly come to accept New York and Queens College as a second home.” Read more about Josephine Cooke here.

Brian Small will attend Columbia University—one of two Ivy League institutions to which he was accepted—to study mechanical engineering. He plans to combine his interests in engineering and medicine to pursue a career in creating bionic prosthetics for the handicapped. Small—who was also accepted into the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins, New York University, and the Stevens Institute of Technology—credits the Queens College physics faculty and the guidance he received from his freshman year advisor with helping him attain an internship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Small describes the courses he took with physics lecturer Peter Glass as “rigorous, but fair,” crediting Glass with encouraging “everyone to ask questions both in and out of class…so that I understood and enjoyed the material.” Small, who has been the recipient of several internal awards throughout his college career, is the newest Queens College alum in his family—his brother and several cousins also attended QC.

Joseph Hill, an honors student and opera singer graduating with dual degrees in Classical Performing Arts and Business Management of Performing Arts, is committed to music and helping others. He plans to apply to the doctoral program in Performance Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Hill’s graduation this May is an achievement that was hard-fought and won: After his father’s sudden death and mother’s hospitalization, Hill, who is adopted, assumed co-guardianship at the age of 18 of his eight-year-old brother, who suffers from ADHD. To provide financial support while homeschooling his brother, Hill worked two part-time jobs, one as a cashier and overnight stocker at Walmart. As a Lead Ambassador for the Andrew Goodman Foundation—named after the murdered QC student and civil rights worker—Hill is dedicated to bringing voting awareness to campus. He also has distributed food and toiletries to the homeless during Midnight Runs organized by QC clubs and, since 2016, has performed monthly with other members of the volunteer nonprofit Sing for Hope, visiting hospitals, children’s health facilities, and other sites throughout New York City. He is also active in the CUNY Service Corps and Project Excel, part of the CUNY Black Male Initiative, as a peer mentor and a mentee in subjects such as music and theatre. Says Hill, “I believe we should never limit ourselves. We have only this one life.” Read more about Joseph Hill here.

James Marone, a Marine Corps veteran, is graduating with a major in English and a minor in Business and Liberal Arts. He served as a Data Network Specialist with 2nd Battalion 7th Marines, where he participated in a Marine Expeditionary Unit to Okinawa, Japan, and deployed to Afghanistan. As president of the QC Veterans Club and through the Veterans Affairs work-study program, Marone has been a guiding force in the growing campus veteran community, advocating to improve the quality of resources for veterans and increase their involvement in all aspects of student life, He feels that a highly active and well-networked veteran community can positively impact a veteran’s post-service experience. Marone believes that success in the business sector is rooted in the ability to communicate effectively, and plans to draw on his passion for English to succeed both creatively and professionally.

 

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its eighty years of service to the City and State through its outstanding liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its 19,000+ students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report’s Best College and a Forbes magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


New Alumni Practice Groups Launch at CUNY Law

The first iteration of a new Alumni Engagement initiative united alums working in solo and small firm lawyer for the school’s first Practice Group meeting on May 23, hosted in the co-working space available at 2 Court Square.

 

The Solo/Small Business Practice Group brought together students, experienced alumni in the initial stages of small private practice, and professionals considering a starting down a new path in the name of learning and supporting one another (and enjoying delicious local Mexican food).

From marketing and book keeping to technology, hiring, and maintaining a separation of downtime and ownership of a small business, the group discussed local resources available to small firm start ups and shared information and contacts. A central tension the group is combatting is the desire to be not only financially stable but also successful in the face of lawyering “in the service of human needs” and providing affordable representation; many in the group began their practices to better serve the communities of which they are a part.

Leading the group is alumna Angela Torregoza, (‘12) who recently launched a boutique immigration law practice in Long Island City with fellow alumnus Amir Rasoulpour (‘12).  The Practice Group model is designed to support Torregoza in collecting feedback from the group to determine what topics of most of interest going forward, and will expand to include an on-line discussion group and resource archive. In addition to in-person meetings and workshops, the program will include speaker series and CLE programs. To date, forty alums have connected to advance this Practice Group.

 

If you are interested in starting  or joining a different practice group, contact Alizabeth Newman, head of Alumni Engagement, at newman@law.cuny.edu. If you have questions or would like to join the Solo/Small Business Practice Group , please contact Angela Torregoza at angela@legalease.us.


JOHN JAY STUDENT RESEARCHERS SHINE DURING 2018 RESEARCH AND CREATIVITY WEEK

 John Jay Student Researchers Shine During 2018 Research and Creativity Week

 

This spring, John Jay students presented original research and projects to fellow students, faculty, and the general public as part of the annual Research and Creativity Week. From April 30 to May 4, 355 undergraduate and graduate students from 25 areas of study participated.

Presenters included students in the Honors Program, the Program for Research Initiatives in Science and Math(PRISM), Macaulay Honors College, the McNair Scholars Program, and Student Academic Success Programs(SASP), as well as students completing their capstone courses in the Criminal Justice and International Criminal Justice majorsAlso included were the departments of Public Management, Psychology, and English. A total of 163 faculty members served as mentors for student projects.

Bettina Muenster, Assistant Director of the Office for Student Research & Creativity, helps organize Research and Creativity Week. As always, she was impressed by the students who participated. “This year’s Research & Creativity Week has once again been an enormous success and demonstrated the indisputable power of intense student-faculty research collaborations,” said Muenster.

 

Ashley Gonzalez
Student Ashley Gonzalez presents her International Criminal Justice capstone research on discrimination in the Dominican Republic to onlookers

 

This year’s projects were diverse in topic and form. While Karen Argueta presented a storytelling podcast she helps produce at John Jay, Joseph Mahmud presented an app that he and students Steven Pacheco and Donauta Watson-Starcevic created to help formerly incarcerated individuals find jobs. For their innovative app, Mahmud and his team were recently named the winners of the Echoing Green Social Impact Challenge.

 

Joseph Mahmud and Steven Pacheo presenting their app CONNECTr
 Joseph Mahmud (left) and Steven Pacheco (right) presenting on their app, CONNECTr, which aims to help formerly incarcerated people find jobs

 

On May 3, Dr. Guillermo Linares, Acting President of the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation, visited the Honors Program poster session. The posted session showcased Honors students’ scholarship and creativity across various disciplines. Dr. Linares, who oversees financial aid for higher education in New York State, was able to witness some of the unique and remarkable research conducted by John Jay students.

 

Bryant Silva

Honors student Bryant Silva presents his criminal justice research to Dr. Guillermo Linares

 

PRISM students also showcased their research presentations in forensic science, toxicology, cell and molecular biology, chemistry, environmental science, and computer science. Lisset Duran, who has conducted award-winning research on the genetics of breast cancer and who will be attending Princeton as a Ph.D. candidate this fall, presented her findings at the PRISM symposium as this year’s Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher.

 

Lisset Duran, Dr. Guillermo Linares and Dr. Nathan Lents
(from left to right) Student Lisset Duran; President of the NYS Higher Education Services Corporation Dr. Guillermo Linares; and Director of Honors Program Dr. Nathan Lents

 

On May 4, to conclude the weeklong fair, students were given awards for top ePortfolios. EPortfolios are student digital archives that document learning and spotlight achievements in and out of the classroom. You can view the list of award-winning portfolios here.

 

Selina Li and Daniel Auld
EPortfolio award winner Selina Li (left) with Director of Student Learning Dr. Daniel Auld (right)

 

By the end of the week, John Jay scholars who presented, many of whom are graduating this May, walked away with a sense of accomplishment. “Students were visibly beaming with excitement and energy,” said Muenster. “They eagerly shared their work, passions, and future aspirations as emerging scholars.”

 

View more photos from Research and Creativity Week here.


JOHN JAY IS USING INNOVATIVE DATA PROJECT TO HELP BOOST GRADUATION RATES

John Jay is Using Innovative Data Project to Help Boost Graduation Rates

 

In partnership with DataKind, a non-profit committed to helping social justice leaders use data to increase their impact, John Jay College is taking an innovative approach to improving student graduation rates through the use of data and analytics.

Using 10 years of historical student data, the project, which was sponsored by the MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth and supported by the Robin Hood Foundation, aims to help John Jay advisors identify students who are at risk of dropping out or taking over four years to graduate. The hope is that this data can help advisors prioritize intervention services for students at risk of not finishing their degrees.

Dara Byrne

Dara N. Byrne, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Retention and Dean of Undergraduate Studies

Across the country, college graduation rates are disproportionately low among low-income students. Dara N. Byrne, Associate Provost for Undergraduate Retention and Dean of Undergraduate Studies, believes that Datakind’s research will be invaluable to supporting John Jay students, especially those from low-income backgrounds. “The lower the income, the more likely you are to be impacted by that burden of how to afford all aspects of college,” Byrne says. “The tool is allowing us to see trends and patterns and help us to rethink our approaches earlier.”

In an exploratory analysis of the 10-year data, the Datakind team was able to find which factors are associated with a student’s decision to leave school before finishing their degree. The team also created two sets of models designed to predict the likelihood that a student would graduate within four semesters after completing 90+ credits of coursework, once they are already in their late junior or senior year. The models predicted within a 70 to 90 percent accuracy whether students would graduate.

“The more we engage with the opportunities and data skills that were provided by this project, the more it allows us to do more with our students around academic skills and job preparedness,” says Byrne. “I am very hopeful about what this will mean in terms of preparing young people for the future.”

Read more about the project here.


Renowned Legal and Business Expert Barry A. Bryer to Receive Queens College President’s Medal at the College’s Baccalaureate Convocation, May 29

— Alumnus Bryer Has Been Widely Recognized for Decades as a Leading Mergers and Acquisitions Lawyer and Expert on Corporate Governance 

May 29, 2018 (Queens, NY) – The Queens College President’s Medal—the college’s highest administrative honor—will be awarded at the college’s baccalaureate convocation on May 29 to distinguished alumnus Barry A. Bryer, a corporate securities lawyer and renowned expert on mergers and acquisitions. The ceremony will take place at 7 pm in the college’s Colden Auditorium.

“A prominent figure in business and legal circles, Barry A. Bryer has nonetheless found time to give back to his alma mater for 30 years as a member of the Queens College Foundation Board of Trustees,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “But during this time of the #MeToo Movement, it is also with pride that we acknowledge his service as a member of the Legal Advisory Council of Sanctuary for Families, the leading service provider and advocate for survivors of domestic violence, sex trafficking, and related forms of gender violence.”

A 1969 cum laude graduate with a B.A. in Political Science, Bryer went on to receive his J.D. degree from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1972. He was on the editorial board of the Virginia Law Review and was elected to The Order of the Coif, the national honor society for law school graduates.

Combining his interest in securities markets and his legal acumen, Bryer embarked on a career as a corporate and securities lawyer focused primarily on mergers and acquisitions. A partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz for 25 years, and thereafter a partner at Latham & Watkins LLP until his retirement in 2015, Bryer was recognized as a leading mergers and acquisitions lawyer and corporate governance expert by such publications as the Chambers USA Legal Guide, the Legal Media Group’s Guide to the World’s Leading M&A Lawyers, and the IFLR 1000 Guide. He was a featured “Dealmaker” in the American Lawyer.

Bryer published numerous articles and lectured on structuring leveraged buyouts, the duties of corporate directors in takeovers, corporate governance matters, and representing special board committees in conflict transactions and internal investigations. He was particularly active in representing technology and pharmaceutical companies.

Besides being Chair of the Board and Executive Committee of the Queens College Foundation Board of Trustees and a member of the Legal Advisory Council of Sanctuary for Families, Bryer has served on the Ramaz School Board of Trustees; the Park Avenue Synagogue Board of Trustees, where he continues as an Honorary Trustee; and the University of Virginia School of Law Alumni Council.

A member of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, Bryer has served on the Corporation Law Committee and on the Special Committee on Mergers, Acquisitions and Corporate Control Contests. He is also a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its eighty years of service to the City and State through its outstanding liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its 19,000+ students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report’s Best College and a Forbes magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


MORE THAN 3,700 STUDENTS GRADUATE FROM JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 2018

More than 3,700 Students Graduate from John Jay College  of Criminal Justice on Wednesday, May 30, 2018

 

Champion of Women’s Rights Rashida Manjoo and Pioneering Criminologist Ronald V. Clarke to Receive Honorary Degrees and Address the Graduating Class

WHAT:

Led by President Karol V. Mason, who will preside over the ceremonies for the first time, students, alumni, faculty and guests will gather at Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing, N.Y., for John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s 53rd Commencement exercises. In keeping with the national trend, the 3,700+ graduates in the Class of 2018 – John Jay’s largest graduating class ever – are 58 percent female.

The College will award 3,110 bachelor’s degrees and 607 master’s degrees. The class includes 178 military veterans. Students range in age from 19 to 74, with six pairs of siblings and two sets of twins.

This year, eleven students enrolled in the College’s Accelerate, Complete and Engage (ACE) program as freshmen three years ago will graduate earlier than expected and will enter the fields of law, healthcare, and public service. ACE is a comprehensive program designed to dramatically raise graduation rates and help young people reach their full potential.

This year’s morning ceremony will also feature the first graduate of the Prison to College Pipeline (P2CP) Program.

View snapshots of a few members of the Class of 2018.

WHO:

Speakers will include the following honorary degree recipients.

Ronald V. Clarke, one of the most important figures in criminal justice research, has helped to transform the study of criminology. His work has reshaped crime prevention strategies worldwide to focus on changing the characteristics of the situations in which crimes occur. Over the past 25 years, this concept has help lead to significant crime reduction in New York City, the United States and other nations. Clarke is a University Professor at the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice and the associate director of the Center for Problem-Oriented Policing. In 2015, he was awarded the prestigious Stockholm Prize in Criminology. He will be awarded a Doctor of Science degree.

Rashida Manjoo is an international human rights advocate who has worked to establish women’s rights as human rights. As the United Nations Special She Rapporteur on Violence Against Women from 2009 to 2015, she was a trailblazer in the fight for a binding global treaty to recognize extreme domestic violence against women as human rights violations. Manjoo was also an anti-Apartheid activist and women’s liberation campaigner in South Africa. She also served as the former Parliamentary Commissioner of the Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) of South Africa. She is currently the co-convenor of the Human Rights Program within the Law Faculty at the University of Cape Town She will be awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters degree.

VALEDICTORIAN:

Veronika Lizarv is a Forensic Psychology major from Brooklyn, NY, with a 4.0 GPA. Her twin sister graduated last year with a John Jay degree in Forensic Psychology, and her mother has a master’s degree in Forensic Psychology, so Lizarov actually attributes much of her academic success to her family, as well as her caring professors.

 

WHEN: 

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

  • Morning Ceremony begins at 10:30 AM 
    Ronald V. Clarke will address graduates.
  • Afternoon Ceremony begins at 3:30 PM
    Rashida Manjoo will address graduates.
WHERE:

Arthur Ashe Stadium, 124-02 Roosevelt Avenue, Flushing, N.Y.


CUNY Law’s INRC and the NYCI Publish New Report on Policing and Surveilling Latinx Communities

 

On May 18, CUNY Law faculty members Nermeen Arastu and Talia Peleg, of our Immigrant and Non-Citizen Rights Clinic (INRC), and Babe Howell, expert in criminal law and gang policing and surveillance, partnered with the the New York Immigration Coalition (NYIC) to release a new reportSwept Up in the Sweep: The Impact of Gang Allegations on Immigrant New Yorkers.

 

The report examines how the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) are using over-broad gang allegations to deport and detain Latinx communities across New York State.  Through an extensive field study, the report details the Trump administration’s use of supposed-gang enforcement to carry out punitive immigration policies and shows how Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), with other federal agencies and law enforcement, uses arbitrary methods to profile immigrant youth of color to allege gang affiliation. As a result, immigrant youth are detained for prolonged periods, have had their visa applications denied, and have faced deportation without proper due process.

“Gang databases are purely based on stereotypes. Gang databases do not require any criminal background or even proof of gang membership, instead include being seen with neighbors, friends or families; observed in local bodegas or restaurants or parks; and social media and video content. There are no notices and checks to assure accuracy of these databases. Relying on these gang databases for immigration or detention decisions violates due process, equal protection, and adherence to fact-based decision making.” – Babe Howell, professor at CUNY School of Law, as quoted in the official press release

 

CUNY Law’s INRC has long represented immigrant populations that have been wrongly characterized as national security threats or criminals to justify their deportation. Many of the INRC’s existing clients have been caught in a web of over-broad post-9/11 security measures. Within the context of the clinic’s work, advocates have seen individuals deported or denied benefits because they attended a certain mosque, dressed in a certain way, were seen in bodegas or community parks in surveilled low-income communities, or engaged in legitimate, non-violent political activism.

“For over a decade, we have seen the shattering impact of the government’s post-9/11 ‘anti-terrorism’ policies, which has labelled immigrants as ‘national security threats’ based on nothing more than their nationality, ethnicity, or religion. These policies have clear devastating impacts: indefinite detention, permanent banishment, distrust, trampled civil liberties, and the absence of enhanced safety.” – Talia Peleg, Visiting Clinical Law Professor in the Immigrant and Non-Citizen Rights Clinic at the CUNY School of Law, as quoted in the official press release

 

“Our research shows that little so-called ‘proof’ such as the color of one’s clothes, the bodega where they bought their lunch, or the shape of a tattoo can be used by the U.S. government to justify a gang allegation and deport aspiring Americans. By carelessly painting large swaths of New York’s Latinx immigrants as gang members, the U.S. government has again used threats and fear as justification for the erosion of the constitutional and civil rights of communities of color.” – Nermeen Arastu, Clinical Professor & Co-Director of the Immigrant and Non-Citizen Rights Clinic at the CUNY School of Law, as quoted in the official press release

 

  The shared goal of the INRC and NYIC is to help policymakers, community members, and practitioners see the broader patterns of discriminatory profiling and surveilling and prevent past mistakes. The findings of the report are based on a survey of over 40 practitioners and advocates who represent immigrant communities around New York State.

We are proud to highlight the work of many of CUNY Law’s recently graduated INRC students (listed as researchers, editors or contributors on page 2 & 4 of the report) completed the extensive research, editing, drafting and most importantly, brainstorming, that led to the completion of this report. The INRC faculty note that they were continually impressed and grateful for their creativity, relentless focus on impacted voices, and commitment to this project despite their heavy litigation docket.  CUNY Law’s Creating Law Enforcement Accountability & Responsibility Project (CLEAR Project) contributed relevant perspective on discriminatory policing and immigration enforcement in New York’s Muslim communities.

 

The report is available at www.nyic.org/sweptup 


RON MOELIS FELLOWS WIN ECHOING GREEN SOCIAL INNOVATION CHALLENGE

Ron Moelis Fellows Win Echoing Green Social Innovation Challenge

 

The Ron Moelis Social Innovation Fellowship was created to help John Jay students pursue business endeavors and opportunities that are socially responsible. That’s why Joseph Mahmud, Steven Pacheco and Donauta Watson-Starcevic, three inaugural Ron Moelis Social Innovation Fellows, started creating CONNECTr, a mobile app that will help people with criminal records find employers open to hiring them.

The Moelis Fellowship was created by the generous support of Ron Moelis, John Jay College Foundation Trustee and co-founder, CEO and Chairman of L+M Development Partners Inc., a leader in developing affordable, mixed-income and market-rate housing. When he established the Fellowship, Moelis said: “I wanted to work with the College to create an opportunity for students who maybe hadn’t really considered a career in business, and show them that there are ways to foster what I call ‘the double bottom line’ – doing well while doing good.”

 

“I saw the necessity of creating CONNECTr based on my experience of being released from prison with little to no support.” Steven Pacheco

 

Professor Heath Brown, who directed the fellowship, was contacted by Echoing Green, requesting student proposals for The Future of Work Social Innovation Challenge, sponsored by Echoing Green, Barclays and Smart Cities New York. “Echoing Green is a global leader in social innovation, and I knew these students would thrive in the competition,” says Brown. “Joseph, Steven and Donauta completed a small business plan at the same time that they were finishing their spring academic semester, running for student government and preparing for graduation.”

Their hard work paid off. The CONNECTr team won the Echoing Green Social Impact Challenge with their plan to create a mobile job app that helps formerly incarcerated individuals find employment. “The competition was intense,” says Pacheco, John Jay’s next Student Council President. “However, it was surprisingly thoughtful in regards to networking and bonding.”

His teammate, Mahmud, who’s worked with the Prisoner Reentry Institute (PRI) as a Pinkerton Fellow at The Legal Aid Society, agrees. “We networked with people we would never have crossed paths with in any other setting, finalists from elite institutions like Columbia University, NYU, Penn and MIT,” says Mahmud. “None of us had a business or technology background, but we strongly believed in our idea. The adrenaline was unreal during the competition round, and we came out victorious.”

Watson-Starcevic, an English major, was struck by the supportive atmosphere amongst the competitors. During lunchtime the participants all sat together and shared the visions behind their innovations. “There was this really powerful moment when a young man blurted out, ‘Wow, it really doesn’t matter which one of us wins.’ He was right. We were all committed to social good being done,” says Watson-Starcevic.

To learn more about the CONNECTr app, and the visionaries behind it, we talked to the team and their advisor, Professor Heath Brown.

Q:  What made you so passionate about creating this app?

SP: I saw the necessity of creating CONNECTr based on my experience of being released from prison with little to no support. Society’s overall impression of you as a formerly incarcerated person is that you are no longer worthy of your humanity, and this worldview impacts every aspect of your life.

DWS: I am not an American citizen. I grew up undocumented. So I understand the hopelessness associated with a lack of opportunity in a place called home. The concept behind CONNECTr stems from an overwhelming desire to be of service to a demographic that’s been systematically locked out of opportunities.

 

The app will give hope to people within the justice system, letting them know that there are socially conscious companies out there open to hiring them.” Joseph Mahmud

 

Q: What ripple effect do you hope this app will create?

JM: I want to see our app break cultural and biased views of justice-affected individuals on a macro level. The app will give hope to people within the justice system, letting them know that there are socially conscious companies out there open to hiring them.

DWS: At the moment there’s a real struggle in American industries around diversity and inclusion. During the Ron Moelis Social Innovation Fellowship, we had the chance to visit companies and hear about their need for candidates from diverse backgrounds. Joseph tapped into that information and formed a large group of organizations ready and willing to support what we are doing with this app.

Q: What would help you take the app to the next level?

SP: An investment valued at $200,000 would allow us to do wonders in a short period of time, three to six months to be specific. Aside from all of the business and operational logistics, we greatly need an app developer and a graphic designer to help us materialize this concept as soon as possible.

DWS: We’re looking for partnerships, advisers, and additional support from employers willing to sign on to our vision. Of course, more capital would help fund the design and marketing strategy behind the app.

Q: Professor Brown, what are you most proud of most about this team?

HB: I’m most proud of how they combined their various backgrounds. Donauta has a background in writing and the arts. Steven has a background in music and student government. And Joseph has a background in public administration and has worked at several legal advocacy organizations. Innovation demands combining perspectives and learning from diverse insights. This is what every team of John Jay students brings to their collective work. It’s up to us as an institution to make these opportunities happen, where they can collaborate so productively. The sky is the limit on what Bloodhounds can do.


Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of May 28, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

I am hoping you are having a wonderful three-day weekend.

Thank you once again to all of the families who were able to join last week’s K-12 Curriculum Showcase, a night of celebrating our students’ intellectual achievements as scientists, thinkers, writers and creators across the disciplines.

This week, on Wednesday evening, we will be hosting our evening Orientation for next year’s incoming students in Grades 6 and Grade 9, 5:15pm. Please join us if your child will be entering NEST+m’s Middle Grades or Upper Grades next year.

Upper Grades students will resume their normal lunch procedures on Tuesday May 29th: students with signed parental permission to leave our campus during lunch may do so.

Important Dates:

  • Tuesday, May 29th: The 4th Grade Science Performance Task
  • Wednesday May 30th: Regents Exam Tickets will be distributed to students taking Regents exams
  • Friday June 1st and Saturday June 2nd: Lower Grades After-School Musical, Shrek
  • Tuesday June 5th: Regents Exam, Global History & Geography. Only Upper Grades students taking tests will be on site.
  • 6th Grade Theatre Plays:
    • Wednesday, June 6th, Classes 6D, CC, + 6A, 5:30pm -7:00pm
    • Friday, June 8th, Classes 6B + 6E, 5:30pm -7:00pm
  • Thursday June 7th: Anniversary Day: No Students on Site
  • Monday June 11th: K-8 clerical day. Only Upper Grades Students on site. Last day of instruction prior to Regents Week for Upper Grades Students.
  • June 12th: Regents Week begins. Please see the New York State Regents Exam Schedule here: Upper Grades students only report to school for the exams they are taking. 8th graders who are enrolled in Regents courses (Math, Science, Social Studies) only report to school for the exams they are taking. Students are expected to use their additional time for studying.
  • Friday June 15th: All NYC DOE Schools closed, Eid al-Fitr

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication,

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

Student Opportunities

Summer Journalism at NYU
Visit our website, Summer Journalism at NYU, to find out more about us and be sure to connect with us on facebook! Like our page to interact with current and prospective students, ask questions, and to keep up with the latest news about Summer Journalism.

If you don’t find answers to your questions here, email us at: journalism.summer@nyu.edu

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Putney School Summer Arts Program, July 15- August 3
In this three-week dynamic workshop, students will collaborate to create in response to urgent social, political, or environmental issues of our era. APPLY HERE

Manhattan Youth Downtown Day Camp in Tribeca is Now Interviewing 17 and 18 year olds!
Apply to be a Camp Counselor! Applications available via email at: gabi@manhattanyouth.org

Business, Entrepreneurship and Leadership Programs
Summer Discovery  offers high school students ages 14-18 the opportunity to make the most of their summer with hands-on learning in a variety of business related courses. It’s not too late to attend one of the world’s most prestigious universities this summer. Prepare for the transition from high school to college. Experience living on a college campus and learn to balance business related course work and fun. MORE INFO

STEM Summer in the City, a free, five week for current 2nd – 10th graders that is engaging and a fun summer program designed around STEM – science, technology, engineering and math.  MORE INFORMATION

The MFSC (Manhattan Field Support College Expo) is on Friday, May 11th 10am to 2pm.
The MFSC college expo offers to juniors and all transfer school students exposure to over 50 colleges and universities, including technical programs. This Expo focuses on college and career readiness as students and counselors ask questions and learn about individual opportunities at institutions of higher education.
More info HERE; Register HERE

Summer Shakespeare
Summer Shakespeare is a five-week theater acting program for students who receive free or reduced lunch. Prior experience with Shakespeare is not required.
For more information CLICK HERE.

Summer Journalism at NYU
Visit our website, Summer Journalism at NYU, to find out more about us and be sure to connect with us on Facebook! Like our page to interact with current and prospective students, ask questions, and to keep up with the latest news about Summer Journalism. Questions? Email journalism.summer@nyu.edu

Marist College Summer Pre-College
There are still spots available in Marist’s Summer 2018 Pre-College Programs!
What is Marist Summer Pre-College?

  • An academic program offered to rising high school juniors and seniors
  • 16 different courses offered on our New York campus
  • Choose 2 or 4 week options
  • Students will earn 3 to 6 transferable college credits
  • Students can get a head start on college and benefit from the following:
  • Experience residential life on a college campus
  • Meet like-minded students from around the world
  • Work in a small classroom environment led by Marist faculty
  • Have your interested students apply today to secure their spot in the 2018 Marist Summer Pre-College Program!

For more information, including a list of programs, visit: www.marist.edu/precollege

3T Summer Style Workshop
Naked Angels Theater Company’s (nakedangels.com) 6th annual free 3T Summer Style workshop will take place July 9-19th.  There will be an intro to filmmaking week and a week of writing for the theater.  Professional actors will be acting in the student writers’ work.  It is fast, fun, free, and freeing!  Please email 3T@nakedangels.com for more info and an application.  First come, first accepted!  Click here for more information.

NY Center for Children
The New York Center for Children is a non-for-profit, child-friendly center, providing free, comprehensive evaluation and therapy services to victims of child abuse and their families. We are currently accepting referrals for a 10-12 week support group beginning mid-March for adolescent female’s (ages 14-16) who have experienced sexual abuse. Participants must attend an intake appointment prior to beginning group and commit to attending every session. Please note that our services are completely free and confidential.
Attached is our flyer with more information about the group. For further information, please contact Leah Mansback at (212) 517-3012 ext 34.

Here are a variety of summer job listings:

Camp Cardiac and Camp Neuro
Scholarship and standard applications have just opened up for Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro 2018!
Run by medical students in over 30 cities nationwide with locations in Manhattan and Westchester County, Camp Cardiac & Camp Neuro are 1-week summer day camps for high school students interested in exploring careers in medicine. Students may learn more and apply by visiting http://www.campcardiac.org and http://www.campneuro.org.

In addition, you may download PDF flyers by clicking on the following links:
Camp Cardiac 2018 Flyer
Camp Neuro 2018 Flyer

Duke University Summer Session
Improve your college application and go to college while still in high school!
At Duke Summer Session, we are committed to providing high school students with the opportunity to be a college student over the summer at one of the world’s premier universities.  By attending our Summer College program, you will not only have the authentic college experience of living in Duke University’s dorms and taking credit-bearing classes alongside undergraduate students, but also the opportunity to accompany your college application with a letter of recommendation from a Duke instructor and transcript from Duke University – two substantive indicators that you have what it takes to thrive in an elite academic setting. Courses fill up quickly, so apply online today: Application for US Students

YMCA – Teen Summer Paid Internships
The Center for Architecture’s Summer Programs give curious kids an opportunity to dive into an architecture topic of interest and test out their own design ideas. Each program explores a different theme through art and building activities, design challenges, and special site visits. Summer Programs run five days (Monday-Friday), 9:00am-4:00pm at the Center for Architecture. A limited number of need-based scholarships are available.
2 weeks of professional development training (sessions are facilitated by industry professionals from Colgate, Univision, Uber, Memorial Sloan, HBO etc)
6 weeks at internship (participants are placed in their industry of choice*)
Each participant is paired to a mentor for the duration of the program
Participants receive 2 monthly metrocards + $300 clothing stipend + $1500 “working” stipend
Visit: www.teencareerconnection.org

The Woodland Ecology Research Mentorship (WERM) is open to current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. This 14-month program provides a unique opportunity to work with local ecologists and participate in ecological research projects. WERM students learn content and develop basic research skills during their first summer through hands-on projects and coursework.  After building on their skills at weekend workshops during the academic year, students embark on a final research project under the guidance of a science mentor for their second summer. The application deadline for this program is April 1st, 2018. For more information and the online application please go to http://www.wavehill.org/education/woodland-ecology-research-mentorship/

We have Scholarships for students for our Summer Programs in New York!!
We are glad to offer students a special 40% scholarship and discount (tuition is then $1,490 instead of $2,450) on our Summer 3-Week Summer Program “Discover New York Business and Finance”, which combines top level courses, company and financial institutions visits and guests speakers lectures.
Click here for MORE INFO HEREBROCHURE 3-Week Program.

August Writers’ Workshop
The School of The New York Times is excited to announce our new end-of-summer August Writers’ Workshop for rising middle and high school students (grades 7-12) of all writing abilities on August 13–17 in New York City. This week-long program helps students enhance their writing skills under the tutelage of some of the best writers in the world. Students will emerge with strengthened communication skills, confidence in their writing and a profound sense of the power of the written word and visual communication—all right before school starts! The August Writers’ Workshop is the perfect way to kick off the academic year and occurs right after our NYC Summer Academy.

Workshop Quick Facts
Date: August 13–17, 2018
Grade Eligibility: Rising 7-12
Click here for more information.
Click here to register.

Summer 2018 College Credit Courses at Baruch College
Current 10th and 11th graders can apply to enroll in one of the following college credit bearing courses for FREE:
Business Fundamentals – BUS 1011 (3 Credits)
Journalistic Writing – JRN 3050 (4 credits)
Cultural Anthropology – ANT 1001 (3 credits)
Critical Health Issues – HED 1911 (3 credits)
Program Details:
All courses will take place at Baruch College from July 5th – August 16th
Courses will be from Monday through Thursday from 9am – 2pm
Eligibility:
Be a current NYC public high school 10th or 11th grader
Have the following test scores: PSAT/SAT Verbal (Min. 480) OR English Language Arts Regents (Min. 75), OR  ACT English Score (Min. 20),  OR  Overall 80+ English average
Online Application: www.baruch.cuny.edu/collegenow. Deadline for application and ALL supporting documents: April 13th, 2018

Rutgers School of Engineering
Rutgers University–New Brunswick is excited to announce an opportunity for students interested in engineering. The Rutgers School of Engineering is offering the chance for students to participate in a new Pre-Engineering Summer Academy to develop their knowledge and skills through real-world field experiences.

This intensive one-week certificate program will introduce students to a variety of engineering areas including: Aerospace, Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Forensic, Mechanical.

Eligible students must be between the ages of 16-18, must have completed courses in precalculus and physics, and must submit an online application.

Interested in learning more? Attend an online information session or visit Pre-Engineering Summer Academy. Contact: cpreston@admissions.rutgers.edu.

George Washington Pre-College
GW Pre-College offers credit and non-credit programs for motivated high school students to study in Washington, D.C. Our programs are exciting and intensive, offering a transformative introduction to college life! Please click here for more information. Please click here to apply.

Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program
Our FREE 7-week summer program teaches 10th–11th grade girls the computer science skills they need to make an impact in their community and be competitive in the job market of the future. No past experience with coding is required to apply and take part in the Summer Immersion Program. Summer stipends are also available to cover transportation and living expenses for those who qualify.

Click here for more details on the Summer Immersion Program. Applications open in early January!

Spring Test Prep by Atlas 
Study Skills Seminar (FREE) – 4/21, 10am-12pm – Register Here
June 2 SAT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
June ACT Prep Starts 4/21 – Enroll Here
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 4/28 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 5/19 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Hybrid Exam (FREE) – 6/2 – Register Here (Class of 2020)
Finding Your Right Path Seminar (FREE) – 6/16, 10am-12pm – Register Here
Common App & Essay Workshop – 8/14 & 8/16, 6-9pm – Enroll Here
– Making College Affordable Seminar (FREE) – 9/8, 10am-12pm – Register Here

School of NY Times NYC Summer Academy 2018
Applications for NYC Summer Academy 2018 are now open.

The skills taught at The School of The New York Times are core to being a participant in a global community of thinkers. While we know not all of our students want to become journalists someday, the writing, critical thinking, visual storytelling and persuasive communication skills taught during Summer Academy can help guide students’ academic and professional paths.

This year, we are pleased to announce the return of our most beloved courses from past summers and introduce an exciting lineup of new offerings. As always, we’ll turn New York City into our classroom and invite students to immerse themselves in the iconic neighborhoods, people and culture of this great city.

Click here to view the 2018 Course Catalog


Shaun King, Activist and Journalist, To Keynote 2018 LaGuardia Community College Commencement

Shaun King, Activist and Journalist, To Keynote 2018 LaGuardia Community College Commencement

More than 2,000 Expected to Receive their Associate’s Degrees

***9am, June 5th @ Barclays Center***

Shaun King, Activist and Journalist, To Keynote 2018 LaGuardia Community College Commencement
Shaun King, a Black Lives Matter advocate, eminent writer, journalist, and humanitarian will give the keynote address at LaGuardia Community College’s 46th Commencement on June 5, 2018 at Barclays Center.

Shaun King gained attention for his activism involving police cruelty and justice. He has led a number of social media campaigns in movements for social justice. He has described how seeing video of Eric Garner’s death on YouTube as the “breaking point” which motivated him to begin speaking out publicly against police brutality and advocating for the Black Lives Matter movement. He worked for the New York Daily News as senior justice writer from 2015 to 2017, and is currently a columnist for The Intercept and writer-in-residence at the Harvard University-based Fair Punishment Project. He is also the political commentator for the legendary Tom Joyner Morning Show. In 2017, he received the Samuel Peabody Award for Journalism from the Citizen’s Committee for Children in New York — an award given annually to one journalist who uses their platform and position to improve the lives of children.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr., a 1998 graduate of LaGuardia Community College, will give the alumni speech.

The Commencement will be led by LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. For more information about LaGuardia’s 46thAnnual Commencement, visit: http://www.laguardia.edu/Commencement/

WHO: Members of LaGuardia’s Class

  • 2,000 graduating students who’ll receive their associate’s degrees from LaGuardia Community College, and their friends and families
  • LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow, and additional College leadership, faculty and staff
  • Keynote Speaker: Shaun King, writer, activist, journalist, humanitarian, and a prominent voice within the Black Lives Matter movement
  • Class of 2018 Speaker: Karina Ramos-Caraballo

WHAT: LaGuardia Community College’s 46th Commencement

WHEN: Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 9am ET

Press Call: 8am ET. Reporters should enter via the Calvin Klein VIP Entrance of Barclays Center. It’s the Entrance on Northwest corner of arena on Atlantic Avenue by Ft. Greene Place across Old Navy, Marshall’s and Burlington Coat Factory. Reporters will be asked to check-in at one of the two stationary podiums in the entrance to receive a press badge allowing them to access the media section, and a press packet.

WHERE: Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, 11217

To attend the 2018 LaGuardia Community College Commencement, credentialed members of the media are asked to RSVP by replying to this email or calling (718) 482-6131 or (718) 482-5060 by Monday, June 4th, 5pm ET.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College, located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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In the Balance: Edwina Richardson-Mendelson

The Honorable Edwina Richardson-Mendelson is Class of ’88 alumna celebrated for her commitment to Family Law and Criminal Justice. Currently a Judge of the Court of Claims, as well as a state-wide Deputy Chief Administrative Judge for Justice Initiatives, she also presides over the New York County Supreme Court Criminal Term Youth Part. Read on for why starting her day at 4AM is vital to her success, how she seeks progress and not perfection, and why her legal degree wasn’t the finish line but a mile-marker in her marathon. In this spotlight, she shares how she gets it done.

 

 

 

 

On her typical morning

My workday mornings begin at 4 a.m. when I awake.  I work very, very hard, but I like to say that I play hard as well, so I am a fan of self-care and wellness.  For me, self-care is rising early enough to do all that I want to and like to do before my work day begins.  That includes mediation, spiritual devotion time, exercise and a really nice cup of coffee.   I leave home for work at 6 a.m. and my work day often ends late at night.  Even with self care to fortify me, there is always far more work for me to do than time in which to accomplish things.  I aspire to a season of less stress and the possibility of fewer than the hundreds of emails I currently have waiting to be addressed in my inbox.  I remind myself each morning that I seek progress and NOT perfection, and try to do what is mine to do that day.

 

On keeping Justice top of mind

 It’s easy to keep Justice front and center in my day-to-day life and in my larger career narrative.  I lead our state court system’s Office for JUSTICE Initiatives as Deputy Chief Administrative Judge for JUSTICE Initiatives!  In addition to spearheading programs involving child welfare and juvenile justice, including implementation of the new law raising the age of criminal responsibility in N.Y.S., I also lead the state court system’s Access to JUSTICE Program.  Our mandate is to ensure meaningful access to justice for those passing through the doors of every New York State housing court, civil court, criminal court and family court—regardless of income, background or special need.

 

On her education and life-long learning 

I was fortunate to have the opportunity to receive a fantastic legal education that actually began at the college level – in the Urban Legal Studies (ULS) Program of City College (CCNY), where Haywood Burns was my Dean.  ULS was a 6-year BA/JD program where my first year at CUNY Law School also served as my final year of College.  From the very start in the ULS program, my education was focused on law and law-related courses, which served me very well.  However, by the time I graduated from CUNY Law School, I was well-educated on the law and felt less than capable in other areas.  My reason for pursuing other advanced degrees was to broaden my knowledge base lens beyond law, while also having my studies relate to my work in law.  While pursuing my Masters and Ph.D. in Criminal Justice, I was able to take courses in English, Sociology and Psychology.  It was fun and helpful to me in my work as a Family Court practitioner.  I was also able to supplement my education and income by teaching undergraduates as an Adjunct Professor at John Jay College where I was pursuing my advanced degrees.  I must admit that I loved school and being a student, so continuing my education while practicing law as a newer attorney worked in my favor.  Also, after taking the LSAT to enter Law School and the bar exam to enter the legal profession, preparing for the GRE graduate school entry exam wasn’t as daunting a task as it would have been had I not already experienced difficult standardized exams.  I encourage students to explore different forms of education beyond a law degree in areas of interest to them.  I was a single parent and solo practitioner during my post law school studies, and it took many years to complete my advanced degrees.  For me, it was certainly a journey more akin to a marathon than to a sprint.

 

On the most pressing call to action for advocates of children and families

I am now a Judge of the Court of Claims, as well as state-wide Deputy Chief Administrative Judge for Justice Initiatives.  As such, I am primarily involved in court policy and planning.  Those who know me know that Family Court is the court of my heart.   NYC Family Court refers to me as their “Administrative Judge Emeritus,” a title of honor that I plan to hold forever.  Family Court is where I spent most of my years as a lawyer and judge.  More recently, I shifted my judicial focus to the criminal arena, where I presided over the New York County Supreme Court Criminal Term Youth Part involving cases where adolescents as young as 13 are prosecuted as adults.  There are plenty of public interest areas in need of enhanced child and family advocacy.  As we implement the new law raising the age of criminal responsibility in N.Y.S., there has been recent and necessary focus on appropriate juvenile justice interventions for youth.  Also there has been recent consideration of the intersection of immigration and housing issues for families.

 

On processing trauma 

It’s difficult to answer this.  It’s been 30 years since I’ve graduated from CUNY Law School, and I have spent my entire legal career hearing stories of pain, abuse and neglect, and making critically important decisions for the people who have appeared in my courtroom.  I understand and appreciate the impact of vicarious trauma that legal and other professionals endure from our work with people in deep need and crisis.  As I stated earlier, I work hard and I play hard as well, and this ‘playing’ helps me disconnect.  I’ve recently re-started my long-ago abandoned love affair with my cello, whom I call Orville.  I take music lessons, and play every chance I get.  I’m sounding a bit less awful.  I have a hook rug project going with no rush to completion, and I take fresh-air walks and ride a bike when I can.   Additionally, beginning my work day with mediation and spiritual devotion time continually renews my faith and strengthens me to deal to the best of my ability with these painful and tragic circumstances which bring litigants to court.

 

On recommendations she’d like to see adopted and institutionalized by NY state courts

What an interesting question.  What comes to mind is gratitude. I get to wake up every single day and participate in work about which I am passionate; work that is important and fulfilling.  I get to try to make the world better.  I’m so fortunate to be able to do that.  I’ve never made any recommendations that came just from me.  I habitually surround myself with wise and hard-working people – many with whom I disagree on occasion.  They all inform recommendations I make.  I’m deeply privileged to serve in justice system improving work.  Lucky me!


Summer in China, Jordan for two CCNY language scholarship winners

 

CCNY’s Libby Ho [left] and Atsuko Sakuari will spend the summer in China and Jordan, respectively, as Critical Language Scholars.

Amman, Jordan, and Changchung, China, are the summer destinations for City College of New York’s Critical Language Scholarship recipients Atsuko Sakuari and Libby Ho.

The competitive national award will take Sakuari, a sophomore majoring in computer engineering, to the Jordan Language Academy in the Jordanian capital. She’ll spend eight weeks there studying Arabic, her minor.

A Japanese immigrant who’s served in the U.S. Coast Guard, Sakuari said her pursuit of Arabic suits her career goal perfectly.

“I want to do something that combines international diplomacy and computer science,” said the Manhattan resident.

Ho, from the Macaulay Honors College at CCNY, travels to Changchung in northeast China to study Mandarin, one of two widely spoken variants of the Chinese language. She’ll also be away for two months.

Born and raised in New York of Chinese immigrant parents, Ho grew up speaking Cantonese, the other form of Chinese. “Mandarin is a completely different language,” observed the CUNY/BA human physiology major.

The Brooklyn resident is a Colin Powell Fellow and plans a medical career in underserved communities, hence her mission to learn Mandarin, in addition to the Spanish she’s learning at CCNY.

“I hope to study medicine in the future and serve immigrant populations that can’t speak English. Communication is very important and that’s why I’m learning these other languages,” she added.

About The Critical Language Scholarship Program
The CLS Program is an intensive overseas language and cultural immersion program for American students enrolled at U.S. colleges and universities. The program includes intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences designed to promote rapid language gains.

CLS is part of a wider government initiative to expand the number of Americans studying and mastering foreign languages that are critical to national security and economic prosperity. CLS plays an important role in preparing students for the 21st century’s globalized workforce and increasing national competitiveness.

CSL is a program of the United States Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. It is supported in its implementation by American Councils for International Education.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY School of Professional Studies Academic Director Dr. Bonnie Oglensky Publishes Ambivalence in Mentorship

New York, NY – May 24, 2018 – The relationship between mentor and protégé is often complicated, layered with conflicting sentiments and expectations that can either benefit or afflict the two parties involved. Dr. Bonnie Oglensky, academic director of sociology and human relations at the CUNY School of Professional Studies (CUNY SPS), delves into mentorship as a way to further examine the intricacies of this power dynamic in her newly published book, Ambivalence in Mentorship: An Exploration of Emotional Complexities.

The book, which reflects Dr. Oglensky’s immersion in social science research on the topic over the past 25 years, employs vivid case narratives to take a nuanced look at the emotional complexities of their mentorships.

“I have long been aware of the intensity of the emotional connection and profound influence of mentoring relationships,” says Dr. Oglensky.  “At the same time, I have learned from my own experience and from interviews with scores of mentors and protégés about the vulnerabilities and risks that such bonding entails.  Mentorship is a hugely important relationship in a person’s life – and understanding and appreciating its ups and downs is crucial to personal and professional growth.”

Throughout the text, Dr. Oglensky traverses the vital and risky elements of this relationship with the intention of providing professionals in numerous fields with a new perspective to the highs and lows of mentorship.

“I hope readers will gain an appreciation of the centrality of mentorship in growing up,” says Dr. Oglensky. “Mentorship – a relationship that lives apart from our family lives – can be every bit as influential in helping us to grapple with what it means to struggle to grow. And there is grace in that process, touching both mentor and protégé in ways that can often not be described but are certainly felt.”

Home to the first fully online degree programs at the City University of New York, the CUNY School of Professional Studies provides online and on campus programs that meet the needs of adults who are looking for a seamless way to finish or transition into a bachelor’s degree, earn a master’s degree or certificate in a specialized field, advance in the workplace, or change careers.

Press Contact:
Andrea Fagon
Director of Marketing and Communications
andrea.fagon@cuny.edu
646-664-8690


Office Hours with Nina Chernoff

Professor Nina ChernoffNina Chernoff cemented her place in the CUNY Law Professor Hall of Fame this year when she was given the Outstanding Professor Award by the graduating class of 2018.  Proving for perhaps the first time that it is, in fact, possible to make Powerpoints both informative and entertaining, Nina is known for unparalleled cat memes and clever ruses. Step into her classroom and be prepared to question every forensic evidence scene you’ve seen on your favorite procedural dramas. Prior to joining CUNY’s faculty, Nina was an Acting Assistant Professor of Lawyering at New York University Law School. She has also worked as a staff attorney in the Special Litigation Division of the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, served as a Zubrow Fellow at Juvenile Law Center, and worked on programs and policies affecting at-risk youth at Public/Private Ventures in Philadelphia.

 

If we asked you to pen your own introduction, what would you add to the “standard faculty intro” to give us the really important details?

Like most faculty members at CUNY Law, I’m eager to build connections between my scholarship and real-world reform through working closely with attorneys and courts concerned with the same issues in my research. For example, though I’ve written about fair cross-section claims – the tool criminal defendants use to protect their constitutional right to a jury of their peers – what feels more important are the opportunities I have to coordinate with courts that are trying to increase the diversity of their pools and attorneys litigating those claims. I always learn a great deal from these experiences and it allows me to identify how my scholarship can be most useful.

 

What’s new and exciting in your classroom this semester?

Shining a light on the unreliability of many types of forensic evidence! This semester I have a small class of students who are combining a study of the rules of evidence with in-depth analysis of the problems with forensic evidence. They’re each drafting legal pleadings that use law and science to argue for the exclusion of some unreliable methods –  like bite-mark and hair evidence, arson investigations, and fingerprints. It’s exciting to watch the students use their legal skills to help the criminal justice system catch up with scientific developments.

 

What’s this we’ve heard about wigs?

I have been known to appear in disguise – complete with wig – in my Professional Responsibility class. The course is about figuring out how to apply ethical rules in practice, so I try to make the classroom as realistic as possible. And sometimes that means having a “supervisor” run into the room and demand you take action – which requires the students to work in real time to figure out ethical solutions to conflicts. But it’s not just me: we also have staff and faculty come to class in-role as teenagers so students can explore the ethical issues involved in counseling a juvenile client who might not be making thoughtful long-term decisions.

 

Do you have any alumni in your inbox right now?

I have two alumni in my inbox and my phone – two fantastic students who just graduated and are now preparing for the bar exam. I am their bar mentor, which means we’ll be working together this summer to ensure they succeed on the bar exam.  They’re doing all the hard work, of course, but I’m here to grade practice essays, help them stick to their study schedule, and provide plenty of chocolate.

 

If you could recruit anyone to guest lecture in your class, who would it be? Or, alternatively: if you could attend a lecture by anyone, on anything – what would you sit in on?

I’m actually hoping to attend a class that’s being taught at the law school this fall. The course is Race and the Law and it is being taught by two extraordinary judges: The Honorable Ronald Ellis and the Honorable Jenny Rivera. It would be a thrill even to just sit in the back of the room and listen!

 

What can’t you let go of? Is there anything that holds you enthralled, that you want to keep on people’s radar, or that is keeping you up at night?

I’m obsessed with the jury system and will stop people in the street if I hear them trying to figure out how to avoid jury service. Juries are particularly important today when so many questions have been raised about the discretion exercised by some police officers, prosecutors, and judges. The jury system is designed to ensure that the community has a voice in the process of prosecution, and it is critical to ensure that juries reflect the communities they come from.

 

Summer is right around the corner. Any essential reads or books you’ve been looking forward to?

I’m looking forward to reading Chokehold: Policing Black Men, by this year’s commencement speaker, Paul Butler. And this is the summer I’m finally going to read War and Peace. (I hope by making this public declaration, I’ll actually follow through!)


Department of English Professor Eva Shan Chou Awarded Resident Fellowship to New York University’s Center for Ballet and the Arts

Project to focus on writing a historical account of ballet in China from its beginnings in 1954 to today

Department of English professor and chair Eva Shan Chou, PhD, of Baruch College’s Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, has been awarded a Resident Fellowship to New York University’s Center for Ballet and the Arts (CBA).

Dr. Chou is among 27 artists and scholars who will serve as CBA Fellows during the 2018-19 academic year. The group represents the Center’s largest cohort, featuring a range of disciplines including writers, choreographers, filmmakers, dancers, a lighting designer, and scholars.

“I am excited to be joining a community that will includes principal dancers from the New York City Ballet among those working on choreography,” Dr. Chou said. “To see the artists up close, to watch the unfolding of experimentation, is very important for my continued thinking as a critic.”

According to the Center, it is the “first international institute devoted to the creative and academic study of ballet.”  Entering its fifth year, the CBA Fellowship Program invites scholars and artists from the field of ballet and its related arts and sciences to work at the Center on their own scholarly and artistic projects.

Ballet in China: A History

As a Resident Fellow, Dr. Chou will be developing a historical account of ballet in China from its beginnings in 1954 to its present strikingly accomplished position in the international ballet world.

Like the country’s history, the path of ballet in China contained intense about-turns, multiple beginnings, and a recent strong arrival on the international scene. This history approaches the development of ballet in China as a function of fluctuating relations between an art form and cultural authorities. It also pays special attention to the role that ballet plays in the creation and shaping of national identity.

Along with this book project, Dr. Chou will continue writing about dance performances for Ballet Review (New York).

“Dance studies is growing rapidly in many stimulating directions,” she said, “and the range and depth of the 2018-19 Fellows and their projects show this. Dance studies is clearly establishing itself as a field within cultural studies in addition to its first home of performance studies.”

Presenting Ballet as an Art Form

A history of ballet in China is Dr. Chou’s primary goal during her fellowship, but she is already thinking about other forms of dissemination that can stem from this core book.

“Ballet is a multi-media art form,” she said. “Even ballet that has no record in moving images can be – needs to be – excitingly presented outside the pages of a book. I want to infect others with the enthusiasm that I feel.”

A Cultural Historian

Dr. Chou’s work has focused on many different forms of art, moving from classical poetry to modern fiction, and now ballet. As a cultural historian, Dr. Chou has found her status as a bilingual outsider to be beneficial in her research on each of her projects. Whether poetry from twelve hundred years ago, or literature from China’s modern beginnings a century ago, or ballet in the past seven decades, the ability of art to cross borders and languages has always inspired her to undertake research.

“I am a cultural historian who’s always been interested in works of art both as creative works and in their relation to their use in China’s sense of identity,” she said. “What has stayed constant is my interest in the historical and political frames that ascribe value to the art.”

 

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Four CUNY Baccalaureate Students Win Chancellor’s Global Scholarship

CUNY BA congratulates Melissa Corning, Natasha Danielian, Kimberly Martinez and Matthew Perez on receiving the CUNY Chancellor’s Global Scholarship to study abroad in the winter and spring 2018 terms. Melissa will spend her fall semester at the Universidad de Belgrano in Buenos Aires, Argentina through CCIS, and will conduct independent ethnographic research on tango for her senior thesis while she’s there. Natasha and Kimberly will spend a month studying Japanese Language and Culture at Ritsumeikan University in Tokyo, Japan, through the College of Staten Island. Matthew will study entrepreneurship and data management at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, Netherlands through City College this summer.

As part of CUNY’s commitment to “[widen] the pipeline of language training, study abroad, and cross-cultural learning and collaboration for all students” (The Connected University, CUNY Master Plan 2016-2020), the Chancellor’s Global Scholarship provides partial funding on a competitive basis to CUNY students planning a study abroad experience. Funding for these scholarships is provided by the University Office of Academic Affairs and the SEEK program under the auspices of the University Office of Special Programs.

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CUNY BA is the University-wide, individualized degree. It is an exciting, versatile, rewarding degree route for highly motivated, self-directed students whose academic goals transcend traditional majors. Students create their own degree plans working directly with faculty mentors and academic advisors.


The Graduate Center, CUNY Announces Two Honorary Degree Recipients and Commencement Speaker

The Graduate Center of The City University of New York will award honorary degrees to Neal Kumar Katyal, former acting solicitor general of the U.S., and Katharine Viner, the first woman to serve as editor-in-chief of Guardian News & Media, and recognize Patricia Chapple Wright (Ph.D. ’85, Anthropology) with its President’s Distinguished Alumni Medal at its fifty-fourth Commencement exercises on Wednesday, May 30, 2018.

Graduate Center Distinguished Professor André Aciman, New York Times best-selling author of Call Me by Your Name and other works, will give the Commencement address.

Neal Kumar Katyal, the Paul and Patricia Saunders Professor of law at Georgetown University, partner at the firm of Hogan Lovells, and former acting solicitor general of the United States, has argued more Supreme Court cases in United States history than any other minority attorney, breaking the record held by Thurgood Marshall. As acting solicitor general under President Barack Obama, Katyal successfully defended the constitutionality of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Most recently, in the Supreme Court on April 25, Katyal argued the “Travel ban” case on behalf of the State of Hawaii against President Donald Trump, earning Katyal a headline in Politico as “The Travel Ban’s Legal Nemesis.” A graduate of Dartmouth College and Yale Law School, Katyal was one of the youngest professors to receive tenure and a chaired professorship at Georgetown University Law Center.

Katharine Viner took the reins of The Guardian and The Observer in 2015 when the business model for modern newspapers was failing. She has effectively navigated the challenges of running a news organization in the digital age with innovative business models and a passionate respect for reporting that, as she says, “takes time and effort, carefully uncovers the facts, holds the powerful to account, and interrogates ideas and arguments—work that speaks to the urgency of the moment, but lasts for more than a day.” She is considered one of the most eloquent and thoughtful analysts of journalism today. As advertising revenue has fallen for newspapers generally, The Guardian has chosen to keep its website open to all readers. Viner’s speeches and extended reflections on the press have highlighted the importance of journalism to the functioning of democracy.

Patricia Chapple Wright (Ph.D. ’85, Anthropology) has been honored as a MacArthur Fellow and is the recipient of many awards, including the Chevalier d’Ordre National of Madagascar and the Indianapolis Prize for conservation. She is a distinguished professor of anthropology at Stony Brook University. Wright took on conservation issues more than 30 years ago in Madagascar when she and her colleagues discovered the golden bamboo lemur and re-discovered the greater bamboo lemur, a species thought to be extinct. The lemurs lived in one of the country’s last remaining intact rain forests, a habitat that was threatened by timber exploitation. She spearheaded an integrated conservation and development project that ultimately led to the 1991 inauguration of the Ranomafana National Park. Her work has been featured in several documentaries and in the 2014 IMAX film Island of Lemurs: Madagascar, narrated by Morgan Freeman. She is the author of more than 170 scientific papers and of a two-volume autobiography.

André Aciman is a distinguished professor of comparative literature and French at The Graduate Center and a noted novelist and essayist. The first of his four novels, Call Me by Your Name, garnered widespread praise and inspired the film by the same name, which won the 2018 Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. While a professor at Princeton, Aciman published his acclaimed memoir, Out of Egypt, for which he received the 1995 Whiting Award. He is the author of three more novels and a number of essay collections. He has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New Republic, and The New York Review of Books, and his work has appeared in several volumes of Best American Essays. His teaching at The Graduate Center, which started in 2001, focuses on the work of Marcel Proust and the literature of memory and exile.

The Graduate Center will confer 547 master’s and doctoral degrees at its Commencement exercises on Wednesday, May 30, at 7:30 p.m. at Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall.

Media Contact: Tanya Domi, tdomi@gc.cuny.edu, 212-817-7283

 

About The Graduate Center of The City University of New York

The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) is a leader in public graduate education devoted to enhancing the public good through pioneering research, serious learning, and reasoned debate. The Graduate Center offers ambitious students more than 40 doctoral and master’s programs of the highest caliber, taught by top faculty from throughout CUNY — the nation’s largest public urban university. Through its nearly 40 centers, institutes, and initiatives, including its Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC), The Graduate Center influences public policy and discourse and shapes innovation. The Graduate Center’s extensive public programs make it a home for culture and conversation.


Art historian Anna Indych-López is new CCNY Katz Professor

 

Art historian Anna Indych-López is CCNY’s new Stuart Z. Katz Professor in the Humanities & the Arts.

Anna Indych-López, an expert in Latin American modern art, is The City College of New York’s 2018-2019 Stuart Z. Katz Professor in the Humanities & the Arts.  The endowed professorship is supported by a $1 million gift to City College by distinguished alumnus Stuart Z. Katz, Esq., a 1964 graduate.

As Katz Professor, Indych-López will work on her fourth book, “Imágenes de la ciudad: Mexico City and The Aesthetics of Public Space.”   It will explore the intersections of art and activism, public spaces and historical memorialization in the Mexican capital.

According to Indych-López, “Imágenes de la ciudad” was inspired by the provocative dialogues in one of the graduate seminars she teaches.

“My study concentrates on the ways in which artists, advertisers, designers, photographers, urban dwellers, and others have negotiated the visual construction of Mexico City across the 20th century and have transformed the city itself by creating visual networks and spatial and urban interventions,” she explained.

Indych-López’ previous books include:

Indych-López’ scholarship investigates Latin American and U.S. modernisms as well as Latina/o and U.S.-Mexico borderlands contemporary art, focusing on trans-American exchanges, the polemics of realisms, and public space.

She holds appointments as professor of Latin American and Latina/o art history in CCNY’s Division of Humanities and the Arts, and at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit

 


Distinguished CUNY Fellow honor for Spitzer’s Marta Gutman

 

CCNY’s Marta Gutman, an award-winning author and architectural historian, is now a Distinguished CUNY Fellow. Photo credit: Marcos Gasc

Marta Gutman, an award-winning author and historian in The City College of New York’s Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture, is the recipient of a new honor: Distinguished CUNY Fellow.  As a Fellow, she takes up a semester-long appointment at the Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC), a program of the Graduate Center, CUNY, in the fall.

ARC promotes interdisciplinary scholarship among Fellows who are selected for their outstanding published research and scholarship.

At ARC, Gutman will collaborate with scholars researching inequality in all of its manifestations. She’ll also continue work on her new book,

“Just Space: Architecture, Education, and Civil Rights in Urban America” that will be published by the University of Texas Press in 2020.

Gutman’s first book, “A City for Children: Women, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850–1950” (The University of Chicago Press, 2014), earned her four prizes including the Spiro Kostof Award from The Society of Architectural Historians.  The prize recognizes interdisciplinary studies of urban history that make the greatest contribution to our understanding of the growth and development of cities.

“A City for Children” focuses on the ways in which women used and reused   everyday buildings over a hundred year span in Oakland, California, to make the city a better place for children.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Baruch College to Graduate 5,024 Students at Commencement Ceremony on May 30 at Barclays Center

National Endowment of the Arts Chairman Dr. Jane Chu to deliver keynote address; ceremony to confer more than 5,000 degrees in business, arts and sciences, and public affairs

Baruch College will hold its 2018 Commencement on May 30 at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, conferring 5,024 degrees in business, business administration, public and international affairs, education, and arts and sciences. The Class of 2018 includes more than 3,800 undergraduate and over 1,200 graduate degree recipients.

Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD, will preside over the exercises and David Christy, PhD, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, will serve as the master of ceremonies.

The Commencement ceremony will begin at 9:30 a.m. at Barclays Center, located at 620 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. The event will also be livestreamed starting at 9:15 a.m. via the College’s homepage, www.baruch.cuny.edu. Follow and share on the College’s social media channels: Twitter and Facebook.

Keynote Speaker

Jane Chu, PhD, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), will deliver the keynote address and receive an honorary doctorate of humane letters degree.

Since being confirmed as chairman by the U.S. Senate in 2014, Dr. Chu has awarded more than $409 million in grants to nonprofit organizations and artists and oversaw multiple-year increases to the NEA’s Congressional budget appropriation to expand its military healing arts initiative, Creative Forces. She also launched the United States of Arts project that demonstrates the importance of the arts in communities across the country. An accomplished and artist, Dr. Chu is the daughter of Chinese immigrants.

Read more about Dr. Chu’s accomplishments as head of the NEA here.

Alumnus to Receive Honorary Degree

Austin W. Marxe (’65), who graduated with a Bachelor’s of Business Administration with a major in Accounting, will be awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters degree. Mr. Marxe is the president and managing director of AWM Investment Company, a firm he founded in 1991 which supports small companies that would otherwise not be financeable.

Mr. Marxe has always had an eye toward giving back. In 2007, he made a gift to the Baruch College Fund to purchase new Bloomberg terminals for the trading floor and began supporting the scholarship fund in 2011. He endowed the Austin Marxe Scholarship for promising incoming freshman in 2015 and made a $30 million gift to Baruch in 2016 to endow and name the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs. Mr. Marxe’s donation was the largest single gift in the history of Baruch College.

Watch a video interview with Marxe and learn more about the man behind this transformation gift in the Baruch Alumni magazine.

Valedictorian and Salutatorian

The valedictorian for the Class of 2018 is Patrycja Koszykowska, who is receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in Political Science and Economics from the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences.

She was a 2017 Rhodes Scholarship nominee, received a 2016 Phenomenal Woman Award from the Baruch College Women’s History Month Committee, and was a recipient of the 2014 Comptroller’s Achievement Award in Economics and Finance in Nassau County.

As a student, Ms. Koszykowska has been an active participant in many campus organizations, as well as having served as Secretary and then President of the Polish Culture Club at the College. Ms. Koszykowska will be attending graduate school at the University of Cambridge to obtain a Master of Philosophy in International Relations and Politics.

Kevin Savarese is the salutatorian for the Class of 2018. A Macaulay Scholar, he will graduate with a Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Economics and a double minor in Business Law and Interdisciplinary Honors in New York City Studies from the Zicklin School of Business.

Mr. Savarese made the Dean’s List in 2015, 2016, and 2017, and was inducted into the Beta Gamma Sigma Honor Society, and the Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society.

On campus, Mr. Savarese has participated in the Max Berger Pre-Law Fellows Program in the Starr Career Development Center, was co-founder and vice president of the Photography Club in the Macaulay Honors College, and a member of the Golden Key International Honour Society. Upon graduation, Mr. Savarese will enter Fordham University School of Law with a merit scholarship.

Learn more about Ms. Koszykowska and Mr. Savarese here.

Watch and Follow the 2018 Commencement Live

Watch the livestream of the Commencement ceremony on May 30 beginning at 9:15 a.m. via Baruch College’s website. Follow and share on the College’s social media channels: Twitter and Facebook.

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Brooklyn College Class of 2018 Valedictorian Margaret Iuni’s Goal Is to Teach Tolerance

The William E. Macaulay Honors College student believes a key component to overcoming many of the obstacles facing society today is practicing compassion, a trait she wants to instill in younger generations of students.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

<p>Margaret Iuni will be giving the valedictory address at this year's Commencement Ceremony. </p>

Margaret Iuni will be giving the valedictory address at this year’s Commencement Ceremony. Photo: Craig Stokle.

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018 share their thoughts on some of the more complex and challenging aspects of their areas of study. For more on this year’s commencement, visit our FacebookInstagram, and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2018 hashtag to join the conversation.

Margaret Iuni is the valedictorian of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018.

She was born and raised in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn surrounded by a large family of Irish and Italian heritage. Before coming to Brooklyn College, she attended Bishop Kearney High School where she took classes through St. Joseph’s College.

William E. Macaulay Honors College student, Iuni majored in English education for grades 7–12 and minored in history with a focus on New York City studies. She chose Brooklyn College because of its affordability, diversity, and outstanding reputation in education and the humanities. She has a 4.00 grade point average and has made the Dean’s List every semester she has attended Brooklyn College.

Iuni is a very active scholar. She interned for Professor Roni Natov in the English Majors’ Counseling Office, where she advised students on program requirements and helped publish the Department of English student magazine, The Junction. She also contributed to the office’s blog. She was president of the Macaulay Creative Writing Club and a member of Brooklyn College’s Eta Theta Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, the international honor society for education. She was the recipient of the 2017 Herb Berman Memorial Scholarship for academic merit and civic service, the 2017 Special Merit Award for Outstanding Contribution to the English Department, and served as the Lisa Goldberg/Revson Scholar in 2016 for her service to New York City. She indicates that Brooklyn College faculty have been essential to her success, noting that Professor Natov, Professor Priya Parmar, and Adjunct Professors Sivan Butler-Rotholz and Janice Pumelia have profoundly affected her life both academically and personally.

In classic Brooklyn College spirit, Iuni has dedicated her life to the education, advancement, and empowerment of younger generations. She is a student teacher at Brooklyn Collegiate Preparatory High School, and assistant coach and team judge of the forensics (speech and debate) team at Xaverian High School. Previously, she was a summer supplemental music history instructor and English tutor for the Brooklyn College Percy Ellis Sutton SEEK Program, assistant teacher at the Buckley School of Irish Dance, and a peer mentor for her fellow students at Brooklyn College. She serves as a research assistant on Professor Parmar’s upcoming publication focused on dismantling the school to prison pipeline through hip-hop pedagogy. Iuni’s civic engagement extends to the nonprofit sector; in 2014, she founded the Brooklyn College Relay for Life Club to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Just recently, she received a Mayoral Service Award from the City of New York for outstanding volunteer efforts.

Next year, she plans to attend New York University’s Graduate School of Arts and Science Program for English and Comparative Literature, with the goal of becoming a full-time high school teacher. She hopes to continue to guide young adults toward a more empathetic and tolerant worldview through literary studies and mentor students in need of academic guidance.

In that vein, Iuni was asked her thoughts on solutions to some of the biggest problems young people receiving a public education face as it relates to equity and resources. This is what she had to say.

With the caveat that there are scholars and policymakers who have researched this topic extensively and are much better equipped to address the multifaceted problem of inequity in the public education system than I am, I believe that incorporating critical pedagogy in a classroom would be a great place to begin. Critical pedagogues aim to provide a democratic, relevant, and experience-inclusive education to all students despite differences in race, ethnicity, sex, gender, sexual identity, socioeconomic status, language, ability, age, class, or any other element of a student’s identity. It extends beyond the formal curriculum and empowers all students to develop strong individual and group identities by questioning hegemonic (social hierarchical) powers within cultures and subcultures that are relevant to them. Incorporating critical theory and multiple literacies in a high school English classroom may at first seem like a difficult task because many schools still subscribe to the literary canon of books written by typically white Western men. However, by incorporating students’ experiences and cultures, and by diversifying course materials, students can contextualize and engage with traditional texts more effectively, while becoming empowered to question and incite change.

My experiences as a student of an English secondary education program have framed my desire to place the field of literature in dialogue with student experiences as a way to examine the human condition without excluding narratives curated for younger audiences. I believe the introduction of the intersection of literary studies and youth studies in my own classroom could spark the formation of political, social, and economic thought in young readers. Critically reading literature is vital to the creation of well-rounded, well-adjusted global citizens. In a diverse city such as New York, wherein dozens of cultures collide on a daily basis, it simply does not make sense to perpetuate a single-culture environment. The study of literature within the context of students’ experiences can pedagogically shape attitudes towards students’ own identities as well as to those that are different from theirs. I am a firm believer that valuing students’ experiences from all backgrounds and instilling a culture of respect within a classroom can help positively shape students’ lives and those whom they come in contact with. I have personally witnessed the positive effects that critical reading can have on the lives of students whose cultures are often forgotten or have been actively removed from the curriculum and who hide parts of themselves to ‘fit in.’

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Cultural Competency and Intersectionality Are Priorities for English and History Double Major Nicole Solis-Ramirez

The graduating senior and mother of four discusses how her life impacts her approach to academics.

By ROBERT JONES JR.

<p>Nicole Solis-Ramirez's multicultural background inspires her intersectional approach to her scholarly work.</p>

Nicole Solis-Ramirez’s multicultural background inspires her intersectional approach to her scholarly work.

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018 share their thoughts on some of the more complex and challenging aspects of their areas of study. For more on this year’s commencement, visit our FacebookInstagram, and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2018 hashtag to join the conversation.

Nicole Solis-Ramirez is a member of the Class of 2018 graduating with a bachelor of arts in English and a bachelor of arts in history, with a minor in Puerto Rican and Latino studies. Solis-Ramirez, who hails from York, Pennsylvania, is of European and Japanese descent.  She made the Dean’s List every semester she attended Brooklyn College. She was also accepted into the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, where she conducted research on a series of Roman coins from 100 B.C. The data she assembled during the semester will add to Department of Classics Associate Professor Liv Yarrow‘s ongoing research in that area. She also made the Department of English’s Chairperson’s List of Outstanding Scholars in 2017, and works part time in the Brooklyn College Learning Center as an English tutor.

Solis-Ramirez’s husband is Mexican American, and she is the mother of four children, ages seven to one, two of whom are currently enrolled in the Brooklyn College Early Childhood Center. She says she works to ensure that her children are educated about their heritage so that they are instilled with a sense of pride. She is a full-time student, a mentor in the Peer Mentoring Program, and an elected member of the Community Education Council for her home district in Brooklyn. She credits the Magner Career Center for helping her to prepare for the job market by providing resources such as cover letter and resume review and career advisement. She was accepted into Brooklyn College’s Master of Arts English Program and hopes to one day become a college professor.

Solis-Ramirez shared her thoughts on how identity, history, and literature intersect, and what impact all three have had on her and her family.

“There are layers to rebuilding a system that does not erase or ignore the works of marginalized perspectives in literature. The Internet and social media have given people a platform that is special in the way that it crosses age, race, and gender barriers. Yet, living in this unique moment that offers us an opportunity to celebrate marginalized voices is not enough. Changes need to be made at a larger institutional level and we, as the people who are the foundation and support of these institutions, have a responsibility to hold them accountable.

“On an individual level, we need to hold ourselves responsible for unlearning Eurocentric and colonial ideologies. In my own experience, I was never exposed to literature or literary characters that represented me. I never questioned why some books were considered ‘classics,’ and what it meant to have characters of color being depicted by white authors. My educational experience at Brooklyn College made me more aware of how unaware I was. Just because someone is a woman does not mean that she cannot contribute to the patriarchy. Just because someone is other than European does not mean that they cannot contribute to Eurocentrism. The acceptance of the Eurocentrism of literature is compliance— we need to hold ourselves and our institutions accountable for the silencing of marginalized perspectives.

“As a woman who is multiracial but white passing, my struggle has not necessarily been the same as other marginalized groups. Growing up in a small, predominately white town, I think that my siblings and I were very aware that we would never be accepted as white or Japanese. From a very young age, I loved reading; literature was my great escape. However, I never found authors who vocalized feelings through their characters that were similar to my own.

“Partially because of how those that have preceded me have been silenced and because those with similar experiences were not present in the literature that was introduced to me, understanding my own identity has been a continuous process with no starting point. Yet, another layer of my struggle lies in the fact that my grandmother, who immigrated to the United States from Japan, was silenced. My grandfather did not permit my grandmother to teach her children her native language. There was no sense of pride instilled in my family lineage. Perhaps I silenced my own voice because of my feelings of inadequacy.

When I think about marginalized voices being heard in spaces where they have been silenced, I think of my children. I want them to hear voices similar to their own, and I want them to be able to speak. My partner was born and raised in Mexico, and because of the many political discussions that are currently present in the United States, we have worked very hard to instill a sense of pride in every cultural identity that exists within our children. Because these voices have been historically silenced, the most important lesson I can teach them is that their voice is significant because of who they are.”


Letter to NEST+m Students and Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of May 21, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

Please join us on Wednesday for our K-12 Curriculum Showcase, 4pm to 7pm, featuring:

  • K-5 Science Fair
  • 6-8 Science Fair and Grades 6-12 Curriculum Highlights
  • Upper Grades Spring Music Concert

 CLICK HERE for an overview of this comprehensive evening!

Middle Grades Families: Please join us on Thursday for our Middle Grades Spring Concert!

As we enter the final two weeks of May, a reminder to Upper Grades Students and families, the last day of instruction prior to Regents Week is Monday June 11th.

The Regents Week calendar is here: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/assessment/schedules/2018/504hs-june2018.pdf

Families: We look forward to seeing you this week.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication,

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

 

 This week

Wednesday May 23rd

  • Middle Grades Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am, in the NESTCafe
  • Upper Grades Math Team Carnival, in the courtyard, 2:40pm
  • K-12 Curriculum Showcase 4pm to 7pm featuring:
    – K-5; 6-8 Science Fair
    – Highlights across Grades 6-12
    – Upper Grades Spring Concert, 6pm

Thursday May 24th

  • Lower Grades Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am, in the NESTCafe
  • Middle Grades Spring Concert, 6pm

 
Friday May 25th

  • Upper Grades Principal’s Coffee, 8:30am, in the NESTCafe

Looking Ahead:

  • Monday May 28th: Memorial Day: Schools Closed.
  • Tuesday, May 29th: The 4th Grade Science Performance Task.
  • Monday, June 4th: The 4th Grade Science Written Test.
  • June 5th: Regents Exam, Global History & Geography
  • June 7th: Anniversary Day, No school for students.
  • June 11th : Clerical Day: elementary & middle school students do not attend. Final Day of Instruction for Grades 9-12.
  • June 15th: Eid al-Fitr: schools closed

Student Opportunities

Putney School Summer Arts Program, July 15- August 3
In this three-week dynamic workshop, students will collaborate to create in response to urgent social, political, or environmental issues of our era. APPLY HERE

Previously announced opportunities for NEST+m students

Manhattan Youth Downtown Day Camp in Tribeca is Now Interviewing 17 and 18 year olds!
Apply to be a Camp Counselor! Applications available via email at: gabi@manhattanyouth.org


STEM Expo Plaza Party for Harlem kids at CCNY May 20

 

Concrete Canoe team

Chem-e-Car team

Community School District Five

Many parents are concerned their children’s school doesn’t have an emphasis on science. Or that the way science is taught is too boring to engage their kids. One way to get kids interested in science is to show them experiments that make them ask “how did you do that”?

This Sunday, May 20, from 12-5pm, kids from the Harlem community (and their parents) can get psyched about science at the STEM Expo Plaza party at the Grove School of Engineering at the City College of New York at 259 Convent Avenue and 140th Street.

CCNY engineering and computer science student clubs will showcase some of the mind blowing work they’ve done this year, including a concrete canoe, a blazing fast Chem-E-Car, and a “computer garden” that grows food without soil or harmful chemicals.

The event is open and free to the public and features interactive STEM exhibits, vendors, music and food. It is offered on day two of Harlem STEM Weekend and is hosted by the Grove School in partnership with District Five and Harlem Renaissance Education Pipeline (HREP).

Grove School Dean Gilda Barabino looks forward to welcoming kids and parents, saying “So much about what we do at the Grove School remains a mystery to our neighbors. On Sunday, we will open our doors to the Harlem Community to demystify what it is we do and to also cultivate the natural curiosity of community’s school aged children—some, our future students. This will be just one of many activities to come in which we will engage and partner with the community.”

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media contact: rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu


Jane Chu, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, to Speak at Baruch College Commencement Ceremony on May 30, 2018

Jane Chu, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts

Jane Chu, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), will be the keynote speaker at Baruch College’s Commencement Ceremony on May 30, 2018 at Barclays Center, New York City.

Since being confirmed as chairman by the U.S. Senate in 2014, Chu has awarded more than $409 million in grants to nonprofit organizations and artists; issued new research reports on arts participation and the impact of the arts and cultural industries on the nation’s gross domestic product; and launched the United States of Arts project that demonstrates the importance of the arts in communities across the country.

In 2015, Chu launched her signature leadership initiative, Creativity Connects, that investigates the current state of the arts in our nation, and explores how the arts connect with other industries. She also oversaw multiple-year increases to the NEA’s Congressional budget appropriation to expand its military healing arts initiative, Creative Forces.

The following year, Chu accepted a Special Tony Award on behalf of the agency for its “unwavering commitment in paving the road” between Broadway and cities throughout the U.S.

Under Chu’s leadership, the NEA ranked first among small agencies in Best Places to Work in the Federal Government for 2016.

A Passion for the Arts

In additional to her experience in arts administration and philanthropy, Chu is an accomplished artist and musician.

The daughter of Chinese immigrants, Chu was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma and raised in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. She studied music growing up, eventually receiving bachelor’s degrees in piano performance and music education, as well as master’s degrees in music and piano pedagogy, a PhD in philanthropic studies, an MBA, as well as three honorary degrees

Before becoming the 11th chairman of the NEA, Chu served as the president and Chief Executive Officer of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City.

2018 Commencement Ceremony

Baruch College will hold it 2018 Commencement Exercises for both undergraduate and graduate students on Wednesday, May 30 at Barclays Center at 620 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. The ceremony will commence at 9:30 am.

For more information, go to Baruch College Commencement.

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A Feirstein Cinema School Graduate Talks Diversity in the Film Industry

Daniel W. Smith ’18 M.A. finds his voice and shares it as part of a commencement campaign celebrating the Brooklyn College Class of 2018.

<p>Dan Smith is a member of the first official graduating class of Brooklyn College's Barry R. Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema.</p>

Dan Smith is a member of the first official graduating class of Brooklyn College’s Barry R. Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema. Photo: David Rozenblyum.

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018 share their thoughts on some of the more complex and fraught aspects of their areas of study. Find more student commencement profiles and videos on our FacebookInstagram, and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2018 hashtag to join the conversation.

Daniel “Dan” W. Smith is a member of the Class of 2018, graduating with his master of arts in screen studiesfrom Brooklyn College’s Barry R. Feirstein Graduate School of Cinema. Smith financed his education with a scholarship he won from the New York City Office of the Mayor. He is a part of Feirstein’s first official graduating class. The cinema school is dedicated to cultivating new and emerging voices in cinema in a diverse and inclusive learning environment.

A Las Vegas native, Spider-Man aficionado, and singer in the New York City Gay Men’s Chorus, Smith came to Brooklyn in the hopes of refining his career as an educator. Currently a high school teacher, his ultimate goal is to become a college professor and he believes his academic experiences at Brooklyn College have prepared him to pursue a Ph.D. in media studies.

When asked about the state of Hollywood, media production, and diversity, particularly in the United States, Smith had this to say.

Wonder Woman is the first critically acclaimed film and box office smash starring a female super-hero.

 

“While Hollywood has definitely made progress in presenting more diverse narratives in film and media, many of them lauded for their attempts at representation, these attempts are often superficial because the majority of the producers behind them are still white males. For example, Wonder Woman was directed by a woman who did the best she could with a film written and produced by men and that battle of perspectives plays out in the final product. So, while women, queer people, people of color, and other marginalized demographics are out there creating media in an attempt at real diversity, it is a slow-going process. Many of us who find ourselves in marginalized and underrepresented communities want a revolutionary change, but I feel that with a system so sexist, homophobic, and, quite frankly, racist, this change will not happen overnight.”

 

Love, Simon is about a gay teen who comes out to his family and friends, and falls in love.

 

“A film like Love, Simon (a coming-of-age story of a gay teenager) could never have been made a generation ago because of the mindset of Hollywood and the nation as a whole. What is fortunate is that not just the people behind the creation of the film, but people who understood the importance of the film advocated for its showing across the nation even in small towns where queer-themed films could still be controversial.”

 

Black Panther is the second-highest grossing film of 2018 so far, earning over a $1 billion globally.

 

Black Panther is an example of a film that is on the right track as well. With a predominately black cast and crew, it certainly broke molds within the Hollywood paradigm, particularly because it was made by Marvel Entertainment, but also because it was made to target a general audience, not to exploit a marginalized one. What it comes down to is Hollywood wants to make money, but that is largely based on public consumption trends and I believe that those trends are shifting toward more diverse narratives in Hollywood as well as television and other media. Eventually, that will bring about change rather than simply superficial fixes.”

 

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Hostos Gears Up for 50th Anniversary Commencement

 

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of The City University of New York will celebrate the achievements of 709 graduates at its 48th Commencement, to be held on Thursday, May 31, at New York City Center. In total, the College celebrated 1,292 students in two ceremonies this year.

Hostos is also celebrating its official 50th Anniversary, and this event will truly take on a special meaning.

“To recognize the men and women who have made the commitment to their education, just as this institution has for so many others since 1968, is truly a highlight of our yearlong anniversary celebration,” said Hostos President, Dr. David Gómez. “On behalf of Eugenio María de Hostos Community College, we could not be prouder of them as they move forward to become the change agents of tomorrow.”

commencement speaker

This year’s Commencement Speaker is Luis Salgado, an international director, choreographer, and educator known for his work as the Latin Assistant Choreographer of the Tony Award-winning musical In The Heights, and most recently was seen on the Broadway stage in the Gloria Estefan Musical On Your Feet!

Luis has performed on Broadway in Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, ROCKY, and In The Heights, as well as in Off Broadway shows and Broadway tryouts; The Mambo KingsFame on 42nd Street, and Aida,among others. Film credits includeAmerican GangsterDirty Dancing 2, the remake of Dirty Dancing for TVEnchanted, and Step Up 2: The Streets. He both performed in and served as assistant to the choreographers of Enchantedand Step Up 2.

Luis has directed/choreographed productions in and out of the United States, including Amigo Duende The Musical, Bountiful,Song of SolomonCandela Fuerza y Pasión in Lima PerúTo Be or Not To Beand, most recently, RAGTIMEat the Axelrod Performing Arts Center.

In 2017, he directed and choreographed the U.S. premier of the Spanish version of In The Heights in Washington D.C., which received 18 nominations for the 2018 Helen Hayes Awards, including Best Musical, Best direction, and Best Choreography.

He is the founding director of R.Evolución Latina, an affiliate of the non-profit organization Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. Through R.Evolución Latina, Luis empowers the Latino community to discover its full potential. Throughout his career, he has worked as a teacher, affecting the lives of thousands of young artists by providing them with the tools to grow and to use their art to create social change. In April of this year, Luis devised a performance piece with a group of NYC artists and the class of adult performers from Latin America, To Be or Not To BeA Shakespearean Experience,that explored what it means to be an immigrant in the U.S.

This year’s Valedictorian and Salutatorian are two incredible examples of the diversity and inclusiveness that have powered the College since its inception in 1968.

valedictorian

Valedictorian Raz Rivera was born and raised in Kfar Blum, a kibbutz in Israel’s Upper Galilee. She left high school at age 15 to attend Tel-Hai, a local community college, where she intended to study art and art history. Rivera’s life changed course when she was drafted to serve in the Israeli Defense Forces a year and a half into her studies. She took a year off to travel after she left the military, visiting Europe and the U.S. before returning to Israel.
A mother of two, Rivera immigrated to New York in 2007. Motivated by her children and an enduring passion for learning, she decided in 2016 to go back to school. Rivera is a member of the ASAP program and the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. She also participated in Hostos’ Honors Program and was president of the Honors Club. In 2017, she received the Women’s and Gender Study Award and English Gold Medal Award for her essay “Gender and Our Identity.” She will pursue a degree in Public Administration at City College.

swimi student

Class Salutatorian Swimi Kolancheril was born and raised in India and immigrated to New York with her family in 2015. As a child, she wanted to follow her father’s path into the field of engineering. She began her journey toward her goal in 2016, when she enrolled in Hostos’ Joint Dual Engineering program with The City College of New York’s Grove School of Engineering.

Kolancheril served as the president of the Robotics Club at Hostos and as a student ambassador for the Student Leadership Academy. In the spring of 2018, she was nominated to Phi Theta Kappa’s All-State Academic Team and part of a winning team at the 26th Annual CSTEP Statewide Student Conference. She plans to pursue a Bachelor’s degree at The City College of New York, with a focus on electrical engineering and a minor in math.
Representing CUNY for this special anniversary commencement, Trustee Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez, and Vice Chancellor Pamela Silverblatt will also be in attendance.

What: Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of CUNY 48th Commencement Ceremony.
When: Thursday, May 31, at 3:00 p.m.
Where: New York City Center, located on 130 West 55th Street, between 6th and 7th Avenues in midtown Manhattan.

About Hostos Community College
Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for nearly half a century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.
Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Baruch College Hosts Finals of CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition

Team from Baruch College and New York City College of Technology finish in first-place, proposing IBM Watson artificial intelligence for crowdsourced New York City flood maps

From left to right: Augustus Kaptko, Nathaniel Zinda, and Sett Hein received $5,000 for winning the 2018 CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition.

New York, NY – May 16, 2018 – In February 2018, 400 City University of New York (CUNY) students from 20 CUNY campuses registered to participate in the third CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition. Two months later, 36 teams consisting of a total of 177 students from 17 CUNY campuses completed the semester-long competition that included information sessions, workshops, and a two-day boot camp. From the completed projects, ten were selected and invited to the final round held on May 11, 2018 at Baruch College.

Competition teams comprised of three to five students who submitted a three-page case statement and one-minute video of their project aimed at solving a specific problem of urban life and to move New York City towards the principles laid out in Mayor de Blasio’s OneNYC plan: growth, equity, sustainability, and resilience. Out of the 36 teams, a total of 42 finalists from eight CUNY schools were selected to participate in the last round of the event.

Baruch College accounted for 64 percent of the finalists. Half of this year’s finalists are majoring in computer and information sciences, while almost 10 percent are studying public affairs/public administration which represents the first time this major surpassed finance or accounting.

“This year’s competition demonstrated the interest, creativity and energy CUNY students bring to identifying and proposing solutions to a pressing social issue,” said Stan Altman, Ph.D., professor at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, who is the lead organizer of the program. “All of the winning teams worked on projects with high social impact, and all CUNY students demonstrated once again that CUNY is New York City’s University.”

Baruch College’s Marxe School of Public and International Affairs administered the Competition, along with support from IBM and The Lawrence Field Center for Entrepreneurship at Baruch College. For the first time, the Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer, the NYC Department of Health & Mental Health and the NYC Administration for Children’s Services joined the competition.

Competition Overview

The CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition challenged students to think about the implications that deployment of digital technologies would have on the public, such as issues of personal privacy and ethical behavior, cyber security and intellectual property rights, and shifts in the type of skills and knowledge required to be successful in today’s and tomorrow’s workforce.

During the final event, each team made a five-minute PowerPoint Presentation to a panel of judges about their project. The judges for the competition were: Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, former Deputy Mayor for health and human services for New York Mayor Bill de Blasio from 2014 to 2015; Fernando Ferrer, CUNY Trustee; Wendy Garcia, Chief Diversity Officer of the New York City Comptroller’s Office; Doris Gonzalez, Director of Corporate Citizenship for IBM; and Steve Savas, former Presidential Professor at Baruch College. Additionally, last year’s CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition winning team from Brooklyn College served as 2018 judges.

2018 Winning Teams

The 2018 CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition first-place team comprised Nathaniel Zinda and Sett Hein from Baruch College, and Augustus Kaptko from New York City College of Technology. The winning team worked on a project called “Providing Real-Time Flood Data to Improve Climate Change Resiliency Efforts” and received $5,000.

This project proposed to leverage IBM Watson capabilities to increase the City’s ability to identify areas at risk of flood as climate change increases the frequency and severity of storms. Their flood mapping software would be able to extract data from unstructured Twitter posts during a disaster – or intense storm – and use that data to construct a crowdsourced map, in real-time, of where residents experience flooding throughout the city.

Watch full video presentation: 2018 CUNY-IBM Watson Case Competition Winning Team Discussing Urban Flooding Analytics Project

The second place team also featured two Baruch College students—Carlos Bibiloni and Christian Collazo— who worked with Sohail Anwar from New York City College of Technology. These students obtained $3,000 for coming in second.

Their project called “Reducing Recidivism” focused on how technology can help inmates prepare plans for transitioning back into society months before being released from prison. Their proposed app, which they dubbed “Release on Recognizance,” would use services like Watson Assistant, Speech to Text, and Discovery, to provide a conversational interface where information can be requested about rehabilitation. It would be personalized via integration with existing prison systems. This solution aims to support prisoners by giving them step by step paths towards true rehabilitation.

The recipients of $2,000 for finishing in third place were Egor Semeniak (Macaulay Honors College), Anthony Astarita (Macaulay Honors College), Yuri Yurchenko (College of Staten Island), and Vincent Vitiello (College of Staten Island). Their project aimed to increase the number of New Yorkers that complete the 2020 Census to provide a more accurate count of the number of people residing in New York City, resulting in greater representation in Congress and increased federal funding.

The business case title of their project was Synthia: The SMS Census Assistant. With this AI-powered solution, citizens would receive a phone number on their Census form that they can use to text with Synthia. The chat bot solution would speak in any language, answer any questions an individual may have, and securely and conveniently record and send their information to the Census Bureau.

About IBM Watson

IBM Watson represents a new era in computing called cognitive computing, where systems understand the world in a way more similar to humans: through senses, learning, and experience. Watson continuously learns from previous interactions, gaining in value and knowledge over time. With the help of Watson, organizations are harnessing the power of cognitive computing to transform industries, help professionals do their jobs better, and solve important challenges.

Media Contacts:

Suzanne Bronski, (646) 660-6093, Suzanne.Bronski@baruch.cuny.edu

Ari Fishkind, 914-499-6420, fishkind@us.ibm.com

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Baruch College Announces the Valedictorian and Salutatorian for Class of 2018

Valedictorian Patrycja Koszykowska

 Salutatorian Kevin Savarese

Baruch College has named Patrycja Koszykowska and Kevin Savarese as the Valedictorian and Salutatorian, respectively, for the Class of 2018. Both students will join their fellow graduates during the College’s Commencement Ceremony on May 30 at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Koszykowska will deliver the valedictory address to students during the Commencement exercises. On May 16, Savarese will give the salutatory address at the College’s Student Achievement Awards at Baruch College.

“Grateful for being exposed to diversity of thought”

Koszykowska is receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in Political Science and Economics from the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences.

She was a 2017 Rhodes Scholarship nominee, received a 2016 Phenomenal Woman Award from the Baruch College Women’s History Month Committee, and was a recipient of the 2014 Comptroller’s Achievement Award in Economics and Finance in Nassau County.

During her time at Baruch, Koszykowska said she was “grateful for being exposed to the diversity of thought” while studying with classmates from all over New York, the United States, and the world. She added that “this experience has transformed my perspective on social and business issues and has deepened my sense of empathy. The drive and perseverance of fellow classmates, along with the passion and dedication of my professors, have pushed me to step out of my comfort zone and to pursue a myriad of philanthropic and academic opportunities.”

As a student, Koszykowska has been an active participant in many campus organizations, as well as having served as secretary and then president of the Polish Culture Club at the College.

She has additional experience as an advocate for the HeForShe Movement, a United Nations initiative dedicated to the global gender equality cause, and as a member of the non-profit Forte Foundation, a consortium of companies and business schools working together to empower women. Koszykowska also volunteered for bay summer cleanups with local businesses in Long Beach, New York.

Her most recent internship as a Risk & Analytics Summer Analyst at BlackRock, Inc., resulted in a full-time offer of employment upon graduation. Instead, Koszykowska will be attending graduate school at the University of Cambridge to obtain a Master of Philosophy in International Relations and Politics.

Her long-term goal is to pursue a career in corporate social responsibility or in international development consulting. Additionally, she is aiming to form a non-profit focused on providing globalization studies to the youth.

“Future success is not taken for granted”

Savarese, a Macaulay Scholar, will graduate with a Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Economics and a double minor in Business Law and Interdisciplinary Honors in New York City Studies from the Zicklin School of Business.

He was on the Dean’s List in 2015, 2016, and 2017, and was inducted into the Beta Gamma Sigma Honor Society, and the Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society.

Savarese said “future success is not taken for granted” at Baruch. He added that the College “instilled in us (Baruch students) hard work and perseverance, and graduates have a hunger to succeed. This success would not have been possible without the support of my peers and the mentorship of devoted professors.”

On campus, Savarese has been an active participant in the Max Berger Pre-Law Fellows Program in the Starr Career Development Center, co-founder and vice president of the Photography Club in the Macaulay Honors College, and a member of the Golden Key International Honour Society. He participated in many Macaulay co-curricular activities including the pre-Law Club, the Business Club, and the Outward Bound program.

Savarese also had internships including in the Office of the Special Advisor to the Chancellor of CUNY, serving as a research intern, and was a legal intern at Duane Morris LLP.

From 2014 through 2016, Savarese volunteered in his former elementary school, PS 185 in New York City, where he provided hundreds of hours of tutoring services in mathematics and English language arts to help students prepare for state exams.

Upon graduation, Savarese will enter Fordham University School of Law with a merit scholarship. Afterwards, he wants to begin a career in regulatory or compliance legal functions to “play a part in ensuring fair and honest business practices.”

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Kingsborough Community College Named One Of 10 Finalists For 2019 Aspen Prize For Community College Excellence For A Second Time

$1 Million Prize Recognizes Excellence in Community College Student Success Outcomes;
Winner to be Announced in April 2019

Brooklyn, NY, May 15, 2018 – New York’s CUNY Kingsborough Community College was named today as one of 10 finalists for the 2019 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the nation’s signature recognition of high achievement and performance in America’s community colleges. (See complete list of finalists below.)

Awarded every two years since 2011, the Aspen Prize recognizes institutions that achieve high and improving student outcomes, selected from over 1,000 community colleges nationwide.

Focused solely on student access and success, the Aspen Prize recognizes community colleges with exceptional achievements in four areas:
• Student learning;
• Certificate and degree completion while in community college and after transferring to
a four-year institution;
• Employment and earnings rates after graduation; and
• Access for and success of minority and low-income students.

The $1 million prize purse will be awarded in April 2019 at an event in Washington, D.C. to the winner, two or three finalists-with-distinction, and a “Rising Star” that has achieved exceptional levels of improvement. Between now and then, Aspen will work with a team of national experts to collect extensive, additional data and conduct multi-day site visits to the 10 finalist colleges.

“Kingsborough Community College’s academic programs and support services demonstrate a deep commitment to ensuring success for all students,” said Joshua Wyner, executive director of the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program in Washington, D.C. “Faculty and staff are continuously assessing student performance and seeking opportunities to do better. This has led to a consistent improvement in graduation/transfer rates over the past five years.”

CUNY Kingsborough Community College, also named a 2013 Aspen Prize Finalist-with-Distinction, stands out as one of the nation’s top community colleges for many reasons, including:
• An ASAP program designed to help lower-income students graduate faster by providing clear course maps and addressing their specific social and academic needs with a wide array of services, including intensive advising, tutoring, career services, and professional development.
• Nationally-recognized, scaled learning communities that put cohorts of students on the same track, integrating learning and non-academic supports for its most underserved students.
• A deep commitment to ensuring success for all students, reflected most recently through its Diversity Scorecard, a publicly accessible assessment by race and ethnicity of student success.
• Robust services to help students overcome non-academic barriers such as inadequate childcare, housing, and transportation costs.

Community colleges today enroll about 40 percent of all U.S. undergraduates – six million students – who are working toward earning degrees and certificates. Improving student success across the more than 1,000 community colleges in the U.S. is critical to national efforts to develop talent and enable individual social mobility, because:
• Community colleges disproportionally enroll low-income and minority students enrolled in college today.
• Community college graduation rates remain flat, with fewer than 40 percent of all entering students earning a degree and/or transferring to a four-year college or university.
• A college degree is today more important than ever before: Recent research shows that out of the 11.6 million jobs created in the post-recession economy, 11.5 million require a college education.

The 10 Aspen Prize Finalists have achieved strong and improving student success rates in very different contexts – they are from rural and urban areas, serve demographically different student bodies, and offer a varied mix of technical workforce and academic transfer programs. These 10 institutions offer proof that every community college can achieve higher levels of success for students while in college and after they graduate.

The 2019 Aspen Prize Finalists (listed in alphabetical order):
• Alamo Colleges District – Palo Alto College – San Antonio, TX o First time Finalist
• Broward College – Fort Lauderdale, FL o 2017 Finalist-with-Distinction o 2013 Finalist
• CUNY Kingsborough Community College – Brooklyn, NY o 2013 Finalist-with-Distinction
• Indian River State College – Fort Pierce, FL o 2017 Finalist-with-Distinction o 2015 Finalist
• Miami Dade College – Miami, FL o 2011 Finalist-with-Distinction
• Mitchell Technical Institute – Mitchell, SD o First time Finalist
• Odessa College – Odessa, TX o 2017 Rising Star Award (for rapid improvement)
• Pasadena City College – Pasadena, CA o 2017 Finalist
• Pierce College at Fort Steilacoom – Lakewood, WA o First time Finalist
• San Jacinto College – Pasadena, TX o 2017 Rising Star Award (for rapid improvement)

During the remainder of 2018, the Aspen Institute will complete a rigorous review process that includes examination of data on learning, graduation, workforce, and equitable outcomes for all students as well as multi-day site visits to each of the 10 finalist institutions. In early 2019, a distinguished Prize Jury will select a grand prize winner, finalists-with-distinction, and a Rising Star.

The 2019 Aspen Prize is generously funded by the Joyce Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, and the Siemens Foundation.

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Kingsborough Community College, an Achieving the Dream Leadership College, is dedicated to promoting student learning and development as well as strengthening and serving its diverse community. Kingsborough annually serves approximately 15,000 full- and part-time students in liberal arts and career courses. The only of The City University of New York’s seven community colleges to be located in Brooklyn, Kingsborough provides a high-quality education through associate degree programs that prepare students for transfer to senior colleges or entry into professional careers.

The Aspen Institute College Excellence Program aims to advance higher education practices, policies, and leadership that significantly improve student outcomes. Through the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the Siemens-Aspen Community College STEM Award, and other initiatives, the College Excellence Program works to improve colleges’ understanding and capacity to teach and graduate students, especially the growing population of low-income and minority students on American campuses. For more information, visit http://highered.aspeninstitute.org/.

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute is based in Washington, DC; Aspen, Colorado; and on the Wye River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. It also has offices in New York City and an international network of partners. For more information, visit www.aspeninstitute.org.


New research from LaGuardia Community College Professor Benjamin Taylor shows that wasps drum to alert one another of food nearby

Findings provide first evidence that wasps have complex communication about food, just as ants, bees, termites, and other social insects

May 15, 2018

Professor Benjamin Taylor Photo
Have you ever had to shout to call your family to the dinner table?

Or watched an old movie where a cook would ring a bell to let the cowboys know it was dinner time?

Turns out that humans aren’t the only creatures that need to find creative ways to tell their loved ones and comrades about a meal on the table.

Benjamin Taylor, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology in the  Department of Natural Sciences at LaGuardia Community College/CUNY, co-led research that found that wasps have their own way of communicating to each other about mealtime.

Professor Taylor and his colleagues studied a behavior exhibited by the wasps called gastral drumming. When workers produce the behavior, they drum their gaster (or abdomen) against different parts of the nest in a rhythmic fashion, producing distinct sounds.

German yellow-jacket wasp
“For nearly five decades, researchers thought the gastral drumming was a signal of hunger. My team and I showed that they’re actually informing each other through this behavior that there’s good food nearby, and other workers should be activated to go out and search for it,” said Professor Taylor. “Our findings are really exciting because they provide the first evidence that wasps have complex communication about food, just as ants, bees, termites, and other social insects.”

In the social insect world, the drumming behavior shown by wasps in this study is known as ‘recruitment.’

“There are some really famous examples of recruitment in other social insect groups—but foraging in social wasps was never thought to involve complex communication,” said Professor Taylor. Examples include ants producing pheromone trails—resulting in lines of ants following each other to and from their nest. “Also, the honey bee waggle dance is one of the most iconic forms of communication found in any organism, and that includes social insects or otherwise,” said Professor Taylor.

“The work of Professor Taylor, and other faculty at LaGuardia Community College, underscores our commitment to research. It’s a fundamental part of what we do: expanding the knowledge and skills our students possess and pushing boundaries in creating new knowledge,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow.

Professor Benjamin Taylor in Bee Suit Photo
The study, published in The Science of Nature focuses on a species of wasp called the German yellowjacket. These are yellow and black striped wasps.

“These wasps often show up at picnics, ballgames—anywhere food can be found. German yellowjackets are notorious for aggressively defending their nests,” said Professor Taylor. “Anyone who has stepped on one won’t soon forget it. I suspect that most people who say they were stung by a bee were actually stung by one of these wasps. But I don’t want to make them sound like ruthless monsters. When they sting, it’s most often to defend themselves or the other members of the colony.”

“German yellow jacket wasps are vital components of ecosystems and are often overlooked as pollinators for plants. Many wasp researchers have been trying to get others to reassess their importance in this regard (e.g. https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/in-defence-of-wasps-why-squashing-them-comes-with-a-sting-in-the-tale-a7144306.html). There’s also a hashtag used on social media (#wasplove), to try to get people to understand their importance.”

Professor Taylor and his students are currently testing additional hypotheses for the function of the gastral drumming. Because of the significant variation in how the wasps produce the behavior, they’re examining whether this variation conveys the quality of the food, in addition to the fact that there’s food available.

“There’s a lot that we can learn from social insects. For one, they’re known for being incredibly efficient, so much so that shipping companies utilize models which have been derived from foraging ants to try and ship their goods as efficiently as they possibly can. So, if your package arrives faster, you probably have a social insect to thank for that,” said Professor Taylor.

• • • •

LaGuardia Community College, located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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CUNY TO GRADUATE THOUSANDS OF STUDENTS IN COMMENCEMENT CEREMONIES, WITH LEADERS, ARTISTS, WRITERS AND MORE AS KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Thousands of students from The City University of New York’s 24 institutions will receive their degrees over the next few weeks at commencements featuring keynote speakers whose accomplishments as leaders, influencers, artists and writers are as diverse as CUNY itself.

Among the addresses will be the City College commencement speech by Anita Hill, whose allegations against a Supreme Court nominee nearly 30 years ago made sexual harassment a national issue and laid the groundwork for the #MeToo movement of today. Another is André Aciman, a Lehman College alumnus and now a CUNY professor who is the author of the book that became the acclaimed 2017 film “Call Me By Your Name.” Cristina Jiménez Moreta, who led the movement that created DACA while a student at Queens College and was recently named one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People of 2018, will deliver the address at her alma mater. Journalist and MSNBC host Chris Hayes will speak to graduates of Macaulay Honors College. Actor, producer and filmmaker Vin Diesel will deliver the address at Hunter College’s commencement ceremony.

“The commencements on CUNY’s campuses each spring are celebrations of achievement for our new graduates, of course, but also for their colleges and for the University as a whole,” said Chancellor James B. Milliken. “This year’s commencement speakers reflect our mission and the diversity that makes CUNY special. It’s a pleasure to read this year’s list and see so many people who have made a difference in the world since they were students themselves. Their stories and their words on commencement day will be sources of inspiration to our new graduates.”

Here is a look at the commencement speakers scheduled for seven of CUNY’s senior colleges and highlights of others:

City College: Anita Hill, whose allegations against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas brought sexual harassment into the forefront as a national issue in 1991, will speak at CCNY’s 172nd commencement on June 1. Hill is now a professor of social policy, law and women’s studies at Brandeis University’s Heller’s School for Social Policy and Management. The sexual harassment cases and #MeToo movement of the past year have brought Hill back into prominence as the woman whose courage in speaking out made sexual harassment a part of the social lexicon. The City College commencement will be on the South Campus Great Lawn.

Baruch College: Jan Chu, chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), will be the keynote speaker at Baruch’s commencement May 30 at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. An accomplished artist and musician and the daughter of Chinese immigrants, Chu has overseen $409 million in NEA grants since becoming chairperson in 2014. She has launched projects to demonstrate the importance of the arts, including an initiative called Creativity Connects, which investigates the current state of the arts in the country and explores how the arts connect with other industries. In 2016, Chu received a Special Tony Award on behalf of the NEA for its “unwavering commitment in paving the road” between Broadway and cities throughout the United States.

Lehman College: Novelist and memoirist André Aciman, a 1973 Lehman graduate and now a CUNY professor, will be the speaker at the college’s 50th Commencement on May 31. Aciman is the author of the 2007 novel “Call Me By Your Name,” which was turned into an Academy Award-winning movie. Egyptian-born and the author of four novels, Aciman is a distinguished professor in the comparative literature program at The Graduate Center and the director of its Writers’ Institute.

Brooklyn College: Judith Heumann, a Brooklyn-born disability-rights activist whose social justice leadership is recognized globally, will be the keynote speaker and receive an honorary doctorate at Brooklyn’s commencement May 31 at Barclays Center. Known as the “mother of the independent living disability-rights movement,” Heumann, who has used a wheelchair since contracting polio when she was two, has been a leading force in legislation and policies that benefit and protect people with disabilities. Her pioneering efforts over more than four decades — working for the World Bank and in the Clinton and Obama administrations, led the charge for the mainstream recognition of disability rights.

Queens College: Cristina Jiménez Moreta, a Queens alumna who organized the national campaign that led to the creation of DACA when she was a student, will be the college’s commencement speaker on May 31. Born in Ecuador, Jiménez Moreta came to New York with her parents when she was 13 and graduated cum laude in 2007. She founded and remains executive director of United We Dream, the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the country, and last year she was named a MacArthur Fellow for her role in changing public perceptions of immigrant youth and for helping shape the national debate around immigration policy. She was recently named one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People of 2018.

Hunter College: Actor Vin Diesel, who attended Hunter as an English major in the late 1980s before pursuing an acting career, will deliver the commencement address and receive an honorary doctorate at the college’s graduation ceremonies at Radio City Music Hall on May 30. Diesel, whose given name was Mark Sinclair, grew up in New York and began acting when he was 7. He’s best known for his portrayal of the character Dominic Toretto in “The Fast and the Furious” movie franchise.Diesel recently starred in and produced the eighth installment, which grossed $1.2 billion worldwide.

Macaulay Honors College: MSNBC host Chris Hayes will address Macaulay’s 500 graduates at the United Palace Theater on June 7. Born and raised in the Bronx, Hayes attended Hunter College High School and became one of the country’s prominent young journalists and commentators. In addition to hosting the nightly “All In with Chris Hayes” on MSNBC, Hayes is the author of the bestselling Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy, about the crisis of authority in American life, and A Colony in a Nation, focusing on the racial disparities of the criminal justice system.

York College: Lysa Scully, general manager of LaGuardia Airport, will deliver the York commencement address June 1. Apart from running one of the country’s busiest airports, Scully is overseeing the $8 billion project to bring LaGuardia into the 21st century, creating an entirely new airport while the existing one remains up and running.

CUNY School of Professional Studies: Writer and social activist Shaun King will be the speaker at the school’s commencement June 1 at David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center. King is known for his columns on justice for The New York Daily News and promotion of the Black Lives Matter movement on social media. He’s now a writer-in-residence at Harvard Law School’s Fair Punishment Project and a columnist for The Intercept.


CUNY COMMENCEMENT 2018 SCHEDULE

 

BARUCH COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Jane Chu, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts, will deliver the commencement address and receive an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters degree.

WHERE:        Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., in Brooklyn, NY

WHEN:          Wednesday, May 30, 2018, at 9:30 a.m.

CONTACT:   Suzanne Bronski, 646-660-6093

 

CUNY GRADUATE CENTER

 

WHO:            André Acimen (’73), a Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at the CUNY Graduate Center and author of the acclaimed novel Call Me By Your Name, will deliver the keynote address.

WHERE:        David Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, 10 Lincoln Center Plaza, Columbus Avenue and 65th Street, New York, NY

WHEN:
          Wednesday May 30, 2018, at 7:30 p.m.

CONTACT:   Tanya Domi, 212-817-7283

 

HUNTER COLLEGE

 

WHO:            Actor, producer and filmmaker Vin Diesel (“The Fast & The Furious,” “Saving Private Ryan,” “The Chronicles of Riddick”) who attended Hunter College, will receive an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, as well as deliver the keynote address.

WHERE:        Radio City Music Hall, 1260 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY

WHEN:          Wednesday, May 30, 2018, at 3:00 p.m.

CONTACT:   Devin Callahan, 212-396-6590

 

JOHN JAY COLLEGE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

 

WHO:            Ronald V. Clarke, one of the most important figures in criminal justice research and education, has helped to transform the study of criminology over the past four decades. He will deliver the keynote address at themorning ceremony. He will also be honored with an Honorary Doctor of Science degree. Rashida Manjoo, an international human rights advocate, particularly in the area of women’s rights as human rights, for over 30 years, will be the keynote speaker at the afternoon ceremony and also receive an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters.

WHERE:        Arthur Ashe Stadium, 124-02 Roosevelt Ave., Flushing, NY

WHEN:          There will be two commencement ceremonies on Wednesday, May 30, 2018, the first at 10:30 a.m. and then at 3:30 p.m.

CONTACT:   Rama Sudhakar, 212-237-8628

BROOKLYN COLLEGE

 

WHO:            Judith E. “Judy” Heumann, a disability-rights activist whose social justice leadership is recognized globally, will be the keynote speaker and receive an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters degree.

WHERE:        Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., in Brooklyn, NY

WHEN:          Thursday, May 31, 2018, at 9:15 a.m.

CONTACT:   Keisha-Gaye Anderson, 718-951-5882

 

COLLEGE OF STATEN ISLAND

 

WHO:             Tyehimba Jess
, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and associate professor of English at the College of Staten Island, will deliver the keynote address.

WHERE:        Great Lawn, CSI, Willowbrook Campus, 2800 Victory Blvd., Staten Island, NY

WHEN:          Thursday, May 31, 2018, at 9:30 a.m.

CONTACT:   Terry Mares, 718-982-2428

 

THE CUNY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH & HEALTH POLICY

 

WHO:            Cecile Richards, a national leader for women’s rights and social and economic justice, author of The New York Times bestseller Make Trouble, and president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Planned Parenthood Action Fund, will be the keynote speaker. Ms. Richards will also be given an Honorary Doctor of Science degree.

WHERE:        Apollo Theater, 253 W 125th St., New York, NY

WHEN:          Thursday, May 31, 2018, at 5 p.m.

CONTACT:   Barbara Aaron, 646-364-9772

 

HOSTOS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Luis Salgado, an international director, choreographer and educator (“In The Heights” and “On Your Feet!”)will deliver the keynote address.

WHERE:        New York City Center, 131 W 55th St., New York, NY

WHEN:          Thursday, May 31, 2018, at 3 p.m.

CONTACT:   Rich Pietras, 718-518-6513

 

LEHMAN COLLEGE

 

WHO:             André Acimen (’73), a Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at the CUNY Graduate Center and author of the acclaimed novel Call    Me by Your Name, will deliver the keynote address. Acimen will also be receive the Alumni Achievement Award.

WHERE:        South Field, Lehman College, 250 Bedford Park Blvd. West, Bronx, NY

WHEN:          Thursday, May 31, 2018, at 10:00 a.m.

CONTACT:   David Koeppel, 718-960-4492

 

QUEENS COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Cristina Jiménez Moreta (’07), a MacArthur Fellow, an immigrant rights advocate and co-founder of United We Dream, will serve as the keynote speaker and will be presented with an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters degree.

WHERE:        Queens College Quad, 65-30 Kissena Blvd., Queens, NY

WHEN:          Thursday, May 31, 2018, at 9 a.m.

CONTACT:   Maria Matteo, 718-997-5595

 

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Tim Tynan, the Managing Director and Global Head of Citigroup Business Services, will be honored with a Presidential Medal Award at the morning ceremony and will address the graduates. Steven Fiterman, Manager and Chief Principal of the Steven C. and Susan L. Fiterman Charitable Foundation, will also be honored with a Presidential Medal Award and will address the afternoon graduates.

WHERE:        The Theater at Madison Square Garden, 4 Pennsylvania Plaza in New York, NY

WHEN:          Friday, June 1, 2018, at 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.

CONTACT:   Manuel Romero, 212-220-1238

 

BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

WHO:             This year’s ceremony will have no commencement speaker.

WHERE:        Ohio Field, Bronx Community College, 2155 University Ave/, Bronx, NY

WHEN:          Friday, June 1, 2018, at 9:30 a.m.

CONTACT:   Ramona Barksdale, 718-289-5457

 

CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK

 

WHO:             Anita F. Hill, noted law professor, author and activist for gender and civil rights, will serve as the keynote speaker and receive an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters degree.

WHERE:        South Campus Great Lawn, 135th St. and Convent Ave., New York, NY

WHEN:          Friday, June 1, 2018, at 9:30 a.m.

CONTACT:   Jay Mwamba, 212-650-7580

 

CUNY SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

 

WHO:             Shaun King, journalist, activist and humanitarian, who is a Writer-In-Residence at Harvard Law School’s Fair Punishment Project and columnist  for The Intercept, will deliver this year’s keynote address.

WHERE:        David Geffen Hall, 10 Lincoln Center Plaza, New York, NY

WHEN:          Friday, June 1, 2018, 4:30 p.m.

CONTACT:   Andrea Fagon, 646-664-8690

 

QUEENSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Dr. Diane B. Call, the President of Queensborough Community College, will deliver this year’s keynote address.

WHERE:        Queensborough Community College Athletic Field, QCC, 222-05 56th Ave., Bayside, NY

WHEN:          Friday, June 1, 2018, at 9:00 a.m.

CONTACT:   Alice Doyle, 718-281-5591

 

YORK COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Lysa Scully, general manager of LaGuardia Airport, will deliver the keynote address at this year’s commencement.

WHERE:        Health and Physical Education Field, York College, 160-30 Liberty Ave., Jamaica, NY

WHEN:          Friday, June 1, 2018, at 9:00 a.m.

CONTACT:   Marcia Comrie, 718-262-3865

 

CUNY BACCALAUREATE

 

WHO:            Gareth Rhodes (’11) who graduated summa cum laude from the CUNY B.A. program, before going to work for Governor Andrew Cuomo as deputy press secretary, will deliver the keynote address. He is currently attending Harvard Law School and running for Congress in New York’s 19th District.

WHERE:        Proshansky Auditorium, CUNY Graduate Center, 365 5th Ave., New York, NY

WHEN:          Monday, June 4, 2018, at 10:30 a.m.

CONTACT:   Regina Matthews, 212.817.8223

 

MEDGAR EVERS COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Deval Patrick, the former Governor of Massachusetts, will deliver the keynote address and receive an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree.

WHERE:        Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY

WHEN:          Monday, June 4, 2018, at 9 a.m.

CONTACT:   Kevin Adams, 718-270-6244

 

NEW YORK CITY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

 

WHO:            Catherine Grace “Cady” Coleman, a former member of the NASA Astronaut Corps, Air Force Officer and chemist, will deliver the keynote address.

WHERE:        Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave. in Brooklyn, NY

WHEN:          Monday, June 4, 2018, at 5:30 p.m.

CONTACT:   Stephen M. Soiffer, 718-260-5992

 

LAGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

WHO:             Shaun King, journalist, activist and humanitarian, who is a Writer-In-Residence at Harvard Law School’s Fair Punishment Project and columnist  for The Intercept, will deliver this year’s keynote address.

WHERE:        Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., in Brooklyn, NY

WHEN:          Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at 9 a.m.

CONTACT:   Luda Spajic, 718-482-5060

 

MACAULAY HONORS COLLEGE

 

WHO:            Chris Hayes, host of MSNBC’s “All In With Chris Hayes” and bestselling author, will deliver this year’s keynote address.

WHERE:        United Palace Theater, 4140 Broadway, New York, NY.

WHEN:          Thursday, June 7, 2018, at 3:00 p.m.

CONTACT:   Kathryn Lineberger, 212-729-2912

 

STELLA AND CHARLES GUTTMAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

WHO:            Dr. John B. King, Jr. the President and CEO of The Education Trust, a national nonprofit organization that aims to identify and close opportunity and achievement gaps from preschool through college, and former U.S. Secretary of Education, is this year’s keynote speaker. Dr. King will also receive a Presidential Medal Award.

WHERE:        Hostos Center for the Arts & Culture, Hostos Community College, 450 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY

WHEN:          Thursday, June 14, 2018, at 10:30 a.m.

CONTACT:   Linda Merians, 646-313-8023

 

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 undergraduate students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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JOHN JAY COLLEGE HOSTS SOLITARY CONFINEMENT WEEK

John Jay College Hosts Solitary Confinement Week

 

Solitary confinement has become a critical issue in criminal justice reform, and this April, John Jay College, in partnership with The Center on Media, Crime and Justice, Public Square Media and National Religious Campaign Against Torture (NRCAT), hosted Solitary Confinement Week, a weeklong series of events designed to educate journalists, advocates, John Jay community members and the general public on the adverse effects of prolonged isolation.

In addition to a symposium titled “Rethinking Solitary Confinement: Where Do We Go From Here?”, a walk-through, replica solitary cell was installed on John Jay’s campus, where participants learned about the negative mental and physical effects of being held in isolation for up to 23 hours a day in a tiny six-by-nine-foot cell. Participants also used virtual reality headsets to get a better understanding of the psychological damage caused by solitary confinement.

“This is really powerful,” said John Jay President Karol V. Mason, after going through the virtual experience. “There ought to be very, very limited circumstances where somebody is separated from the general population.”

Watch President Karol V. Mason experience NRCAT’s solitary confinement simulation

 

Johnny Perez, Director of the U.S. Prisons Program with The National Religious Campaign Against Torture(NRCAT), has experienced solitary confinement firsthand and is now an advocate for the abolition of solitary confinement, a practice that he and NRCAT believe constitutes torture. He says that educating students on the realities of mass incarceration is important, especially for John Jay students who will become future criminal justice leaders.

 

“A lot of legislators write policy with people they never come in contact with. There is a big space between policy in theory and policy in practice, and in order to close that space, you need people who are directly impacted involved in teaching and learning.” —Johnny Perez, Director of the U.S. Prisons Program, NRCAT

 

“A lot of legislators write policy with people they never come in contact with,” Perez said. “There is a big space between policy in theory and policy in practice, and in order to close that space, you need people who are directly impacted involved in teaching and learning.”

President Karol V. Mason expressed admiration for Perez and the advocates who participated in the weeklong series who are working towards criminal justice reform. “Johnny Perez spent three years in solitary confinement, but he is still able to do this work and make sure other people don’t have that experience,” she said. “There’s so much talent locked up in our criminal justice system.”

 

President Karol Mason

 

“Johnny Perez spent three years in solitary confinement, but he is still able to do this work and make sure other people don’t have that experience. There’s so much talent locked up in our criminal justice system.” —President Karol V. Mason

 

On April 25, the John Jay Student Affairs Office, Public Square Media and NRCAT screened video stories from “RIKERS: An American Jail” and The Marshall Project’s “We Are Witnesses,” and featured panelists of experts and advocates. Bryant Silva, a graduating senior at John Jay College who interns at Public Square Media and helped organize Solitary Confinement Week, says that events like these allow students to understand the importance of criminal justice reform. “As a college for criminal justice, this is directly relevant to what we study,” Silva said. “People are getting informed, and they’re seeing that solitary confinement is unacceptable and a violation of our human rights.”

“Having a deep understanding of mass incarceration allows you to humanize the people who have been impacted by the system,” said Perez. “We’re not saying you shouldn’t hold people accountable—we’re saying you shouldn’t treat people inhumanely in the course of holding them accountable.”


Sports journalism legend Gerald Eskenazi leads CCNY AVA honorees

 

Legendary sports journalist Gerald Eskenazi, who had a 47-year career at the New York Times, will be honored by CCNY.

Gerald Eskenazi, ’59, the acclaimed sportswriter who had a distinguished 47-year career at The New York Times and has authored 16 books, is among the honorees at The City College of New York’s Alumni Varsity Association’s 52nd Annual Hall of Fame Reunion Dinner on May 24.

Eskenazi, who generated more than 8,000 bylines at the Times, will receive the Mark Asa Abbott Award at The National Arts Club in Manhattan for   service to the AVA.

Victor Calise, commissioner, New York City Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities, will receive the AVA’s New York Sports Legend.

AVA Hall of Fame inductees are:

  • Dzindzi Asamoah-Wade, ’14 women’s soccer;
  • Dan Papachristos, ’75, (posthumously) men’s ice hockey;
  • Dalliana Toussaint, ’14, women’s volleyball;
  • Lazaro Valdes, ’79, men’s track and field;
  • Jessica Wang, ’12, women’s fencing; and
  • Jeffrey Williams, men’s ice hockey.

Williams was an All-star defenseman on the CCNY varsity hockey team between 1971 and 1974. He later finished college at Hunter.

For more information or to attend the Hall of Fame Reunion Dinner, please contact the event coordinator Nina Ferrell at: nferrell@ccnyalumni.org. The Alumni Varsity Association is an affiliate of the Alumni Association of The City College of New York.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

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CCNY’s Anan Kazi and Kevin Gonzalez earn Salk Scholarships

Anan Kazi, CCNY Class of 2018 and a Salk Scholar.

Kevin Gonzalez is CCNY’s other 2018 Salk Scholar.

Anan Kazi and Kevin Gonzalez, two members of The City College of New York’s Class of 2018, are recipients of Jonas E. Salk Scholarships awarded by The City University of New York. The scholarships recognize exceptional students who plan careers in medicine and the biological sciences.

As Salk Scholars, Kazi, from Macaulay Honors College at CCNY, and Gonzalez will each receive a stipend of $8,000 to be allocated over three or four years of medical studies.

Following are brief bios of the two Scholars:

Anan Kazi
Born in Houston, Texas, of Bangladeshi immigrant parents, Kazi is graduating from Macaulay with a BS in biology and a minor in mathematics. The Brooklyn resident enters SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, in downtown Brooklyn, this fall.

Kazi was inspired by her father, a psychiatrist at Kings County Hospital, which is an affiliate of SUNY Downstate, to pursue a medical career. “Seeing the impact he has on the community inspired me,” she said. “I want to help people but also look at it from a scientific perspective.”  Her interest is OB/GYN.

Kazi has captained the Bollywood dance team, which she terms “a CUNY Macaulay Honors outfit,” that performs in Tristate area and charity events. The team, “Macaulay Deewane,” has won several competitions.

Kevin Gonzalez
A former Delta aircraft mechanic who worked on planes as large as the Boeing 747, Gonzalez is also graduating with a BS in biology. He’ll enter Columbia University’s neurobiology and behavior PhD program.

He said his experience working on aircraft taught him how to troubleshoot and think about problems from an analytical point of view.

The Queens, resident, was encouraged to enroll in college by his supervisor at Delta. “So I came to CCNY and said ‘let’s try some biology,’” he said.

He met Mark Emerson, assistant professor of biology, who became his mentor and “revolutionized how I see science.”

A highlight of his junior year was a 10-week summer internship at Harvard Medical School, with Lisa Goodrich in the department of neurobiology.

I’m excited to do science. Seeing more underrepresented minorities do science is good,” said Gonzalez, who applied for 12 graduate schools and was accepted by all of them.

About the Salk Scholarship Program
The Salk Scholarship is named for Dr. Jonas Salk, a 1934 graduate of City College, who developed the first polio vaccine in 1955. Dr. Salk turned down a tickertape parade in honor of his discovery, and asked that the money be used for scholarships instead. New York City provided initial funding for the scholarships that year.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Queens College to Recognize Award-Winning Students in Second Annual Winners Celebration May 16

— Honorees Include Marshall Scholar Planning to Study the Role of Dance Therapy in Neuro-Rehabilitation; Alumnus and Former QC Baseball Player
Steven Nicokiris is Guest Speaker —

Media interviews and photo ops with the honorees, their parents, and President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez will take place near the main stage during opening ceremony introductions.

WHAT:
With nearly 75 city, state, and federal award-winning students in academia and athletics for the 2018 academic year, Queens College will acknowledge their success in its second annual campus-wide celebration on Wednesday, May 16, from 12:15 to 1:30 pm.

WHERE:
Dining Hall
Queens College, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens
Click here for directions to campus; click here for a campus map.

WHO:
Host President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez will recognize the honorees, including Marshall Scholar Josephine Cooke; NSF Graduate Fellowship recipient Tamar Lichter ’17; and Jeannette K. Watson Fellowship recipient Renuka Surujnarain; and All-Met Second Team Honoree Beth Bonin of the women’s basketball team. Special guest speaker will be Queens College alumnus Steven Nicokiris, CPA managing director, CBIZ financial management firm and former QC baseball player. For a full list of student winners, please click here.

Among the other students being recognized will be first-, second-, and third-place winners of the NBC Universal Social Hack; CUNY 2017 and 2018 Hackathons; IBM’s Startup Weekend NYC Blockchain Edition; eBay Startup Cup; Perkins Hack; Hackachella; Verizon Sports/Media/Technology Startup Bootcamp; the Women’s Tennis team, winners of the NCAA East II Region; and the Men’s Tennis team, winners of the East Coast Conference Men’s Tennis Championship and NCAA East II Region; and the Track and Field Team, the East Coast Conference Outdoor Track and Field Champions.

Pizza (kosher and non-kosher) will be served, along with gourmet ice cream provided by Queens College alumni and brothers Bruce and Mark Becker, owners of Max and Mina’s Ice Cream. Named for the brothers’ grandparents, the store is known for such eccentric flavors as Cajun, lox, purple mint chip, beer and malt. The band Black MoMa will perform a range of soul, jazz and hip-hop selections.

 

Background:   Begun in Spring 2017 by President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, the Queens College Winners Celebration brings together administrators, faculty, students, and staff in a celebration recognizing student excellence in academia and athletics.

Josephine Cooke is the third student from Queens College to be named a Marshall Scholar. The Marshall Scholarship Program, begun in 1953 as a gesture of gratitude to the people of the United States for the assistance the United Kingdom received under the Marshall Plan, offers talented Americans the chance to study at a UK university of their choice. Cooke, a neuroscience and psychology double-major who plans to complete a PhD at Imperial College London, will focus on how dance therapy can be used to rehabilitate neurological disorders. Read more about Cooke here.

Steven Nicokiris, who played baseball for Queens College as an undergraduate, is a member of the school’s Athletic Advisory Committee, which is made up of alumni who review candidates and make recommendations for the college’s Athletics Hall of Fame. He works closely with the college’s Center for Career Engagement and Internships as a member of their Employer Advisory Committee to develop career opportunities for Queens College graduates and internships for accounting and economics majors. Nicokiris is a frequent speaker on campus to both accounting and finance students, as well as to incoming student-athletes. Read Nicokiris’s full bio here.

Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

 

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


CCNY students go the distance in Concrete Canoe

The Concrete Canoe team

“Cosmos” the award winning Concrete Canoe

Engineering students are used to solving tough problems. But building a canoe made of concrete that’s capable of winning a race – that’s quite an accomplishment!

On May 7, a team of Grove School of Engineering students made The City College of New York proud by finishing first in the Men’s Sprint, second in the Women’s Sprint, and by taking third place overall in the 2018 Concrete Canoe Metropolitan Conference Competition. The team also won first place for their report paper.

Here’s a list of how CCNY ranked in each of the competition categories:

  • Design Paper – 1st Place
  • Oral Presentation – 4th Place
  • Final Product – 2nd Place
  • Women’s Sprint – 2nd Place
  • Men’s Sprint – 1st Place
  • Co-ed Sprint – 3rd Place
  • Women’s Endurance – 3rd Place
  • Men’s Endurance – 6th Place
  • Total – 3rd Place

How on earth did they do it? The GSOE civil engineering Concrete Canoe team made improvements to the standard concrete mix using new components such as expanded shale and pozzitive (a secondary cementitious material). They also relied on one other key ingredient: Slack, the mobile app that keeps collaboration and communication flowing.

Although their canoe, which is named Cosmos, was heavier than that of NYU, they managed to beat their rival in two of the sprint races.

It’s also worth noting that CCNY had the largest number of supporters who produced the highest volume of noise during the races!

Faculty advisor Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh, an assistant professor in the department of Civil engineering at the Grove School commented on the team’s accomplishments saying: “When I think of Concrete Canoe club, the first thing that comes to mind is the efficiency with which the students have been managing this multi-scale project. They handle a wide range of activities including engineering design, construction, logistics, practicing paddling, academic writing, oral presentation, and dealing with critical and urgent situations. Over the past six years I have observed the high degree of professionalism in the manner the students communicate and work together. Concrete Canoe is an old CCNY tradition. It has been giving the students precious memories and invaluable experience that they carry through their lives and careers.”

Congratulations to all of the GSOE civil engineering Concrete Canoe team members:

  • John Cifuentes
  • Erica Loo
  • Fabian Francis
  • Ethan Chiu
  • Betsy Vargas
  • Daisy Leandro
  • Elaine Famutimi
  • Dehaan Rahman
  • Luis Abreu
  • Andrea Limon
  • Bryant Ling
  • Jonathan Flores
  • Xinbin Xu
  • John Baumann
  • Jonathan VanSleet
  • Jan Kasimierscuk
  • Anthony Nuccio
  • Zhi Chen
  • Jesica Mei
  • Richard Aguilar

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Media contact: rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu


Reimagining Black Mamahood in an Unjust Society

Lynn Roberts, Assistant Professor in the Community Health and Social Sciences department at CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy is quoted in the Rewire.News article, “Reimagining Black Mamahood in an Unjust Society.” Roberts is a scholar in the reproductive justice field, and is one of the editors of the Radical Reproductive Justice anthology. The full article is below.

Reimagining Black Mamahood in an Unjust Society

Regina Mahone |  May 10, 2018  |  Rewire.News

One could argue that parenting, for Black women, is an act of political warfare. Women of color-led organizations have been working for decades to disrupt the toxic narrative around Black motherhood, a critical step toward dismantling the white supremacy stronghold—but it remains a steep hill to climb.

Launched this week, Forward Together’s eighth annual Mamas Day celebration is honoring Black motherhood in all its forms and the right to parent. To commemorate the celebration, artists created original card designs paired with messaging that names “what mamas need during Mamas Day and always: health care, family recognition, to live free from violence and criminalization, amongst other things,” said Diana Lugo-Martinez, the movement building director at Forward Together, a reproductive justice organization committed to Black liberation. “We’re reframing the system that’s rooted in white supremacy, anti-Black racism, misogyny, transmisogyny, xenophobia—a system that’s continuously trying to deny us our rights and our dignity.”

Since chattel slavery on stolen land, state actors have sought to control Black women’s reproduction and ability to parent in one way or another. Most recently, “the modern child welfare system … has disproportionately removed children of color from homes rather than providing support,” said Lynn Roberts, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy.

This year, Forward Together collaborated with Black Mamas Matter Alliance, the National Network of Abortion Funds, SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, and the Southern Birth Justice Network “to raise the issues Black mamas are facing, with a goal of moving people to support ongoing campaigns and fights at the state, local, [and] national level that these organizations are leading,” said Lugo-Martinez. “These organizations are working to ensure that Black mamas have the right, respect, resources, and recognition to thrive.” SisterSong, for example, is leading the fight to end shackling of pregnant people who are incarcerated. “We’re asking that folks hold themselves, our communities, and systems accountable and pledge their support and show up for Black mamas and ride alongside these organizations,” Lugo-Martinez added.

Campaigns like the Mamas Day project amplify imagery that allows Black people, including Black immigrant mothers, to see themselves as their communities and their children, see them, and for non-Black people to bear witness. “It is at its heart a culture shift campaign,” Lugo-Martinez told Rewire.News.

The co-creators of the term “reproductive justice” were the first movement leaders to highlight how for women of color, the “ability to control what happens to our bodies is constantly challenged by poverty, racism, environmental degradation, sexism, homophobia, and injustice,” as Loretta Ross, co-founder and former national coordinator of SisterSong, put it in Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice.

As Roberts pointed out, the child welfare system offers a clear example of how Black mothers’ rights are tossed aside. In the 1990s, she directed a family rehabilitation program (FRP) in Harlem, New York, called First Steps: one of at least 20 in New York City that provided numerous services, including mental health care and in-home support, to mothers who used substances. “It was a model that worked,” Roberts told Rewire.News.

A 1999 study of the programs found that completing the program was associated with a decrease in the number of out-of-home placements of children, which are costly services, noted Roberts. Still, the program was defunded not long after former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani (R) took office.

Was it a numbers game? If so, according to Roberts, it doesn’t add up. “Does it cost more to pay for a child to be in foster care, or for someone to be in jail, or to pay for them to have a decent education and employment opportunities? When we match those dollars and cents, we know that prevention and supportive services are much more economical.”

Roberts wrote in her essay in the 2017 Radical Reproductive Justice anthology that to her knowledge, “there has not been a city initiative since FRP that centers low-income black and Latina women and their families and provided support rather than punishment for their drug use.”

Clearly, though the program ended, Roberts’ perspective hasn’t changed on its impact. “I am an adoptive parent and if I had my preferences, as much as I love my two adopted children, I would have loved to have had programs available to their moms, their birth moms, to support them in a way that they could have remained with them,” Roberts told Rewire.News in a phone interview. “I also recognize that sometimes things don’t work out, and maybe even if those services were provided, the parents might have had difficulties. But who makes those determinations, right? Everyone is very alarmed whenever there’s a child death at the hands of their parents, but we also know that some people are given more slack even when they are under the system’s watch.”

By and large, Black women in the United States have not been given leeway or dignity while birthing or parenting in the same way as other mothers. Black women have been branded as “welfare queens,” dangerous to the offspring in their wombs, and the reason for their children’s poor education and low job prospects. In the eyes of far too many people in this country, Black women can’t do right and are not “worthy” of basic human decency. This racist ideology is used as a tool against them by Republican, and some Democratic, lawmakers to slash social service rolls.

To counter that narrative, the Black Mamas campaign seeks to “paint the picture of who our families are and who our mamas are, and shift the culture for us to really begin to think about celebrating and honoring our mamas and who they are,” said Lugo-Martinez. Previous campaigns have centered other mamas organizing to fight systemic oppression, including formerly incarcerated mamas and their push to “ban the box” in 2015, and immigrant and Muslim mamas, who have been targeted under the Trump administration, in 2016 and 2017.

Amir Khadar, a multidisciplinary artist from Minnesota who created one of this year’s Mamas Day cards, explained in a phone interview that they have always looked up to their mom.

“I started to understand a lot of her motives during our upbringing, like some of the decisions that didn’t necessarily make me too happy and how she was doing it all for our safety and our success in a lot of ways,” they said. “I’ve always really admired her strength. All the characters I draw today are in some way inspired by my mom.”

In Khadar’s Mamas Day image, a mother is doing her Black child’s hair. “I wanted to depict something that was like a normal situation, a very regular situation that I’m used to experiencing—well, my mom doing my hair. It’s a very loving moment and I don’t think that it’s respected as a loving moment since the [positive] narratives that are pushed forward of motherhood are always of white mothers,” they told Rewire.News. “I think there’s so much power in them doing their hair, so I just want that to be recognized.”

Iman Geddy, an Atlanta-based artist who also created a Mamas Day card, explained on the phone that she never really understood how difficult parenting was: “You know when you’re a child, you just think that your mother is a superhero and she’s magically getting things done; you just take it for granted.”

Geddy continued, “She was working two jobs, put me through college, put my two brothers now through college as well. All the while without any social services, without any kind of safety net. It really took a toll on her and it also forced her to put her life on hold because she had to wait for all of us to get situated before she could go back to school and essentially get recertified for work that she was already doing before she came” to the United States from Somalia.

“It was a real kind of violence … that didn’t really have a language to it because the understanding is that, you know, you’re a mother, this should come naturally to you. You should be able to raise your children; you should be actually overjoyed to be able to do this thing. I’m not saying that we didn’t enjoy our lives together and we had a very—considering everything that happened—we had a very happy childhood. I’m so lucky, incredibly lucky,” Geddy said, referring to her family’s ability to leave a war-torn country and come to the United States. “But when I think about it, I’m just always so amazed and so, almost, heartbroken to think of how much easier her life would have been had there been a support system for single mothers.”

Black teen moms also experience a dearth of support services and an indiscriminate amount of stigma. “It begins by what we say about the prevention of teen pregnancy, as if this is just a known fact: that at all costs we should prevent it, as if it’s never a good thing,” said Roberts, who was a teen mom. “That alone sets someone up once they become pregnant to never feel that they are a welcome part of society. And that just trickles down through school systems, to families, from that teen parent to the child.”

Deeming a young person as unfit to be a parent is illogical when you come to understand that “the circumstances that led up to becoming a teen parent aren’t being addressed,” said Roberts, such as poverty in the family, a lack of comprehensive sex education, or childhood sexual abuse.

Teens who become pregnant deserve “every support imaginable and that’s health-care access for prenatal care and for a healthy delivery, being able to remain in school … [and] having opportunities beyond high school for college, work, employment, and child care—the same things all other parents should have, and have a right to,” said Roberts.

Roberts wanted to be clear that she refers “to not only teen parents, but also the whole idea of unplanned pregnancies, as ‘unsupported pregnancies.’” She added, “In my view, an unsupported pregnancy is one where the state, the community, and the family are unsupportive of the pregnant person.” That lack of support translates into limited or no access to quality health care, along with zero support for a decent education, employment, housing, and other social services, explained Roberts.

“Those types of opportunities and services should be readily accessible and affordable and culturally relevant,” she added. Beyond services, a supported pregnancy model would require shame-free messaging from media and the larger community, including medical practitioners and researchers, who Roberts argued should consider using the term “unsupported pregnancy” in place of “unintended pregnancy” to more accurately describe the social conditions that contribute to long-term, disparate outcomes. Meanwhile, “in the family, we’d also have to ensure [members] recognize and support young people irrespective of pregnancy.”

Community plays an important role in the success of Black mothers of all ages. Geddy’s mom “lost her community when she left home”—as did the artist. This showed her that forming community is an intentional practice, not always a natural one. “When you come to a place and no one, absolutely no one, comes from your specific background or your tribe,” you have to expand your “sense of community and really start forging families through bonds that transcend kinship in terms of traditional kinship, in terms of blood or ethnicity.” So through her art, she would like “for people to really see themselves as not only connected to the world around them, in the general sense, but also valuable in that they always have something to offer. You always have something to offer someone and you can always learn from others.”

That seems to underscore the Mamas Day campaign’s message: People should expand their way of thinking to see others as they are and maybe as more than they think themselves or others are.

When asked about the campaign’s ultimate goal, Lugo-Martinez told Rewire.News, “Now more than ever we must show up for Black mamas, because the health-care system, the immigration system, the economy were never built to benefit folks of color. It’s on all of us to fight systemic oppression. My hope is that folks will take the pledge and truly commit to fighting alongside Black mamas for health and justice.”

 

Click here to view the original article.


HSI:Urbano Conference at The City College of New York on May 23

The HSI: Urbano Conference will take place at CCNY from May 23-May 25.

NSF-Sponsored Hispanic Student Achievement Conference, May 23 through May 25

The HSI:URBANO Conference, an exploration of the issues affecting Hispanic and underrepresented minority students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), will take place from May 23, 2018, through May 25.  The conference, funded by the National Science Foundation and focused on Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI), will be held in the CUNY Graduate Center’s Advanced Science Research Center on the campus of the City College of New York.  Registration is currently underway and is accessible at the HSI:URBANO Conference website.

“The HSI:Urbano Conference is an exceptional opportunity to explore what is keeping Hispanic students from taking their place in STEM studies and STEM careers,” noted Jorge Gonzalez-Cruz, Mechanical Engineering professor at the City College of New York and conference coordinator. “More importantly, the conference will identify specific solutions that can be implemented in urban colleges to address this issue.”

Conference Purpose:

Hispanics represent 18 percent of the United States population today and are projected to represent 30 percent of the population by the year 2050.  However, they receive only 9 percent of the STEM degrees awarded, and account for only 7 percent of the America’s STEM workforce.  This discrepancy represents a significant gap – in achievement, in lost potential, in economic opportunity, in work-ready employees for industry – that places our country at risk.  The National Science Foundation (NSF) has committed substantial resources to address this issue over the years.  It has funded the HSI:Urbano conference, and several others like it throughout the country, to gather insights into the reasons for this gap and to identify interventions that can help to close it.  The conference will end with a grant writing workshop conducted by Joan Walker, HSI program director with the NSF.

“This is a critical issue for the NSF,” said Walker.  “We are looking forward to the conference and to considering the proposals that will undoubtedly emerge from it.”

Conference Information:

The HSI:Urbano Conference will begin on May 23 with a description of the nature and importance of HSI issues by experts in the field. A series of panel discussions then will explore the nature of the issues from three perspectives:

  •     College administrators, who provide services to students to support their studies and prepare them for graduation
  •     Employers, who consider the qualifications of students seeking STEM careers
  •     Students themselves, whose perspective on Hispanic and underrepresented student performance in STEM is not often considered.

City College President Vincent Boudreau also is scheduled to speak.

The second day of the conference, May 24, will begin with an exploration of interventions that attempt to improve Hispanic and underrepresented student achievement and work-readiness, focusing on programs to that:

  •     Leverage technology in the classroom
  •     Use social media to build community and improve access to services
  •     Promote experiential (or project-based) learning.

Breakout sessions to identify additional interventions will follow. The day will culminate with a presentation from a successful Hispanic STEM student and a banquet at which NSF’s Acting Assistant Director for Education and Human Resources William J. (Jim) Lewis will make a presentation.

The third day of the Conference, May 25, will present the results from the breakout sessions of the previous day.  It will end with presentations by Carmen De La Rosa, New York State Assemblywoman representing District 72, and Adriano Espaillat, Member of the United States House of Representatives, New York District 13.  CUNY Chancellor James Milliken and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer are also slated to speak.

The NSF Grant Writing Workshop will end the Conference.For more information about the conference, please visit http://hsiurbano.ccny.cuny.edu/.

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Spring 2018 Commencement speaker and honorees announced

The Spring 2018 commencement ceremony of the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, will honor two leaders in public health and social justice: Cecile Richards will receive an honorary doctorate and deliver the keynote speech, and Sergio Matos will receive the Champion of Public Health Award. The ceremony will take place on May 31, 2018 at the Apollo Theater in Harlem.

 

Cecile RichardsHonorary Doctor of Science in Public Health

Cecile Richards is a national leader for women’s rights and social and economic justice, and the author of New York Times bestseller Make Trouble. As President of Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Planned Parenthood Action Fund for more than a decade, Richards has worked to increase affordable access to reproductive health care and to build a healthier and safer world for women and young people. After starting her career as a labor organizer, working with women earning the minimum wage, she went on to start her own grassroots organizations, and later served as Deputy Chief of Staff to House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. In 2011 and 2012, she was named one of TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World. Richards is a frequent speaker and commentator on politics and progressive issues. She and her husband, Kirk Adams, have three children and live in New York City and Maine.

 

 

Sergio MatosChampion of Public Health Award

Sergio Matos is the co-founder and executive director of the Community Health Worker Network of NYC (CHWNYC), an independent professional association that works to advance the CHW workforce while preserving the integrity of the work. Matos has been a community health worker for over 30 years and has worked to help communities organize around issues of environmental and social justice, hunger, chronic disease management and social and economic issues that affect their health. Under his leadership, CHWNYC has trained over 1000 CHWs throughout the US and the Caribbean. Matos is a past chair of the Community Health Worker Section of the American Public Health Association – the largest association of public health professionals in the world – where he worked as a policy leader and futurist to build a national platform that developed a national CHW definition and succeeded in getting the US Department of Labor to issue a unique standard occupational classification (SOC # 21-1094). Matos recently co-authored a book titled, Bridging the Gap – How CHWs Improve the Health of Immigrants, published by Oxford University Press.

 

 

For more information about the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy commencement ceremony, please visit our commencement page.


Graduating Senior Cynthia Ly Uses Interesting Classroom Strategies to Ensure a Well-Rounded Education for a Diverse Student Body

Looking to become a high school biology teacher, Ly finds particular techniques that establish equity in a public school setting.

<p>Cynthia Ly wishes to teach biology at Brooklyn College-neighbor, Midwood High School. Photo: David Rozenblyum.</p>

Cynthia Ly wishes to teach biology at Brooklyn College-neighbor, Midwood High School. Photo: David Rozenblyum.

 

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018 share their thoughts on some of the more complex and challenging aspects of their areas of study. For more on this year’s commencement, visit our FacebookInstagram, and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2018 hashtag to join the conversation.

Cynthia Ly is a member of the Class of 2018, graduating with a bachelor of arts in biology education (grades 7–12). Ly was born and raised in Brooklyn to Taiwanese and Vietnamese immigrants. When she was 11 years old, she published an essay about her father’s escape from the Viet Cong, and though terrified of public speaking, read the essay before an audience to rousing applause. Ly selected Brooklyn College for its affordability and proximity to her home, as well as its closeness to the institution at which she wishes to become a full-time teacher, Midwood High School. She is a Zicklin Summer FellowNew York City Men Teach Fellow, and a writer for Stuck in the Library, a creative magazine that aims to cultivate a thriving literary community on the Brooklyn College campus.

Ly shared her perspective about how some of the institutional obstacles surrounding public education might be surmounted.

“We would solve the problem of inequality in the public education system by having supports for a different kind of instruction. It’s tiring for the students to hear teachers lecture for 45 minutes every single day. I’m currently a student-teacher at Midwood High School, and I teach young people from diverse cultural and educational backgrounds. Students all learn differently, and I’m always experimenting with my lesson plans to try to make the best of it all. I usually incorporate memes, gifs, and other pop-culture references to grab my students’ attention and keep them focused throughout class. Of course, I alter the memes and gifs to correlate to the particular science lesson. Also, having students work in groups, and encouraging them to discuss their responses with their peers, helps. When I walk around the classroom after my mini-lesson and observe the groups, I witness the amazing atmosphere that has taken over: students exchanging ideas and relating the lesson to their own cultures. Students start noticing the similarities among themselves, rather than pointing out the differences. I love asking my students ‘scaffolding questions.’ A scaffolding question is when an instructor asks a series of questions to ultimately get the majority of the class to respond in a detailed manner. The students get to participate and ask scaffolding questions as well. I tell my students all the time that all questions are acceptable because I don’t want anyone to feel like their questions are ‘stupid.’ When I was in high school, I felt like I was limited in resources and confidence because of the lack of questions I asked. I don’t want my students to make the same mistakes I made, and enforcing these small teaching strategies helps provide me every child I instruct a full and well-rounded education.”

 

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


High-Sensitivity Microsensors on the Horizon With Design Breakthrough by Researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY

Wireless microsensors have enabled new ways to monitor our environment by allowing users to measure spaces previously off limits to research, such as toxic areas, vehicle components, or remote areas in the human body. Researchers, however, have been stymied by limited improvements in the quality of data and sensitivity of these devices stemming from challenges associated with the environments they operate in and the need for sensors with extremely small footprints.

A new paper published today in Nature Electronics by researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York, Wayne State University, and Michigan Technological University, explains how new devices with capabilities far beyond those of conventional sensors can be built by borrowing concepts from quantum mechanics.

The team, led by Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC’s Photonics Initiative and Einstein Professor of Physics at The Graduate Center, and Pai-Yen Chen, professor at Wayne State University, developed a new technique for designing microsensors that allows for significantly enhanced sensitivity and a very small footprint. Their method involves using isospectral parity-time-reciprocal scaling, or PTX symmetry, to design the electronic circuits. A ‘reader’ is paired with a passive microsensor that meets this PTX symmetry. The pair achieves highly sensitive radio-frequency readings.

“In the push to miniaturize the sensors to improve their resolution and enable large-scale networks of sensing devices, improving the sensitivity of microsensors is crucial,” Alù said. “Our approach addresses this need by introducing a generalized symmetry condition that enables high-quality readings in a miniaturized footprint.”

The work builds on recent advances in the area of quantum mechanics and optics, which have shown that systems symmetric under space and time inversion, or parity-time (PT) symmetric, may offer advantages for sensor design. The paper generalizes this property to a wider class of devices that satisfy a more general form of symmetry — PTX-symmetry. This type of symmetry, is particularly well-suited to maintain high sensitivity, while drastically reducing the footprint.

The researchers were able to show this phenomenon in a telemetric sensor system based on a radio-frequency electronic circuit, which exhibited drastically improved resolution and sensitivity compared to conventional sensors. The microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based wireless pressure sensors share the sensitivity advantages of previous PT-symmetric devices, but crucially the generalized symmetry condition allows both for device miniaturization and enables an efficient realization at low frequencies within a compact electronic circuit.

This new approach may allow researchers to overcome the current challenges in deploying ubiquitous networks of long-lasting, unobtrusive microsensors to monitor large areas. In the age of the internet of things and big data, such networks are useful for wireless health, smart cities, and cyber-physical systems that dynamically gather and store large amounts of information for eventual analysis.

“Development of wireless microsensors with high sensitivity is one of the major challenging issues for practical uses in bioimplants, wearable electronics, internet-of-things, and cyber-physical systems,” Chen said. “While there has been continuous progress in miniature micro-machined sensors, the basics of telemetric readout technique remains essentially unchanged since its invention. This new telemetry approach will make possible the long-sought goal of successfully detecting tiny physical or chemical actuation from contactless microsensors.”

Media Contact:  Tanya Domi, tdomi@gc.cuny.edu, 212-817-7283, Paul McQuiston, Paul.Mcquiston@asrc.cuny.edu, 212-413-3307, Thomas Gorman, tgorman@wayne.edu, 313-577-3853

 

Organizational Attribution

Our correct name is the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York. For the purpose of space, Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY is acceptable. On second reference, ASRC is correct.

About the Advanced Science Research Center

The ASRC at the Graduate Center elevates scientific research and education at CUNY and beyond through initiatives in five distinctive, but increasingly interconnected disciplines: environmental sciences, nanoscience, neuroscience, photonics, and structural biology. The ASRC promotes a collaborative, interdisciplinary research culture with renowned researchers from each of the initiatives working side-by-side in the ASRC’s core facilities, sharing equipment that is among the most advanced available.


Letter to Students and Families, Week of May 14th, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,
 
Hoping you had a wonderful Mother’s Day Weekend!
 
Before we jump into our week ahead, a moment of gratitude: During this past Friday’s NESTFest, the artistry and talents of our K-12 school community were on display for all who attended this annual celebration. All of this was possible due to our students, families and the collaborative energy of teachers Pieter Voorhees, Jillian Fletcher, Jeffrey DuPont, Craig McGorry and the NEST+m PTA.  Here are some photos from the event.
 
As I listened to and watched our students on stage, I reflected upon the ways in which NEST+m’s commitment to Intellectualism, Inclusivity, Collaboration and Exploration were exhibited throughout the evening. Whether performing solo or within an ensemble, each of our performers demonstrated their capacity for empathy and artistry.
 
To see an even wider range of our students’ talents on display, please join us on Wednesday May 23, 2018, for our end-of-year Curriculum Showcase.  Details below.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication,

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal

 

This week

Tuesday

  • May 15th at 4:00pm – SLT Meeting

Wednesday

  • May 16th, all day – Middle Grades Exploration Day field trips

Thursday

  • May 17th, 8:30am – PTA Meeting and Election


Looking Ahead:

  1. Upper Grades Regents Field Testing, Week of May 21st
  2. NEST+m’s 2nd Annual Curriculum Showcase – featuring K-5 Science Fair, Curricular Highlights from across Grades 6-12 and Upper Grades Spring Music Concert – will take place May 23rd, 4:00pm to 7:00pm.
  3. The 4th Grade Science Performance Task is Tuesday, May 29th.
  4. Middle and Upper Grade Orientation events will be held on Wednesday, May 30 from 5:15pm – 7:30pm! Incoming and continuing families are encouraged to attend; more details forthcoming!
  5. The 4th Grade Science Written Test is Monday, June 4th.


Student Opportunities

Manhattan Youth Downtown Day Camp in Tribeca is Now Interviewing 17 and 18 year olds!
Apply to be a Camp Counselor! Applications available via email at: gabi@manhattanyouth.org


Fashion Merchandising Executive, Educator-Scientist and Financial Industry Leader Are This Year’s Queens College Annual Gala Honorees

— Award-Winning 1010 WINS Radio Reporter and Queens College Alumna Juliet Papa Hosted; Gala Raised Funds for Student Scholarships —

FLUSHING, N.Y., May 10, 2018 — The Queens College Gala is an annual event begun in 1990 to honor alumni whose professional success and dedication to philanthropy and public service embody the college’s motto, “Discimus ut serviamus: We learn so that we may serve.” This year’s event celebrated leaders in fashion merchandising, science education, and the financial industry on Wednesday evening, May 9, at Guastavino’s in Manhattan. The gala coincided with the completion of the college’s 80th-anniversary year-long celebration of alumni, faculty, and student achievement.

The 2018 honorees were President and CEO of Fashion Group International Margaret Hayes Adame ’61, recognized with the college’s Leadership Award; Chairman, Managing Partner, and Co-Founder of Comvest Partners Michael S. Falk ’84, who received the President’s Award; and educator, scientist and civic leader Dr. Joan Friedman Newmark ’61, honored with the Alumni Award. Juliet Papa, award-winning 1010 WINS radio reporter, served as host and emcee for the fourth consecutive year.

“Margaret Adame, Joan Newmark, and Michael Falk have achieved tremendous professional success. But they didn’t stop there. Collectively, these three alums have worked tirelessly on behalf of medical, educational, and religious institutions, voter rights, children, the environment, and the arts. We take enormous pride in our honorees,” said Queens College President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, who offered greetings to an audience of over 300 alumni and guests.

The gala is the college’s principal fundraiser, raising over $1 million in scholarship funds for a richly diverse student body representing more than 150 nations. Queens College students also play a role in the gala as performers, artists, and guest liaisons, giving them an opportunity to interact with the honorees and other alumni in attendance. It was held on Wednesday, May 9, at Guastavino’s in Manhattan.

Margaret Hayes Adame
Margaret Hayes is president and CEO of Fashion Group International, where she directs and implements strategic goals for 6,000 members in 28 chapters internationally. FGI produces runway trend presentations, seminars, business symposiums, and special events as an information resource for the fashion industry, including apparel, accessories, beauty, and interior and home design. As an international trade organization, FGI is represented in nine countries. Executive membership is by invitation only. Hayes is a seasoned, senior-level merchandising executive. For a full bio on Margaret Hayes Adame, please click here

Michael S. Falk
Michael Falk is chairman, managing partner, and co-founder of Comvest Partners. He chairs Comvest’s  executive committee, which oversees the firm’s management and strategic direction, is a member of the equity and lending investment committees, and has played active board roles with many of Comvest’s investments. Under his leadership, Comvest has grown to manage more than $3 billion. Comvest is the successor to Commonwealth Associates, which Falk co-founded in 1988; under his direction, Commonwealth led investment or financing transactions to finance operations, acquisitions, and restructuring of more than 100 technology, health care, and service-related lower-middle-market businesses. For a full bio on Michael Falk, please click here.

Dr. Joan Friedman Newmark
Joan Friedman Newmark has enjoyed a rewarding and diverse career in education, science, and the community. After marrying her fellow graduate student, Richard, and raising two children, she earned a secondary teaching certificate and taught chemistry, physics, and math in St. Paul, Minnesota’s public schools. She then worked until retirement in the Abrasives Laboratory at 3M. For a full bio on Dr. Joan Friedman Newmark, please click here.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received over 100 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its eighty years of service to the city and state through its outstanding liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its 19,000+ students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report’s Best College and a Forbes magazine Best Value College, thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


BIC students recognized with record number of scholarships from The LAGRANT Foundation

BIC students receive The LAGRANT Foundation scholarships: (l. to r.) Kelvin Morales, Amera Lulu, Rebecca Rivera, Jenifer Cuffari, and LaToya Heron.

Ad/PR undergrad Wendy Ngala is TLF scholar.

An unprecedented five students from The City College of New York’s Branding and Integrated Communications (BIC) master’s degree program have received highly competitive The LAGRANT Foundation (TLF) scholarships, awarded to students who share the foundation’s mission of increasing ethnic diversity in the advertising, marketing, and public relations industries.

The five graduate students are: Jennifer Cuffari, LaToya Heron, Amera Lulu, Kelvin Morales, and Rebecca Rivera. In a stellar showing, the CCNY cohort is among just 40 graduate students nationwide to receive a TLF scholarship.

This year’s TLF awards mark the fifth year in a row – in BIC’s fifth year of existence – that BIC students have been chosen to win the highly selective scholarships. With 14 recipients in just five years, BIC has now received the most scholarships given to a school/program in the Northeast during The LAGRANT Foundation’s 20 year history.

Acknowledging BIC’s strong showing, Kim L. Hunter, Founder and Chairman of TLF, said that “CCNY students are thoughtful, creative, and imaginative.”

Jen, LaToya, Amera, Kelvin, and Rebecca will each receive $3,250 and will be recognized at a reception in New York in May as they embark on two days of career development workshops. During these activities, students will have the opportunity to meet industry professionals, network, and gain exposure to the advertising, marketing, and public relations world.

Wendy Ngala, an undergraduate student in City College’s Advertising & Public Relations program, was also selected to receive a TLF scholarship of $2,000. Wendy is one of only 60 undergrads nationally to be recognized.

Since its inception in 1998, The LAGRANT Foundation (TLF) has provided 372 scholarships and $1.98 million to continue its mission to increase the number of ethnic minorities in the fields of advertising, marketing and public relations. With the generous support of its major donors and supporters, TLF provides students with career & professional development workshops, scholarships, internships, entry-level positions and mentors to African American/Black, Alaska Native/Native American, Asian American/Pacific Islander and Hispanic/Latino undergraduate and graduate students.

“BIC is honored to have had our grad students recognized by The LAGRANT Foundation every year since our launch in 2013,” said Nancy Tag, professor and program director of BIC. “Having five winners from BIC’s fifth cohort is particularly spectacular and puts CCNY’s record of educating the brightest talent in communications in the spotlight alongside longstanding powerhouses such as Syracuse, Harvard, Georgetown, and the University of Pennsylvania. I’m very proud of BIC’s 14 recipients — and celebrate our most recent honorees Jen, LaToya, Amera, Kelvin, and Rebecca.”

About The LAGRANT Foundation (TLF)

Since its inception in 1998, The LAGRANT Foundation (TLF) has provided 411 scholarships and $2.13 million to continue its mission to increase the number of ethnic minorities in the fields of advertising, marketing and public relations. With the generous support of its major donors and supporters, TLF provides students with career & professional development workshops, scholarships, internships, entry-level positions and mentors to African American/Black, Alaska Native/Native American, Asian American/Pacific Islander and Hispanic/Latino undergraduate and graduate students.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Contact: Susan Konig

914 525 1867

skonig@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit.


Upper Grades Orientation is Wednesday, May 30 at 5:15pm

You’re Invited to our Upper Grades Orientation

Please join us on Wednesday, May 30th from

5:15pm – 7:00pm

Families of students with IEPs & 504s, please stay with us from 7:00 – 7:45pm; please bring your child’s IEP!

Pizza Social for all students at 7:00pm!

NEST+m Auditorium
111 Columbia Street,
New York, NY 10002

corner of Columbia & Houston St.

RSVP here: https://goo.gl/forms/P7x4vuJXinr0xkLi1

We look forward to seeing you!

DOWNLOAD the flyer here: UG_orientation_flyer


Middle Grades Orientation is Wednesday, May 30 at 5:15pm

Middle Grades Orientation 

Please join us on Wednesday, May 30th
from 5:15pm – 7:00pm

Families of students with IEPs & 504s, please stay with us from 7:00 – 7:45pm; please bring your child’s IEP!

Pizza Social for all students at 7:00pm!

NEST+m Auditorium
111 Columbia Street, New York, NY 10002

corner of Columbia & Houston St.

Please RSVP at this link: https://goo.gl/forms/P7x4vuJXinr0xkLi1.

We look forward to seeing you!

DOWNLOAD the flyer: MG_orientation_flyer


Moxie Foundation gift invests in the spirit of creativity and change at CCNY

The Moxie Foundation’s new gift to CCNY is designed to help students realize their capability to create significant, positive change in the world.

CCNY President Vince Boudreau [right] hails the Moxie Foundation’s vision of higher education as “utterly progressive, deeply humanistic” and in tune with the college’s historic mission.

The City College of New York is pleased to announce a major gift from the Moxie Foundation that will strengthen the College’s capacity to prepare students for creative problem solving in the 21st century.  The $2.73 Million gift will launch the Moxie Initiative, designed to support outside of the box thinking, experiential learning, and academic innovation throughout every discipline at the College. The gift’s vision is that every student in every major will realize her or his capability to create significant, positive change in the world.

“One of my fondest ambitions for CCNY is for our work to become more fully and deeply engaged with and responsive to the needs of our society, particularly those needs one often finds in neighborhoods around our Harlem campus,” said President Vince Boudreau. “The Moxie Foundation gift provides us with the resources and encouragement to take some big steps in that direction. The Moxie Foundation’s vision of what higher education should be is utterly progressive, deeply humanistic, and entirely in tune with the historic mission of our great college.”

The Moxie Initiative will support faculty, staff, and students through several new programs designed to promote engaged, cross-disciplinary approaches to teaching and research; and to enable new courses within every major that utilize hands-on, problem based learning to teach critical competencies for effective change-making.

“The world is changing rapidly. City College students must be prepared to lead change in an economy of jobs that don’t yet exist. It is critical that everyone understand they possess a level of creativity and ingenuity – an entrepreneurial spirit that they can tap into to succeed in any endeavor, career or industry,” added Irwin Zahn, the Moxie Foundation Founder and a 1948 CCNY alumnus.  “We believe deeply in the power of collaboration and innovation, and we are delighted to support President Boudreau’s vision for the future of this incredible institution.”

The Moxie Foundation has been a significant supporter of City College since it helped establish the Zahn Innovation Center, an on-campus incubator, in 2012. This new gift will further and build upon the work of the Zahn Innovation Center by expanding the spirit of creativity and innovation on a campus-wide scale.

About the Moxie Foundation
Established in 1998, the Moxie Foundation is a family foundation based in San Diego, California. The Foundation is dedicated to enriching communities and empowering changemakers through the spirit of innovation. It works closely with partner organizations dedicated to advancing education, the environment, health and international development. For more information visit moxiefoundation.org.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Anita Hill is CCNY Commencement keynote speaker, June 1

CCNY’s 172nd Commencement honorees [from the top] Anita Hill, Seymour Moskowitz and Harold Scheraga.

Commencement honors for Seymour Moskowitz ’54ME & Harold Scheraga ’41

Anita F. Hill, the noted law professor, author and voice for gender and civil rights, is the keynote speaker at The City College of New York’s 172nd Commencement Exercises, June 1. Hill will receive the honorary degree Doctor of Humane Letters.

City College will also honor two of its distinguished alumni at the 9:30 a.m. ceremony on the South Campus Great Lawn, 135th St. and Convent Ave., Manhattan.

Seymour L. Moskowitz, ’54ME,  co-founder and retired president of CoVant Management Inc., which acquires and manages companies that support federal government agencies in the areas of defense and national security, will be receiving the honorary degree Doctor of Science.

Harold Abraham Scheraga, ’41, pioneering scientist and George W. and Grace L. Todd Professor Emeritus, Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, will be awarded, in absentia, the honorary degree Doctor of Science.

The honors are for their professional accomplishments.

Following are brief bios of the honorees:

Dr. Anita F. Hill
In 1991, Anita Hill’s powerful testimony on national television helped frame sexual harassment and the exploitation of women at work as a matter of human and civil rights. Hill did that during the Senate Judiciary Committee’s televised hearings on the confirmation of Clarence Thomas for the Supreme Court of the United States.  She went on to a stellar career as an author and public lecturer on gender and Civil Rights. Her books include: “Race, Gender and Power in America: The Legacy of the Hill-Thomas Hearings” (coedited with Emma Coleman Jordan), and “Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race and Finding Home.” Hill is University Professor of Law, Public Policy and Women’s Studies at Brandeis University and Of Counsel at Cohen, Milstein, Sellers and Toll. In the latter position, she continues her public work for justice in America.  In 2017, she was appointed Chair of the Hollywood entertainment industry’s Commission to Eliminate Sexual Harassment and Advance Equality in the Workplace.

Seymour L. Moskowitz, ’54ME
From the Cold War through the aftermath of 9/11, Seymour Moskowitz’ engineering acumen has contributed vitally to U.S. national security – including counterintelligence and counter terrorism – as well as the development of environmentally clean electric power generation systems to protect life on earth. A member of CCNY’s Class of 1954, Moskowitz’ outstanding career after earning a BS in mechanical engineering includes several highlights. He held leading research positions at Curtiss-Wright and Vitro corporations before his role in a group that acquired Anteon International Corporation. Anteon provided mission-critical information and technology services to government agencies. It grew into CoVant Technologies LLC and CoVant Management with Moskowitz as co-founder of the new entity. Moskowitz served as president of CoVant before retiring.  As an innovator, Moskowitz holds seven patents and has authored numerous technical and peer-reviewed papers on turbine and combustion technologies.

Dr. Harold Abraham Scheraga, ’41
Harold Scheraga is George W. and Grace L. Todd Professor Emeritus in the Department of Chemistry at Cornell University.  He fell in love with physics and chemistry at CCNY from where he graduated with a BS degree in 1941. His passion led to a new understanding of one of the fundamental building blocks of life, the protein molecule. This laid the foundation for current efforts to treat human diseases by specifically targeting damaged proteins. Scheraga has spent more than six decades at Cornell where’s he’s combined experimental and theoretical approaches to produce a new understanding of molecular interactions within and between proteins. He’s played a major role in explaining the physical principles underlying the behavior of proteins, laying the foundation for understanding forces responsible for protein structure and stability and mechanisms by which proteins fold into  three-dimensional objects. These findings, in turn, enabled predictions of native structures of proteins. A Brooklyn native, Scheraga has also been an exceptional mentor to young scientists.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPOINTS VICE CHANCELLOR RABINOWITZ TO SERVE AS INTERIM CHANCELLOR

The Board of Trustees of The City University of New York today appointed Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost Vita C. Rabinowitz to serve as Interim Chancellor, effective June 1, succeeding Chancellor James B. Milliken, who is stepping down at the end of the month.

For nearly a decade prior to her current appointment at CUNY in 2015, Dr. Rabinowitz served as Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Hunter College, where she has been a dedicated faculty member her entire academic career.

“The enormous respect that Dr. Rabinowitz’s work has engendered over the course of four decades of service to CUNY’s mission inspires confidence throughout the University in her latest appointment as Interim Chancellor,” Board of Trustees Chairperson William C. Thompson Jr. said.  “Her distinguished scholarly accomplishments, commitment to student success and tireless devotion to the University make her ideally suited to provide the direction and stability the system needs until a new chancellor assumes office.”

The vote to appoint Dr. Rabinowitz came during today’s Board of Trustees meeting, the last one during the tenure of Chancellor Milliken, who joined CUNY in 2014 from the University of Nebraska.  A graduate of New York University School of Law who practiced in the city early in his career, Chancellor Milliken considered the CUNY position a homecoming.  During his tenure at CUNY, the University has opened and expanded important academic programs, become the nationally recognized leader in improving community college graduation rates and been recognized for propelling low-income students into the middle class at unprecedented rates.

“The Board of Trustees thanks you for your tireless dedication to public education and for helping The City University of New York retain its place among the world’s great universities,” Board Chairperson Thompson said to Chancellor Milliken during today’s public meeting of the Board.  “You have been a true advocate, and we deeply appreciate everything you have done for our University system.  We wish you good health and great success in your next endeavors.”

Incoming Interim Chancellor Rabinowitz has taught and mentored thousands of students over the course of her 37 years at Hunter.  Before serving as Hunter’s provost, she held a variety of administrative positions at the school, including chairperson of the Department of Psychology, acting associate provost, and acting provost.

While at Hunter, Dr. Rabinowitz was the recipient of major National Science Foundation (NSF) grants, including one that established Hunter’s Gender Equity Project (GEP), which sought to advance women faculty in the natural and social sciences and became an incubator for faculty development at Hunter. She served as co-director of the GEP for eight years. As provost, she received an NSF award to strengthen the many STEM enrichment programs at Hunter College and launch Hunter’s Undergraduate Research Initiative.

In addition to her extensive service at Hunter, since 1978 Dr. Rabinowitz has been a member of the doctoral program in Psychology at CUNY Graduate Center, where she served as acting program head of the Social/Personality doctoral subprogram.

Dr. Rabinowitz received her master’s and doctoral degrees in social psychology at Northwestern University.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 undergraduate students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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$40,000/yr. Transfer Scholarship Awarded to Eleni Romano, Mechanical Engineering Major

Eleni Romano

Eleni Romano, age 24, a mechanical engineering major at LaGuardia Community College/CUNY (“LaGuardia”), is one of 47 recipients of the 2018 Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. This highly competitive national scholarship provides awardees with up to $40,000 annually for a maximum of three years to complete their bachelor’s degree.

“Being selected for the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship is an astounding accomplishment — a testament to a student’s incredible work,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “Community colleges educate the vast majority of low-income, recent immigrant, or otherwise disadvantaged students, and giving them the opportunity to pursue their bachelor’s or even graduate work with significantly fewer financial worries is an incredible benefit. We’re so proud of Eleni Romano, our ninth LaGuardia student to be awarded this coveted award since 2006, and know that with the ability this award will afford her to focus on her studies, the possibilities of what she can accomplish are that much wider, and we all stand to benefit.”

Ms. Romano was a member of President’s Society – Tech, the college’s leadership development program for students interested in STEM fields. She’s consistently made the Dean’s list, and is a member of the Honors Program. Additionally, as a member of the CUNY Research Scholars Program, Ms. Romano spent two years working on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (NASA GISS) research program. While at LaGuardia, she received several scholarships from the LaGuardia Community College Foundation to help make ends meet.

“Eleni has been my research mentee for almost two and half years, and her work has been nothing short of outstanding,” said John Toland, Ph.D., associate professor of physics at LaGuardia. “Her contributions to our research project about gyroscopes merit publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, which we will be preparing over the summer. Eleni demonstrates confidence, competence, integrity and grit in both her research work for me and as an active member of the college community. I am very proud of her and excited to see where her academic journey will go.”

“Eleni has taken the time to understand quantum mechanics at a fundamental level and can explain her research to a general audience or to physicists who have been in the field for decades,” said Allyson Sheffield, Ph.D., associate professor of physics at LaGuardia. “She provides invaluable feedback and advice to her fellow CUNY Research Scholars and is a true inspiration to them.”

“I’m so grateful to my mentor John Toland for his help and support,” says Ms. Romano. I’ve learned so much working with him on his work on gyroscopes, which are navigational systems found in many technologies from smartphones, to planes and satellites – making it possible to determine what’s up and down, what’s portrait or landscape orientation. I always had an interest in science, but family and friends discouraged me pursuing it as a career. His support allowed me to pursue my dream.”

“And Dr. Sheffield helped me so much by advising me as I wrote my Jack Kent Cooke application.”

Ms. Romano and her family moved to the US from Athens, Greece when she was nine years old. She is married to Marco Gonzalez, who is also a student at LaGuardia.

She describes herself as having been a “lazy student” in high school, at Bayside High School. Consequently, she placed into developmental math at LaGuardia; since then has taken (and passed!) every single math class at LaGuardia.

The lowest grade she got in a math course at LaGuardia was a B+, which she attributes to having to juggle work (in a restaurant) with school to make ends meet.

“I came from MAT096 (developmental math) to being a Jack Kent Cooke scholar! When I found out that I got the scholarship, I just couldn’t believe it—I was so excited! Now with the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship, I won’t have to take out loans, and will be able to totally focus on pursuing my bachelor’s without having to work.”

Ms. Romano is the 9thLaGuardia student to be awarded a Jack Kent Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. In 2017, three LaGuardia students were selected for this covered scholarship.

The LaGuardia Jack Kent Cooke scholars have included:

  1. Yeshey Pelzom (2006); Agnes Scott; King’s College, London (M.A., also funded by the JKC Foundation)
  2. Harmonie Kobanghe (2012); Georgetown; Columbia (M.A., also funded by the JKC Foundation)
  3. Cristina Mihailescu (2014); Columbia
  4. Xavier Medina (2015); Columbia
  5. Nathan Weiss (2015); Baruch
  6. Jonathan Morales (2017); Stanford
  7. Konstandinos Gobakis (2017); Amherst
  8. Miguel Castillo (2017); Columbia
  9. Eleni Romano (2018)

Karlyn Koh, Ph.D., LaGuardia’s Cooke Foundation Faculty Representative, director of the LaGuardia Honors Program, and a professor of English remarks that “our Cooke scholars over the years are examples of not only the talent and drive that many community college students possess, but also of how far the latter can go with academic and financial support. These nine Cooke scholars are thus surely an inspiration to other LaGuardia students, and also to all of us who work on behalf of students to support their success.”

In addition to the monetary award, Cooke Transfer Scholars receive comprehensive educational advising from foundation staff to guide them through the processes of transitioning to a four-year school and preparing for their careers. The foundation also provides opportunities for internships, study abroad, and graduate school funding, as well as connection to a thriving network of 2,300 fellow Cooke Scholars and alumni.

What are Ms. Romano’s plans for the future? As she says, “I’m 1000% sure getting a physics degree. I definitely want to get a master’s in physics; and I’m still deciding if I’ll pursue a Ph.D. as well. I’m interested in Columbia University, as well as in the Stevens Institute of Technology, where my mentor Professor John Toland studied. We’ll see!”

“Community colleges provide an affordable first step for many students with financial need to begin their higher education journey,” said Harold O. Levy, executive director of the Cooke Foundation. “Cooke Transfer Scholars have demonstrated incredible ability and ambition, and we look forward to supporting their success at universities such as Stanford, Cornell, and MIT.”

This year, nearly 2,500 students applied for the Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. The foundation evaluated each submission based on academic ability, persistence, leadership, and service to others. The recipients selected have a median adjusted gross income of $5,000 and an average GPA of 3.92. Biological sciences, engineering, and computer/informational sciences are the most popular fields of study among the cohort.

A full list of the 2018 Cooke Transfer Scholars, including the community colleges and states they represent, can be viewed here.

• • • •

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation is dedicated to advancing the education of exceptionally promising students who have financial need. Since 2000, the foundation has awarded $175 million in scholarships to more than 2,300 students from 8th grade through graduate school, along with comprehensive counseling and other support services. The foundation has also provided over $97 million in grants to organizations that serve such students. www.jkcf.org

LaGuardia Community College, located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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CCNY faculty and student to learn how Pixar works its magic

Laisa Barros

Phillip Burch and Pilar Newton

Pixar is known the world over for its crowd pleasing animated films like Coco, Finding Nemo, and Toy Story. While the company’s movies are beloved, they’re also studied by students and teachers who carefully dissect the company’s innovative animation techniques and character development methods.

Many of those students and teachers dream of someday walking the company’s legendary halls – or even working there. For two faculty members and one student from the Electronic Design and Multimedia department at The City College of New York, that dream will come true this summer when they get a chance to observe the Pixar process close-up.

Phillip Burch, an Adjunct Professor who teaches 3D modeling and animation and Pilar Newton, an Adjunct Professor who teaches 2D animation, will travel to Pixar’s headquarters in Emeryville, California at the end of May for a two-day Education Story Development Summit. Laisa Barros, a computer science major with a minor in art with a focus on web development and animation, will start a Pixar summer internship in June.

Burch and Newton will spend their time soaking up new thinking and skills they can bring back to the classroom. Burch says of the opportunity: “I’m always looking for new approaches to help foster the incredible creative abilities of our students. I’m hoping to learn new techniques for the development of narrative in animation. The unparalleled storytelling knowledge of Pixar will certainly provide new tools and resources for our students to help push the boundaries of what they are capable of.”

Newton concurs, saying “My incredibly talented students all have amazing stories to tell. Thanks to Pixar, I’ll be able to share my improved knowledge of storytelling with them. I give my heartfelt thanks to Annette Weintraub of CCNY and Beth Sasseen of Pixar for seeing the amazing potential in our students and giving me the honor of being including in the Pixar Education Summit.”

Laisa Barro says “Studying Computer Science and Art allows me to combine my creative and technical skills in unique and innovative ways. As a Production Support Engineer intern at Pixar, I’ll have the opportunity to apply those skills while working with almost every group at the studio to help diagnose and problem-solve issues for users on GNU/Linux-based desktop platforms.”

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media Contact: rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu (347) 330-7470


Actor Vin Diesel to Deliver Commencement Address and Receive Honorary Degree at Hunter College’s Spring 2018 Graduation Ceremony

Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab has announced that Vin Diesel, who grew up in New York City and attended Hunter College, will deliver the commencement address and receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters on Wednesday, May 30th at Radio City Music Hall. Actor Vin Diesel to Deliver Commencement Address and Receive Honorary Degree at Hunter College's Spring 2018 Graduation Ceremony

Diesel was an English major at Hunter in the late 1980s before pursuing his acting career.  He will address the more than 1,800 students graduating this May.

Most recently, Diesel reprised his role as Dominic Toretto in the eighth installment of “The Fast and the Furious” franchise, in which he both starred and produced.  The film had the largest international release of all time, grossing over $1.2 billion worldwide.


Hunter College Student Safia Mahjebin Wins Prestigious Truman Scholarship

President Jennifer J. Raab announced that Hunter College junior, Safia Mahjebin, has just been named a Truman Scholar.Hunter College Student Safia Mahjebin Wins Prestigious Truman Scholarship Mahjebin is one of 59 new Truman Scholars selected from among 756 candidates at 311 colleges and universities nationwide. The Truman Scholarship is one of the most coveted of nationally competitive scholarships and supports two years of graduate study. It was founded in 1975 to prepare future generations for careers in public service leadership.

“I’ve known Safia since her first year at Hunter and have watched her progress as a Roosevelt Scholar through a string of fellowships and public service initiatives that have distinguished her as an outstanding public service leader of the future. We are so very gratified that the Truman Foundation has recognized Safia’s already significant contribution to the cause of children’s rights by bestowing this distinction.” While at Hunter, Mahjebin has been instrumental in helping to pass legislation to raise the legal age of marriage for girls in New York State from 14 to age 17, by testifying before the New York State Assembly.

Mahjebin is only the second student in Hunter’s history to win a Truman. Christine Curella, who majored in Urban Studies and Economics at Hunter, earned the honor in 2006-07, before getting a Master’s in City Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Curella currently works for the New York City Mayor’s Office.

A philosophy major, Mahjebin became a JFEW Scholar at Roosevelt House in her sophomore year, and this year was named a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow. Mahjebin is the only Truman Scholar in this year’s class from a public university in New York. Mahjebin plans to pursue both a JD and PhD in Islamic Studies so that she can advocate for women throughout the world: “I want to make the world a better place for girls and women, than the world I came into.”

President Raab points out that Mahjebin is the latest in a group of outstanding Hunter students who have won prestigious international scholarships at Hunter this year. Thamara Jean received a Rhodes Scholarship in November and Matthew Locastro was recently named a Luce Scholar. “These achievements only underscore the high caliber of our student body and the important work of the Ruth and Harold Newman office of Prestigious Scholarships & Fellowships in supporting our students in their pursuit of excellence.”


Hunter Postdoctoral Fellow’s New Study Links Immune Activity to Limited Childhood Growth

Dr. Samuel Urlacher of the Department of Anthropology has published a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), a prestigious Hunter Postdoctoral Fellow’s New Study Links Immune Activity to Limited Childhood Growthjournal that focuses on high quality research from around the world, subject to rigorous peer review. Dr. Urlacher’s study, “Tradeoffs between immune function and childhood growth among Amazonian forager-horticulturalists”, details his innovative work among the Shuar, an indigenous population in remote Ecuador with whom Dr. Urlacher has worked extensively since 2011.

Along with a team of other researchers, which included Hunter Professor Herman Pontzer, as well as scientists from Harvard, the University of Oregon, Northern Arizona University, and the University of Colorado, Dr. Urlacher carefully tracked the growth of 261 children ages 4-11 and investigated how growth was impacted by biomarkers of immune function and body fat. This population consumes a low nutrient-density diet, and calories are precious. At the same time, they are subject to high rates of infection and parasitic disease, especially during vital growth and development periods. By tracking the relationship between childhood immune activity and growth rates, Dr. Urlacher and his team found a strong connection between higher reserves of body fat and children’s ability to maintain growth while mounting an immune response. Children with less body fat, however, showed significant declines in growth when experiencing acute inflammatory immune activity. This finding indicates that children who have low body fat – limited energy reserve – are less able to support growth while also meeting the demands of a costly immune response to infection.

Even low levels of immune activity typically without overt symptoms of infection can significantly stunt growth, the study finds. A child does not even need to be symptomatic – or outwardly “sick” – in order for their growth to be compromised over timespans that vary from as little as one week to over an entire year. “This suggests that child growth is much more acutely sensitive to immune challenge than typically recognized,” Dr. Urlacher says. Also surprising is the amount of body fat necessary to buffer the growth-impeding effects of immune activity. “We found that even modest levels of body fat moderate the relationship between immune function and subsequent growth, highlighting the physiological and energetic underpinnings of this relationship. We are among the first to do this with humans, and it’s particularly exciting to demonstrate this effect for inflammation that is thought to be a primary factor underlying child growth faltering, later life obesity, and poor metabolic health.”

This tradeoff between growth and immune function is an intriguing revelation about the biological mechanisms that have shaped human evolution and patterns of life history. As we deepen our understanding of nutrition, energy expenditure, and the nature of our species’ unique childhood life stage, we can use these new insights to inform health policy among vulnerable populations and to contextualize the evolutionary mechanisms that have led to urban problems of sedentariness, obesity, and chronic disease. Dr. Urlacher’s longstanding relationship with the Shuar — he has spent 20 months living with them — provides him access to a rare longitudinal dataset. Looking ahead to further study and analysis, there is huge potential for understanding the evolutionary mechanisms that shape human health and fitness.


Science Magazine Cites Professor Hyungsik Lim’s Frontline Work in Neurological Imaging

In its coverage of emerging trends in research technology, the website of Science, the world’s leading journal of scientific research, recognized recent advances madeScience Magazine Cites Professor Hyungsik Lim’s Frontline Work in Neurological Imaging by biophysicist Hyungsik Lim and his Hunter College team. In studies funded by the National Institutes of Health, Professor Lim’s lab has found a new way to detect the deterioration of myelin, the substance that coats nerve cells and enables the proper functioning of the nervous system. Using an optical microscope rather than the commonly used MRI machine, the Hunter researchers are getting much sharper, more detailed images of myelin in the living brain. These high-resolution images will eventually be useful in diagnosing and treating MS and other devastating neurological diseases.


Hunter College High School Senior Wins Top Award In Regeneron Science Talent Search

Hunter College President Jennifer J. Raab announced today that Benjamin Firester, a Hunter College High School senior, has won the top prize in the Regeneron Science Talent Search 2018.Hunter College High School Senior Wins Top Award In Regeneron Science Talent Search The prize carries an award of $250,000.

Benjy, as he is known, is the fourth Hunter High student to finish first in the competition’s history, and the first New York City resident since 2005 when HCHS student David Bauer won the coveted prize.

Benjy’s prize was for the development of a mathematical model that can predict how weather patterns can spread spores of the Late Blight Fungus, the same disease that caused the Irish Potato Famine and that still causes billions of dollars in crop damages annually. Benjy was one of 40 finalists from around the country who were honored.

His program uses existing blight locations, date, time and detailed local weather data to model the likely routes by which Late Blight will spread and predict likely future infection sites. Farmers will be able to someday use the shared data to assess blight risk and reduce the preemptive use of fungicide.

The prize was awarded by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and the Society for Science & the Public which conduct the nation’s oldest and most prestigious science and math competition for high school seniors. Regeneron became the third sponsor of the Science Talent Search in 2017 following Westinghouse from 1942-97 and Intel from 1998-2016. Regeneron provided awards of more than $1.8 million for the finalists, who were evaluated for their scientific and mathematical knowledge and abilities, in addition to their research projects.

“We are incredibly proud of Benjy,” said President Raab. “His immense talent, paired with the support of his family and the Hunter High community made this achievement possible. He now takes his place in the legacy in the sciences at Hunter College High School, the only New York City high school to receive a first place award in this competition in more than 20 years.”

President Raab also thanked the superb group of teachers and administrators at HCHS including science research seminar coordinators Gilana Reiss and Phil Frankel; Dr. Phillip Jeffery, Chair of the school’s Science Department, and the school’s principal, Dr. Tony Fisher.

“We are ecstatic about Benjy’s recognition by the Regeneron STS judges,” said Lisa Siegmann, Acting Director, Hunter College Campus Schools. “It speaks so highly of his intellectual curiosity, his diligence and how his Hunter College High School education has prepared him for the rigors of scientific inquiry.”

Hunter College High School has had four first place finishes as well as several finalists in the national science competition. Amy Reichel won the Westinghouse competition in 1981 as did Dr. Adam Cohen in 1997. David Bauer won the Intel competition in 2005. In addition, Benjy’s sister Kalia, a HCHS graduate, came in 2nd place in the Global Good category in 2015 in the same competition.


Hunter Professor’s Research Yields New Nanoparticle Discovery, and Possible New Cancer Treatments

Hunter professor Hiroshi Matsui is part of a team of researchers who recently published a study in Nature Cell Biology, a leading publication of global science news, that touts the discovery of a Hunter Professor's Research Yields New Nanoparticle Discovery, and Possible New Cancer Treatmentsnew nanoparticle with promising implications for cancer research. This study represents the culmination of years of painstaking work by Professor Matsui, as well as specialists in the fields of nanotechnology and cancer research from Cornell and Memorial Sloan-Kettering.

The scientists used a cutting-edge technique called asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation to sort nano-sized particles called exosomes. These exosomes are secretions that all cells issue, but in the case of cancer, the exosomes are self-targeting; they know where to go in the body, acting as vehicles for intercellular communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells contain DNA, RNA, fats, and proteins – essential indicators of the cells’ make-up. Studying the pathway of the exosomes – where they go and how they travel – can help us understand how cancer cells metastasize and, potentially, prevent them from wreaking havoc on the body. Using an instrument previously used to separate bacteria or viruses from blood, the scientists were able to separate three distinct exosome subtypes. In doing so, they discovered a new nanoparticle, which they named “exomeres.”

These exomeres differ from other exosomes in compelling ways: they’re smaller and structurally distinct, with the capacity to fuse with healthy cells, radically altering immune system function. Cancer, so the exosomes indicate, is a really smart disease. These secretion particles tell a vivid story of how the disease creates the ideal conditions for itself to thrive. But, with this new understanding comes the potential to perhaps outsmart even the wiliest cells.

These tiny exosomes — less than 50 nanometers in diameter – have become “a very hot subject in oncology lately,” says professor Matsui. “Their small size provides a sweet spot for us nanotechnologists, and it makes our contribution very important for the future study of cancer.” He and his colleagues have a patent pending for the technology they used in their recent study, and plan to publish further regarding the implications of their research. “We expect that the role of each exosome will be revealed in the next publication, and understanding these mechanisms will allow researchers to halt cancer metastasis by impeding these pathways.”

Professor Matsui’s postdoc students at Hunter were crucial to the study’s success, using expert skill in investigating the tiny particles for structural and mechanical properties, which could be a key factor for cancer metastasis and progression. Professor Matsui stressed the importance of collaboration by many scientists in the success of this groundbreaking research: “The integration of biology and nanotechnology will be critical for future medicine, and multidisciplinary research teams will win the game.”


Hunter Is Named a Fulbright 2017-2018 Top Producer

The U.S. Department of State has just announced that Hunter maintains its standing as one of the nation’s Top Producers of Fulbright award winners.Hunter Is Named a Fulbright 2017-2018 Top Producer

Of the master’s degree-granting public and private institutions named 2017-2018 Top U.S. Student Fulbright Producers, Hunter stands in the nation’s top 11 and New York State’s top 3. Hunter is also the #1 producer in the CUNY system.

Once again, our academic community congratulates the young Hunter scholars now working and studying abroad on 2017-18 Fulbright grants. Their profiles can be found here.

We also congratulate Hunter’s newly announced 10 semi-finalists for 2018-2019!

The 2018-19 “finalists” (Fulbright lingo for award winners) will be named later this spring. This year, our semi-finalists’ planned destinations include an exceptionally wide range of countries: Italy, Germany, South Korea, Taiwan, Columbia, Argentina, Sri Lanka, Greece and Spain.

We look forward to celebrating the announcements of the new finalists, and to sharing highlights of their academic achievements and Fulbright plans.

In the meantime, an important date approaches. The application period for 2019-2020 Fulbright U.S. Student awards begins April 1, 2018. Interested members of Hunter’s Classes of 2019, 2018, and recent years are urged to email Fulbright advisor Myrna Fader at mfader@hunter.cuny.edu.


A conversation between Lin-Manuel Miranda and Bill and Melinda Gates at Hunter College

On February 13, Hunter College hosted a conversation between Lin-Manuel Miranda and Bill and Melinda Gates in Assembly Hall. A conversation between Lin-Manuel Miranda and Bill and Melinda Gates at Hunter CollegeThe wide-ranging Q&A explored Bill and Melinda’s 10th Annual Letter and why they are optimistic about the state of the world. Bill, Melinda, and Lin-Manuel engaged with the student audience and Facebook live viewers from around the world, who came prepared with thought-provoking—and fun—questions about philanthropy, global health, education, and current events.

A video of the Q&A can be seen here.


Computer Science Major Moshe Farah Details the “Privacy Paradox” in the Digital Age

With Wall Street, the Brooklyn Bridge, and the Freedom Tower as his backdrop, Moshe ‘Moe’ Farah stands proud as a member of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018.

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018 share their thoughts on some of the more complex and challenging aspects of their areas of study. For more on this year’s commencement, visit our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2018 hashtag to join the conversation.

Moshe “Moe” Farah is a member of the Class of 2018 and will be receiving his bachelor of science in computer science. He is the recipient of the City University of New York (CUNY) Guttman Transfer Scholarship for High-Achieving Community College Graduates, which he received after transferring from Kingsborough Community College.

The son of Jewish immigrants, and born and raised in Brooklyn, Farah is the first person in his family to receive a college education. Post-graduation, Farah will be working full-time for JP Morgan Chase & Co. as a software engineer, a position he says was possible because of Brooklyn College alumni connections cultivated by the Magner Career Center.

Given his expertise, Farah was asked his thoughts on the current state of information in the digital age and how it impacts the privacy of individual citizens and presents problems with personal and financial safety.

“We can all agree that information technology has changed the world. We are indeed living in the digital age. Without a doubt, information technology is doing very positive things, but we must be aware of the concerns of privacy and safety when it comes to our information on the Internet. The ‘privacy paradox’ comes into play here. It occurs when individuals express that they have concerns about their privacy online, but take no action to secure their accounts. Additionally, while individuals may take extra security steps for other online accounts, such as those related to banking or finance, this does not always extend to social media. There are many things we must do to solve these issues. To be a functioning citizen of the digital age, we are constantly opting in to platforms, apps, and services while accepting their terms of service without understanding them. We need to realize that our information has value. On any free platform, we, the users, are the product. Knowing that, we should safeguard our personal information as rigorously as we do any other.”

 

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


A Business Degree 15 Years in the Making

Dionne Davis hopes that her tenacity to obtain her bachelor’s degree is an inspiration to others who take unconventional routes to pursue a college education.

As they prepare for the next stages of their lives, members of the Brooklyn College Class of 2018 share their thoughts on some of the more complex and challenging aspects of their areas of study. For more on this year’s commencement, visit our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter pages. Use the #BCGrad2018 hashtag to join the conversation.

Dionne Davis is a member of Class of 2018, graduating with a bachelor of science in public accounting, business, management, and finance from Brooklyn College’s Murray Koppelman School of Business. She was born and raised in Brooklyn, the daughter of Trinidadian immigrants. Davis’ road to graduation was a long one. She has been working toward her undergraduate degree for the past 15 years, juggling motherhood, a full-time job, and her own natural beauty products business. Through sheer tenacity, she achieved this goal, and just in time too—she recently received a promotion at her job as an administrator at SUNY Downstate Medical Center.

Given her experience in working for a large corporation as well as working for herself, Davis discussed what she sees as the responsibility of business owners and an ethical approach to business.

“Business owners have an ethical responsibility to provide the customer with the best product and service we can. Too many times, we have heard about a company that has compromised the safety and satisfaction of their customers to gain a few dollars. I say ‘a few dollars,’ but we are talking millions—but compared to what is sacrificed, it seems like a few. It should be the priority of a business owner to view their customers like they would their own family. We only want the best for our family, and we would not intentionally put them in harm’s way, correct? This is our responsibility as business owners. The best way to balance the desire for profit margins, innovation, and integrity would be never to lose the trust of one’s customers and be truthful to yourself and for what you stand. Listening to your customer’s needs is very important—and there is always a need, we just have to find it. Of course, in a capitalist society, we want the most for our buck when it comes to purchases for our business. But we have to understand that in achieving this, the option of failing our customers is not an option at all. We cannot be so determined to gain the maximum profit that we pay the highest price of all: loss of customer trust and confidence. In a time where there is so much distrust between businesses and consumers, transparency is vital to market growth and stability.”

 

 

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


Senior Emmanuel Dwomoh earns CCNY its fourth Fulbright this spring

Emmanuel Dwomoh from CCNY’s Class of 2018 is headed to Uganda on a year-long Fulbright grant to study the high prevalence of esophageal cancer there.

Graduating senior Emmanuel Dwomoh is The City College of New York’s fourth Fulbright award recipient this spring. The biology honors student leaves CCNY on June 1 with a year-long research grant to study the high prevalence of esophageal cancer in Uganda.

A naturalized U.S. citizen born in Ghana, Dwomoh’s winning Fulbright proposal takes him back to Mbarara in southwest Uganda where he spent summer 2017 working on a malaria project.  Mbarara is also the epicenter for esophageal cancer in that nation.

“East Africa forms the African esophageal cancer hot spot where esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a variant of the disease, is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males,” said Dwomoh, a Bronx resident. “My Fulbright project will examine environmental factors unique to the region that may contribute to the high ESCC rate seen there.”

He will be based at the Mbarara University of Science and Technology. Dr. Samson Okello will serve as his research mentor in-country.

Dwomoh, who is graduating with a 3.8 GPA, plans on attending medical school on his return from Uganda in 2019.

His Fulbright award follows similar grants to two other members of CCNY’s Class of 2018, Claire Lynch and Etienne Forbes.

Lynch, a political science and Jewish studies double major in the Colin Powell School and Macaulay Honors College at CCNY, received a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant grant tenable in Spain.

Forbes’ Fulbright U.S. Student grant will take him to Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in September for a one-year master’s of science degree program in culture, organization and management.

In addition, David Lohman, associate professor of biology  in CCNY’s Division of Science, was selected a Fulbright ASEAN Research Scholar for the second time in his career. He returns to Southeast Asia to continue his study of butterfly evolution and the role of islands in species formation.

About the Fulbright Scholar Program
Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program’s purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries. Fulbright Scholars are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and demonstrated leadership potential in their fields.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


CUNY Baccalaureate Alumna Susan Abdelghafar Receives Fulbright Award

Susan Abdleghafar, a September 2017 graduate of CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies, has received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program award to Malaysia in from the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. Abdelghafar will support the teaching of English as part of a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship.

Abdelghafar is one of over 1,900 U.S. citizens who will conduct research, teach English, and provide expertise abroad for the 2018-2019 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement as well as record of service and leadership potential in their respective fields.
The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to build lasting connections between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The Fulbright Program is funded through an annual appropriation made by the U.S. Congress to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Participating governments and host institutions, corporations, and foundations around the world also provide direct and indirect support to the Program, which operates in over 160 countries worldwide.
Since its inception in 1946, the Fulbright Program has given more than 380,000 students, scholars, teachers, artists, professionals and scientists the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas, and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.
Fulbrighters address critical global challenges in all areas while building relationships, knowledge, and leadership in support of the long-term interests of the United States. Fulbright alumni have achieved distinction in many fields, including 59 who have been awarded the Nobel Prize, 82 who have received Pulitzer Prizes, and 37 who have served as a head of state or government.
For further information about the Fulbright Program or the U.S. Department of State, please visit http://eca.state.gov/fulbright or contact the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Press Office at ECA-Press@state.gov.

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CUNY BA is the University-wide, individualized degree. It is an exciting, versatile, rewarding degree route for highly motivated, self-directed students whose academic goals transcend traditional majors. Students create their own degree plans working directly with faculty mentors and academic advisors.


CUNY Baccalaureate Senior Jawad Rashid Receives Fulbright Award

Jawad Rashid of CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies and New York City College of Technology has received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program award to Moldova in Public Health from the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. Rashid will conduct research as part of a project to examine community mental health development in Moldova.

Rashid is one of over 1,900 U.S. citizens who will conduct research, teach English, and provide expertise abroad for the 2018-2019 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement as well as record of service and leadership potential in their respective fields.

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to build lasting connections between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The Fulbright Program is funded through an annual appropriation made by the U.S. Congress to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Participating governments and host institutions, corporations, and foundations around the world also provide direct and indirect support to the Program, which operates in over 160 countries worldwide.

Since its inception in 1946, the Fulbright Program has given more than 380,000 students, scholars, teachers, artists, professionals and scientists the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas, and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

Fulbrighters address critical global challenges in all areas while building relationships, knowledge, and leadership in support of the long-term interests of the United States. Fulbright alumni have achieved distinction in many fields, including 59 who have been awarded the Nobel Prize, 82 who have received Pulitzer Prizes, and 37 who have served as a head of state or government.

For further information about the Fulbright Program or the U.S. Department of State, please visit http://eca.state.gov/fulbright or contact the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs Press Office at ECA-Press@state.gov.

***********

CUNY BA is the University-wide, individualized degree. It is an exciting, versatile, rewarding degree route for highly motivated, self-directed students whose academic goals transcend traditional majors. Students create their own degree plans working directly with faculty mentors and academic advisors.


Innovative student startups win $150K in CCNY’s Zahn competition

Student startup FreeFoot, winners of the $50,000 Kaylie Prize for its assistive device for those with gait disorders. From left Winnie Ngo, Anwar Jammal and Jade Ardinez.

Health and mental wellness-related pitches by student startups were among the big winners in the Zahn Innovation Center’s 2018 venture competition at The City College of New York. More than $150K in prizes went to the budding inventor/entrepreneurs to develop their ideas.

The startups competed in four categories. Some startups designed hardware devices, others created software, some focused on social impact, and others were women-led ventures that leveraged technology for NYC. The startups at the Zahn Center have both a hyper-local focus in the city, as well as a global perspective in congruence with City College’s diverse student body.

FreeFoot won the $50,000 Kaylie Prize for its assistive device for those with gait disorders

The $25,000 Zahn Technology Prize went to Skinno for its app to decipher skincare ingredients for consumers.

FloraMind’s mental health education curriculum for high school students to promote self-care and break the stigma around mental health received the $25,000 Zahn Social Impact Prize.

In the Standard Chartered Women+Tech4NYC category, an app that connects college students with new friends via safe, reliable, publicly shared walking routes earned CakeWlk the $25,000 top prize.

The runners-up in all four categories each received $5,000. They are:

  • Brystech, an imaging device that makes breast cancer-screening more comfortable and accessible (Kaylie Prize);
  • Fare, a driver-focused intuitive taxi demand prediction model (Zahn Tech);
  • Listen!, an e-learning tool that teaches basic vocabulary and language structure for children in refugee camps (Social Impact); and
  • Among Allies,  a platform that helps victims of workplace sexual harassment find resources while also helping companies establish safer workplace environments (Standard Chartered Women+Tech4NYC).

Click here for all the winners in the 2018 venture competition.

About the Zahn Innovation Center
The Zahn Innovation Center, a program of the City College Fund, is at the heart of entrepreneurship at the City College of New York. It inspires a diverse community of changemakers to develop transformative ventures.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Find out how to eat healthy as you age May 9 at CCNY’s Mini-Medical School

Dr. Ghada Soliman

You are what you eat. But your nutritional needs change as you age. Take a proactive part in your own health by attending the CUNY School of Medicine’s Mini-Medical School on Nutrition and Healthy Aging at The City College of New York on May 9.

The featured speaker will be Dr. Ghada Soliman, Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental, Occupational, & Geospatial Health Sciences at the CUNY School of Public Health. Dr. Soliman is well known for her research and teaching, as well as her expertise in community nutrition education, food policy, and personal nutrition.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to reserve your spot to attend on Wednesday, May 9th, from 5:30-7:00pm in the North Academic Center (NAC) room 1/103 on the City College Campus.

This will be the final session for Spring 2018. So please spread the word and bring a friend!

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places

it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and

divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Media contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu (347) 330-7470

Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos to deliver Kahn lecture May 10 at CCNY

Alex Stamos

Data security is on everybody’s minds these days. Who better to speak to this important topic than Facebook’s Chief Security Officer, Alex Stamos.

Stamos, who will be the featured speaker on May 10 at the 2018 Robert Kahn & Patrice Lyons Lecture, hosted by the Grove School of Engineering at the City College of New York, is committed to bringing more openness and collaboration to the security community, and to building solutions that keep people safe in the circumstances they face every day.

He is an expert in global scale infrastructure, designing trustworthy systems, and mobile security. A frequent speaker at conferences and industry events, including Black Hat, RSA, DEF CON, Milken Global, Amazon ZonCon, Microsoft Blue Hat, FS-ISAC, and Infragard, Stamos became somewhat of a legend in 2015 when he pushed back on government efforts to weaken security.

Before Facebook, Stamos served as the CISO of Yahoo, where he led the security team to develop innovative security technology and products. He was also the co-founder of security consultancy iSEC Partners, a company that helped hundreds of companies build secure and safe systems. Stamos holds a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Grove School Dean Gilda Barabino looks forward to welcoming Stamos to campus, noting: “With the availability of rapidly evolving technologies in an increasingly networked world, cyber security is of paramount importance. We’re pleased to have Alex Stamos, an industry expert, talk about ‘Building Security for All’. We are grateful for the Robert Kahn and Patrice Lyons Lecture that has allowed us to bring in distinguished lecturers and top experts to enrich the academic discourse on campus and broaden perspectives.”

Please RSVP for what promises to be a fascinating and timely lecture. This event, which is free and open to the public, will take place at 5pm with a reception to follow on May 10, 2018 in Steinman Lecture Hall at the Grove School of Engineering at City College.

About The City College of New York

Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself. View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Media contact: Rebecca Rivera rrivera1@ccny.cuny.edu (347) 330-7470

Letter to NEST+m Students & Families from Mark Berkowitz, Week of May 7, 2018

Dear NEST+m Students and Families,

This week is Teacher Appreciation Week! Please join me in thanking NEST+m’s extraordinary and extraordinarily dedicated teachers for their hard work and effort, each day, to meet the needs of every NEST+m student. 

This week also begins the AP Testing Period for students in AP Courses. Good luck to all students engaging in AP testing! Visit this link for the AP Exam Schedule.

On Friday, please join us for NESTFest, our annual music talent show and celebration.

Thank you for your ongoing support and communication,

Warmly,

Mark Berkowitz
Principal


This week

Monday May 7:

Tuesday, May 8:

Wednesday, May 9:

  • Lower Grades Math Team Celebration, 7:30am, Gymnasium
  • AP Testing Continued

Thursday, May 10:

  • AP Testing Continued
  • PTA Mother’s Day Plant Sale

Friday, May 11:

  • AP Testing Continued
  • PTA Mother’s Day Plant Sale
  • NESTFest! 6:00-8:30pm, Auditorium. Please join us!

Looking Ahead:

  1. SLT Meeting – 5/15, 4:00pm
  2. PTA Meeting & Election – 5/17, 8:30am
  3. NEST+m’s 2nd Annual Curriculum Showcase, featuring K-5 Science Fair and Curricular Highlights from across Grades 6-12 will take place May 23rd, 4:00pm to 7:00pm. More details forthcoming. Please save the date!

More than 600 students attended LaGuardia’s recent Immigration Information Fair

Over 45,000 students from more than 150 countries come to LaGuardia Community College each year. Many are recent immigrants, or have immigrant family members and friends.

On two days in April 2018, the Immigration Information Fair was held on LaGuardia’s campus to make sure that LaGuardia students have up-to-date information about immigrant rights and resources at LaGuardia, CUNY, and the broader NYC/Queens community.

Immigrant Information FairThe view from above at the recent Immigration Information Fair held at LaGuardia Community College over two days in April 2018.

More than 600 students attended the fair. A main feature was a Know Your Rights workshop, presented by the New York Immigration Coalition . The event also offered free consultations with attorneys to ask questions. More than 80 students availed themselves of these consultations.

LaGCC FoundationLaGuardia Community College Foundation staff provide information about scholarships and emergency funds that students can apply for, at the college’s recent Immigration Information Fair.

“We want to thank the many groups that came to provide resources about their services to our students,” said Mimi Blaber, executive director of the CUNY Language Immersion Program at LaGuardia. “We know there are a lot of questions and confusion about the topic of immigration, and we wanted to provide as much info as possible.”

Steffi RomanoA student receives a legal consultation with an attorney at the recent Immigration Information Fair at LaGuardia Community College.

Groups that attended included CUNY Citizenship Now!CUNY School of LawCatholic Migration ServicesHellenic American Neighborhood Action CommitteeLegal Aid SocietyQueens Library, the Arab American Association of New York, Make the Road, and the Office of New Americans.

The fair also afforded LaGuardia students an opportunity to learn about the many services that help students enter and stay in college:

Additional resources can be found on the LaGuardia website.


Salzburg spring touches Colin Powell School junior Ranin Ali

Top photo: Colin Powell Fellow Ranin Ali [left] with Holocaust survivor Hedy Rose who was in hiding a few blocks from Anne Frank in Amsterdam during World War II. Bottom photo: Ali at the Nazi concentration camp Dachau.

There was a time when springtime was associated with revolutions abroad, particularly in the political sphere. For Ranin M. Ali, a junior in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at The City College of New York, the impact seems personal after her own spring experience in Salzburg, Austria, with a Dutch Holocaust survivor and contemporary of Anne Frank.

City College’s first participant in the Global Citizenship Alliance, a week-long seminar that teaches students from around the world to become global citizens, returned home just that — a global citizen eager to encourage others to embrace empathy.

A Muslim born in Libya, raised in Sudan, and living in New York since 2009, Ali’s worldview was changed entirely by the intense program, its star guest, Hedy Rose, and a visit to the Dachau, the infamous Nazi-era concentration camp.

“Hedy shared her experiences during World War II, how she and her family hid after her father was taken,” said the Brooklyn resident. “Her mother died of stress while hiding in a family friend’s basement. Hedy, then six, and her older sister hid in another basement in Amsterdam throughout the war.  Anne Frank was in hiding a few blocks away. They survived on soup made from potato peels.”

Rose’s sorrowful memories reinforced the Salzburg program’s key messages on what it takes to be a global citizen: “how to be emphatic, why we need to be emphatic and eliminating the ‘us’ versus ‘them’ attitude. It was great,” said Ali, a business major minoring in public policy.

“Before the seminar, I always considered myself Sudanese-American. Now I consider myself a global citizen while acknowledging other people’s differences and experiences,” she said. “I’ve become more appreciative of the world and everyone’s differences.”

Ali hopes to make a difference in her role as a Colin Powell Fellow. The program prepares students for a life in public service and active citizenship where they can apply their skills to issues of public concern.

She is also a SEEK Scholar and was accompanied to Salzburg by Marie C. Nazon, acting director of SEEK. The program nominated Ali for the Salzburg seminar based on, among other things, her academic excellence, and engagement in SEEK programs.

About The SEEK Program at CCNY
The Percy Ellis Sutton Search for Education, Elevation, and Knowledge (SEEK) program was founded in 1965 at The City College of New York. It is the higher education opportunity program at the senior and comprehensive (four year) CUNY colleges, while College Discovery (CD), founded in 1964, is at the CUNY community colleges (two year). SEEK and CD were established to provide comprehensive academic, financial, and social supports to assist capable students who otherwise might not be able to attend college due to their educational and financial circumstances. Students are admitted without regard to age, sex, sexual orientation, race, disability or creed.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit

 


John Jay’s Ace Program To Welcome A Third Cohort With Support From The Mayor’s Office For Economic Opportunity And The Laura And John Arnold Foundation

John Jay’s Ace Program To Welcome A Third Cohort With Support From The Mayor’s Office For Economic Opportunity And The Laura And John Arnold Foundation

Thursday, May 3, 2018 – The Accelerate, Complete and Engage (ACE) program at John Jay College of Criminal Justice will welcome a third cohort of students this fall 2018, with support from the Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity (NYC Opportunity) for an additional 275 to 300 students for up to five years. The program is designed to improve students’ persistence in collegiate programs, raise graduation rates and help young people reach their full potential.

ACE has been so successful that students who started as freshmen three years ago are graduating earlier than expected this May, as part of the class of 2018. These graduating students have diverse interests and career plans, and have accepted positions at the New York Police Department and Queens County District Attorney’s Office, enrolled in graduate school for social work, and are entering the fields of law, healthcare, and public service.

One of those students is Abidur Rahman, who is graduating early thanks to the ACE program. The program helped him enroll in summer classes and finish his bachelor’s degree in just three years. Because of ACE, Rahman received financial support that he says played a crucial role in helping him complete his education. As a Law and Society major and a New York City native, Rahman is passionate about learning the law to help empower local marginalized communities. Through his involvement with the Pre-Law Institute at John Jay, he recently completed an internship at Bronx County Family Court that radically changed his perception of the legal field.

“In Hollywood, you usually see white men in courtrooms, but the judge was a Puerto Rican woman,” Rahman said. “Seeing her work with parents rather than just punishing them inspired me. Being a judge in a family court is now one of my highest ambitions.”

Abidur RahmanAbidur Rahman

The ACE program is the baccalaureate model of CUNY’s highly successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs). The ASAP program doubled graduation rates and is a nationally recognized model. Just as ASAP aims to graduate at least half of its students within three years – a goal it has consistently exceeded – ACE aims to double the current graduate rate of its students to at least 50 percent within four years and 65 percent within five years.  NYC Opportunity provided CUNY ASAP’s first funding, and is closely engaged in the work of both ASAP and ACE. A college degree substantially increases earnings and reduces the likelihood of experiencing poverty, making it a key aspect of making New York City a fairer and more equitable city.
“My top priority is our students’ success, and I’m encouraged that the early data shows that ACE has significant promise for improving retention and completion rates,” says John Jay College President Karol V. Mason. “Being the first four-year CUNY college to initiate the ACE program gives me great pride, and I’m grateful for the support of the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity, the Arnold Foundation and CUNY so that we can expand and study this program and help more ACE students stay firmly on track to graduate from John Jay in four years.”

ACE provides the same proven system of comprehensive support as ASAP, including dedicated academic advisement, career development counseling, as well as financial support such as tuition gap waivers, winter and summer session scholarships, unlimited MetroCards, and textbook vouchers.  The program requires internships in the junior and senior years, and offers 14 majors for full-time study at John Jay.  This type of programming evens the playing field for all students by providing access to supportive services that help ensure graduation.

CUNY received funding from the Robin Hood Foundation to launch the ACE pilot cohort of 250 students in fall 2015, and NYC Opportunity and the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women supported a second cohort in fall 2017.  With the addition of this third cohort, NYC Opportunity’s support totals more than $9.5 million for the ACE program, and the addition of the new cohort brings the total number of students served to 894. Additionally, through the support of the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, CUNY and Metis Associates will conduct a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of this new ACE cohort.

“We are strongly committed to college success as an important anti-poverty strategy, and are excited about the potential of ACE to dramatically increase graduate rates,” said Matthew Klein, Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity. “We are proud to increase our support for ACE after its promising start, and look forward to learning whether its comprehensive model can achieve as much success at the baccalaureate level as CUNY ASAP has had at the associate level.”

“We know that having a college degree means higher earnings and a lower likelihood of experiencing poverty, so it is important that we remove obstacles that too often prevent students from pursuing higher education or staying on track to graduate” said Carson Hicks, Deputy Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity. “ACE provides a foundation and resources that help young people earn their baccalaureate degrees. By funding a third cohort of ACE, NYC Opportunity is investing in our city’s future.”

Preliminary analysis of outcomes for the first ACE cohort demonstrates excellent progress toward timely graduation. Fall 2015 ACE students have higher retention rates, and take and earn more credits than similar John Jay students who are not enrolled in the program. As of fall 2017, 65 percent of the fall 2015 ACE cohort were on track to graduate within four years (based on credit accumulation and academic standing) vs. 37 percent of statistically matched comparison students.  Achievement gaps appear to be narrowing between race subgroups in the areas of retention, credits attempted/earned, and being on track to graduate within four years.
John Jay College
An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and a Minority-Serving Institution offering a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of researching and advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.

The City University of New York
The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity
The Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity (NYC Opportunity) uses evidence and innovation to reduce poverty and increase equity. It advances research, data and design in the City’s program and policy development, service delivery, and budget decisions. NYC Opportunity’s work includes analyzing existing anti-poverty approaches, developing new interventions, facilitating the sharing of data across City agencies, and rigorously assessing the impact of key initiatives. NYC Opportunity manages a discrete fund and works collaboratively with City agencies to design, test and oversee new programs and digital products. It also produces research and analysis of poverty and social conditions, including its influential annual Poverty Measure, which provides a more accurate and comprehensive picture of poverty in New York City than the federal rate.


JOHN JAY’S ACE PROGRAM TO WELCOME A THIRD COHORT WITH SUPPORT FROM THE MAYOR’S OFFICE FOR ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY AND THE LAURA AND JOHN ARNOLD FOUNDATION

Contact:  Rama Sudhakar, 212-237-8628

Thursday, May 3, 2018 – The Accelerate, Complete and Engage (ACE) program at John Jay College of Criminal Justice will welcome a third cohort of students this fall 2018, with support from the Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity (NYC Opportunity) for an additional 275 to 300 students for up to five years. The program is designed to improve students’ persistence in collegiate programs, raise graduation rates and help young people reach their full potential.

ACE has been so successful that students who started as freshmen three years ago are graduating earlier than expected this May, as part of the class of 2018. These graduating students have diverse interests and career plans, and have accepted positions at the New York Police Department and Queens County District Attorney’s Office, enrolled in graduate school for social work, and are entering the fields of law, healthcare, and public service.

One of those students is Abidur Rahman, who is graduating early thanks to the ACE program. The program helped him enroll in summer classes and finish his bachelor’s degree in just three years. Because of ACE, Rahman received financial support that he says played a crucial role in helping him complete his education. As a Law and Society major and a New York City native, Rahman is passionate about learning the law to help empower local marginalized communities. Through his involvement with the Pre-Law Institute at John Jay, he recently completed an internship at Bronx County Family Court that radically changed his perception of the legal field.

“In Hollywood, you usually see white men in courtrooms, but the judge was a Puerto Rican woman,” Rahman said. “Seeing her work with parents rather than just punishing them inspired me. Being a judge in a family court is now one of my highest ambitions.”

The ACE program is the baccalaureate model of CUNY’s highly successful ASAP (Accelerated Study in Associate Programs). The ASAP program doubled graduation rates and is a nationally recognized model. Just as ASAP aims to graduate at least half of its students within three years – a goal it has consistently exceeded – ACE aims to double the current graduate rate of its students to at least 50 percent within four years and 65 percent within five years.  NYC Opportunity provided CUNY ASAP’s first funding, and is closely engaged in the work of both ASAP and ACE. A college degree substantially increases earnings and reduces the likelihood of experiencing poverty, making it a key aspect of transforming New York City a fairer and more equitable city.

“My top priority is our students’ success, and I’m encouraged that the early data shows that ACE has significant promise for improving retention and completion rates,” says John Jay College President Karol V. Mason. “Being the first four-year CUNY college to initiate the ACE program gives me great pride, and I’m grateful for the support of the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity, the Arnold Foundation and CUNY so that we can expand and study this program and help more ACE students stay firmly on track to graduate from John Jay in four years.”

ACE provides the same proven system of comprehensive support as ASAP, including dedicated academic advisement, career development counseling, as well as financial support such as tuition gap waivers, winter and summer session scholarships, unlimited MetroCards, and textbook vouchers.  The program requires internships in the junior and senior years, and offers 14 majors for full-time study at John Jay.  This type of programming evens the playing field for all students by providing access to supportive services that ensures graduation.

CUNY received funding from the Robin Hood Foundation to launch the ACE pilot cohort of 250 students in fall 2015, and NYC Opportunity and the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women supported a second cohort in fall 2017.  With the addition of this third cohort, NYC Opportunity’s support totals more than $9.5 million for the ACE program, and the addition of the new cohort brings the total number of students served to 894. Additionally, through the support of the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, CUNY and Metis Associates will conduct a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of this new ACE cohort.

“We are strongly committed to college success as an important anti-poverty strategy, and are excited about the potential of ACE to dramatically increase graduate rates,” said Matthew Klein, Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity. “We are proud to increase our support for ACE after its promising start, and look forward to learning whether its comprehensive model can achieve as much success at the baccalaureate level as CUNY ASAP has had at the associate level.”

“We know that having a college degree means higher earnings and a lower likelihood of experiencing poverty, so it is important that we remove obstacles that too often prevent students from pursuing higher education or staying on track to graduate” said Carson Hicks, Deputy Executive Director of the Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity. “ACE provides a foundation and resources that help young people earn their baccalaureate degrees. By funding a third cohort of ACE, NYC Opportunity is investing in our city’s future.”

Preliminary analysis of outcomes for the first ACE cohort demonstrates excellent progress toward timely graduation. Fall 2015 ACE students have higher retention rates, and take and earn more credits than similar John Jay students who are not enrolled in the program. As of fall 2017, 65 percent of the fall 2015 ACE cohort were on track to graduate within four years (based on credit accumulation and academic standing) vs. 37 percent of statistically matched comparison students.  Achievement gaps appear to be narrowing between race subgroups in the areas of retention, credits attempted/earned, and being on track to graduate within four years.

John Jay College

An international leader in educating for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and a Minority-Serving Institution offering a rich liberal arts and professional studies curriculum to upwards of 15,000 undergraduate and graduate students from more than 135 nations. John Jay is home to faculty and research centers at the forefront of researching and advancing criminal and social justice reform. In teaching, scholarship and research, the College engages the theme of justice and explores fundamental human desires for fairness, equality and the rule of law. For more information, visit www.jjay.cuny.edu.

 The City University of New York

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity

The Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity (NYC Opportunity) uses evidence and innovation to reduce poverty and increase equity. It advances research, data and design in the City’s program and policy development, service delivery, and budget decisions. NYC Opportunity’s work includes analyzing existing anti-poverty approaches, developing new interventions, facilitating the sharing of data across City agencies, and rigorously assessing the impact of key initiatives. NYC Opportunity manages a discrete fund and works collaboratively with City agencies to design, test and oversee new programs and digital products. It also produces research and analysis of poverty and social conditions, including its influential annual Poverty Measure, which provides a more accurate and comprehensive picture of poverty in New York City than the federal rate.

 

 


BMCC Recognizes Outstanding Student Writing at James Tolan Award Ceremony

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNYWriting and Literature programrecognized outstanding student writers at the 2018 James Tolan Student Writing awards on April 24 in Theater 2, at 199 Chambers Street.

The program included welcoming remarks from Provost and Senior Vice President Karrin Wilks and English Department Chair Professor Joyce Harte. A special remembrance of English Professor James Tolan was delivered by BMCC English Professor Holly Messitt. Two student award winners, Kelly Otterness and Damian Ruff, read excerpts of their work at the ceremony.

BMCC English Professor Diane E. Simmons came up with the idea for an award recognizing student writing in 2003, soon after the BMCC Writing and Literature program began. Simmons worked closely with Tolan to make the awards ceremony a reality and by 2004, outstanding student writers were being recognized with awards that were funded by donations from BMCC faculty.

The awards were renamed for James Tolan after he passed away in March 2017.

Professor James Tolan

“Jim Tolan [shown right] was a profoundly invested teacher. He was a poet and a creative writer,” said English Professor Jason Schneiderman, who called the award ceremony the perfect memorial to Tolan.

Several of Tolan’s poetry collections were published over the years, including Filched (Dos Madres Press, 2017) and Mass of the Forgotten (Autumn House Press, 2013). He was the recipient of honors from the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

“Jim cultivated creativity in himself and others and wanted his students to believe in themselves as writers,” said English Professor Holly Messitt. Tolan connected with his students through his own working-class background, and approached their writing with an enormous generosity of spirit, she says.

“His students have told me that his influence as a teacher has left them with greater insight into how to move through the world as a human being,” said Messit.

Following the awards ceremony, the Writing and Literature program, in collaboration with Poets House, presented National Book Award Finalist and Whiting Award winner Shane McRae as part of The Fourth Reading of the 2017-18 Working Writers Reading Series.

BMCC Student Writer Damian Ruff
This year’s student writing award winners
  • Kelly Otterness, “Colorblind Racism’s Lenses or How to Stay Colorblind in a Colorful World,” critical essay
  • Damian Ruff [shown right], “The Bluest Eye and The Myth of the Black Man: A Queer Reading of a Toni Morrison Classic,” critical essay
  • Damaris Frias, “La Isla de Oscuridad,” fiction
  • Jorge Patino, “Contact: Epitomizing Feminism” critical essay and “Palabras,” fiction
  • Daya Van Dam, “The Case of Free Will Versus Fate in Shakespeare’s Plays: How Prophesies Come True: Human Action or Written in the Stars?” critical essay
  • Domonique Eaddy, “Searching for Heroine,” fiction
  • Jayshawn Lee: poetry
  • Margaret Rempe: “Broken Window” and “If I Knew Any Better,” drama

 


Professor Frank Navas Joins Other 1960s Alumni at 53rd Commencement

 In June 24, 1966, BMCC held its first commencement exercises. President Murray H. Block conferred associate degrees to more than 160 graduates who walked across the auditorium stage at what was then called the Baruch School of the City College of New York City.

Fast forward to 2018 and BMCC’s 53rd commencement is scheduled for June 1 in the Theater at Madison Square Garden. More than 4,000 graduates are expected to receive their associate degrees—and they will be joined by members of BMCC’s 1966 class, as well as others who graduated from BMCC in the 1960s.

Those early alumni will also attend a 50th Milestone Alumni Reception Luncheon, and take their place on the stage during the afternoon commencement ceremony.

“The first graduating classes from BMCC helped establish the ‘Start here. Go Anywhere.’ spirit of the college that has become ingrained in its identity,” says Yaritza Gonzalez, BMCC Manager of Alumni Relations and Annual Fund. “BMCC is more than just a place where alumni completed their degrees. To many, BMCC was a second home during one of the most formative times of their lives.”

When tuition was free and the subway was 20¢

“We were a pretty diverse class, even in the sixties,” says Frank Navas, a member of BMCC’s first graduating class and a Professor of Accounting who has worked at the college for more than 50 years. “Everyone had things in common, like family income, and coming from one-parent households.”

BMCC opened in 1964 on two floors of an office building on West 51stStreet, and expanded to several floors in other buildings, “including a location at 68thStreet and Amsterdam Avenue, and one on Seventh Avenue, where we had a famous recording studio on the top floor and would run into Peter, Paul and Mary in the elevator,” Navas says. “We worked hard but it was a great time. There was a bar close by that we called ‘North Campus’, and we would meet up there for beer, after class.”

At that time, BMCC tuition was free, and a one-way subway fare was 20¢. New York City saw its first transit workers’ strike in 1966, and shut down for 12 days. Lyndon Johnson was President of the United States and protests against the War in Vietnam were in full swing. The Black Panther Party was formed, a woman ran in the Boston Marathon for the first time and Hair opened on Broadway.

Taking the right advice

Professor Navas came to New York City from Puerto Rico at age 11 with his mother and older sister. Since he didn’t speak English, “They put me back a couple grades in school,” he says, “but I picked up the language pretty fast. It helped that I read comic books, and I still read and collect them.” Also, he says, “my cousins would only talk to me in English.”

Even with relatives in New York, the family’s transition was a challenge. “My sister supported the household,” Navas says. “She busted her chops doing piecework in a factory. She gave up her education to support us. We were on public assistance and the social worker told me I shouldn’t go to college, that I should go to work instead.”

Navas ignored that advice. Eventually, he was moved ahead a grade and graduated from Seward Park High School on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. “I only had a general diploma,” he says. “If it hadn’t been for my guidance counselor, Mrs. Shulman, I wouldn’t be teaching here today. She got me the application for BMCC. She said, ‘There’s this new community college I just heard about and I think it would be good for you’.”

Changing times

Navas thrived at BMCC. A member of the basketball team—“Defense was my thing”—and on the Dean’s List, he was awarded the Martin B. Dworkis Memorial Award, “to the outstanding athlete with the highest academic average.”

BMCC had a dress code then, he says. “Men had to wear a suit and tie. Women couldn’t wear pants and they had to wear at least one-inch heels.”

After he transferred to Baruch College, “I don’t remember seeing any women in my accounting classes and there were no women teaching classes,” Navas says, adding that there were also no women or minorities portrayed in the case studies in his accounting textbooks—then times changed.

“At BMCC over the years, I’ve seen more women come on board as professors and students in accounting, and I would say maybe 20 years ago I began to notice women writing accounting textbooks, and the problems in the books began to reflect the diversity in our classrooms. They started to add women to the mix, and also Hispanic business owners and other groups.”

The 50th Milestone Alumni Reception and an invitation to more recent alumni

For Navas, the support he received at BMCC still resonates after 50 years.

“When I finished my bachelor’s degree in accounting at Baruch, there was a professor at BMCC, Lewis Hughes—the best accounting professor I ever had—and he told me a committee of the accounting department wanted to offer me a full-time lecturer position at BMCC, because of his support of me. What I had to do in return, he said, was to continue my education and earn my graduate degree, my MBA.”

Navas kept his end of the bargain. He earned an MBA at Fordham University and has taught at BMCC since Spring 1973.

“The economy has changed in that time, but there is still a great need for accountants,” he says. “If students want to work in accounting they have more opportunities than ever; they can go into forensic, governmental and other areas in the field.”

Navas looks forward to attending the Milestone Luncheon on June 1, the day of BMCC’s 53rd commencement, and comparing notes with classmates he might not have seen for decades.

“I could have gone into accounting and taught other places but I decided teaching at BMCC was the best way to give back,” he says. “I’m very proud of BMCC and I owe a lot to this college.”

According to Gonzalez, who is reaching out to alumni on behalf of the college, “We are very excited about the 50th Milestone Alumni Reception, honoring our graduates from the 1960s. We also want to encourage more recent BMCC alumni, and those who graduated 20, 30 and 40 years ago, to keep in touch with us and participate in our special alumni events. We provide a growing list of benefits for our alumni, including access to the BMCC library, gym and career center. To learn more about the alumni relations office I encourage alumni to visit bmcc.cuny.edu/alumni or email me at ygonzalez@bmcc.cuny.edu.”


Civic Leadership Group Tours United Nations

On April 18, students in the BMCC Civic Leadership Program and Academy of Leadership and Service—both offered through the Office of Student Activities—as well as students from the Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice Department visited the United Nations Headquarters on East 42nd Street in Manhattan.

The trip was organized through the Student Activities office for students interested in learning about the mission of the United Nations, and how they can pursue opportunities in international development and human and social justice.

Led by a UN tour guide, the students visited the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council. They learned about key pillars of the UN’s work, including efforts to promote peace and economic stability across the globe by addressing issues such as disarmament and human rights.

The students were accompanied by BMCC staff members Melissa E. Aponte, Assistant Director of Student Activities and Leadership, and Doug Israel, Director of Government and Community Relations.

According to BMCC Science major Tsering Choetso, who took part in the tour, “I greatly enjoyed the visit to the United Nations. I want to see positive change in the world and I learned that through engagement we can help create that change.”

“The BMCC Academy of Leadership and Service continues to expand leadership development opportunities for our students,” Aponte said. “The Civic Leadership program is a great example of how we seek to address their diverse interests and better prepare them to be engaged citizens after graduating. Visits to the United Nations and other governing bodies provide our students the avenues to take active participation in their communities while challenging them to apply classroom learning to real life situations.”

“I was pleased to see such strong interest from BMCC students in learning about how the United Nations is helping solve many of the planet’s most pressing problems,” said Israel. “As this semester’s Civic Leadership program comes to a close, it is clear that many of our students are interested in being more civically engaged and finding ways to have a positive impact on their communities here in the U.S. and also abroad.”

The participating students included Asana Abubakari, Djenabou Bah, Odaine Chambers, Fnu Tsering Choetso, Makeme Conde,Thierno Hamdiata Diallo, Niels Hansen, Caeden Ignaszak, Raykhon Juraeva, Stephanie Jerome,Mahnaz Masud Khan, Wendy Miguel, Kiyonah Mya Buckhalter, Kelly Otterness, Awa Sanno, Sultan Saleh, Prince Sari, Ayman Saweris, Maharanni Singh,Lansana Sylla, Beatriz Santiago Torres, Sultana Yesmin and Rumeysa Yoruklu.

Students interested in joining the Civic Leadership Program next semester may contact Melissa Aponte, Assistant Director of Student Activities, at maponte@bmcc.cuny.edu.

 

RELATED ARTICLES: Students Make Their Voices Heard in AlbanyBMCC Celebrates Student Leadership and ServiceBMCC Delegation Meets With Elected Officials


BMCC Partnership Creates Emergency Medical Technician Training

Alternative high school students who have earned their High School Equivalency diploma and are 18 to 24 years old can now enter a training program and start working toward a career as an Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT).

This opportunity has been made possible by a partnership between the Paramedic program in the  Department of Allied Health Sciences and the Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), Comprehensive Development, Inc. (CDI), and Northwell Health.

Funded by the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation, the Spring 2018 EMT pilot program is serving its first cohort, 25 students who will receive technical and customer service training and earn stackable credits into the Associate in Applied Sciences (A.A.S.) Paramedic program in BMCC’s Allied Health Science department. They will also complete an internship and be placed in EMT or related healthcare positions.

“This important partnership supports BMCC’s goal to enable student transitions across the education continuum from high school to our community college,” says Sunil Gupta, Dean of the Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development at BMCC.

The EMT program enables eligible high school graduates to accrue postsecondary, bankable college credit, he explains. “It opens a pathway to higher education in the long run and in the immediate future, makes it possible for these 18- to 24-year-olds to apply in-demand skills and certification to enter the thriving New York City healthcare industry.”

Combining customer service and technical skills training

During the planning of the EMT program, “We changed our lens to ask, ‘What do employers want from workers in these fields?’,” says Michael A. Roberts, Executive Director of the CDI. “We met with medical providers and representatives from urgent care facilities and asked, ‘What would it take, for you to hire an 18- to 24-year-old? What do you see as missing in their skill set?’”

The upshot of those meetings is that the EMT students are starting with an eight-week Bridge Program taught by CDI staff at BMCC. During this time, they focus on workplace issues and customer service skills, especially as they relate to the healthcare industry.

After completing the Bridge Program, the students complete 12 weeks of EMT occupational training taught by BMCC’s Paramedic program, and an eight-week internship at a Northwell Health medical facility.

At the end of the program, they will be eligible to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians EMT Certification, and will work with an employment specialist whose goal is to place them in EMT or related positions.

“Collaboration between Northwell, Borough of Manhattan Community College and Comprehensive Development Inc. will help EMT program graduates develop all the competencies needed to succeed in the workplace and perform at a high level,” said Deirdre J. Duke, Corporate Director of Human Resources Programs at Northwell Health.

Serving the at-risk male population

Another consideration in designing the EMT program was who it will serve. Participants are recruited from three high schools in the CDI network: The High School for Health Professions and Human Services, Manhattan Comprehensive Night and Day High School, and City-As-School High School.

The EMT program is modeled after the successful Medical Assistant Specialist (MAS) program at BMCC, which also provides a Bridge Program, occupational training and an internship—all culminating in job placement and retention services.

While the MAS program has excellent completion rates, “It attracts about 85 percent female students, and we realized we weren’t serving the at-risk male population,” Roberts says. “Now we have an EMT cohort of 25 participants, and 18 of them are male participants within the 18- to 24-year-old age range.”

Applying EMT skills in tangible, life-saving settings

To complete the internship component of the EMT program, “We’re going to take the students to Northwell on the Long Island Rail Road,” says Roberts. “They’ll take part in an intensive training leading to their EMT certification exam and get a full immersion into the EMT workplace.”

Vincent Papasodero, Program Director at the Northwell Health Emergency Medical Institute (EMI), says, “Thanks to this innovative curriculum, EMI will be able to offer students tangible, life-saving skills through patient simulation sessions that replicate real-life medical emergencies, interactions with actual patients in clinical settings, including those with special needs, and training in hazardous materials and emergency vehicle operations.”

Removing the driver’s license barrier

As part of a larger emergency medical system, EMTs are expected to stabilize and safely transport patients in situations ranging from routine medical transports to life-threatening emergencies.

This translates into a barrier for the young men and women of color the EMT program is designed to serve, Roberts says, “most of whom live in urban centers, use public transportation and don’t drive.”

For this reason, the EMT program provides a driver’s training component.

“Not only that, it costs the students nothing,” Roberts says. “The program is free, and it’s an incredible opportunity. Graduates of the program who earn their certification could make up to $40,000 a year, as an EMT. They can also enter the Paramedic program at BMCC and lattice up, to become a paramedic. We’ve created a number of pathways for them.”


Reception Set for May 10 to Honor Faculty and Staff who Have Served up to 50 Years at BMCC

On May 10, Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) will celebrate faculty and staff who have accrued up to 50 years of service to the college, with a luncheon reception in the Fiterman Hall Conference Center.

“We are celebrating the success and dedication of our faculty and staff, and their commitment to our students,” said Karrin E. Wilks, Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs. “BMCC is an amazing place to work and these honorees are a testament to that.”

BMCC President Antonio Pérez, along with other administrators of the college, will take part in the ceremony as each honoree receives a certificate honoring their years served.

The event, hosted by the Office of Academic Affairs, is open to all BMCC faculty and staff. Please RSVP to Maria Castillo, macastillo@bmcc.cuny.edu.

50 Years of Service at BMCC 

Martin P. Levine

Fay Rogg

45 Years of Service at BMCC

Edward M. Bostick

Everett William Flannery

40 Years of Service at BMCC

Laszlo Grunfeld

Joseph Johnson

Mary S. Padula

35 Years of Service at BMCC

Philip A. Belcastro

June L. Gaston

Bernardo Pace

Michael Paul Basile

30 Years of Service at BMCC

Jacqueline Andrews

Kenneth Levinson

Lisa St. Hill

25 Years of Service at BMCC

Peter Consenstein

Diane Dowling

Allan Felix

David H. Knight

Fred J. Lane

Marie A. Morgan

Frederick A. Reese

Suzanne C. Schick

Carol Wasserman

Tracy Wynn

Lily Yi-Elkin

20 Years of Service at BMCC

Lawrence C. Dumaguing

Yakov Genis

Leonore Gonzalez

Yi Han

Eda Henao

Angela E. Jervis

Konstantinos Kanellopoulos

Stephen Kelly

Alkis Papoutsis

Samuel Paul

Ruru Rusmin

Diane E. Simmons

Christopher B. Thompson

Nanette Van Loon

Nathan A. Whyte

 


BMCC Celebrates Opening of Panther Pantry

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) students, faculty and staff gathered in the BMCC Single Stop office April 23 to celebrate the opening of the college’s new Panther Pantry with a ribbon cutting ceremony.

BMCC students facing a food emergency who visit the Single Stop Office for a needs assessment will now be able to take home a three-day supply of nutritionally balanced, nonperishable food. Single Stop staff will also continue to work with and connect those students to sustainable food sources, primarily the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

“The BMCC community has always responded to student needs, and this new service takes it to another level, “ said Deborah Harte, Director of BMCC’s Single Stop program. She also said the food pantry will serve an estimated 250 students each month, with plans to expand the program as more funding becomes available.

CUNY’s interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Christopher Rosa praised BMCC’s new accomplishment, telling the audience that creating a food pantry is not logistically an easy task. “No college has greater demand for space than BMCC,” he said.

Rosa said the BMCC’s Single Stop is helping change the overall narrative and stigma that often surrounds public assistance.

“BMCC understands we are reframing the conversation about public benefits as a new form of financial aid,” he said.

BMCC leads effort

From the start, the pantry has been an in-house effort coordinated by the Office of Student Affairs and BMCC President Antonio Pérez who arranged for initial project funding from the BMCC Foundation. The college is currently applying for additional financial sources and will also accept nonperishable food donations from faculty and staff.

“For me, this is a moment that hits home,” said Pérez, as he recalled his own childhood when he and his family faced issues of food insecurity. “We must do our part to make certain students don’t go home hungry,” he said.

BMCC Vice President of Student Affairs Marva Craig said addressing food insecurity relates directly to the college’s mission to retain students and ensure they graduate. “Over the years, faculty have reported witnessing students who show up for class hungry, sometimes, those students are in need of food to get them to the finish line.”

Hunger, a national problem among college students

Conversations surrounding the detrimental role that hunger plays in Academic performance have been ongoing for years. In the past 30 days, 36 percent of university students and 42 percent of community college students felt food insecure, according to a recent study from the Hope Lab, a Wisconsin based research laboratory aimed at improving equitable outcomes in postsecondary education. At BMCC, around 71 percent of BMCC students come from families earning less than $30,000 a year, many below the poverty line.

Roseann Ragone, Assistant Director of BMCC Enrollment Management Services brought along a food donation for the pantry.

“I worked in Financial Aid for 27 years and I saw a lot of students who are in need. Giving something to the BMCC community is the right thing to do,” she said, “If everyone would donate just one item, imagine what an even more far reaching program this might be.”


BMCC and Mercy College Sign Articulation Agreement

L-R: Mercy College Provost Jose Herrera and President Tim Hall; BMCC President Antonio Perez and Provost Karrin E. Wilks

L-R: Mercy College Provost Jose Herrera and President Tim Hall; BMCC President Antonio Perez and Provost Karrin E. Wilks

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) and Mercy College, an institution in Westchester County, New York with campuses in Dobbs Ferry, the Bronx and Yorktown have signed a comprehensive master articulation agreement. The agreement was announced at the BMCC campus on Wednesday, April 18.

“This partnership provides a seamless pathway for students to receive a four-year degree and Mercy College is excited to welcome students from Borough of Manhattan Community College through this articulation agreement,” said Mercy College President Tim Hall.

“We are delighted to enter this articulation agreement with Mercy College,” said Antonio Pérez, BMCC President. “Just as BMCC has programs in place to ensure student success when they enter our institution, we place a high priority on their seamless transfer to the next level of their educational journey. The abundance of academic programs and opportunities available at Mercy College will highly benefit our ambitious graduates.”

Starting today, this partnership will ensure a smooth transfer process for BMCC students to matriculate to Mercy College with junior standing. More than 29 degree programs from BMCC Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.) and Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees will be transferable to Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Behavior Science degrees at Mercy College.  A minimum of 60 credits (and a maximum of 75) from the associate degrees can be applied toward the completion of the articulated bachelor degree program. Transferring students will be expected to fulfill Mercy College’s bachelor’s degree requirements and adhere to general academic policies and procedures.

“A commitment to student success is at the heart of BMCC’s mission,” said Karrin E. Wilks, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, BMCC. “Integral to that success are pathways to baccalaureate programs that enable our graduates to move closer to their goals. We are excited at the opportunity for our students to continue their higher education at Mercy College, which will mentor and support their leadership, as well as their academic skills.”

“This is a wonderful partnership between two institutions who share a similar mission that focuses on serving our students with programs that will prepare future leaders in our shared community,” said Dr. José Herrera, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs, Mercy College.

In keeping with the Mercy College mission of providing students with a pathway to graduation success, Dr. Herrera explained, all transfer students will receive a PACT mentor that will help them navigate degree requirements, register for classes, track academic progress and develop leadership skills.

About Mercy College

Mercy College is the dynamic, diverse New York City area college whose students are on a personal mission: to get the most out of life by getting the most out of their education.  Founded in 1950, Mercy is a coeducational and nonsectarian college that offers more than 90 undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs within five schools: Business, Education, Health and Natural Sciences, Liberal Arts and Social and Behavioral Sciences. With campuses in Dobbs Ferry, Bronx, Manhattan and Yorktown Heights, the vibrancy of the College culture is sustained by a diverse student body from around the region.

About Borough of Manhattan Community College 

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) is part of the City University of New York (CUNY) and enrolls over 27,000 degree-seeking and 11,000 continuing education students a year, awarding associate degrees in more than 45 fields. BMCC ranks #5 among community colleges nationwide in granting associate degrees to minority students, according to data from the U.S. Department of Education. Visit: http://www.bmcc.cuny.edu.


Faculty Awarded for Innovative Projects

In center: Professor Roderick S. Snipes, one of 41 BMCC faculty recipients of PSC-CUNY awards

In center: Professor Roderick S. Snipes, one of 41 BMCC faculty recipients of PSC-CUNY awards

The Professional Staff Congress of the City University of New York (PSC-CUNY) supports the professional growth of faculty with grant awards for their projects in the creative arts, as well as for their research in the social sciences and humanities, natural sciences, curriculum development and other areas.

In the current PSC-CUNY Cycle 49, 41 Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) faculty members have received Cycle 49 PSC-CUNY awards for their research projects. Traditional-A Awards provide up to $3,500, while Traditional-B Awards range from $3,600 to $6,000. Awards are distributed by the University Committee on Research Awards, a faculty committee, and administered by the Research Foundation of CUNY.

“The depth and breadth of scholarship represented by these awards is impressive, as is the collective impact on a broad range of fields,” said Karrin E. Wilks, Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs. “We are proud of the outstanding research and creative activity of our faculty, providing unprecedented learning opportunities for our students and establishing BMCC as a premier community college.”

Traditional-A Awardees

Jamal Ali, Physics and Engineering: Gender differences in the optical properties and imaging of gray matter In human brain

David Allen, Mathematics: Presheavs of Quasitoric Manifolds and Cohomological Rigidity

Upali Aparajita, Physics and Engineering: Multishell nanorobots for sampling, detecting and treating cancerous cells

Shoba Bandi-Rao, Education: Reviewing by Ear: Helping English Language Learners Revise their Essays

David Bahr, English and Creative Writing: Surrogate Selves: Re-experiencing the Past Through Other People’s Lives

Tracy Bealer, English and Creative Writing: “What’s the opposite of phallic?”: Language, Loss, and Creative Mourning in Y: The Last Man

Rachel Corkle, Comparative Literature and Modern Languages: The Fragility of Virility in 1830s France

Bertie Ferdman, Performing Arts: Curating Dramaturgies

Miguel Fiolhais, Physics and Engineering: Study of the top quark Yukawa coupling at the Large Hadron Collider

Sarah Haviland, Art History, Visual Arts, Communication Arts & Sciences: Avian Habitat: A Sculptural Bird-Figure Installation

Barys Korzun, Physics and Engineering: Preparation and Study of Flash-Evaporated Thin Films of Compounds of the Cu-Fe-S System for Optoelectronic Applications

Cynthia Lam, English: Geographies of Home: Re-membering the Body in the Construction of Latina Subjectivity

Stephanie Laudone, Law and Criminal Justice, Sociology, Urban Studies: Intensive Mothering and Vaccine Choice: Reclaiming the Lifeworld from the System

Kurt Levent, Mathematics: Navigating the Sky with Projective Geometries and Octonionic Algebra

Jun Liang, Biology and Earth Sciences:Developing a novel genetic model of healthy aging with Chloride intracellular channel protein (CLIC)

Laurie Lomask, Comparative Literature and Modern Languages: Oral Histories of the Caribbean Diaspora in New York City

Sarah Madole, Art History, Visual Arts, Communication Arts and Sciences: The Sarcophagi of Ancient Arles and Social Experience among Romans and Christians

Micah Miller, Mathematics: A Dold-Kan Correspondence for Infinity Cosimplicial Chain Complexes and Multicomplexes

Soniya Munshi, Law and Criminal Justice, Sociology, Urban Studies: Mapping Safety Apparatuses: Gendered Violence, Immigrant Victim-Survivors and the Carceral State

Abel Navarro, Chemistry and Biochemistry: Seaweed and Their Hydrogels as Adsorbents of Pharmaceutical Products from Contaminated Waters

Maria Pagan Rivera, Health Sciences, Health and Human Services, Speech and Hearing: Sin Papeles (Without Papers): Generational Transmissions of Trauma in an Undocumented Immigrant Family Living in NYC

Robert Reed, Performing Arts: Performances (Lecture/Recitals) and Master-classes of Bach’s Six Suites for Solo Violoncello, BWV 10

Shari Rothfarb Mekonen, Performing Arts: Heroes (working title)

Roderick S. Snipes, Business Administration: Age as Determining Factor in Youth Entrepreneurship Education Outcomes

Francisca Suarez-Coalla, Comparative Literature and Modern Languages: Literature’s footprint on the city of Oviedo, Spain (La huella de la literatura en la ciudad de Oviedo, España)

Janice Summers, Nursing: Faculty Advisement and Helpfulness and the Retention of First-Semester Associate Degree Nursing Students

Jane Tezapsidis, Biology and Earth Sciences: Forskolin induces apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma Cells

Valerie Thiers-Thiam, Comparative Literature and Modern Languages: Reaching out to Armenian Mothers and Grandmothers – Transgenerational Trauma and Resilience

Yan Yang, Art History, Visual Arts, Communication Arts and Sciences: The Influence of 19th century Yamato-e Revivalists (Fukko Yamato-e) on Yamato-e’s Pictorial Style

Hasan Yumak, Education: Correlation between Math Skills and General Chemistry Course Grades

Traditional-B Awardees

Maria de los Angeles Donoso Macaya, Interdisciplinary: South-to-North Photographic Displacements: Susan Meiselas, Chile from within (1990) and Chile desde adentro (2015)

C. Ray Borck, Interdisciplinary: “More aggressive than ever”: Biomedicalization, Discursive Testosterone, and C. Masculine Embodiment

Candido Hernandez, Anthropology, Classics, Philosophy, Linguistics: Use of Technology for critical thinking and decision making among first generation immigrant students at BMCC

Orlando Justo, Business Administration:Trade Openness and Growth: Evidence from the Transitional Economies of Eastern Europe

Kwasi Konadu, History: A People’s History of Jamaica in the World

Leigh LaBerge, Interdisciplinary: Wages Against Artwork: Socially Engaged Art and the Decomodification of Labor

Sophie Marinez, Interdisciplinary: The 1937 Massacre in the Dominican Republic: An Internal Conflict

Khushmand Rajendran, Health and Human Services, Speech and Hearing: Moderators of the Impact of Medications and School-Based Services on Children’s Behavioral Problems Between Early Childhood and Adolescence

Lisa Sarti, Art History, Visual Arts, Communication Arts and Sciences: Screens of Painted Canvas: Panoramas and the Birth of Cinematography

Jill Strauss, Interdisciplinary: On, Off or Under the Pedestal: Reconfiguring Memorials to Change the Conversation

Hao Tang, Computer Science and Library: Semantic 3D Modeling with Prior Knowledge of Indoor Structure

 

 

 

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • PSC-CUNY has provided grant awards for 41 BMCC professors
  • Grants support research projects in the creative arts, social sciences, humanities, natural sciences and other areas
  • Awards are part of Cycle 49 and are administered by the Research Foundation of CUNY

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BMCC Panther Symbolizes a History of Pride and School Spirit

The Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) Panther has had a makeover—and BMCC students have given it a new name—Manny (short for Manhattan).

In all, more than 3,000 students responded to an email survey by the office of Student Affairs asking them to choose between the names; Hudson, Pat the Panther, Professor Paws and finally the winner, Manny. Almost half of the student participants selected Manny with Professor Paws coming in a distant second place.

“The BMCC Panther instills pride by generating school spirit, excitement and participation,” said Marva Craig, Vice President of Student Affairs at BMCC.

Mascots such as the BMCC Panther have a storied past. They first arrived on college campuses in the late 1900s, but people dressing up as bears, tigers or elephants did not grow popular until the 1970s. The term itself is rooted in French and means “lucky charm.”

Over the years, colleges within the City University of New York system picked their own mascots, according to the CUNY Athletic Conference. At BMCC, the Panther has been around since the college’s earliest days as a business school located in an office building at 134 West 51st Street and called Manhattan Community College, or MCC.

Tracing the panther’s history

“There was a dress code back then, everyone was required to be in business attire,” said Doug Machovic, a member of MCC’s first graduating class in 1966 who is now a professor of Health Education at BMCC.

illustration of panther 1967

Getting ahead in business appears to have been the inspiration behind the original MCC Panther mascot. The Panther “symbolizes the power of knowledge and our drive for success in the business jungle,” said a full-page entry from the 1966 MCC yearbook that includes a drawing of the MCC panther.

Archival material provided by the A. Philip Randolph Library at BMCC, as well as first-person accounts, shows that the MCC Panther first pounced onto the men’s basketball court in late 1965 or early 1966 when the college’s athletic program was being led by William “Dolly” King; sports legend, professor and men’s basketball coach.

One of King’s lead players, Frank Navas, was also a member of MCC’s first graduating class and the college’s first recipient of the Martin B. Dworkis Award for Scholarship, Leadership and Sportsmanship, named after MCC’s first president.

“Our coach, William ‘Dolly’ King was a great athlete, but he was an even greater human being,” said Navas, who is now a professor of accounting at BMCC.

King, who arrived at MCC in 1965 as a Professor of Physical Education, Health and Recreation was a star athlete who played for the all-black New York Renaissance professional team.  Then in 1946 King made history when he signed with the all-white Rochester Royals, making him first African American to join the National Basketball League, the predecessor to today’s National Basketball Association.

King has since been recognized as one of the top basketball players of his era according to the Black Fives Foundation, a nonprofit that celebrates the legacy of African Americans in Pre-1950s basketball.

Early panther pride

Spurring the 1967 Panthers onto victory, a spirited cheerleading and booster squad led by Physical Education Professor Mary Jacobs.  The cheerleader’s co-captain was Beryl Duncan, who today is Beryl Duncan Wilson, a professor and counselor in BMCC’s College Discovery program.

students with panther head

“I vaguely remember someone at games wearing a distorted animal head—probably intended to look like a Panther,” said Wilson. A photograph from the 1967 MCC yearbook does in fact show what looks to be a student holding the furry head of a panther.

Wilson says she doesn’t know why the college settled on the Panther as a mascot versus a tiger or a bear—although she and others have speculated that it could be related to the Summer 1966 debut of the Marvel Comic Black Panther series.

Despite the college still being in its infancy, Panther Pride was so great during King’s time as coach, busloads of students often traveled with the basketball team to away games at colleges across the region, Wilson says.

By 1969, Coach William “Dolly” King had compiled a 50-7 record during his time at MCC. But on January 28 while at Panthers game in Binghamton, New York, King had a heart attack and died the next morning. He was just 52 years old.

By the 1970s, men’s varsity sports teams, like the college itself, had expanded. Panther teams included cross-country, soccer, track and field and wrestling teams. For women, there was now basketball, bowling, softball, volleyball and cheerleading. There were also club programs in karate and fencing. Drawings of the Panther were showing up in MCC merchandise such as banners, t-shirts and posters, as well as in yearbooks and other publications.

The panther comes to life

The first image of someone dressed in a panther costume shows up in a 1988 BMCC yearbook. By then, BMCC had a new home at 199 Chambers Street and its student body had grown exponentially. BMCC Athletic Director Steve Kelly suggested that the college probably acquired a costume sometime during that period or in the early 1990s. Nonetheless, by the 2000s, the Panther had become an intricate symbol of BMCC’s school spirit and its brand, showing up at basketball games and other events.

eManny the Panther will certainly make an appearance at the college’s 43rd Commencement, on June 1 at the Theater at Madison Square Garden—an opportunity for graduates and their families to meet BMCC’s official ambassador of school spirit.

“The BMCC Panther symbolizes pride and represents oneness for students and the rest of the college community,” said Craig. “It wears the college colors of orange and blue, fostering school spirit, positive identity with the college, and enthusiastic participation at special and athletic events.”


Former BMCC President Joshua L. Smith Creates Faculty Development Fund

L-R: BMCC President Antonio Perez and former BMCC President Joshua L. Smith

L-R: BMCC President Antonio Perez and former BMCC President Joshua L. Smith

Dr. Joshua L. Smith, the fourth president of Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY), led the College through its construction when it moved to lower Manhattan in 1983. His contribution enabled BMCC to continue its evolution as an institution of higher education. Most recently, Dr. Smith made a generous gift of $25,000 to fund the Dr. Joshua L. Smith Faculty Development Fund at BMCC.
“BMCC cannot significantly improve student success—our highest priority—without strong, visible, and pervasive faculty leadership, particularly pedagogical leadership.” said Karrin E. Wilks, BMCC Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. “Dr. Smith’s generous gift will support our collective commitment to developing the theory and practice of pedagogical leadership at BMCC, as we strive to be the very best we can be.”
“The importance of faculty development today cannot be overstated,” said Philip A. Keefe, Director of Major Gifts and Planned Giving in the BMCC Office of College Development. “Professors face a growing array of changing roles and responsibilities that require them to engage in ongoing professional learning. This generous donation will make it possible for BMCC to support professors as they grow and adapt to the changing environment of today’s community college.”
The Dr. Joshua L. Smith Faculty Professional Development Fund will enable BMCC to provide faculty with strategic teaching and learning opportunities such as pedagogical workshops led by guest educators who are renowned in their fields, and panel discussions. Faculty development themes that could be addressed include high-impact teaching practices, academic mindset, blended-hybrid-online learning, adaptive learning and faculty mentoring.
“I would like to thank Dr. Smith for his continuing generosity and support of pedagogical excellence at BMCC,” says Doris R. Holz, Vice President of Development and Chief Operating Officer of the BMCC Foundation.
As the College’s fourth president, Dr. Smith oversaw the construction of the BMCC campus in downtown Manhattan. Cited by Diverse Issues in Higher Education as one of the most influential figures in higher education in the 20th century, he is Emeritus Professor of Higher Education at the School of Education, New York University.
Upon leaving BMCC, Dr. Smith served as Chancellor of the Community Colleges of California, overseeing 107 colleges and 1.2 million students. He taught at City and Baruch Colleges before joining the faculty at NYU, and as a member of the Board of Overseers of Regent College of the University of the State of New York, he was a founding member of the Board of Trustees of Regents College. Dr. Smith also served in the U.S. Air Force as a pilot in the Strategic Air Command. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Boston University and a masters and doctoral degree from Harvard University.

BMCC Hosts 53rd Commencement

Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC/CUNY) will confer Associate degrees to more than 3,800 graduates during morning and afternoon Commencement ceremonies at The Theater at Madison Square Garden, 4 Pennsylvania Plaza in Manhattan, on June 1.

The Commencement Ceremony will include graduates from Summer 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018 and Spring 2018 graduates.

The morning ceremony will begin at 11 a.m. and the afternoon ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Each ceremony will feature remarks by members of BMCC’s administration and speeches by the 2018 BMCC valedictorians, who have not yet been selected.

Morning and afternoon ceremonies for different majors

BMCC offers Associate degree programs in more than 45 disciplines, ranging from engineering to art history to computer science.

The morning ceremony will accommodate graduates in Accounting, Animation and Motion Graphics, Art Foundations: Art History, Art Foundations: Studio Art, Forensic Accounting, Bilingual Childhood Education, Biotechnology, Business Administration, Business Management: Finance and Banking, Business Management: General Management, Business Management: Marketing, Business Management: Travel and Tourism, Childhood Education, Communication Studies, Community Health Education, Computer Network Technology, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Early Childhood Education: Infant/Toddler, Early Childhood Education: Preschool, Engineering Science, Geographic Information Science, Mathematics, Modern Language: French, Modern Language:Italian, Modern Language: Spanish, Multimedia Programming Design: Computer Arts and Design, Multimedia Programming Design: Programming, Office Operations, School Health Education, Science, Science for Forensics, Science for Health Professionals, Secondary Education, Small Business Entrepreneurship, Theatre, Video Arts and Technology and Writing and Literature.

The afternoon ceremony will accommodate graduates in Criminal Justice, Sociology, Economics, Gerontology, Health Information Technology, History, Human Services, Liberal Arts, Nursing, Paramedic, Psychology and Respiratory Therapy.

2018 Presidential Medalists

The 53rd Commencement Presidential Medalists are Tim Tynan and Steven Fiterman, both members of the BMCC Foundation Board.

Steven Fiterman

Steven Fiterman is the Manager and Chief Principal of several real estate management and development companies that invest in local communities across the United States. These companies provide real estate portfolio management, as well as expertise in community and land development, and residential home building.

Mr. Fiterman has offices in both Minnesota and Florida, and is the son of BMCC Foundation Board Member Miles Fiterman, who passed away in 2004 and who donated the original Fiterman Hall to BMCC in 1993. Steven Fiterman, along with his wife Susan, is also a trustee and principal donor to the Steven C. and Susan L. Fiterman Charitable Foundation.

Tim Tynan is the Managing Director and Global Head of Citigroup Business Services, responsible for global operations and services including Payment Services, Employee HR Services, Procurement, General Services and Financial Reporting Operations.

Tim Tynan

Mr. Tynan served as the Chairman of the BMCC Board of Trustees from 2003 to 2005 and continues to serve as a member of the Board today. He is actively involved with Bridges-to-Community, the NGO promoting development and cross-cultural learning in Nicaragua, as well as serving as a regular guest lecturer at The NYU Stern School of Business.

50-year anniversary graduates

This  year, alumni who are reaching their 50-year anniversary of graduating from BMCC will be participating in the 53rd Commencement. These graduates from the 1960s will walk in the afternoon procession and sit on the dais during the ceremony.

More information

For information on caps and gowns, tickets, commencement procedures, graduates and guests with disabilities, diplomas, children as guests, the 2018 Yearbook and other areas, visit the 53rd Commencement Ceremony page on the college website.


Department of History Associate Professor Offered Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant

Thomas Desch-Obi will conduct research on the history of an endangered Afro-Colombian martial art

Thomas Desch-Obi, an associate professor in the Department of History in the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, was offered a prestigious Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant for 2018-19 to support his research on the history of an endangered Afro-Colombian martial art called grima.

The Fulbright Scholar Grant will allow Desch-Obi to spend seven months in Colombia, beginning January 2019, conducting archival and ethnographic research. His project will have three components: forming and circulating a traveling exhibit; creating a digital archive by filming oral histories of living masters of grima and digitizing copies of their cartillas de malicia (private grima texts); and completing a manuscript on the history of grima.

“Highlighting stories of resistance such as how grima empowered Afro-Colombians to play active roles in struggles for land and political recognition are important to maintaining peace,” Desch-Obi said. “This project will be first to document the rich history of resistance in Colombia before the last living exponents of this African derived art—and their cartillas documenting this artform—are gone forever.”

Grima: An endangered Colombian art of resistance in times of peace and war

By the early 19th century, enslaved Africans and their descendants in the Colombian Cauca developed a variety of martial arts collectively referred to as grima, which utilized the unarmed body, lance, or machete for attack and extreme corporal dexterity for defense.

In times of peace they were used in various struggles by Afro-Colombians to help abolish slavery, to gain honor within black communities through bloodless duels and dance, to empower women, and to defend communal lands from encroachment by the rich and politically powerful. In times of war, grima allowed Afro-Colombians to participate politically by defending the liberal party in the numerous civil wars of the 19th century, and to overcome their Peruvian opponents in the conflict over Leticia in the 1930s.

While these grima exponents are acknowledged as history makers in the oral histories of their own communities, they are invisible in published histories of Colombia. With this Fulbright Fellowship, Desch-Obi plans to end this erasure through a historical exegesis of grima’s role in communal life and national struggles from the 1840s to 1950s.

Traveling Exhibit

The first part of Desch-Obi’s research project will be to curate a small traveling museum exhibit that will narrate the history of African martial arts to Colombia via the slave trade, grima’s role in abolition and liberal war efforts, the transnational histories of the grima styles “juego cubano” and “venezolano modern,” the role of grima in Colombian literature and dance, and opportunities to save the art. The exhibit will include five short documentaries highlighting various aspects of grima’s history.

Collecting and Digitizing Cartillas de Malicia

Cartillas are hand-written books that have been passed from master to disciple for generations to ensure the undiluted transmission of each grima lineage’s history and pedagogy. However, these books are in peril because many living academy graduates are predominantly in their 80s and 90s with no disciples, which means the cartillas will be burned after their owners die.

Desch-Obi has encountered more than 15 living masters who have agreed to allow the digitization of their manuscripts, dating from the 1850s to the 1950s. But war in Colombia has limited the number of cartillas Desch-Obi has been able to collect. He will potentially be able to collect more cartillas in a region of Colombia where the peace process continues, and then use these hand-written books for his research. The materials will also be housed at Vanderbilt University’s digital archival collection so scholars worldwide will have access.

Manuscript on the history of grima

Desch-Obi is working toward completing his second monograph Hombres Históricos: Grima and the Afro-Colombian Struggle. This book will reveal how Afro-Colombians emerged from slavery using grima fighting forms to play major roles in liberal revolutions in Colombia and in ongoing struggles for women’s empowerment, political recognition, and defense of communal lands. Desch-Obi plans to publish this book in Spanish with the University of ICESI’s Centro de Estudios Afrodiaspóricos (Center for African Diaspora Studies) and will submit it for publication with Cambridge University Press’s Afro-Latin America series.

“My manuscript will use contemporary accounts to document that these machete‐wielding black soldiers were usually the most feared opponents on the battlefield, and explore the historical development of the tactics and social histories that made this feat possible,” Desch-Obi said. “In doing so, it will illuminate the perspective of these common people, the importance of their skills, and the contributions they made to their country’s history.”

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City College physicist Vinod Menon receives top IEEE honor

CCNY physicist Vinod Menon

City College of New York physicist Vinod Menon, whose research in light-matter interaction at the nanoscale has advanced the field of photonics, is among six scientists globally bestowed with IEEE Photonics Society Distinguished Lectureships. The accolade honors excellent speakers who have made technical contributions of high quality and enhanced the technical programs of Photonics Society chapters.

Menon’s year-long tenure begins July 1, 2018 and ends June 30, 2019.

A professor in the City College’s Division of Science, Menon’s research includes the development of nanoscale structures where the quantum nature of light is exploited for potential applications in computing, communication, sensing and energy harvesting.

Some of the recent work from Menon’s Laboratory for Nano and Micro Photonics (LaNMP) has led to the following developments and their possible applications:

Mastering the “valley” property of electrons, which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed “valleytronics” – similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin).

Demonstrating a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented way. This could lead to such benefits as ultrafast LEDs for Li-Fi (a wireless technology that transmits high-speed data using visible light communication), enhanced absorption in solar cells and the development of single photon emitters for quantum information processing.

Unveiling new half-light half-matter quantum particles raising prospects of developing computing and communication technologies based on quantum properties of light and matter.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

 

 

 

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Tony Award winner Stew to debut new musical with the LaGuardia Community College Theatre Program

Tony Award winner Stew to debut new musical—a modern take on U.S. history—with the LaGuardia Community College Theatre Program

Tickets on Sale NOW for “Columbus is Happening

Production Will Run May 8—12, 2018, at the LaGuardia Performing Arts Center

Tony Award winner Stew to debut new musical—a modern take on U.S. history

Tony Award winner Stew is collaborating with LaGuardia Community College award-winning Theatre Program to launch a brand new musical called “Columbus is Happening.”

Stew describes “Columbus is Happening” as an ode to Queens—particularly, our legacy as a landing spot for immigrants to the U.S. As Stew describes, “Everything good about this country and about Queens was born of people’s resistance.”

It’s a lively rendition filled with dancing, catchy-songs, and memorable one-liners. Lynching, slavery, and immigration are topics in the work, which are woven together with issues and topics of modern day life, such as the life of immigrants living in Queens today.

“I always write with geographic specificity, and I built ‘Columbus is Happening,’ for Queens and for LaGuardia Community College,” says Stew. “To me, Queens is genuine—it’s the New York that I always wanted to come to, and it’s the America I always wanted to live in. I like diversity in art, but that diversity only happens if the environment is genuine. And where else but LaGuardia Community College could we have a 20-person cast from all over the place?”

Students in the cast hail from South Korea, Germany, Belize, Puerto Rico, The Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Maine, and Portland, Oregon.

LaGuardia Community College, with students from more than 150 countries who speak 96 native languages, has among the most diverse student population of any college nationwide; and Queens is among the most diverse counties of the U.S.

For the past several months, Stew has been coming regularly to LaGuardia to meet with LaGuardia’s theatre students—meetings that have helped inspire his development of the new work—and to attend rehearsals, during which he is often writing or tweaking material (making edits to make it “nice and short and tight” as he says, or stopping a run through to teach a song to an actor).

“Our students have so much to gain from this collaboration between Stew and our Theatre Program,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “Students are getting to perform under the guidance and inspiration of a Tony-award winning dramatist and are having the opportunity to watch an emerging work of art come to life. We’re delighted that under Professor Stefanie Sertich’s leadership, our theater program is flourishing and it is a testament to her work that this opportunity comes to LaGuardia student. And a special thank you to Stew for sharing his talents with our students and investing in their futures—investments that are sure to pay back in dividends in the years to come.”

In 2016, Ms. Sertich directed LaGuardia Theatre students in a production of “Passing Strange,” for which Stew took home the Tony Award for Best Book in 2008. LaGuardia’s production was selected for five prestigious awards, including Distinguished Production of a Musical, from the national awards committee of the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival—the premiere theatre festival for the more than 700 US colleges and universities with theatre programs.

“Columbus is Happening” will run from May 8 through May 12, in the Little Theater, here at the LaGuardia Performing Arts Center of LaGuardia Community College.

Tickets for the eight-run production are on sale for $10 (or $8 for those with a valid student ID). For more info and to buy tickets, visitbit.ly/LGCStew.

Show times are:
May 8 — 7:30p.m.
May 9 — 2:30p.m. and 7:30p.m.
May 10 — 7:30p.m.
May 11 — 2:30p.m. and 7:30pm
May 12 — 2:30pm and 7:30pm

• • • •

About the LaGuardia Community College Theatre Program
Under the direction of Stefanie Sertich since 2011, LaGuardia theatre students have received numerous regional and national recognition at the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival, the premiere theatre program for the more than 700 two- and four-year colleges and universities nationwide with theatre programs. Graduates of LaGuardia’s theatre program have transferred to highly-competitive, audition-based programs at four-year colleges, including Boston University, Pace University, Marymount of Manhattan, The New School, Brooklyn College, Hunter College, Lehman College, Queens College, Dean College, SUNY New Paltz and others. As well, several LaGuardia theatre students have been selected for scholarships to study at prestigious theatre conservatory programs including the Commonwealth Shakespeare Company and Margolis Method Training Center in Barcelona. Visit www.laguardia.edu/Theater/ to learn more.

About LaGuardia Community College
LaGuardia Community College, located in Long Island City, Queens, educates more than 50,000 New Yorkers annually through degree, certificate, and continuing education programs. Our guiding principle Dare To Do More reflects our belief in the transformative power of education—not just for individuals, but for our community and our country—creating pathways for achievement and safeguarding the middle class. LaGuardia is a national voice on behalf of community colleges, where half of all US college students study. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), the College reflects the legacy of our namesake, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the former NYC mayor beloved for his championing the underserved. Since our doors opened in 1971, our programs regularly become national models for pushing boundaries to give people of all backgrounds access to a high quality, affordable college education. We invite you to join us in imagining what our students, our community, and our country can become. Visit www.LaGuardia.edu to learn more.

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Queens College Choral Society Presents Britten’s War Requiem, A Plea for Peace

— 77th Annual Spring Concert —

FLUSHING, NY, May 1, 2018—The Queens College Choral Society, joined by the QC orchestra and QC choir, will perform Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem in concert on Saturday, May 19, at 8:00 pm at olden Auditorium, Kupferberg Center for the Arts. Britten’s War Requiem combines the traditional Latin Requiem text with the poems of Wilfred Owen, a “war poet” who died in World War I. Britten’s work is one of the most extraordinary calls for peace ever put into musical form, and its performance this year, on the centenary of the World War I armistice, is especially appropriate.

The vocal solos will be performed by alumni Jennifer Grimaldi, soprano, and Gilad Paz, tenor, and faculty member Sidney Outlaw, baritone. James John, associate professor and music director of the QCCS, will conduct. The choral society is “a singing organization of and for the public, and the students and staff of Queens College.” Unique in the diversity of its membership, which ranges from high school musicians—participating through the high school outreach program—to singers who have performed with the society for over 40 years, QCCS is a treasure in the borough. The society, accompanied by orchestra, typically presents two concerts per year (in December and May) devoted to great choral masterpieces such as Verdi’s Requiem, Handel’s Messiah, and Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis. The QCCS has also performed multiple premieres of new works, including pieces composed by Queens College Music Department faculty members.

Tickets are $20 and are available through the Kupferberg Center Box office at (718) 793-8080 or online at www.kupferbergcenter.org. Group discounts for high school students and teachers are also available. To take advantage of this offer, visit www.qcchoralsociety.org

For directions to Queens College, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/welcome/directions/Pages/default.aspx

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu

 


New York Times Publishes Photo Essay by Faculty Member Maureen Drennan

Maureen Drennan

Bath Beach. Credit Maureen Drennan

The New York Times published a photo essay by Maureen Drennan, assistant professor in commercial photography at LaGuardia Community College, in the Sunday Times on April 22, 2018.

Following is an expert from the piece, titled, “Touring the Rust Belt of New York City.”

“You have ideas about a project,” said Maureen Drennan, “but then when you go out there and shoot, things change.”

The idea… Ms. Drennan said, was to document the Rust Belt of New York City: an industrial wasteland that would stand as “a microcosm of the larger Rust Belt of the Midwest,” where once-vital factories gave way to hulking wreckage and the anger that animated the 2016 presidential election.

Then she started shooting. What she found was both less apocalyptic and more interesting than what she had envisioned. She worked along the waterfront of Sunset Park, the Gowanus Canal and Newtown Creek, which separates Bushwick in Brooklyn and Ridgewood in Queens. Where she found decay, she also found a natural world hellbent on renewal. Where she found abandonment, she also found communities of great warmth and resilience. What she did not find was bitterness.

“I was struck by pastoral quality,” Ms. Drennan, 46, said. “There’s a sensual aspect to the almost jungly landscape. It’s sort of lovely. It wasn’t smelly, which also surprised me. If you walk around, especially in summer, the birds and bugs and other natural sounds drown out the clanging machinery.” …

To continue reading the article, and to see the complete photo essay on the New York Times website, click here.


Legendary drummer Al Foster stars at CUNY Jazz Festival, May 11-12

 

Al Foster guest stars at the 2018 CUNY Jazz Festival at City College. Photo credit: Oeyvind Toft

Al Foster, the master drummer and major jazz innovator with a legacy spanning five decades, headlines the 20th annual CUNY Jazz Festival May 10-11 at The City College of New York.  The two-day festival in Aaron Davis Hall Theatre B includes performances by CCNY student ensembles and ensembles from other CUNY schools. Student performances take place throughout both days.

The festival begins 11 a.m. Thursday with a performance by the CCNY Faculty Jazz Ensemble comprising of saxophonist Steve Wilson, trombonist Scott Reeves, pianist Ray Gallon, bassist Aidan O’Donnell, and drummer Mark Ferber.

A member of Miles Davis’ band for 13 years, Foster performs with the CCNY Large Ensemble at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 10. This will be followed by a student jam session.

Friday concerts begin at 12 p.m. with student performers. At 7:30 p.m., the final   Gala Concert features the CCNY Graduate Jazz Ensemble followed by The Al Foster Quartet.

Other participating CUNY schools include Hunter, Queens, Lehman, Staten Island, and LaGuardia Community College.

Foster’s contribution to the language of jazz drums is almost unparalleled.  His career began 1964 when he joined Blue Mitchell’s quintet.  He has toured and recorded extensively with Herbie Hancock, Sonny Rollins, Joe Henderson, McCoy Tyner, Stan Getz and Bobby Hutcherson, along with his long tenure with Miles Davis.  Foster has also co-led notable groups such as ScoLoHoFo, with guitarist John Scofield, saxophonist Joe Lovano and bassist Dave Holland.

The music for the Thursday night concert with the CCNY Large Ensemble consists of Foster’s compositions arranged by festival director Mike Holober for a 2016 collaboration with Foster and the WDR Big Band – the German Radio Jazz Orchestra based in Cologne.  Holober said “we are thrilled to have Al as our guest.  His presence as a drummer and composer are truly an inspiration to everyone.”

In 1995, Foster formed his own group, The Al Foster Quartet. For the CUNY Festival Al’s quartet will include tenor saxophonist Eric Alexander, pianist Adam Birnbaum and bassist Doug Weiss.

Click here for the complete festival schedule.  For further info email Mike Holober at mholober@ccny.cuny.edu.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
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Kaye Scholars shine at City College

Kay Scholars and Carlos Riobo

Clockwise from left: Yasmin El Gheur, Carlos Riobo, Lipmann Wong, Jose Ocasio and Orubba Almansouri.

Since 2002, the H. Austin and Florence R.S. Kaye Foundation joined with The City College of New York providing funds to support talented students pursuing a major in the Division of Humanities & the Arts. The City College of New York’s Kaye Scholars Program alumna, Yasmin El Gheur, is getting ready to graduate as the Class of 2018’s Valedictorian.

“The scholarship gave me more control over my academic pursuits and was the catalyst that led me to a more rigorous and fulfilling experience at City College,” said El Gheur, who majored in Art History and minored in Arabic Language and Cultures. “My CCNY experience would have been completely different, and not as positive, had it not been for the Kaye Scholarship.”

Another notable Kaye Scholar is alumna Orubba Almansouri who graduated in 2016 with a double major in English and History and a minor in Arabic Language and Cultures. She is currently finishing up her master’s degree in Near Eastern Studies at New York University.

“The support the scholarship provided allowed me to focus on my research interest and dedicate my time to my studies, which paid off at the end when I graduated Salutatorian of my class,” said Almansouri, who’s stirring salutatory speech at the 170th Commencement got her an invitation to the United State of Women Summit by commencement address speaker Michelle Obama.

Two Kaye Scholars featured in the photo are:

  • Jose Ocasio is an Ad/PR Program major and graduates in June 2019.
  • Lipmann Wong is a film and video major and graduates in June 2019.

“The Kaye Scholarship is a lifeline for foreign students and for others who have shined in the classroom, but who are at risk of delaying their time to degree or even dropping out of college altogether because they simply cannot make ends meet in New York City,” said Kaye Scholars Academic Director Carlos Riobo, professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature and the chair of the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures. “We passionately support the humanities and the arts because we recognize the need to sustain critical thinkers, life-long learners, and creative professionals.”

For more information about the Kaye Scholars Program, or to apply, please visit http://kaye.ccny.cuny.edu/application.html.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
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Steven Galeano shows KO power in class and in the ring

Steven Galeano, a CCNY sophomore majoring in AD/PR, in action in the 141-pound open final in the inaugural Ring Masters Championships at Madison Square Garden.

Galeano [center] with his MSG Ring Masters’ top scholar-athlete award after the finals. Left is his Bronxchester BC coach Marc Farrait and on the right his father and assistant coach Edwin Galeano, Sr.

Nineteen-year-old Steven Galeano is the quintessential mix of brains and brawn that powers The City College of New York’s scholar-athlete tradition. The AD/PR sophomore in CCNY’s Division of Humanities and the Arts turned on the style at Madison Square Garden to win the inaugural MSG Ring Masters’ 141-pound open championship. He defeated Deyshawn Williams of Eastern Queens BC in a three-rounder.

But that’s not all. Galeano, a Harlem resident, also received the USA Boxing Metro’s top honor, the Johnnie Woluewich Award for his athletic and academic achievements. He’s a journalism minor and has a 3.20 GPA.

In the community, Galeano is a mentor in Harlem’s Young Achievers program that provides guidance and support to young men of color.

Next stop for the multiple amateur titlist is the 2018 National Golden Gloves, May 14-19, in Omaha, Nebraska. Galeano will be representing the NY Metro team.

Even though City College hasn’t had a varsity boxing program in decades, Galeano who trains at the Bronxchester BC under Coach Marc Farrait, proudly flies the CCNY flag in the ring. He thanks the college for supporting both his academic and athletic endeavors.

“Representing CCNY has been a pleasure,” he said. “The environment and everyone I’ve met at CCNY have supported me as I focus simultaneously on my academics and boxing.

“CCNY has very much complemented my long-standing admiration for education and I can’t wait to graduate and walk across the stage in 2020 as YOUR champion.”

From a boxing family, Galeano is actually following in his older brothers, Edwin, Jr. and Chris’ footsteps. Chris, a CCNY alumnus, was a two-time New York Daily News Golden Gloves winner, a USA Championship Golden Medalist and is 10-1 as a pro in the middleweight division.

Galeano is co-trained by his father Edwin, Sr, and had one bye and two decision victories in qualifying for the Ring Masters finals.

About the MSG Ring Masters Championships
More than 600 boxers competed in over 200 bouts in the inaugural Ring Masters Championships organized by USA Boxing Metro. Forty-six qualified to the finals at Madison Square Garden which featured both men’s and women’s novice class and open class divisions. The tournament officially replaces the New York Daily News Golden Gloves that run from 1927 to 2017 and produced many world champions. These include Sugar Ray Robinson, Floyd Patterson, Jose Torres, Emile Griffith, Mark Breland and Riddick Bowe.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
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CCNY created “Nueva York” scoops double Emmys

City College film professor Jerry Carlson (second from right) with CCNY-educated producers of “Nueva York”: (from left) Alex Lora, Sara Foudy and Carmen Vidal, at the NY Emmy awards.

Averaging an award every season since its premier, “Nueva York,” CUNY TV’s Spanish-language cultural series created by City College film Professor Jerry Carlson, won two New York Emmy Awards at the 61st Annual Awards Ceremony at the Marriot Marquis. This brings to 14 the number of Emmys garnered by the show, now in its 14th season.

The series’ senior producer, Carlson and his crew, mostly graduates of CCNY’s MFA Film Program, received four nominations this year. The two winners were an Emmy in the environmental affairs category and for coverage of politics/government. The Emmys are presented by members of the New York Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

“For more than a decade “Nueva York” has dedicated itself to the transnational role that our city plays in the Spanish world — from dishwashers to Nobel Prize winners with equal respect and curiosity,” said Carlson.

The show, which premiered in 2005, explores the rich textures of Latino society in the city, focusing on politics, art, culture, and the traditions of Spanish-speaking populations across the metropolitan area.

Carlson, who chairs City College’s media and communication arts department and is a specialist in Latin American cinema, said the continued honors for “Nueva York” reflect two facts: “the richness of Latino life in La Gran Manzana (The Big Apple) as a subject and the talent with which the production team has been able to capture that cultural energy.”

Click here to watch an episode of “Nueva York.”

The show’s segment producers include CCNY MFA alumni:

  • Gisela Alcantara
  • Sarah Foudy
  • Alex Lora
  • Wilson Reyes
  • Mario Rosales
  • Carmen Vidal

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


SOROS FELLOW JOEL SATI ONE OF CUNY’S MANY EXCEPTIONAL AWARD WINNERS

Joel Sati came to the United States from Kenya when he was nine, became a DACA recipient at 19 and graduated with a degree in philosophy from City College in 2016. Last week, Sati’s journey reached a milestone when he was named a winner of one of the nation’s most hard-earned academic honors, the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans.

Sati, who is now working on a Ph.D. in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy program at the University of California at Berkeley – to be followed by a law degree at Yale – was chosen as one of 30 Soros winners nationwide from a pool of 1,766 applicants. The $90,000 fellowship rewards high achievement by immigrants and children of immigrants who are selected on the basis of their potential to make significant contributions to American society, culture or their academic fields.

Sati’s award, announced April 17, is among a host of prestigious honors for CUNY students and recent graduates so far this year. The list includes 15 Fulbright Scholarships that will send CUNY students to countries around the world for one-year research studies. And it includes nine National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships for graduate students in fields ranging from bioengineering to geophysics.

CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken said, “CUNY students have won dozens of the nation’s most competitive and prestigious academic honors in recent years – Fulbrights, Soros and NSF fellowships, Rhodes and Truman scholarships, among others – and this is another banner year. We’re particularly proud of the determination and achievement of students like Joel Sati, a young man who represents our highest aspirations as a university and a country.”

The Soros Fellowships were established in 1997 by Paul and Daisy Soros, Hungarian immigrants and American philanthropists who created a $50 million endowment to help high-achieving, first-generation Americans further their graduate studies. For 25 years the fellowship winners were green card holders or naturalized citizens; now the program includes recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program established by President Barack Obama in 2012 to protect immigrants who came here illegally as children.

Sati came to this country with his mother in 2002 and lived in Georgia, and then Maryland, for 11 years. Because he was undocumented – something he learned only when he started applying to colleges – he was ineligible for most financial aid. His mother worked two jobs to send him to a community college in Maryland, but DACA was adopted soon after he began and Sati became one of its early recipients. With his new status came financial aid opportunities that allowed Sati to transfer to City College, where he became one of the campus’s academic stars and an activist on immigration issues.

“Coming from a working-class immigrant background, being honored in this way is one of the best achievements I could have ever hoped for,” Sati said of his Soros Fellowship, adding, “It’s always great to make my mum proud. It’s because of her that I am where I am.” And he’s thankful to City College and his mentors there. “For years City College has helped amplify the stories of immigrants like myself,” Sati said. “I would not be where I am without CCNY.”

CUNY’s 15 Fulbright Scholars, meanwhile, join a select group of U.S. students who have earned either grants to travel abroad for research or graduate study or an English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) to teach in another country. In each case of this highly competitive process, the students have been endorsed by a U.S. screening panel and accepted by their host country.

  • Vaiva Aglinskas, The Graduate Center: research in Lithuania
  • Jaclyn Callery, Baruch College: ETA in Argentina
  • Grace Cesario, The Graduate Center: research in Iceland
  • Kelsey Chatlosh, The Graduate Center: research Chile
  • Istou Diallo, John Jay College of Criminal Justice: research in India
  • Victoria DiTomasso, Hunter College/Macaulay Honors College: research in Germany
  • Emmanuel Dwomoh, Hunter College: research in Uganda
  • Etienne Forbes, City College: master’s study in Amsterdam
  • Eleni Katechis, Hunter College: ETA in Taiwan
  • Claire Lynch, City College/Macaulay Honors College: ETA in Spain
  • Ardit Marku, Hunter College: ETA in South Korea
  • Michael Mazzeo, Hunter College/Macaulay Honors College: ETA in Spain
  • Marielle Ray, Hunter College/Macaulay Honors College: ETA in Argentina
  • Jonathan Zisook, The Graduate Center: research Poland
  • Jawad Rashid, CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies/City Tech, research in Republic of Moldova​.

In addition, Lindsay Griffiths, Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College, won an ETA to Colombia, but had to turn it down to start a Ph.D. program at Princeton University.

The following CUNY graduates are this year’s winners of grants from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship program. They are listed with their undergraduate colleges, current institutions and fields of study:

  • Monica Vanessa Avilez, Lehman College: Biological Anthropology
  • Ioannis Eugenis, Brooklyn College and Stanford University: Bioengineering
  • Stanley Ko, City College and Rutgers University: Marine Geology and Geophysics
  • Emily Lau, Hunter College: Organismal Biology
  • Tamar Lichter, Queens College: Mathematical Sciences
  • Lizhi Liu, City College and Columbia University: Systems and Molecular Biology
  • Roland Maio, City College: Machine Learning
  • Tannuja Devi Rozario, John Jay College of Criminal Justice and University of Massachusetts, Amherst: Sociology
  • Mary Regis Shanley, Northeastern University and CUNY Graduate School University Center: Neurosciences

In addition to the winners of major national awards, CUNY has announced the eight recipients of its own prestigious award – the Jonas E. Salk Scholarships for the study of medicine and biomedical sciences. The award provides $8,000 to each student to defray the cost of their medical and graduate research studies. Below are the winners with their undergraduate CUNY colleges and the institutions where they will pursue their medical and research education.

  • Lisset A. Duran, John Jay College/Macaulay Honors College and Princeton University
  • Kevin Christian Gonzalez, City College and Columbia University
  • Elizabeth Gorodetsky, Hunter College and New York University School of Medicine
  • Jack Jnani, Hunter College and Stony Brook University School of Medicine
  • Anan Kazi, City College/Macaulay Honors College and SUNY Downstate College of Medicine
  • Marharyta Labkovich, Hunter College and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Daniela Mikhaylov, Hunter College/Macaulay Honors College and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Lily Lee, Brooklyn College/Macaulay Honors College and SUNY Downstate College of Medicine
  • Iqra Nadeem, Brooklyn College and SUNY Downstate College of Medicine

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni.  CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 undergraduate students. College Now, the University’s academic enrichment program, is offered at CUNY campuses and more than 400 high schools throughout the five boroughs. The University offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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Second Annual Student-Curated Queens College Arts Festival, May 2 – 7, Highlights Emerging Artists in Greater New York

— Over 20 Fine Art, Exhibitions and Performances are Planned; Flushing Native Rapper
Action Bronson Headlines Festival with May 3 Performance — 

Flushing, NY, April 27, 2018 – The arts students of Queens College in collaboration with Kupferberg Center for the Arts present the second annual Queens College Arts Festival that will take place from May 2-7, 2018. The Festival, founded in 2016, is produced and curated entirely by students and aims to highlight the work of emerging artists with performances and exhibitions throughout the campus. Each year, Festival producers hold an open call for proposals across all artistic disciplines, then a committee of student curators selects works to showcase the diversity of styles and voices in the arts today.

“We’re very excited present the second QC Arts Festival, a multi-disciplinary celebration of the arts on our campus,” says Michele Shakhmurov, one of the three lead student producers majoring in biology and minoring in studio arts. “The artists we’re presenting get to express themselves with creative freedom and to show new work in non-traditional venues, like the dance recital in the Godwin-Ternbach Museum or the new music concert and interactive performance in the stairwell of the Aaron Copland School of Music Building, giving our audiences the chance to experience all kinds of art at Queens College.”

“This is the second of what is now a biennial event on our campus. It is completely student run,” added Bill McClure, the College’s Interim Associate Provost. “Students curate and exhibit, but they also manage everything and pay the bills. The 2016 event was exciting and truly provocative. I expect this year to be even better. Everyone should come and see what QC artists and performers can really do!”

The QC Arts Festival, thanks to financial support from the Office of the President, Kupferberg Center for the Arts, and the Queens College Foundation, will feature 23 exhibitions, which represent artists across multiple disciplines, including music, visual art, dance, film, theatre, and fashion. The event will kick off on May 2, 2018 with the opening of several student-curated art exhibitions from artists, including David Gutenmacher, Gina Vasquez, and Unfamous NY. Throughout the Festival, several performative works will also take place, including Leonard Bernstein’s Trouble in Tahiti, a re-imagining of Schoenberg’s seminal Pierrot Lunaire by the Amalgama Ensemble, a concert of newly string quartets by the Queens College New Music Group, and a production of The Tempest by Queens College Theatre Guild. Headlining the  Queens College Art Festival is an exclusive performance by rapper, TV star and author Action Bronson on April 3, 2018 at 8:00 PM in Colden Auditorium. The noted performances are a few of the many offerings available by the Queens College Arts Festival. For an exhaustive program of events, please find the complete Festival Schedule attached to the end of this document.

All exhibitions are free unless otherwise noted in the Festival Program. For more information, visit the arts festival website http://www.qcartsfestival.com/. Please click here to access exhibition images.

_______________________________________________________________________
Festival Program May 2-7, 2018. CUNY Queens College. (65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11367)

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 2018 • Gallery/Installation openings by UNFAMOUS NY, DAVID GUTENMACHER, GINA VASQUEZ, ESTEFANIA VELEZ RODRIGUEZ, SONNISCO, QUEENS COLLEGE CERAMICS CLUB, THE ALWAYS STAY REAL CREW, EDWARD MAJKOWSKI, and QUEENS COLLEGE COSTUME COLLECTION • Performances by QUEENS COLLEGE THEATRE GUILD (The Tempest), LEAH DAVIDSON, BIANCA BELONY and JASMINE OTON (Dance Performance)•

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 2018 • Film Screening, Charlie Chaplin in India by BETHANY FANCHER + VISHNU OMESH • Performance by QUEENS COLLEGE THEATRE GUILD (The Tempest) • Headline Performance by ACTION BRONSON

FRIDAY, MAY 4, 2018 • Performances by QUEENS COLLEGE THEATRE GUILD (The Tempest), QUEENS COLLEGE NEW MUSIC GROUP + RANDOM ACCESS MUSIC (String Quartets) and UNFAMOUS MUSIC COLLECTIVE

SATURDAY MAY 5, 2018  Performances by QUEENS COLLEGE THEATRE GUILD (The Tempest), TROUBLE IN TAHITI (Cond. WILLIAM BIRKBECK). ARTISTS BY ANY OTHER NAME (Her Favorite), and ALEX CONDE (Jazz and Flamenco Concert).

SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2018 • Performances by UNFAMOUS MUSIC COLLECTIVE (Sunday Brunch DJ Collaboration), TROUBLE IN TAHITI (Cond. WILLIAM BIRKBECK)

MONDAY, MAY 7, 2018 • Performances by DJ SPACE and Festival Closing Performance by Amalgama Ensemble

CUNY Queens College is located in the heart of Flushing, NY and is accessible via the Q17, Q25, Q34, and Q88 Bus via the E, F and 7 trains. For directions to Queens College campus, please navigate to http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/directions/Pages/default.aspx

Contact:
Julia Del Palacio
718-997-3589
Julia.del.palacio@qc.cuny.edu


CUNY SPH hosts Staff Appreciation Luncheon and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

Last Thursday, the Office of the Dean and Human Resources held a Staff Appreciation Luncheon to celebrate the hard work, professionalism and dedication of the CUNY SPH staff.

Since the event coincided with “Bring your child to work day,” staff were invited to bring their children and were treated to lunch and refreshments. Pizza and face painting was provided for the children, as well as a number of activities and games.

Photography: Yesenia Gonzalez

Dean Ayman El-Mohandes
CUNY SPH staff
CUNY SPH staff

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

the Office of the Dean and Human Resources held a Staff Appreciation Luncheon to celebrate the hard work, professionalism and dedication of the CUNY SPH staff.

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

the Office of the Dean and Human Resources held a Staff Appreciation Luncheon to celebrate the hard work, professionalism and dedication of the CUNY SPH staff.

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day

CUNY SPH Staff Appreciation and Bring Your Kids to Work Day


Doctoral student Dana Watnick awarded $20,000 American Fellowship

Dana Watnick

Dana Watnick

Doctoral student Dana Watnick was recently awarded a $20,000 American Fellowship by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) to fund her dissertation work entitled Understanding Acceptability of a Vaginal Ring to Prevent HIV and Pregnancy: Integrating Multiple Qualitative Methods.

The fellowship is awarded on the basis of scholarly excellence; quality and originality of project design; and active commitment to helping women and girls through service in their communities, professions, or fields of research.

“I am so honored to receive this award in support of my dissertation work, which will offer me protected time to conduct my research,” said Watnick. “It felt like a long shot, as fewer than 10% of applicants receive funding, but it was worth it!”

 


Reducing global diseases and injuries by effective regulation of corporations

Nicholas Freudenberg speaking at Wemos

Nicholas Freudenberg speaking at Wemos

Can public health researchers and advocates in the United States and Europe develop a shared research and action agenda to improve the public health regulation of transnational corporations?  To explore that question, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy Distinguished Professor Nicholas Freudenberg recently gave several lectures and met with colleagues in Europe.

In talks at the European Parliament, the Dutch Ministry of Health, and at several civil society groups, Freudenberg described the role of corporate business and political practices in the global rise of premature deaths and preventable illnesses from non-communicable diseases and injuries.  “As the U.S.  government dismantles the public health regulatory agencies developed over the last 50 years,” said Freudenberg, “researchers need to document the impact of these changes and develop new strategies to protect public health.  By partnering with European scientists and advocates, we can accelerate this process.”

Freudenberg’s trip was sponsored by Wemos Foundation, a Dutch global health foundation, the European Public Health Alliance and Corporate Europe Observatory. His book Lethal but Legal Corporations, Consumption and protecting Public Health was recently translated into Dutch. 

Cover of Nicholas Fruedenberg's new book "Lethal But Legal"

Nicholas Fruedenberg’s new book


ALUMNI RETURN TO CAMPUS FOR 10TH ALL-CLASS REUNION

Alumni Return to Campus for 10th All-Class Reunion

 

On April 20, John Jay alumni gathered on campus to celebrate their accomplishments and enjoy a night with old friends at the annual Alumni Reunion. Over 400 alumni and guests registered for the event.

This year’s Alumni Reunion was the 10th consecutive all-class reunion in John Jay’s 53-year history. The event coincided with the 25th anniversary of the highly successful McNair Scholars program, and several McNair graduates, and former faculty members associated with the program, returned to campus to celebrate the momentous event.

Read more about the 25th McNair anniversary here.

President Karol V. Mason thanked the John Jay community and expressed her excitement to experience her first reunion at John Jay.
President Karol V. Mason thanked the John Jay community and expressed her excitement to experience her first reunion at John Jay. 

 

Andrew Schweighardt (Ph.D. ’12), Treasurer of the Alumni Executive Board, delivered welcome remarks at the awards dinner. Schweighardt introduced former McCann Scholar Victoria Fix to the stage, who presented this year’s Michael F. McCann Scholarship to student Santos Garcia Avelar. Leading up to the reunion, two new scholarships made possible by generous supporters of John Jay were also announced: the first ever Bettina P. Murray Music Fellowship, which was presented to student Patricia Campbell, and the Camille & Peter Mancuso BA’79 Music Fellowship, which was presented to student Rafael Sholomov.

 

Andrew Schweighardt (left) and McCann Scholarship winner Santos Garcia Avelar (right)
Andrew Schweighardt (left) and McCann Scholarship winner Santos Garcia Avelar (right)

 

The annual Alumni Reunion Awards were given to two alumni and one faculty member for outstanding achievement in their field. Attorney Muhammad U. Faridi was presented the Young Alumnus Award; wrongful conviction expert Mark Deskovic was presented the Distinguished Alumnus Award; and Dr. Teresa A. Booker was presented the Distinguished Faculty Award for her contributions as Associate Professor in the Department of Africana Studies.

Read more about the 2018 Alumni Award Recipients here

(left to right) Muhammad U. Faridi, Dr. Teresa A. Booker, President Karol V. Mason, Mark Deskovic
(left to right) Muhammad U. Faridi, Dr. Teresa A. Booker, President Karol V. Mason, Mark Deskovic

 

Alumni from all years and backgrounds mingled with one another as well as with current students. Rachell Henriquez (’19) and Verlisha Phillip (’19), who are part of the Pre-Law Institute and plan on enrolling in law school after graduation, attended the reunion this year so that they could have a chance to hear from accomplished alumni.  Henriquez says that learning the story of Young Alumnus Award Winner Muhammad U. Faridi, who went from being a cab driver to becoming an attorney, inspired her to dream big. “Faridi is now one of the top litigators in the state,” said Henriquez.

Rachell Henriquez and Verlisha Phillip
Students Rachell Henriquez (left) and Verlisha Phillip (right)

 

Phillip agrees that meeting all the accomplished alumni at reunion inspired her with confidence. “It’s empowering to see these leaders,” she said.

See all the photos of Alumni Reunion here.


MCNAIR SCHOLARS PROGRAM CELEBRATES 25-YEAR ANNIVERSARY

McNair Scholars Program Celebrates 25-Year Anniversary

 

It’s been 25 years since the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program was first launched at John Jay College, and to celebrate the program’s outstanding track record of getting students accepted to Ph.D. programs, a series of events were scheduled through the spring semester.

In late March, the McNair program hosted an alumni panel in which current students heard directly from two McNair alumni who attained doctorates, Dr. Albert Gamarra and Dr. Jessica Armstrong. In front of an audience of students and faculty members, Gamarra and Armstrong discussed how the McNair program prepared them for success in their Ph.D. programs.

“McNair taught me that you need to dedicate yourself,” said Gamarra, who like many McNair Scholars, was a first-generation college student. After Gamarra graduated with his bachelor’s degree in 2004, he decided to pursue his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice at John Jay, but the process wasn’t always easy. “It would’ve been great if I completed my degree in four years, but it actually took me seven,” he said. “Even if it takes twenty years to finish your degree, McNair taught me to keep at it and never give up.”

Dr. Armstrong agrees that McNair prepared her well for her Ph.D. program, and it was because of an internship she had as an undergraduate student at John Jay that she applied to a Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program at Clark University. “I realized I was curious and passionate about learning how to treat substance abuse disorders,” she said. Now, Armstrong is completing a postdoctoral fellowship at Yale University.

McNair Scholars at John Jay College
Dr. Zelma Enriques (left) with alumnus Fermin Fana  (third from left) who graduated in 1994 with the first McNair cohort

 

Associate Director of the McNair program Dr. Ernest Lee says that once John Jay students understand the process of attaining a doctorate, they are motivated to do so. There are currently 25 McNair-John Jay alumni who have graduated with a Ph.D., as well as many more that are currently enrolled in programs. One of those students is Tannuja Rozario, who graduated in 2016 and is pursuing her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. This year, Rozario was awarded the prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Fellowship for her dissertation proposal on the transnational processes of Caribbean women traveling to New York to obtain reproductive health services. “McNair taught me the importance of utilizing all the opportunities that come my way,” said Rozario. “It gave me the tools I needed, including the courage to even apply for grants.”

 

“McNair taught me the importance of utilizing all the opportunities that come my way,” said Rozario. “It gave me the tools I needed, including the courage to even apply for grants.” –Tannuja Rozario ’16

 

At Alumni Reunion on April 20th, McNair alumni as well as faculty members and students gathered to celebrate the monumental anniversary. After an introduction from Director of the McNair program Dr. Jessica Gordon-Nembhard, President Karol V. Mason expressed admiration for the program and those who have worked hard to make it successful. “The McNair program tells students they can reach for the stars when it comes to their education, showing them, yes, a doctorate is attainable for you, regardless of your race, regardless of your gender, regardless of your family’s education, and regardless of your economic status,” she said. “Thank you to McNair faculty mentors, who are so committed to our students’ success.”

Dr. Jannette Domingo, who was instrumental in launching the program at John Jay in the early ’90s, was among the faculty members honored at the event. Because of her contribution, the McNair computer lab will be renamed in her honor. “Thank you to our McNair Scholars,” Dr. Domingo said. “They made my dream for this program come true.”


NCIS’S PAULEY PERRETTE CREATES A FORENSIC SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP

NCIS’s Pauley Perrette Creates a Forensic Science Scholarship

 

On the hit show NCIS Pauley Perrette plays a quirky, crime-solving forensic scientist named “Abby Sciuto.” In every episode “Abby” uses cutting-edge technology to help solve U.S. Navy criminal investigations—a career path many of our students aspire to reach.

Perrette established the Pauley Perrette Forensic Science Scholarship to help support John Jay undergraduate students that traditionally have been underrepresented in the Forensic Sciences. “I wanted to set up the scholarship in honor of the impact my NCIS character ‘Abby’ has had around the world over the last 15 years,” says Perrette. The groundbreaking character made Perrette one of the most popular actresses on primetime television, and motivated thousands of young women to pursue careers in math and science.

 

“I wanted to set up the scholarship in honor of the impact my NCIS character ‘Abby’ has had around the world over the last 15 years.”Pauley Perrette

 

“I hope this scholarship provides an opportunity for a deserving young person to accomplish their dream of acquiring an education in Forensic Science,” says Perrette. And with her help, more real-life versions of “Abby” will have the opportunity to make a difference in our criminal justice system.

Learn more about the Pauley Perrette Forensic Science Scholarship.

Read more about Pauley Perrette’s career and commitment to Forensic Science studies.


CCNY Biologist David Lohman receives Fulbright to Southeast Asia

 

CCNY biologist David Lohman in the Philippines. He returns to Southeast Asia on his second Fulbright award to continue research on research on insect evolution and biogeography.

David Lohman, associate professor of biology at The City College of New York and a leading entomologist with two insects named after him, is once again a Fulbright Scholar. His selection as a 2018-2019 Fulbright ASEAN Research Scholar will take him back to Southeast Asia to continue his study of butterfly evolution and the role of islands in species formation.

The six-month award will allow Lohman to travel to Vietnam, Indonesia, and the Philippines to conduct collaborative research on insect evolution and biogeography. He’ll work with collaborators in each country to develop their capacity to integrate genetic data into their own research.

Lohman first set foot in a tropical forest as a Fulbright Scholar to Australia in 1995-1996.

Lohman uses a combination of field ecology and molecular phylogenetic methods to investigate how interactions between insects and other organisms shape hyper-diverse communities in the tropics. He also studies the phylogeography of butterflies and other organisms in the Indo-Australian archipelago.

Such is Lohman’s reputation in his field that a new species of flies was named after him last year.  Themira lohmanus, a fly that subsists on duck droppings was discovered in Manhattan’s Central Park.

Also carrying the Lohman moniker are Chimaeragathis lohmani, a wasp found in Thailand, and Bulbophyllum davidlohmanii, a soon-to-be-published orchid species found on the Philippine island of Mindanao.

About the Fulbright Scholar Program
Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program’s purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries. Fulbright Scholars are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and demonstrated leadership potential in their fields.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


Harlem Children’s Theatre Festival at CCNY on May 5

The Harlem Children’s Theatre Festival will take place on Saturday, May 5 at CCNY’s Aaron Davis Hall.

The Harlem Children’s Theatre Festival adapts three new plays from myths and fairytales on Saturday, May 5 at The City College of New York’s Aaron Davis Hall. The School of Education’s Graduate Program in Educational Theatre presents the annual festival, which takes place from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

This annual festival is jam-packed with artsy activities, live performances and sing-alongs, and arts and crafts stations. The event is a fun and free for kids of all ages (3 and up) and brings the community and all members of the family together to share in the joy of live theatre and the arts.

The festival features three new plays for young audiences inspired by myths and fairy tales with strong female leads going on epic journeys and overcoming seemingly impossible odds. Audiences will travel travel through enchanted forests with “The Wild Swans,” adventure to the magical lake in “Ampata and the Magic Lake,” and discover how seasons came to be in the interactive tale of “Persephone and the Four Seasons.”

Performance times are as follows:

10:15 a.m. “The Wild Swans”
11:00 a.m. “Ampata & The Magic Lake”
12:00 p.m. “Persephone & The Four Seasons”

Reservations are recommended. For more information and for free tickets, please visit hctf.brownpapertickets.com.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit

 

« BACK TO NEWS

Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Scientists Create Nanomaterials that Reconfigure in Response to Biochemical Signals

A newly published paper in Nature Chemistry details how a research team lead by scientists at the Advanced Science Research Center’s Nanoscience Initiative are developing self-assembling electronic nanomaterials that can respond to biochemical signals for potential therapeutic use.

Biological cells have the complex and miraculous ability to reconfigure and change the way they communicate with each other over time, allowing them to nimbly direct critical functions in the human body — from thinking to walking to fighting disease. A major challenge in materials science is developing nanomaterials that can replicate aspects of these cellular functions and integrate with living systems. In a paper published today in Nature Chemistry, a team of researchers led by scientists at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York detail how they have created synthetic materials with the ability to mimic some behaviors normally associated with living matter.

“The ability to self-assemble, reconfigure and disassemble in response to chemical signals is a common trait in biological materials, but not in manmade ones” said Mohit Kumar, the paper’s lead author and a scientist with Rein Ulijn’s research group at the ASRC’s Nanoscience Initiative and Hunter College. “If you want to integrate synthetic materials into biology, a seamless interface is desirable, which requires materials that share some of the properties of living matter. Our approach will hopefully open the door to manmade materials that can interact with and repair living systems.”

To develop nanomaterials that reconfigure in response to chemical signals, researchers started with the base molecule naphthalenediimide (NDI), which is an organic semiconductor. The molecule was selectively modified on both sides by exposing it to biochemical signals in the form of simple amino acids that were added to the system. An enzyme was used to incorporate the amino acids onto the core molecule, triggering self-assembly and disassembly pathways. This process allowed the formation and degradation of nanomaterials with wire-like features capable of conducting electrical signals.

Amino AcidsBy using different amino acids, researchers were able to direct the development of nanomaterials with different properties, including a programmable nanostructure with the ability to turn electrical conduction on and off through the use of time-dependent self-assembly and disassembly.

“Like neurons in the brain, these materials exhibit a remarkable ability to remodel their electrical connections,” said Allon Hochbaum, a co-author of the paper and material scientist at the Samueli School of Engineering, University of California, Irvine (UCI). “The assembly of these molecules is encoded in their dynamic chemistry, so by simply changing the chemical inputs, we can observe insulating nanomaterials, conductive nanomaterials, or nanomaterials that dynamically switch between conducting and non-conducting states. The fact that their assembly and conductivity evolve in water makes these materials all the more compelling for bio-interfacing applications.”

Funding for the research was provided by the Air Force Office for Scientific Research and the Army Research Office. UCI researchers developed the devices for measuring the nanomaterials’ electrical conducting abilities, while ASRC researchers developed the nanomaterials. The collaborative team’s next step is to interface the new nanomaterials with actual neurons to see how the manmade and biological materials interact.

“We want to see if we can use the dynamic electro-conducting nanomaterials to effectively interface with neurons and result in their on-demand electrical firing,” said Rein Ulijn, director of the ASRC’s Nanoscience Initiative. “We’re still early in that aspect of the work, but what we have so far is an exciting breakthrough that demonstrates the possibility for creating manmade materials that mimic a complex, dynamic activity of biological systems. These new nanomaterials have the ability to respond to biologically relevant chemical signals and provide an electronic interface. In the long run, this may open up a new pathway towards developing treatments that, until now, have only been theoretical.”

Media contacts: Tanya Domi, 212-817-7283, tdomi@gc.cuny.edu; Shawn Rhea, 212-817-7180, srhea@gc.cuny.edu; Paul McQuiston, 212-413-3307, paul.mcquiston@asrc.cuny.edu

 

Organizational Attribution

Our correct name is the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York. For the purpose of space, Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY is acceptable. On second reference, ASRC is correct.

About the Advanced Science Research Center

The ASRC at the Graduate Center elevates scientific research and education at CUNY and beyond through initiatives in five distinctive, but increasingly interconnected disciplines: environmental sciences, nanoscience, neuroscience, photonics, and structural biology. The ASRC promotes a collaborative, interdisciplinary research culture with renowned researchers from each of the initiatives working side-by-side in the ASRC’s core facilities, sharing equipment that is among the most advanced available.


Bernard Baruch Dinner Raises More Than $1 Million for Baruch College Fund

Michael I Roth, Willem Kooyker, and Judith-Ann Corrente honored at the 29th annual event

Left to Right: Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, Michael I Roth,
Judith-Ann Corrente, Willem Kooyker

The 29th annual Bernard Baruch Dinner, held on April 25 at the Intercontinental New York Barclay Hotel, raised more than $1 million for the third consecutive year for the Baruch College Fund. Proceeds from the 2018 event will help students by providing grants and scholarships, offering career services, subsidizing professors with the necessary tools to perform in the classroom, improving College facilities, upgrading technology, and expanding the campus.

“When I came to Baruch eight years ago, in 2010, the term ‘social mobility’ wasn’t in wide use in the lexicon. But even without it, we shared a goal and vision for Baruch—and that was to build on the College’s legacy as a gateway for economic opportunity for all of our students,” said Baruch College President Mitchel B. Wallerstein, PhD. “With great thanks to the enduring support of the Baruch College Fund, Baruch is now a national model for ‘moving students from the bottom 40 percent of household incomes to the top 40 percent.’”

Sandy Kenyon, an entertainment reporter and movie critic for Channel 7 Eyewitness News, served as host for the dinner, which drew more than 400 people. Baruch’s Blue Notes, an all-student acapella group, entertained with a special performance.

Bernard Baruch Dinner Honorees

Three people were honored at the 2018 Bernard Baruch Dinner for their professional achievements and community service. Michael I Roth (’67) was presented with the Bernard Baruch Award for Business and Civic Leadership, while Willem Kooyker (’71) and his wife, Judith-Ann Corrente, were recipients of the Newman Medal for Philanthropy.

Roth is chairman and chief executive officer of Interpublic, one of the world’s largest organizations of advertising and marketing services companies. Roth is the only Baruch alumnus who currently is the head of a Fortune 500 company.

Currently, Roth sits on the leadership committee of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the board of directors of the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy, and The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. Roth is also a member of the Business Roundtable and New York-Presbyterian Hospital’s Heart Steering Committee.

In addition, he is a Trustee of the Baruch College Fund and The Partnership for New York City.

Kooyker is founder and chairman of Blenheim Capital Management, LLC, an independent fund-management company. His professional career spans more than 50 years as a prominent participant in international financial and commodities markets.

Corrente is president of the Monteforte Foundation, Inc., a funder of educational, cultural, and civic projects. She is also president and chief executive officer of the Metropolitan Opera and a trustee of the Lang International Music Foundation.

At Baruch, Kooyker and Corrente have established the Willem Kooyker Deanship of the Zicklin School of Business; the Zicklin Faculty Fund; and the Global Leadership Program within the Zicklin School, which includes a matching component to leverage even more support.

Separate Appeal to Raise Money for Students

During the dinner, a special appeal was made to support Baruch College’s Student Emergency Fund (SEF), which provides critical support for students with short-term financial emergencies, keeping them in school and on track for graduation.

The SEF at Baruch College was created and sustained by the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation. Its mission is to serve as a financial safety net for students during times of urgent need, such as temporary job loss, escalating medical bills, homelessness, food insecurity, and rising transportation costs. Since its inception in 2011, the SEF has helped more than 500 students.

“As you know, many of our students and their families live at or below the poverty line, and many come from challenging home situations where one or both parents may be absent or unemployed,” Wallerstein said. “Since 2011, we have been fortunate to have the Student Emergency Fund as a back-up resource for students in dire need.”

According to President Wallerstein, the goal of the SEF is simple: To keep students in school, engaged, and on track to graduate, preferably in four years.

Wallerstein added, “Everyone in this room plays a crucial role in helping us do that, and I thank you for your commitment to Baruch.”

For those interested in contributing to the Baruch College Fund, visit here.

# # #

 

 


The Edward I. Altman Lecture Series in Financial Economics at CCNY, April 30

Dr. Viral V. Acharya

Dr. Viral V. Acharya will be the guest speaker at The Edward I. Altman Lecture Series in Financial Economics on Monday, April 30.

President Vince Boudreau, The City College Fund & The 21st Century Foundation invite you to The Edward I. Altman Lecture Series in Financial Economics on Monday, April 30 at 1:30p.m. in Shepard Hall, Room 350. Guest speaker Dr. Viral V. Acharya’s talk is entitled “Global Spillovers: Managing Capital Flows and Forex Reserves.”

The Edward I. Altman Lecture Series in Financial Economics was established by Dr. Edward I. Altman, ‘63. Professor Altman is the Max L. Heine Professor of Finance at the Stern School of Business, New York University.

Acharya is a deputy governor at the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and is in charge of monetary policy, financial stability, financial markets operations and regulation, research and statistics, and human resource management.

Prior to joining the RBI, Acharya was the C.V. Starr professor of economics at the Department of Finance at the Stern School of Business, New York University. His primary research interest is in theoretical and empirical analysis of systemic risk of the financial sector and its regulation and genesis in government-induced distortions.

For more information, please call 212-650-6532, or email Ilene@ccnyfund.org. A reception will follow the lecture.

About The Edward I. Altman Lecture Series

The Edward I. Altman Lecture Series in Financial Economics was established by Dr. Edward I. Altman, ‘63. Professor Altman is the Max L. Heine Professor of Finance at the Stern School of Business, New York University. He is the Director of Research in Credit and Debt Markets at the NYU Salomon Center for the Study of Financial Institutions. Prior to serving in his present position, Professor Altman chaired the Stern School’s MBA Program for 12 years. He has been a visiting Professor at the Hautes Etudes Commerciales and Universite de Paris-Dauphine in France, at the PontiFcia Catolica Universidade in Rio de Janeiro, at the Australian Graduate School of Management and MacQuarie in Sydney, University of Western Australia in Perth, Luigi Bocconi University in Milan and CEMFI in Madrid. Dr. Altman was named to the Max L. Heine endowed professorship at Stern in 1988.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.6460
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Five CCNY undergrads Stanford-bound for research this summer

Jared J. Heron [left] and Anton Pavlov, two of the five CCNY undergraduates traveling to Stanford University this summer for research.

Native American relations with the government, Jane Austen’s work from a queer theoretical approach and a study of philosopher Edmund Husserl are among the research topics by the sixth cohort of City College of New York summer interns to Stanford.

Five students from the Division of Humanities and the Arts are the latest participants in the eight-week CCNY-Stanford Summer Research Program that runs from mid-June to mid-August at Stanford University.

Established in 2013, it is designed for students considering graduate school, and specifically doctoral research, in the humanities and arts.  Students receive a $3,000 stipend, on campus room and board and $600 to cover travel expense.

The 2018 participants and their research topics are:

  • Josias Agustin-Mendez (history and architecture), a study of Native American relations with the U.S. government using personal accounts, the records of the Bureau of Indian affairs, reservation laws, and Dakota law;
  • Nabila Akthar (history), the mutual imbrication of the history of the American Enlightenment and the American Revolution, and role that the oft-overlooked New York Province played in furthering the cause of each;
  • Lily A. Evans (English and psychology), Jane Austen’s work with a queer theoretical approach, informed by the context of gender and ownership at the turn of the 18th century;
  •  Jared J. Heron (English), issues of gender in the Old French romance “Le Roman de Silence” and other Medieval French texts such as the “Lais of Marie de France;”
  • Anton Pavlov (philosophy),  philosopher Edmund Husserl and whether the discipline of phenomenology can shed light on particular features of human conscious experience, such as awareness of others.

The students will conduct research in their respective topics with a Stanford faculty mentor. They will, in addition, participate in weekly seminars on the graduate school application process and research in the humanities.

Conversely, CCNY’s Division of the Humanities and the Arts will welcome three Stanford humanities graduate students in fall 2018 to teach undergraduate programs in history, English and philosophy.

Erec R. Koch, dean of Humanities and the Arts, described the program as an outstanding success. He noted the example of two recent participants that are now doctoral students in the humanities at Stanford.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

 

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Jay Mwamba
p: 212.650.7580
e:jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu

View CCNY Media Kit


The New York Knicks’ Head Trainer, Roger Hinds ’77, to Receive Distinguished Alumnus Award at Brooklyn College Commencement

The longtime NBA athletics trainer is set to receive the honor at the ceremony held at the Barclays Center on May 31.

<p>NY Knicks Head Athletic Trainer Roger Hinds '77 tends to injured small forward Carmelo Anthony during a game.</p>

NY Knicks Head Athletic Trainer Roger Hinds ’77 tends to injured small forward Carmelo Anthony during a game.

Roger Hinds ’77, the head athletic trainer for the New York Knickerbockers (NY Knicks), will receive the Distinguished Alumnus Award at the 2018 Brooklyn College Commencement Ceremony on May 31. For the second year in a row, the ceremony will be held at the Barclays Center. He joins fellow guest of distinction disability rights activist Judith E. Heumann, who will be the keynote speaker and receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters.

Hinds has spent more than two decades in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as an athletic trainer for some of the most well-known athletes in the sport. Born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, Hinds moved to Brooklyn with his parents and five siblings at age eight. He was a member of Brooklyn Preparatory High School’s final graduating class in 1972. He earned a Bachelor of Science in physical education from Brooklyn College in 1977, and a Master of Science in physical education from Indiana State University in 1978. He became an NATA Certified Athletic Trainer in 1981.

Prior to entering the NBA, Hinds was an avid NY Knicks fan. He enjoyed a 12-year tenure at the College of Charleston, serving as the school’s head athletic trainer from 1980 to 1990, and director of sports medicine from 1990 through 1992. He was also an adjunct professor in the College of Charleston’s Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

<p>Roger Hinds '77 is the latest recipient of the Brooklyn College Distinguished Alumnus Award, joining such notable figures as former Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz '70 (2005), Grammy Award-winning musician Arturo O'Farrill '96 (2006), and renown poet and author Sapphire '95 (2010).</p>

Roger Hinds ’77 is the latest recipient of the Brooklyn College Distinguished Alumnus Award, joining such notable figures as former Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz ’70 (2005), Grammy Award-winning musician Arturo O’Farrill ’96 (2006), and renown poet and author Sapphire ’95 (2010).

Hinds was the strength-and-conditioning coach for the gold medal-winning U.S. Olympic Team at the 1996 Atlanta Games. From 2001 to 2004, he served as president of the National Basketball Athletic Trainers Association Foundation (NBATA), a non-profit charitable organization that promotes the athletic training profession and raises funds for deserving groups and charities. He currently serves as liaison between the NBATA and the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA). He is the contributing author of two books: Condition the NBA Way (Cadell & Davies 1994) and Total Fitness the NBA Way (Perennial Currents 2000).

Currently in his 24th NBA season, Hinds spent four seasons as assistant athletic trainer and strength-and-conditioning coach, for the Atlanta Hawks; eight years as the head athletic trainer for the Dallas Mavericks; and also served as host athletic trainer for the East squad at the 2015 NBA All-Star Game at Madison Square Garden. He is entering his 14th season as head athletic trainer for the Knicks. Hinds is just the sixth head trainer in the franchise’s 70-year history, joining Jim Nevins, Don Friederichs, Bill Norris, Danny Whelan, and Mike Saunders.

In this NBA/Taco Bell promo, Hinds explains the importance of healthy eating.

In August 2009, Hinds visited his birthplace for the first time in more than 30 years, hosting a basketball training workshop for the Trinidad and Tobago Basketball Federation in Port of Spain. In 2009 and 2010, he was a guest reader for preschoolers as part of the City of Newark’s Head Start health awareness program for youth and parents. In the summers of 2010 and 2011, he traveled to Mexico City to help coordinate basketball clinics for the Eduardo Najera Foundation. In 2010, Hinds co-hosted an online web program for the NBA/Taco Bell Light Menu Initiative, teaming with Brandon Jennings and Basketball Hall of Famer Bob McAdoo to promote the partnership between the two corporations.

<p>Hinds sits down with Edem Kwakumey '18 in the Brooklyn College Student Center at an event arranged by the Magner Career Center for a wide-ranging interview covering personal and professional advice, the importance of hard work and success, and what he gleaned from his 20+ years of working in the NBA. (Photo by David Rozenblyum)</p>

Hinds sat down with Edem Kwakumey ’18 in the Brooklyn College Student Center at an event arranged by the Magner Career Center for a wide-ranging interview covering personal and professional advice, the importance of hard work and success, and what he gleaned from his 20+ years of working in the NBA. (Photo by David Rozenblyum)

Hinds is also an active Brooklyn College alumnus. Since 2016, through an alliance with the Magner Career Center, he has taken time to guide current Brooklyn College students and provide them with the benefit of his industry expertise through class visits, panel discussions, and career mentorship.

For the latest on Roger Hinds and his NBA experiences, follow him on Twitter.

 

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


City College joins CEO Action to advance diversity and inclusion

The Check Your Blind Spots Mobile Tour with be on campus from 12-4 p.m. Thursday, April 26.

CCNY x CEO Action raise awareness of unconscious bias in workplace and on college campuses

The City College of New York joins the growing coalition pledging to advance diversity and inclusion in the workplace and on college campuses. More than 400 CEOs and university presidents have come together for CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™, with City College being one of the first New York City colleges invited to be a signatory.  President Vince Boudreau is committing himself to advancing diversity and inclusion in the workplace and at the college raising awareness of unconscious bias among students.

“City College was founded on a vision of social mobility and education for all,” said Boudreau. “Today, that means our commitment to diversity must be second to none.”

On Thursday, April 26 from 12-4 p.m. in the North Academic Center, the college campus will host the Check Your Blind Spots Mobile Tour, a series of events in partnership with CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™, which aims to reveal the nuances of unconscious bias, or blind spots. Unconscious bias can narrow a person’s vision and potentially influence their behaviors.

With a proud mission of social mobility and access to education and opportunity, City College gives students access to unconscious bias training and multinational corporations with pipelines in place to set up diverse talent for success as they rise to senior level leadership positions. Click here to view the pledge.

Angela Chitkara, PR Track Director, Branding + Integrated Communications at City College, recently published an article in Harvard Business Review that shines a light on diversity and inclusion in the public relations industry.  Unconscious bias training is a tool, she maintains, that prepares students to lead with empathy and courage as they move from the campus to the workplace and into senior leadership positions.

“We are at a major inflection point in our society today; and we are having real, candid conversations about race, gender, and socioeconomic inequalities,” said Chitkara.

By committing, City College is pledging to foster and cultivate an environment where diverse perspectives and experiences are welcomed and respected and where faculty, staff and students feel encouraged to discuss diversity and inclusion. The collective of more than 400 signatories have already shared more than 400 best known actions, exchanging tangible learning opportunities and creating collaborative conversations via the initiative’s unified hub, CEOAction.com.

We are so proud that we are continuing to build momentum and support for the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™ across companies, industries, and regions. This collaboration expands our reach and brings in unique values, actions and perspectives to continue to raise the bar for the entire business community,” said Tim Ryan, U.S. Chairman and Senior Partner of PwC and chair of the steering committee for the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™.

City College brings a unique perspective given its rich history in the Harlem community. The CCNY student body represents diverse, competitive and creative talent needed in solving today’s business challenges.

To learn more about the pledge, visit CEOAction.com. The website serves as a hub for information sharing, idea generation, and program development. With almost 400 best-known actions shared, companies that are not currently implementing the elements of the pledge can use it as an opportunity to learn from others that are already doing so.

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today The Chronicle of Higher Education ranks CCNY #2 among public colleges with the greatest success in ensuring the social mobility of our student body; at the same time the Center for world University Rankings places it in the top 1.2% of universities worldwide in terms of academic excellence. More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in eight professional schools and divisions, driven by significant funded research, creativity and scholarship. CCNY is as diverse, dynamic and visionary as New York City itself.  View CCNY Media Kit.

About CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™

CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™ is the largest CEO-driven business commitment to advance diversity and inclusion within the workplace. Bringing together more than 400 CEOs and presidents of America’s leading businesses, academic institutions and nonprofits, the commitment outlines actions that participating organizations pledge to take to cultivate a workplace where diverse perspectives and experiences are welcomed and respected, employees feel comfortable and encouraged to discuss diversity and inclusion, and where best known—and unsuccessful—actions can be shared across organizations. Learn more at CEOAction.com and connect with us on Facebook: CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion and Twitter: @CEOAction. About CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion™.

 

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Ashley Arocho
p: 212.650.5310
e:aarocho@ccny.cuny.edu
View CCNY Media Kit


Award-winning Brooklyn College Slam Poetry Team in the Spotlight for National Poetry Month

<p>Four members of the Brooklyn College Slam Poetry Team perform their poems simultaneously in front of the Brooklyn College Library. Left to right: Jenna Carter-Johnson, Jared Green, Khadjiah Johnson, and Soré Agbaje. Photo by David Rozenblyum.</p>

Four members of the Brooklyn College Slam Poetry Team perform their poems simultaneously in front of the Brooklyn College Library. Left to right: Jenna Carter-Johnson, Jared Green, Khadjiah Johnson, and Soré Agbaje. Photo by David Rozenblyum.

Having consistently placed in the top three in the College Union Poetry Slam Invitational (CUPSI) since 2013, with awards for Best Group Piece and Best Writing by a Team in the Nerd Slam category, the Brooklyn College Slam Poetry Team is considered one of the top in the nation. Founded in 2011 by Joel Cruz ’14 and Cliff I. Drouillard ’13, the slam team is part of a rich tradition at the college that has produced award-winning poets Jack Agueros ’64, Sapphire ’95 M.F.A., Gracie Leavitt ’11, and Ocean Vuong ’12, and includes such noted past faculty members as John Ashbery and Allen Ginsberg, and current professors Julie Agoosand Ben Lerner.

In the spirit of National Poetry Month, we recently spoke to members of the Brooklyn College Slam Poetry Team about their inspiration, creative processes, future plans, and lives as poets.

There are many components to sophomore Jared Green’s poem, ‘Step (The Original)’: ‘The poem is in two parts,’ he says. “Part one is about the history of South African Gumboot dance. Part two is about the history of stepping, both born out of colonial oppression, genocide, and the silencing of black people in both South Africa and in the United States. Though both styles of dance are very similar, they aren’t the same. Gumboot dance was used as a form of communication because the South African black miners were not allowed to speak in their native tongue out of fear for revolt. Stepping, on the other hand, was a way for the black Greeks to celebrate themselves on their respective college campuses. I wrote the poem as homage to stepping. I learned how to step during my time in Clara Barton High School with the Crown Mecca step team. If it was not for Crown Mecca, I would not have developed the confidence to go on stages and perform poems.’

Jared Green

A self-described Bajan Yankee (born in Brooklyn to Barbadian parents), Jared Green, made the decision to attend Brooklyn College because of the slam team’s reputation and because, he says, “BC’s education program is phenomenal.”

The English secondary education major and slam team president was drawn to poetry when his eighth-grade teacher played a video of a poem called “Poetic Bloodlines” by Gemineye.

Says Green, “Poetry reflects the time we are in and makes this ugly look beautiful. And this is very important because even in the previous movements, poets used their platforms to create art that was intentionally controversial to reach and move people.” Still, he acknowledges that it’s somewhat rare to live off one’s work as a poet and is pursuing his degree in education. “I love kids, and teaching will provide me a space to create and provide for myself at the same time.”

Green is very protective of the art form and wants to ensure that poets are not exploited. “Never do shows that ask you to pay to perform your own work,” he says. “Remember to be honest in your work. Don’t aim to be dope; aim to be honest.”

Of her poem, ‘#NERDPROBLEMS,’ Khadjiah Johnson ’18 says: ‘I wrote it when I was 16 for my best friend’s birthday. Senior year in high school. Over the years, only the first four lines have stayed the same; it’s been through so many revisions. I’m able to pull out a line and say it fits one friend or another, but it’s all the experiences of all of my high school friends.’

Khadjiah Johnson

“I was planning to be a vet because I’m passionate about animals,” says Brooklyn native Khadjiah Johnson ’18. But “when I was in high school I joined Urban Word NYC,” a non-profit organization that has been mentoring New York City youth in the literary arts since its founding in 1999. It was through Urban Word that Johnson began to write poetry. “I was hella dramatic,” she says. “My parents would ask if it was really necessary. Yes, it was necessary. I love writing and performing and let’s mix them together. Poetry is my perfect time to be dramatic and I get to create my own work.”

By the time she came to Brooklyn College, Johnson had decided to become and English major, and joined the two-year old slam team. “We have had amazing poets on our team Katherine George ’16, who is in Urban Word, and studying theater and women’s and gender studiesSean DesVisgnes ’15, our 2016 official coach; and Joel Francois ’17, who was great with the writing process and became a member of the Nuyorican Poets Café slam team.”

Johnson chose television and radio as her minor and says, “I wanted to, over time, go from performance into television writing, specifically for late night television.” It happened sooner than she thought when, last year, she landed an internship at the Late Show with Stephen Colbert. “I did production. Stage runs. Handled talent. Transcribed interviews. It was a lot of hard work but I saw how the head writers got to where they were. I also see how hard it is to step into that career. Johnson did get to join some writing sessions and made strong connections while working on the show. “Now I’m on their writer’s list,” she says.

In regard to the poetic art form, Johnson notes: “Poets and writers and artists have a duty to understand what’s going on around them. We need to understand that people need to step out of themselves. There are different ways to narrate what’s going on in various emotions. Happy, fearful. Do your art to the best of your ability. Be true to the emotion and what’s really happening.”

Soré Agbaje discusses her poem, ‘I Was Born’: ‘I realized that our experiences as women are often so deeply tied to trauma, seemingly unavoidable, as though they are the casualties of being a woman. For us girls, walking outside our home is like stepping into a war. Our bodies are used as weapons against themselves. I was overwhelmed by these feelings, so of course, I had to write. I wrote this poem for visibility and to hold the world accountable for the way it treats women.’

Soré Agbaje

Soré Agbaje chose to attend Brooklyn College solely because of its slam team. “I knew I wanted my college experience to include my passion for poetry and was told about its top-ranking in the spoken word poetry community. Also, I wanted to be a part of the BC community, known for its civically engaged and artistic student body.”

The 22-year old Nigerian-American political science major saw her first spoken word video—that of poet Alicia Howard, who performed a poem about a toxic relationship. “It spoke to broader sociopolitical issues, like the inherent inequalities and dangers women face in romantic partnerships,” says Agbaje. “It blew me away. I didn’t know a poem could be like that. That it could be emotive, and you could get angry in a poem and say whatever you wanted. That night, I attempted my first spoken word poem.”

Riffing on the African proverb, “Until the lion learns to write, every story will glorify the hunter,” Agbaje says that poetry can bring visibility and uphold the personal narrative of “othered” communities. “Taking the personal into politics and vice versa is a huge aspect of my process as well. I write to remember, and so a lot of my poems are written in the style of a memory; especially if it’s commissioned work. I tend to do a lot of research on the topic before I write about it.”

Agbaje believes that poets are equipped with a particular set of skills that can be used beyond that of literary aspirations and credits poetry for her internship at NBC. “As a poet you learn how to communicate ideas and convince an audience in a short and concise way that still leaves an impact. This can translate into careers in a copy editing, content creation, advertising, and more.”

Agbaje has a few words of wisdom for aspiring slam poets. “Don’t slam too much. Don’t,” she says. “When you start becoming a little bit more successful with your craft, try to keep some things to yourself. Don’t fall into the trap that often happens when poetry becomes a career, of only writing when a slam is coming or when an event is coming or when you’re being paid for it. It’s easy for a poet to fall into a depression that way because it is no longer yours. It is now a commodified entity.”

Jenna Carter-Johnson on her poem ‘So Small’: ‘It’s about my experience upstate. Being in New York City it’s so easy to identify racism and inequality, but upstate people just say ‘that’s just the way it is.’ Going from all-black to mostly white spaces was a big shock for me. I wasn’t as aware of my body down here as I was up there as a black girl. And getting placed in honors classes with a bunch of white kids and all of the things that came with that. People started dating and dances and because I wasn’t ‘conventionally attractive.’ I struggled with that for a while. Also, being tall, always taller than everyone even boys. Never confident in my femininity and how often I to perform for other people.’

Jenna Carter-Johnson

Senior Jenna Carter-Johnson lives in Harlem with her grandmother while she attends Brooklyn College. Born in New York City, the women and gender studies major moved north to Newburgh, New York, from the third grade through high school. In junior high, she was introduced to slam poetry through a workshop led by noted slam poet and rapper Saul Williams, a native of the upstate city.

Carter-Johnson found herself back in Harlem after being accepted to Brooklyn College. As a key member of the slam team, she is very much about the stage. “Slam poetry is very performative. You’re performing your trauma all the time,” she says. “You want people to snap, you want people to feel, so you’re picking the most traumatic things to write about. A lot of times I feel like I go back on things I should have left, but you know it’s going to get you a ’10,’ so you perform it. Then I remember why I started writing in the first place and it was to get all my thoughts and emotions out.”

Poetry figures large in Carter-Johnson’s life, which, for her, emphasizes that it plays an important role in the world. “It is political. It reminds us to feel and that politics extends beyond statistics, that there are people behind all of it. Poetry is a tool to explain things.”

Asked if she has any advice for fellow artists, Carter-Johnson shares: “Figure out what you love and find somebody to pay you to do it. As long as people are still feeling emotions, there will always be an audience. There’s money if you look for it. It’s out there. Keep writing. Remember why you started writing. You’re writing for you and not other people.”

 

Contact: Ernesto Mora | 212.662.9939 | emora@brooklyn.cuny.edu


CUNY HACKATHON DEVELOPS NEXT GENERATION OF TECH TALENT FOR NEW YORK

Nearly 500 students from across CUNY will converge on Baruch College later this month for the fourth CUNY Hackathon, a weekend of digital brainstorming, tech teamwork and career development guided by mentors from some of the world’s most important tech companies. The hackathon is co-sponsored by IBM and Google.

“Our students need to understand and be comfortable in an environment increasingly driven by technology, no matter what kind of work they plan to do,” said CUNY Chancellor James B. Milliken. “Preparing CUNY graduates for the 21st century knowledge economy is among our highest priorities.  There are many ways we’re doing this, and activities such as the CUNY Hackathon, which has become one of our most successful and popular events in our broad efforts in recent years, are key.  It’s an effective and exciting way to connect our future graduates with mentors and companies at the leading edge of tech in New York City.”

Hackathons are gatherings where computer programmers and developers collaborate intensively on software projects. The CUNY Hackathon is a twice-a-year event that is equal parts experiential learning, competition, networking — and overnighter. It’s staged by CUNY Startups, an initiative begun in 2014 to encourage students to pursue careers in technology and to launch a new generation of innovative companies in the city. The hackathons are a partnership between CUNY Startups and the Lawrence N. Field Center at Baruch College.

The Spring 2018 CUNY Hackathon, scheduled for April 27-29 in the Newman Library computer lab at Baruch, is the first to be held on a CUNY campus. The theme is “Hack Gotham: Become the superhero that NYC needs!” Participants will form teams and put their heads together to come up with ideas for applications that could be used to improve daily life for New Yorkers.

“About 70 percent of the students who register are beginners with little or no experience in coding or development,” said Faith Fraser, acting director of CUNY Startups. “So we make sure it’s inviting, not intimidating. We start with workshops where they can learn basics on the spot. They can come in having never written one line of code, and over the course of three days they can actually build something. CUNY students are smart and they’re hungry — they’re not afraid to put themselves out there— so we’re always fully booked.”

Students are mentored by experts from the co-sponsoring companies IBM and Google, and from other leading tech companies in New York. To assist with the “Hack Gotham” theme, CUNY Startups has also enlisted the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, which will provide data and teach a workshop to help the students learn how to use open data provided by the city and inspire ideas for apps.

There are prizes for the best ideas and sharpest coding, but according to the organizers and sponsors, it’s less about the outcomes than the experiences.

“We’re working with some of the most amazing tech companies and people,” Fraser said. “Their presence and guidance not only make it a memorable event for students and provides them with an invaluable networking opportunity, but they also teach them about the latest technology. We think it’s important for students to know what these companies are using right now so that once they graduate, they’re equipped with the tools they need to get a job and succeed here in New York City.”

One of the hackathon mentors is CUNY grad Raymond Blum, who is now an engineering manager for Google in New York. Blum said, “The hackathon is an amazing way for students to get real-world experience in a couple of days. It’s a rare opportunity to see a microcosm of what a tech business does, to find out what parts are appealing to you, what parts aren’t, and to find your thing.”

Another mentor, Remko de Knikker, a senior software engineer at IBM, said the hackathons are not just about the technology. “It’s about working with people on a solution; it’s about improvising. The competition and the outcomes are not what matter as much as the learning experience, how you personally grow from it.”

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies. For more information, visit www.cuny.edu.

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HOSTOS PROVOST, DR. CHRISTINE MANGINO, SELECTED AS ONE OF ONLY 40 NATIONWIDE FOR 2018-2019 ASPEN PRESIDENTIAL FELLOWSHIP FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGE EXCELLENCE

Highly-Selective Program Expanding
Talent Pipeline Amid Looming Shortage
of Community College Presidents

 Eugenio María de Hostos Community College of The City University of New York is proud to announce that Provost Dr. Christine Mangino has been awarded the prestigious Aspen Presidential Fellowship for Community College Excellence, a leadership program aimed at preparing the next generation of community college presidents to transform institutions across the nation to help students be more successful both in college and in the workforce.

The fellowship is awarded by the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program, an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C. that aims to advance higher education practices, policies, and leadership that significantly improve student outcomes.

“Dr. Mangino has been invaluable to the planning and execution of the curriculum and programs that allow Hostos to serve the students of the South Bronx,” Hostos President Dr. David Gómez said. “Without her forward-thinking approach and love for what she does, we simply could not execute our important educational mission to serve one of the most diverse student bodies in the nation.”

Dr. Mangino and the 39 other Aspen Presidential Fellows will embark on a 10-month fellowship beginning in July 2018. Delivered in collaboration with the Stanford Educational Leadership Initiative, the Fellows will be mentored by community college leaders who have had outstanding results for their students, learn from national experts about ways to use data to make their students more successful, and learn how to create strong external partnerships with K-12 schools, four-year colleges, and employers in their community.

“I am so excited to be selected for this prestigious fellowship and this opportunity to learn from current presidents, as well as my cohort of fellows,” Dr. Mangino said. “I look forward to enhancing my leadership skills while learning from these leaders about their colleges and potential strategies we can implement to support our students’ success and our college community.”

The Aspen Fellowship responds to a growing need for a new generation of leaders who are well-equipped to meet the challenges facing community colleges:

  • Nationally, nearly 80 percent of sitting presidents plan to retire in the next decade.
  • Traditionally, the path to college presidency has excluded women and people of color: Currently, 71 percent of sitting community college presidents are white and 64 percent are male.
  • The incoming class of Aspen Presidential Fellows is composed of 65 percent women, 43 percent people of color and represents institutions of varying size and geographical spread.

Dr. Mangino was selected through a rigorous process that considered her abilities to take strategic risks, lead strong teams and cultivate partnerships, and focus on results-oriented improvements in student success and access.

With the average community college enrolling about 14,000 students, each Fellow who becomes a president has an opportunity to improve outcomes for hundreds of thousands of students over his or her career. To date, 20 Aspen Presidential Fellows are now sitting community college presidents at institutions that collectively serve more than 250,000 students nationwide.

The Aspen Presidential Fellowship for Community College Excellence is supported by the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation, College Futures Foundation, ECMC Foundation, Greater Texas Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

About Hostos Community College

Eugenio María de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities for a half-century. Since 1968, Hostos has been a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs.

Hostos offers 27 associate degree programs and two certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to The City University of New York’s (CUNY) four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of CUNY, the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 500,000 students at 24 colleges.


Queens College Summer Session Offers Nearly 1,000 Classes, Summer Camp Discount and Cutting-Edge Cyber Security Course

— Twenty Percent Summer Camp Tuition Discount Available for Children of Summer Session Students; Cyber Security Course Open to Non-Computer Majors —

Queens, N.Y., April 25, 2018—Queens College Summer Session—with nearly 1,000 classes available over four sessions from June through August—is introducing two new elements to this year’s program. Summer Session students will receive a 20 percent discount on the cost of enrolling their children in the college’s well-regarded Summer Camp; and a new cutting-edge cyber-security class—open to non-computer majors—will help students identify and analyze cyber-security challenges across multiple disciplines.

Queens College’s Summer Camp is widely known for its value, convenience, and variety of rewarding programs, from sports to classes in theater, dance, literature, and the sciences. An extension of QC’s participation in NCAA Division II sports, activities make use of the campus athletic facilities—soccer, baseball and softball fields, swimming pools, as well as indoor and outdoor tennis courts. Many of the counselors are members of the college’s varsity teams. Parents can accommodate their schedules and budgets by choosing from 2-, 4-, 6- or 8-week sessions with a wide range of age-appropriate activities to exercise their children’s bodies and stimulate their minds and imaginations. Parents should identify themselves as Summer Session students and request the discount when registering their children. They may register by phone at (718) 997-2777 or online.

The new 10-week cybersecurity course, The Threat Within, is part of a unique education–industry collaboration between the college and the Cybersecurity Workforce Alliance (CWA). There is a significant shortage of graduates in the U.S. with the skills to address cybersecurity, business resiliency, information technology risk, business risk, and auditing. In response, key industry leaders launched the CWA, with the goal of producing graduates who are workforce ready. Students enrolled in The Threat Within will work in teams with industry mentors, faculty, and teaching assistants using iQ4, an online technology platform. The goal is to enable students to identify and analyze the depth and breadth of cybersecurity challenges from multiple disciplines. Now open for registration, the course is scheduled for Wednesdays from June 6 to August 22. For more information and to register, click here.

A recently added fourth Summer Session option makes it possible for students to master a challenging science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) course at their own pace—without the pressure of taking it as part of a semester’s full course load. Up to 15 biology, chemistry and mathematics courses ranging from introductory to advanced level are being offered in addition to two writing courses during this session. Enrollment is open now for all four options. Classes are offered from June through August across all four options.

Students may earn a total of 15 credits taking classes across four sessions. Anyone—whether QC and CUNY students looking to accelerate their degree completion or the general public seeking personal enrichment—can choose from nearly 1,000 undergraduate and graduate classes. On-campus and online courses are available in three of the four sessions. Click here to watch a video of students sharing the ways that attending Summer Session benefits their academic career.

For the first time Queens College is offering all registered Summer Session students free campus parking—a savings for those who drive to campus—as well as inexpensive on-campus housing (as low as $240 per week) in the Summit Apartments, the school’s residence hall. Queens College shuttle buses transport students free of charge to and from Jamaica and Flushing.

“Summer Session at Queens College offers students a low-cost opportunity to combine academic advancement with enough time to enjoy the season. Students can benefit from a Summer Session ‘trifecta,’” said QC President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “They can take more challenging STEM courses individually rather than as part of a full semester course load, which pre-med students or those taking double majors find helpful; more quickly complete their degree or meet Excelsior Scholarship requirements; and for those who are Pell-eligible, apply part of their funds to summer courses.”

Students enrolled in the college’s QC in 4 Program and the New York State Excelsior Scholarship Program—who must maintain a 30 credits per year minimum to remain in the programs—can use Summer Session to meet that credit requirement. Quickening degree completion also eases the financial burden since students are able to graduate earlier than when they take classes exclusively in fall and spring semesters. In fact, nine out of ten Queens College students who graduate in four years leave school debt-free.

Summer Session also offers an opportunity for current teachers to progress towards the certifications or degrees they need with graduate-level courses in special education and bilingual education. Similarly, graduate courses in other programs are available for students who must attend part-time due to other obligations.

For schedule information and to apply, please visit the Summer Session homepage.

High school students may also take advantage of free opportunities for academic development through two offerings in the College Now Program: the Summer Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences and the Queens College Summer Science Program. The Summer Institute runs during Queens College Summer Session 2, Monday through Thursday, and is designed to address high school students’ academic, cultural and social interests and needs. The overall purpose of the program is to expose students to hot topics in scientific fields. Part of a city-wide initiative between the CUNY and the NYC Department of Education, College Now’s primary goals are to improve the academic achievement of high school students and to ensure that graduating students are ready to do college-level work. All courses, workshops, and textbooks are free to NYC Public High School students.

About Queens College
Queens College graduates the most teachers, counselors, and principals in the metropolitan area. The college contributes to the local talent pool as a powerful economic engine and a leader in tech education, with more computer science majors than any college in New York City. Queens College also has the third-highest number of accounting and business students in all of New York State. Students from across the country and around the world are attracted to study at the Aaron Copland School of Music. Its renowned faculty and alumni include nationally recognized composers, conductors and performers who have received nearly 40 Grammy Awards and nominations over the past 40 years.

Queens College enjoys a national reputation for its liberal arts and sciences and pre-professional programs. With its graduate and undergraduate degrees, honors programs, and research and internship opportunities, the college helps its nearly 19,000 students realize their potential in countless ways, assisted by an accessible, award-winning faculty. Located on a beautiful, 80-acre campus in Flushing, the college is cited each year in the Princeton Review as one of the nation’s 100 “Best Value” colleges, as well as being ranked a U.S. News and World Report Best College and Forbes Magazine Best Value College thanks to its outstanding academics, generous financial aid packages, and relatively low costs. Visit our homepage to learn more.

For more about Queens college, visit http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/home.aspx

Contact:
Maria Matteo
Office of Communications
Assistant Director, News Services
718-997-5593
maria.matteo@qc.cuny.edu


FORBES RANKS EIGHT CUNY COLLEGES AMONG ‘BEST VALUES’

Forbes rates eight colleges of The City University of New York as among “America’s Best Value Colleges” in the magazine’s 2018 ranking of 300 top public and private institutions.

“We believe a high-value education should empower students who don’t already come from wealth,” Forbes writes. As a result, its methodology gives the heaviest weight, 20 percent, to alumni earnings six to 10 years after graduation, since “long-term earnings are the most tangible proof of a college degree’s value.” Other criteria included net price, net debt, school quality, timely graduation and population of Pell Grant recipients. Forbes’ goal is “to help students decide whether their college investments are likely to reward them with a healthy return.”

Chancellor James B. Milliken said, “The Forbes list is very much in line with other national rankings that consistently highlight CUNY’s ability to move students up the ladder from the lowest 20 percent of family income solidly into the middle class. Different ranking systems assess different things, so the names of the CUNY colleges that are cited and their relative positions will vary, but all of these lists recognize that CUNY is an extraordinary engine of social mobility.”

Last October, for example, seven CUNY senior colleges and five community colleges dominated the Chronicle of Higher Education’s top 10 lists of public U.S. campuses with the greatest success in moving low-income students into the middle class. At the same time, a separate global assessment of college quality using totally different criteria, three CUNY colleges placed among the top 1,000 colleges among the 27,770 analyzed worldwide. Five CUNY senior campuses made the top quarter of Money Magazine’s “Best Colleges for Your Money” last summer.

In its 2018 ranking, Forbes placed Baruch College as No.12, Queens College, No. 51; Brooklyn College, No. 70; Hunter College, No. 92; City College, No. 93; The College of Staten Island, No.111; John Jay College of Criminal Justice, No.156; and Lehman College, No. 222.

The magazine’s full list is here. Its list of just public colleges is here. Its methodology is explained here.

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 24 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 272,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

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CCNY’s Dorthe Eisele wins NSF Early CAREER Award

 

City College’s Dorthe Eisele is the recipient of a 2018 NSF Early CAREER Award from NSF.

Dorthe M. Eisele, assistant professor in The City College of New York’s Division of Science and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is the winner of a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (NSF CAREER) Award. According to NSF, their Faculty Early Career Development Program is a foundation-wide activity that “offers NSF’s most prestigious awards in support of early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization.”

NSF CAREER awards provide five years of funding to help lay the foundation for a faculty member’s future research. Eisele, who is also affiliated with The Graduate Center of CUNY, will receive $725,000 for her research proposal entitled: “Unraveling Excitation-Energy Transfer Processes in Excitonic Light-Harvesting Systems.”

Eisele’s research is inspired by nature. One of nature’s most spectacular molecular architectures is found in the highly efficient solar energy harvesting apparatus of photosynthetic plants and bacteria. While those light-harvesting complexes have been studied extensively, the origin of their high efficiency has remained a mystery. The problem is challenging. The light-harvesting complex not only consists of many individual molecules, but the structure is not rigid, and the molecular components are continually moving. The role that this motion plays in facilitating (or impeding) energy transport is unclear.

Through support from the Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry Program of the NSF Division of Chemistry, Eisele is studying bio-inspired, self-assembled nanomaterials to elucidate nature’s secrets of efficient excitation energy transport. With her dynamic team of students and postdoctoral researchers, she’s synthesizing and investigating new nanostructured molecular assemblies that mimic the interesting features of natural light-harvesting complexes. They then watch the flow of energy through the assembly using super high resolution microcopy techniques, such as sophisticated near-field scanning optical microscopies, with the goal of understanding how structural fluctuations affect energy transport.

The educational component of this NSF CAREER award supports the Eisele Group’s desire to promote science beyond academia. Her team will develop a series of intriguing videos entitled “When Nanoscience Meets Renewable Energy”® aiming to raise public awareness for the importance of fundamental research for today’s society. Secondly, to increase the interest of underrepresented minority middle and high school students to pursue careers in the sciences, Eisele’s team together with CCNY’s City Tutors  is establishing a community outreach program  entitled “Nanoscience: Big World of Very Small Things!”®

About The City College of New York
Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided a high quality and affordable education to generations of New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. Today